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Government Response To The Coronavirus


James Daulton

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1 minute ago, kodycutter said:

How can they expect normal citizens to contribute to eliminating the potential risk of person-to-person spread if hospitals are waiting to charge us $3,270 for a simple blood test and a nasal swab?” he said.

Read more here: https://www.miamiherald.com/news/health-care/article240476806.html#storylink=cpy

Yup.

Exactly.

I work in a building that has a couple hundred hourly employees. Those guys work no matter what, I doubt any of the have HC.

I assume there are situations like this everywhere.

Going to be a breeding ground.

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16 minutes ago, The General said:

It's good they are planning.

Indeed but if leading Democrats had called for FEMA to prepare to have a coronavirus emergency declaration, Trump would probably accuse them of fear mongering, like he did in a tweet this morning. 

Edited by squistion
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Just now, squistion said:

Indeed but if leading Democrats had called for a FEMA to prepare to have a coronavirus emergency declaration, Trump would probably accuse them of fear mongering, like he did in a tweet this morning. 

Well yeah. That's what he does.

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9 minutes ago, kodycutter said:

How can they expect normal citizens to contribute to eliminating the potential risk of person-to-person spread if hospitals are waiting to charge us $3,270 for a simple blood test and a nasal swab?” he said.

Read more here: https://www.miamiherald.com/news/health-care/article240476806.html#storylink=cpy


Yup.

11 minutes ago, The General said:

Cost and lack of HC are going to exacerbate this a ton. 

People scarping by at hourly jobs are going to go to work and not go to doctor.

 

But think of all the money we save by not providing free health care.

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49 minutes ago, squistion said:

:(

https://twitter.com/diagnosinghc/status/1234494148108939264

A Florida man, Osmel Martinez Azcue, who returned from China and found himself becoming sick. Because of the risk of coronavirus, he did the responsible thing & sought medical attention. In the end, it turned out not to be coronavirus — but he was billed $3,270.

https://www.miamiherald.com/news/health-care/article240476806.html

This is a bad tweet and a bad underlying article.

He was not "billed 3270".

He will have to pay 1400. 

There also seems to be some uncertainty if he was ever even tested for corona virus. We also know nothing else about his deductible, max out of pocket etc.He had a better plan that cost 400 a month and decided to get a cheaper plan at 180/month. Seems he might still save money on that decision. 

So sure there is a debate to be had about whether or not 400 bucks a month is an amount we should be paying for healthcare when you make 55k a year, but that is obviously a much different discussion than being billed a fake 3270 for a corona virus test. 

But who cares right? I mean its the spirit of the tweet that matters right? 

 

 

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6 minutes ago, parasaurolophus said:

This is a bad tweet and a bad underlying article.

He was not "billed 3270".

He will have to pay 1400. 

There also seems to be some uncertainty if he was ever even tested for corona virus. We also know nothing else about his deductible, max out of pocket etc.He had a better plan that cost 400 a month and decided to get a cheaper plan at 180/month. Seems he might still save money on that decision. 

So sure there is a debate to be had about whether or not 400 bucks a month is an amount we should be paying for healthcare when you make 55k a year, but that is obviously a much different discussion than being billed a fake 3270 for a corona virus test. 

But who cares right? I mean its the spirit of the tweet that matters right? 

 

 

These are good points.

But when half the country has no savings and I’d assume large numbers of those working hourly jobs with no sick time they aren’t going to the doctor, they are going to work.

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3 minutes ago, parasaurolophus said:

This is a bad tweet and a bad underlying article.

He was not "billed 3270".

He will have to pay 1400. 

There also seems to be some uncertainty if he was ever even tested for corona virus. We also know nothing else about his deductible, max out of pocket etc.He had a better plan that cost 400 a month and decided to get a cheaper plan at 180/month. Seems he might still save money on that decision. 

So sure there is a debate to be had about whether or not 400 bucks a month is an amount we should be paying for healthcare when you make 55k a year, but that is obviously a much different discussion than being billed a fake 3270 for a corona virus test. 

But who cares right? I mean its the spirit of the tweet that matters right? 

From the article link he was billed $3270 (a notice for a claim is considered a billing and if his insurance company balked at that he would be responsible for the entire amount, particularly if he cannot provide the paperwork of 3 years of prior medical coverage as they have requested).

Quote

But two weeks later, Azcue got unwelcome news in the form of a notice from his insurance company about a claim for $3,270.

 

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5 minutes ago, squistion said:

From the article link he was billed $3270 (a notice for a claim is considered a billing and if his insurance company balked at that he would be responsible for the entire amount, particularly if he cannot provide the paperwork of 3 years of prior medical coverage as they have requested).

 

3 years of paperwork to show the flu wasn't a pre-existing condition.    What!!!!!????   :(

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5 minutes ago, squistion said:

From the article link he was billed $3270 (a notice for a claim is considered a billing and if his insurance company balked at that he would be responsible for the entire amount, particularly if he cannot provide the paperwork of 3 years of prior medical coverage as they have requested).

 

Then i guess i was billed 13k for my hand surgery. 

Weird that I never wrote a check for anywhere near that amount.

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11 minutes ago, The General said:

These are good points.

But when half the country has no savings and I’d assume large numbers of those working hourly jobs with no sick time they aren’t going to the doctor, they are going to work.

But again, these are completely different talking points than the misdirection tweet that squistion posted.

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1 minute ago, parasaurolophus said:

Then i guess i was billed 13k for my hand surgery. 

Weird that I never wrote a check for anywhere near that amount.

Did your insurance company tell you when you got that bill that coverage may be denied entirely unless you provided medical records for the prior 3 years to prove you didn't have a preexisting condition?

Bottom line, this guy could still be stuck for entire amount.

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1 minute ago, squistion said:
5 minutes ago, parasaurolophus said:

Then i guess i was billed 13k for my hand surgery. 

Weird that I never wrote a check for anywhere near that amount.

Did your insurance company tell you when you got that bill that coverage may be denied entirely unless you provided medical records for the prior 3 years to prove you didn't have a preexisting condition?

Bottom line, this guy could still be stuck for entire amount.

We're missing the larger picture here. Even if he "only" has to pay $1400 out of pocket, how many people can afford that? How many uninsured/underinsured will just not seek treatment and continue to spread a potentially deadly virus? 

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5 minutes ago, parasaurolophus said:

Then i guess i was billed 13k for my hand surgery. 

Weird that I never wrote a check for anywhere near that amount.

Literally how insurance works. The problem is health insurance companies do just about everything to avoid paying, which is why the system is broken.

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4 minutes ago, parasaurolophus said:

But again, these are completely different talking points than the misdirection tweet that squistion posted.

I didn’t get the talking points angle, didn’t look too much into it.

The point that not having accessible HC and a large group of people only getting paid if they are working is going to help blow this up.

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Just now, The General said:

I didn’t get the talking points angle, didn’t look too much into it.

The point that not having accessible HC and a large group of people only getting paid if they are working is going to help blow this up.

Talking points was a bad phrase by me there. Should have said discussion points or subject matter. 

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2 minutes ago, Amused to Death said:

We're missing the larger picture here. Even if he "only" has to pay $1400 out of pocket, how many people can afford that? How many uninsured/underinsured will just not seek treatment and continue to spread a potentially deadly virus? 

A single guy earning 55k a year paying 180 for health insurance per month instead of 400 probably can. 

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2 minutes ago, Amused to Death said:

We're missing the larger picture here. Even if he "only" has to pay $1400 out of pocket, how many people can afford that? How many uninsured/underinsured will just not seek treatment and continue to spread a potentially deadly virus? 

The answer is very few that can afford that. I go to work unless I'm actively puking my guts out(actually tried to go despite that last year, but couldn't, so I went home), partially because 3 kids aren't cheap, and partly because that's how I was raised. Unless you can't get out of bed, go to work and provide.

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4 minutes ago, Amused to Death said:

We're missing the larger picture here. Even if he "only" has to pay $1400 out of pocket, how many people can afford that? How many uninsured/underinsured will just not seek treatment and continue to spread a potentially deadly virus? 

I agree, many if not most lower income folks with insurance would not have the $1400 out of pocket to pay this and the uninsured/underinsured would avoid treatment at all, as many did pre-Obamacare.

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22 minutes ago, The General said:

These are good points.

But when half the country has no savings and I’d assume large numbers of those working hourly jobs with no sick time they aren’t going to the doctor, they are going to work.

And if they work retail they are spreading their germs to anybody who walks into their store, not just coworkers.

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1 minute ago, squistion said:

I agree, many if not most lower income folks with insurance would not have the $1400 out of pocket to pay this and the uninsured/underinsured would avoid treatment at all, as many did pre-Obamacare.

Hey, my wife complained when we got a $1000* copay for an outpatient procedure. That's $1000 out of pocket on top of my $600 monthly premium taken out of my check.

*that was $500 for each breast to remove pre-cancerous cells. Each breast was considered a separate procedure.

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1 minute ago, parasaurolophus said:

Because squistion was trying to make the argument that the claim that you see is what the patient gets billed. 

This is not true pretty much 100% of the time. 

I think the two of you are arguing semantics. The guy was billed $3700, but still has to pay at least $1400 of that due to his coverage. I have received statements that show me how much a procedure is, and then the insurance covers a chunk. For example, my wife and I were billed $10k for my oldest daughter's birth, but only paid a small portion of it. 

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5 minutes ago, parasaurolophus said:

Because squistion was trying to make the argument that the claim that you see is what the patient gets billed. 

This is not true pretty much 100% of the time. 

No, that wasn't the argument I was making. That was what he was billed and will be entirely responsible if his insurance denies coverage which it appears they will do if he can't provide the 3 years worth of paperwork to prove he did not have a preexisting condition. His coverage is being disputed at the moment.

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11 minutes ago, Kal El said:

The answer is very few that can afford that. I go to work unless I'm actively puking my guts out(actually tried to go despite that last year, but couldn't, so I went home), partially because 3 kids aren't cheap, and partly because that's how I was raised. Unless you can't get out of bed, go to work and provide.

Do you only get paid if you go to work? Because if not, that's a terrible practice.

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2 minutes ago, whoknew said:

Do you only get paid if you go to work? Because if not, that's a terrible practice.

I'm an electrician. I get vacation days and healthcare, with plenty of possible overtime. We get paid hourly.

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1 hour ago, The General said:
2 hours ago, squistion said:

It's good they are planning

They're planning for a hurricane though. 

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9 minutes ago, Sheriff Bart said:

They're planning for a hurricane though. 

Hurricane, epidemic, either one sucks to get caught in. People lose their minds, we're stuck indoors, nothing's really open, it's a mess.

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11 minutes ago, Kal El said:

Hurricane, epidemic, either one sucks to get caught in. People lose their minds, we're stuck indoors, nothing's really open, it's a mess.

Don't worry, everything these days can be delivered.  It's almost like they saw this stuff coming.

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30 minutes ago, Leroy Hoard said:

Don't worry, everything these days can be delivered.  It's almost like they saw this stuff coming.

Amazon is pretty awesome, but it is hard to get stuff delivered with trees down. Granted, less of a risk with a virus, so there is that.

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Went out to lunch Saturday, asked the guy filling our water gasses, "Be honest. You guys get sick days?" I took him off guard. "Uh, no, not really." "So if you get sick you're expected to show up?" "Well, yeah. Or we lose pay."

And that is why I'll be avoiding restaurants for the near future. The people making your salads and bringing you your meals can't afford to take a day off, and in some cases will lose their jobs if they don't get coverage when they do call out.

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4 minutes ago, JamieMurphy said:

Went out to lunch Saturday, asked the guy filling our water gasses, "Be honest. You guys get sick days?" I took him off guard. "Uh, no, not really." "So if you get sick you're expected to show up?" "Well, yeah. Or we lose pay."

And that is why I'll be avoiding restaurants for the near future. The people making your salads and bringing you your meals can't afford to take a day off, and in some cases will lose their jobs if they don't get coverage when they do call out.

I'd also be concerned with the delivery services that insulate you from the actual places. Still a bunch of people touching your food that work on a cash basis.

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5 hours ago, The Z Machine said:

I find it hard to believe that there weren't tons of public health processionals ringing the alarm that the US should be testing testing testing.

I don't know about tons but I read more than one article last week where one person or another stated that we should be testing (and should have been testing by then) everyone that arrive in a healthcare setting with any kind of flu like symptoms.   With the point being to "identify the scope of the problem."   Maybe next year!

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19 minutes ago, BobbyLayne said:

So nobody is even bothering with listening to / watching Pence briefing rn?

Six people are dead in the last 30 hours or so, and the portion of the briefing I saw is about how under control everything is.

We have 91 cases that they're confirming at the briefing, by the way.  That would put the U.S. fatality rate at over 6%.

Edit: I'm not saying that the actual fatality rate is 6%+.  I'm saying we have no handle at all on how many cases we actually have in this country.

Edited by Henry Ford
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1 minute ago, Henry Ford said:

Six people are dead in the last 30 hours or so, and the portion of the briefing I saw is about how under control everything is.

We have 91 cases that they're confirming at the briefing, by the way.  That would put the U.S. fatality rate at over 6%.

High quality information by the best experts in the world. That’s per Vice President Pence.

Back again tomorrow!

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10 minutes ago, Bottomfeeder Sports said:

I don't know about tons but I read more than one article last week where one person or another stated that we should be testing (and should have been testing by then) everyone that arrive in a healthcare setting with any kind of flu like symptoms.   With the point being to "identify the scope of the problem."   Maybe next year!

Seems like a lot of experts feel we already have cases in all 50 states but most are asymptomatic. But we have no way of knowing because we have tested so few.

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20 minutes ago, BobbyLayne said:

So nobody is even bothering with listening to / watching Pence briefing rn?

watching. didn't catch the guys name but he said within a week they will have ability to test one million. that's a lot better than 452 as of yesterday.

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6 minutes ago, Henry Ford said:

Six people are dead in the last 30 hours or so, and the portion of the briefing I saw is about how under control everything is.

We have 91 cases that they're confirming at the briefing, by the way.  That would put the U.S. fatality rate at over 6%.

Edit: I'm not saying that the actual fatality rate is 6%+.  I'm saying we have no handle at all on how many cases we actually have in this country.

101 according to this https://gisanddata.maps.arcgis.com/apps/opsdashboard/index.html?fbclid=IwAR0ye8l15TCa2nmVkapzYuMTTXF-WnSJCmA4dS1f5UaIryJ8rUfPScGfXJ8#/bda7594740fd40299423467b48e9ecf6

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22 minutes ago, song said:

watching. didn't catch the guys name but he said within a week they will have ability to test one million. that's a lot better than 452 as of yesterday.

they also said they’ll have a vaccine in clinical trials within six weeks

which strikes me as reckless & irresponsible, but maybe Pence knows something no expert in the world knows

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30 minutes ago, song said:

watching. didn't catch the guys name but he said within a week they will have ability to test one million. that's a lot better than 452 as of yesterday.

On Saturday the CDC said 75,000 test kits are available.

https://www.npr.org/sections/health-shots/2020/03/02/811314938/coronavirus-testing-what-to-know-as-it-becomes-available-across-the-u-s

Impressive ramp.

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