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Trump/White House Covid positive thread


gianmarco

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16 hours ago, Stealthycat said:

Percentage Calculator: 200000 is what percent of 327000000? = 0.06

And we know 1/2 that 200,000 died WITH covid not because OF covid - probably more

 

take the world wide deaths attributed to covid19 and divide by 7 billion ... what's the % ? 

By this logic, drinking a quart of bleach laced with rat poison is .0000000000000000000001 % lethal. Almost nobody dies from it.

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1 hour ago, Sammy3469 said:

What hypocrisy? It was pointed out both are putting lives at risk and getting called out on it.  

Exhibit A.

1 hour ago, sho nuff said:

Thats isnt hypocrisy.

One positive test...others all negative multiple times, informed all and the public timely...

The Patriots seemed to have acted far more responsible than the White House and Trump.

Kayliegh had multiple negative tests too, as did others in the white house.

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6 minutes ago, tonydead said:

Exhibit A.

Kayliegh had multiple negative tests too, as did others in the white house.

So she is the only one getting criticized?  Or is the entire white house as a whole?

Outside of the Titans...the NFL tes have been far better at handling this than the White House/Trump administration and doing it far more responsibly in isolating, contacting the league and other teams and so on.  The WH has had several of their positive tests announced by the media and didn’t inform the Biden campaign.

It was a poor attempt at whataboutism and no real show of actual hypocrisy...

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As many feared and predicted, Trump is now emboldening those eager to listen to him. And unsurprisingly people are following his lead, replete with misleading statistics and macho claims about not wearing masks.

It's a disgrace, mostly because people are looking for guidance to get through this safely, and they will take this dangerous guidance over the guidance of scientists. And more people will die than needed as a result. 

Hopefully you all stay safe and don't contract the virus. Because if you do, you won't be getting airlifted to Walter Reed as a precaution, you won't be getting Regeneron for compassionate use, you won't have a 4 room suite in a hospital with a team of doctors caring for you and only you.

Today Facebook had to remove a post from the President because it was dangerous, claiming falsely that the flu is more lethal than Covid-19. It broke FB's rules on Covid-19 misinformation. Dumb. 

Be safe. Not dumb. Let's root for each other. And stay healthy. 

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Shimon Prokupecz@ShimonPro · 8m

Top US general, Gen. Mark Milley and several members of the Joint Chiefs of Staff are quarantining after a top Coast Guard official tested positive, several US defense officials tell CNN.  The Vice Commandant of the US Coast Guard, Admiral Charles Ray learned he was infected.

 

 

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2 hours ago, KarmaPolice said:

This post would be great if we once again didn't have many examples of other nations coming together, believing science, listening to doctors and slowing this down.  But at the start it became political for our country which is truly sad and cost 1000s of lives and effected all of us.  

But I guess we got haircuts, get to play raquetball, and some of our bank accounts got a little bigger so all is good.  

ALLEDGEDLY slowing it down

Its a VIRUS that has no cure - it will never go away until there is a vaccine. The Fed Govt didn't make anyone go out and get close to anyone who had and transmitted covdi19 ... people have CHOSEN to go out and mix and mingle

don't blame the Fed Govt for people associating with other people and contracting a virus

 

 

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29 minutes ago, Grace Under Pressure said:

Hopefully you all stay safe and don't contract the virus. Because if you do, you won't be getting airlifted to Walter Reed as a precaution, you won't be getting Regeneron for compassionate use, you won't have a 4 room suite in a hospital with a team of doctors caring for you and only you.

and if you DO contract the virus, there is a high probability you'll survive - its NOT a death sentence and to make everyone crazy with fear results in this

https://www.cnn.com/2020/07/14/us/michigan-mask-dispute-death-trnd/index.html

 

7.49M positive covid 19 cases  in usa 210,000 attributed deaths in usa from a 330 million population in this country from a planet of over 7 billion

 

 

 

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2 minutes ago, Stealthycat said:

and if you DO contract the virus, there is a high probability you'll survive - its NOT a death sentence and to make everyone crazy with fear results in this

https://www.cnn.com/2020/07/14/us/michigan-mask-dispute-death-trnd/index.html

 

7.49M positive covid 19 cases  in usa 210,000 attributed deaths in usa from a 330 million population in this country from a planet of over 7 billion

 

 

 

As much as you ##### about CNN, why are you going there?   

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2 minutes ago, Stealthycat said:

and if you DO contract the virus, there is a high probability you'll survive - its NOT a death sentence and to make everyone crazy with fear results in this

https://www.cnn.com/2020/07/14/us/michigan-mask-dispute-death-trnd/index.html

 

7.49M positive covid 19 cases  in usa 210,000 attributed deaths in usa from a 330 million population in this country from a planet of over 7 billion

 

 

 

The disease also has bad outcomes for those who don't pass away. Long term lung function among them, along with potential neurological issues.

Thankfully, the statistics could be worse. One silver lining is how the disease impacts, or doesn't impact, children. If the stats for 75+ year olds were the same for kids under 10, no one would ever leave the house.

Be careful though. The virus doesn't care about politics, state lines, or anything like that. Unfortunately, that can include party leaders in rural areas like Arkansas.

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1 minute ago, Grace Under Pressure said:

The disease also has bad outcomes for those who don't pass away. Long term lung function among them, along with potential neurological issues.

Thankfully, the statistics could be worse. One silver lining is how the disease impacts, or doesn't impact, children. If the stats for 75+ year olds were the same for kids under 10, no one would ever leave the house.

Be careful though. The virus doesn't care about politics, state lines, or anything like that. Unfortunately, that can include party leaders in rural areas like Arkansas.

Yep.  There is so much focus on death rates, which are staggering numbers.  Like I told him, and like you said, that's part of the equation - we also need to think about long term consquences and also people that get it, don't die, but are effected and not well afterward.  

Talked about even less are the people that are effected that don't even get this.  Because we evidently feel the need to lead the world in deaths and still haven't gotten a handle on this 6months later, our kids have gotten a year of their lives taken from them, and that pisses me off on a daily basis, especially reading flippant posts here about not being afraid and now Trump starting back up with the justaflu crap.   My 5 year old is miserable doing online school every day, and she is missing out on some vital development time.  My teen is staring at no basketball and hasn't been around anybody for 6 months.  I know all of us are effected one way or the other because of this, and it's infurating to know that it didn't have to be this way and that people still don't seem to get it or care.  :rant:

 

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15 minutes ago, Stealthycat said:

and if you DO contract the virus, there is a high probability you'll survive - its NOT a death sentence and to make everyone crazy with fear results in this

https://www.cnn.com/2020/07/14/us/michigan-mask-dispute-death-trnd/index.html

 

I actually appreciate you using a cnn link but did you actually read the story?

Middle aged man decides to break the law and go into a store without a mask. Middle aged man stabs 77yo geezer outside the store when confronted. Middle aged man tries to escape the police and gets killed.

Your takeaway from this story is, "Mask law murders otherwise reasonable and level headed middle aged man!"?

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7 minutes ago, massraider said:

All this bad news can get to you, I find that reading anything at all about Claudia Conway can chase the blues away. 

This girl is the Generation Z whistleblower we need right nownow. 👍🇺🇸

15 year old on Tik Tok may be providing the most truthful information about what's really going on

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From this article in The Atlantic for those insisting Trump is contagious because he tested positive.

Quote

A growing number of studies estimate that a majority of infected people may not infect a single other person. A recent paper found that in Hong Kong, which had extensive testing and contact tracing, about 19 percent of cases were responsible for 80 percent of transmission, while 69 percent of cases did not infect another person. This finding is not rare: Multiple studies from the beginning have suggested that as few as 10 to 20 percent of infected people may be responsible for as much as 80 to 90 percent of transmission, and that many people barely transmit it.

He still should have kept the mask on though.

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3 minutes ago, Drunken Cowboy said:

This is driven by actions though. You don't spread disease if you responsibly isolate yourself. 

Seems kind of self-evident.  :oldunsure:

 

Also - given the explosion of cases for people around the President in a short window suggests, very strongly - that one of the carriers is highly contagious.  If you don't know who that person is - stay isolated.  This is not rocket science.

Trump can do most of his work in isolation, and if memory serves, he also had a golf simulator built in the White House.

 

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1 hour ago, Drunken Cowboy said:
2 hours ago, jamny said:

From this article in The Atlantic for those insisting Trump is contagious because he tested positive.

He still should have kept the mask on though.

This is driven by actions though. You don't spread disease if you responsibly isolate yourself. 

"69% of cases did not infect another person" is a pretty meaningless stat if, also, 69% of cases wore masks and/or completely isolated themselves for 14 days.

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1 hour ago, Sinn Fein said:

Seems kind of self-evident.  :oldunsure:

 

Also - given the explosion of cases for people around the President in a short window suggests, very strongly - that one of the carriers is highly contagious.  If you don't know who that person is - stay isolated.  This is not rocket science.

Trump can do most of his work in isolation, and if memory serves, he also had a golf simulator built in the White House.

 

You would think it is self evident, but apparently not.

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Quote

 

Maria Van Kerkhove, the World Health Organization’s (WHO) technical lead for COVID-19, said at a press briefing on June 8 that asymptomatic transmission appears to be “very rare.” Her statement came just days after the organization directed healthy people living in areas with widespread community transmission to wear fabric face masks in public to help contain the advance of the disease.

In an interview with TIME following the press briefing, Van Kerkhove said she did not mean to suggest that asymptomatic people cannot spread COVID-19. “I did not say that asymptomatic cases cannot transmit; they can,” Van Kerkhove says. “The question is, do they? And if they do, how often is that happening?”

Van Kerkhove says there’s not yet a clear answer, but the WHO’s analyses suggest symptomatic individuals are responsible for most coronavirus transmission. 

 

I think we still don't know enough about this and that certain asymptomatic people aren't contagious. Still, like I said, it doesn't excuse Trump for his actions.

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5 hours ago, KarmaPolice said:

As much as you ##### about CNN, why are you going there?   

to read the other sides views duh   ---   the same reason i go to mostly liberal boards, to understand better how people who don't think like me think

by going outside my views I can better understand ... heck I thought everyone did that ?

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3 hours ago, jamny said:

From this article in The Atlantic for those insisting Trump is contagious because he tested positive.

He still should have kept the mask on though.

It's not outside the realm of possibility that Trump is the super spreader. We have positive cases from the RNC, the campaign, the White House staff and press pool, the Rose Garden event, the secret service, etc. 

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5 hours ago, Grace Under Pressure said:

The disease also has bad outcomes for those who don't pass away. Long term lung function among them, along with potential neurological issues.

Thankfully, the statistics could be worse. One silver lining is how the disease impacts, or doesn't impact, children. If the stats for 75+ year olds were the same for kids under 10, no one would ever leave the house.

Be careful though. The virus doesn't care about politics, state lines, or anything like that. Unfortunately, that can include party leaders in rural areas like Arkansas.

we don't know longterm - it could be like asbestos, it could be like motrin .... we don't know

You are correct  -  it really impacts mostly older people with already failing health - healthy people and kids etc rarely have any toruble .... so why are they the ones targeted with masks/quarantines etc ?  I know the answer - so they don't spread it to older people like Farmer.

but was Farmer suffering from something already? Farmer CHOSE to live, he CHOSE to not let covid19 fears dominate his life. Did he die because of that choice? Might very well have ... but wasn't it his choice to make ?

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5 hours ago, BoltBacker said:

I actually appreciate you using a cnn link but did you actually read the story?

Middle aged man decides to break the law and go into a store without a mask. Middle aged man stabs 77yo geezer outside the store when confronted. Middle aged man tries to escape the police and gets killed.

Your takeaway from this story is, "Mask law murders otherwise reasonable and level headed middle aged man!"?

my take is .... was it counted as a covid19 death ?

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23 hours ago, Stealthycat said:

Percentage Calculator: 200000 is what percent of 327000000? = 0.06

And we know 1/2 that 200,000 died WITH covid not because OF covid - probably more

 

take the world wide deaths attributed to covid19 and divide by 7 billion ... what's the % ? 

The death total won’t be known for a couple years. It is nearly impossible know how deadly a pandemic is while you are going through it. That’s been true of every global pandemic: 1918-1920 H1N1 Spanish Flu, 1957-59 H2N2 Asian flu, 1968 Hong Kong Flu, et al.

In July 2009, toward the end of the first wave of the H1N1 “swine flu” pandemic in the U.S., the government reported 302 deaths attributed to the virus. The CDC now estimates that more than 12,000 Americans died in that pandemic.

Whatever the numbers tell us today about infections and fatalities, they almost certainly represent a significant undercount.

The true scope of a pandemic only becomes clear after it’s over

On March 9, 1958, a global flu pandemic unofficially became a national joke. When Americans turned to the funny pages of their Sunday morning newspapers, they found Charlie Brown, the sad sack hero of Minnesotan Charles Schulz’s “Peanuts” comic strip, lamenting his shortcomings on the hockey rink.

“I don’t feel good,” Charlie Brown told his nemesis, Lucy. “I think maybe I’m getting the Asian flu.”

Lucy, as usual, showed no sympathy. She informed her downcast companion that the “Asian flu” was yesterday’s news. “What a guy!” she exclaimed as she walked away. “Everyone else got the Asian flu six months ago, and he’s just getting it now!”

Charlie Brown was left to deliver the punch line to himself. “Good grief!” he sighed. “I can’t even get sick right!”

It was a funny joke — at the time.

A disconnect between perception and reality

But decades later, with the benefit of hindsight, it doesn’t seem quite so funny. That’s because we know something now that Schulz and his readers didn’t know back then. According to the Centers for Disease Control, the “Asian flu” pandemic of 1957 and 1958 killed an estimated 116,000 Americans and around 1.1 million people worldwide. It was one of the worst public health crises of the 20th century. So how did it become the butt of a joke in the Sunday morning comic section? The answer lies in what was, at the time, a widespread public misunderstanding about the scope of the pandemic — a disconnect between perception and reality. It was the kind of disconnect that we should keep in mind today, as we try, in real time, to make sense of the havoc the new coronavirus is causing.

In March 1958, when the “Peanuts” comic strip appeared, the “Asian flu” — an influenza caused by a new strain of the H2N2 virus — was a well-known fact of life in the United States. It had emerged about a year before in Singapore and Hong Kong, and had spread to U.S. coastal cities in the summer of 1957. Scientists determined early on that very few Americans were immune to the new virus, and they raised public alarms about its potential lethality. (They also rushed to create a vaccine that played a crucial role in limiting the virus’ spread.) When the “Asian flu” arrived in Minnesota in September 1957, people were ready for the worst.

But the “Asian flu” never seemed to live up to its advance billing. State and local health officials reported occasional outbreaks, including one that clobbered Minneapolis’ North High School in October, but the information they shared with the public inadvertently downplayed the virus’ severity. Laborious testing protocols made it difficult to confirm that a patient with flu-like symptoms had actually contracted the “Asian flu,” so mortality statistics released to the public included very few “Asian flu” deaths. At the end of 1957, when the pandemic’s first wave had subsided, Minneapolis’s health commissioner reported a total of just 18 confirmed deaths from the new H2N2 virus — a sobering number, certainly, but nothing close to the numbers that Minnesotans had been primed to expect. And the national death toll was similarly underwhelming: about 6,000 deaths attributed to the new H2N2 virus throughout the entire United States.

Determining ‘excess mortality’

So how do we explain the discrepancy between the 6,000 fatalities ascribed to the “Asian flu” at the time of the pandemic, and the 116,000 deaths that the CDC now estimates occurred then? It all comes down to how fatalities are tabulated and estimated. In an ongoing pandemic, death tolls are based on reports of fatalities officially attributed to the pathogen in question. But those real-time numbers almost always turn out to be undercounts. The true scope of a pandemic’s deadly toll becomes clear only after the fact, when experts use statistical modeling to determine “excess mortality” — the number of deaths beyond what would normally be expected. There’s nothing particularly controversial about using excess mortality to estimate the number of people killed in a pandemic. It’s generally considered the most accurate way to express results of what is admittedly an inexact science. And if you compare at-the-time death tolls of other pandemics with after-the-fact estimates based on excess mortality, you see discrepancies similar to the ones that showed up after the 1957-58 “Asian flu” pandemic.

In November 1918, as the second wave of the H1N1 “Spanish flu” pandemic wound down, federal officials reported that the virus had killed about 82,000 Americans. Today, the CDC puts the death toll at 675,000.

In July 2009, toward the end of the first wave of the H1N1 “swine flu” pandemic in the U.S., the government reported 302 deaths attributed to the virus. The CDC now estimates that more than 12,000 Americans died in that pandemic.

The lesson is simple: It’s nearly impossible to know how deadly a pandemic really is while you’re living through it.

If you find yourself wondering whether Minnesota’s relatively low number of confirmed COVID-19 fatalities (so far) suggests the coronavirus has been overhyped, remember the mistake Charlie Brown and Lucy made back in 1958. They dismissed the “Asian flu” as a nuisance to be laughed off, when it was actually killing more than 100,000 Americans. But Schulz didn’t know any better. Nobody did back then. The true scope of the 1957-58 pandemic became clear only with the passage of time and the application of statistical modeling. Now all of us find ourselves in a similar moment of muddled perceptions. Whatever the numbers tell us today about infections and fatalities, they almost certainly represent a significant undercount. It’s a sobering thought, but it’s also a reminder of why we continue to put up with this unprecedented disruption of our lives.

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6 minutes ago, sho nuff said:

Trump wasn’t asymptomatic.

I didn't say he was. Since there might be evidence that asymptomatic cases aren't contagious, we may well find out some day that some symptomatic cases aren't either, like those with only minor symptoms.

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1 minute ago, BobbyLayne said:

The death total won’t be known for a couple years. It is nearly impossible know how deadly a pandemic is while you are going through it. That’s been true of every global pandemic: 1918-1920 H1N1 Spanish Flu, 1957-59 H2N2 Asian flu, 1968 Hong Kong Flu, et al.

In July 2009, toward the end of the first wave of the H1N1 “swine flu” pandemic in the U.S., the government reported 302 deaths attributed to the virus. The CDC now estimates that more than 12,000 Americans died in that pandemic.

Whatever the numbers tell us today about infections and fatalities, they almost certainly represent a significant undercount.

The true scope of a pandemic only becomes clear after it’s over

 

  Reveal hidden contents

 

On March 9, 1958, a global flu pandemic unofficially became a national joke. When Americans turned to the funny pages of their Sunday morning newspapers, they found Charlie Brown, the sad sack hero of Minnesotan Charles Schulz’s “Peanuts” comic strip, lamenting his shortcomings on the hockey rink.

“I don’t feel good,” Charlie Brown told his nemesis, Lucy. “I think maybe I’m getting the Asian flu.”

Lucy, as usual, showed no sympathy. She informed her downcast companion that the “Asian flu” was yesterday’s news. “What a guy!” she exclaimed as she walked away. “Everyone else got the Asian flu six months ago, and he’s just getting it now!”

Charlie Brown was left to deliver the punch line to himself. “Good grief!” he sighed. “I can’t even get sick right!”

It was a funny joke — at the time.

A disconnect between perception and reality

But decades later, with the benefit of hindsight, it doesn’t seem quite so funny. That’s because we know something now that Schulz and his readers didn’t know back then. According to the Centers for Disease Control, the “Asian flu” pandemic of 1957 and 1958 killed an estimated 116,000 Americans and around 1.1 million people worldwide. It was one of the worst public health crises of the 20th century. So how did it become the butt of a joke in the Sunday morning comic section? The answer lies in what was, at the time, a widespread public misunderstanding about the scope of the pandemic — a disconnect between perception and reality. It was the kind of disconnect that we should keep in mind today, as we try, in real time, to make sense of the havoc the new coronavirus is causing.

In March 1958, when the “Peanuts” comic strip appeared, the “Asian flu” — an influenza caused by a new strain of the H2N2 virus — was a well-known fact of life in the United States. It had emerged about a year before in Singapore and Hong Kong, and had spread to U.S. coastal cities in the summer of 1957. Scientists determined early on that very few Americans were immune to the new virus, and they raised public alarms about its potential lethality. (They also rushed to create a vaccine that played a crucial role in limiting the virus’ spread.) When the “Asian flu” arrived in Minnesota in September 1957, people were ready for the worst.

But the “Asian flu” never seemed to live up to its advance billing. State and local health officials reported occasional outbreaks, including one that clobbered Minneapolis’ North High School in October, but the information they shared with the public inadvertently downplayed the virus’ severity. Laborious testing protocols made it difficult to confirm that a patient with flu-like symptoms had actually contracted the “Asian flu,” so mortality statistics released to the public included very few “Asian flu” deaths. At the end of 1957, when the pandemic’s first wave had subsided, Minneapolis’s health commissioner reported a total of just 18 confirmed deaths from the new H2N2 virus — a sobering number, certainly, but nothing close to the numbers that Minnesotans had been primed to expect. And the national death toll was similarly underwhelming: about 6,000 deaths attributed to the new H2N2 virus throughout the entire United States.

Determining ‘excess mortality’

So how do we explain the discrepancy between the 6,000 fatalities ascribed to the “Asian flu” at the time of the pandemic, and the 116,000 deaths that the CDC now estimates occurred then? It all comes down to how fatalities are tabulated and estimated. In an ongoing pandemic, death tolls are based on reports of fatalities officially attributed to the pathogen in question. But those real-time numbers almost always turn out to be undercounts. The true scope of a pandemic’s deadly toll becomes clear only after the fact, when experts use statistical modeling to determine “excess mortality” — the number of deaths beyond what would normally be expected. There’s nothing particularly controversial about using excess mortality to estimate the number of people killed in a pandemic. It’s generally considered the most accurate way to express results of what is admittedly an inexact science. And if you compare at-the-time death tolls of other pandemics with after-the-fact estimates based on excess mortality, you see discrepancies similar to the ones that showed up after the 1957-58 “Asian flu” pandemic.

In November 1918, as the second wave of the H1N1 “Spanish flu” pandemic wound down, federal officials reported that the virus had killed about 82,000 Americans. Today, the CDC puts the death toll at 675,000.

In July 2009, toward the end of the first wave of the H1N1 “swine flu” pandemic in the U.S., the government reported 302 deaths attributed to the virus. The CDC now estimates that more than 12,000 Americans died in that pandemic.

The lesson is simple: It’s nearly impossible to know how deadly a pandemic really is while you’re living through it.

If you find yourself wondering whether Minnesota’s relatively low number of confirmed COVID-19 fatalities (so far) suggests the coronavirus has been overhyped, remember the mistake Charlie Brown and Lucy made back in 1958. They dismissed the “Asian flu” as a nuisance to be laughed off, when it was actually killing more than 100,000 Americans. But Schulz didn’t know any better. Nobody did back then. The true scope of the 1957-58 pandemic became clear only with the passage of time and the application of statistical modeling. Now all of us find ourselves in a similar moment of muddled perceptions. Whatever the numbers tell us today about infections and fatalities, they almost certainly represent a significant undercount. It’s a sobering thought, but it’s also a reminder of why we continue to put up with this unprecedented disruption of our lives.

agreed

my only problem is now how they chart covid deaths is highly inaccurate and unreliable

heck they're testing NFL teams 2 or 3 times and are stacked with negative positive tests .... its ridiculous how inaccurate they are !

if H1N1 was counted the same, the deaths would be 100,000 ... maybe 200,000 IMO

yes, I really do believe that - anyone dying in 2009 likely had H1N1 virus with 60 million diagnosed - and we wasn't testing healthy people without symptoms ! 

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17 minutes ago, Stealthycat said:

agreed

my only problem is now how they chart covid deaths is highly inaccurate and unreliable

heck they're testing NFL teams 2 or 3 times and are stacked with negative positive tests .... its ridiculous how inaccurate they are !

if H1N1 was counted the same, the deaths would be 100,000 ... maybe 200,000 IMO

yes, I really do believe that - anyone dying in 2009 likely had H1N1 virus with 60 million diagnosed - and we wasn't testing healthy people without symptoms ! 

Actually, you don’t agree. You have a fundamental lack of understanding when it comes to determining excess mortality rate.

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Update—37 positive 1 week WH-orbit #COVID19. *6 New:

Hicks
D&M Trump
*Stephen Miller
*2x military aides
4x WH press aides (*Drummond)
*C Ray
McEnany
Conway
G Laurie
C Christie
M Lee
T Tillis
R Johnson
R McDaniel
J Jenkins 
B Stepien
N Luna
1x Jr staffer
3x reporters
11x OH staff

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Just now, massraider said:

Update—37 positive 1 week WH-orbit #COVID19. *6 New:

Hicks
D&M Trump
*Stephen Miller
*2x military aides
4x WH press aides (*Drummond)
*C Ray
McEnany
Conway
G Laurie
C Christie
M Lee
T Tillis
R Johnson
R McDaniel
J Jenkins 
B Stepien
N Luna
1x Jr staffer
3x reporters
11x OH staff

The conspiracy theorists must be losing their #### realizing how many people in this administration are part of the deep state pushing this narrative to get Trump out of office :mellow: 

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Just now, The Commish said:

The conspiracy theorists must be losing their #### realizing how many people in this administration are part of the deep state pushing this narrative to get Trump out of office :mellow: 

They are, ummm, able to adapt

https://twitter.com/RightWingWatch/status/1313481264717066249?s=19

 

Right-wing conspiracy theorist Rick Wiles suggests that a "COVID Kamikaze" in the press when to the White House SCOTUS event and intentionally infected Trump and several others. 

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1 hour ago, jamny said:

I didn't say he was. Since there might be evidence that asymptomatic cases aren't contagious, we may well find out some day that some symptomatic cases aren't either, like those with only minor symptoms.

The evidence seems to be that some asymptomatic cases are not contagious.  But seemed oddly placed while discussing Trump who was showing symptoms.

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10 minutes ago, massraider said:

They are, ummm, able to adapt

https://twitter.com/RightWingWatch/status/1313481264717066249?s=19

 

Right-wing conspiracy theorist Rick Wiles suggests that a "COVID Kamikaze" in the press when to the White House SCOTUS event and intentionally infected Trump and several others. 

And others are wondering if he was positive at the debate and didn't tell the Biden camp (which they never did) so that they could possibly infect him.

I think that's far-fetched, but.....

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1 hour ago, Maurile Tremblay said:

Trump himself, in his own recent videos, described some of his symptoms. The doctors at the Trump-approved press briefings described a bunch more.

I asked for a link and was given one that didn't prove anything. On a board where links to actual facts is so important I thought it was relevant 

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1 hour ago, massraider said:

Update—37 positive 1 week WH-orbit #COVID19. *6 New:

Hicks
D&M Trump
*Stephen Miller
*2x military aides
4x WH press aides (*Drummond)
*C Ray
McEnany
Conway
G Laurie
C Christie
M Lee
T Tillis
R Johnson
R McDaniel
J Jenkins 
B Stepien
N Luna
1x Jr staffer
3x reporters
11x OH staff

how many died ?

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