Jump to content
Fantasy Football - Footballguys Forums

Will you get a Covid vaccine when available?


gianmarco

Covid vaccine  

461 members have voted

You do not have permission to vote in this poll, or see the poll results. Please sign in or register to vote in this poll.

Recommended Posts

2 hours ago, krista4 said:

Washington announced today that we'd be expanding the eligible groups on March 31 and lowering the age requirement to...60.  At this rate I'll be 60 before I get one.

Crazy.  I'm sure this is explained somewhere but I don't know what is causing the differences among states.  My 16 year old son will be eligible on March 29, before 60 years olds in your state.

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

2 hours ago, krista4 said:

Washington announced today that we'd be expanding the eligible groups on March 31 and lowering the age requirement to...60.  At this rate I'll be 60 before I get one.

You are 100% included in healthcare worker classification.

  • Thinking 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Washington state is a trainwreck of a government.

That being said, I managed to get my first vaccine scheduled for next Wednesday.

I'm 59.

 

 

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

3 hours ago, Summer Wheat said:

Got my second shot of Mederna last week.  Had zero symptoms with first or second.  Thought my arm would be sore but it was nor so pretty happy.

Wow nice. 

Wife got hers late yesterday. Her today was identical to my yesterday. I woke up this morning feeling great after feeling run down all yesterday. Hopefully she wakes up tomorrow the same because I can't handle another day of playing Mr. Mom. :lmao: 

  • Laughing 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

4 hours ago, The Z Machine said:

My wife volunteered at public vaccination site this afternoon.  They only did about 200 in 4 hours.   All extra doses are given to over 65 and public school teachers. 

Gonna be a long road to Tipperary to get a jab here in Maryland. 

Maryland supposed to be going from 2 mass vaccination sites to 5 in the next couple weeks hopefully that will help.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

My parents got their first shots on Monday. Drove to a little town near the Kansas/Nebraska border that had somehow gotten a massive vaccine surplus. My girlfriend got her second shot last week — had some nasty side effects but felt better after 48 hours. And now I’m scheduled to get my first shot of Moderna on the 25th. :towelwave:Can see the light at the end of the tunnel.

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Here in California, I got my first dose of Pfizer yesterday. Felt a little headache, neck stiffness, worn down. Go for my second shot April 7th. Also seeing light at the end of the tunnel, fingers crossed, hoping not to contract anything in the interim. I'm still social distancing and masking and will continue to be until we basically hit herd immunity in my state and the health experts say to go ahead, and even then I'm really reluctant to start too early and be sorry. That's the plan, anyway, though I hear they're having problems vaccinating people who are traditionally not disposed to get vaccinations. That mixed with the political element of it (no political discussions on my end!) ensures that we're going a little bit slower than health experts would like. 

  • Like 3
Link to comment
Share on other sites

9 hours ago, shuke said:

Crazy.  I'm sure this is explained somewhere but I don't know what is causing the differences among states.  My 16 year old son will be eligible on March 29, before 60 years olds in your state.

 

Yeah - I don’t get it either.  16 years old here in Georgia became eligible this past Monday.  And we were supposedly way behind most states.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

5 hours ago, rockaction said:

Here in California, I got my first dose of Pfizer yesterday. Felt a little headache, neck stiffness, worn down. 

That’s exactly how I feel this morning - headache, stiff neck and my arm is really sore.  Definitely worse than how my arm feels after the flu vaccine.

  • Sad 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

15 hours ago, Gawain said:

First Pfizer today. How long from shot to start of side effects did people experience?

Got my first Pfizer yesterday.  Felt it in my arm pretty much right away and still going.  Feel rundown but not sure if that isn't just me tbh.  Haven't really had other symptoms though.

-QG

Link to comment
Share on other sites

1 hour ago, AAABatteries said:

Yeah - I don’t get it either.  16 years old here in Georgia became eligible this past Monday.  And we were supposedly way behind most states.

I wonder if some of these states have more open eligibility because there are more people resistant to getting the vax in the first place - Mississippi for example.

-QG

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

3 minutes ago, QuizGuy66 said:

I wonder if some of these states have more open eligibility because there are more people resistant to getting the vax in the first place - Mississippi for example.

-QG

Yep.  That’s pretty clear based on survey data and vaccination data.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

14 minutes ago, QuizGuy66 said:

Hey @TLEF316 do you have a BMI above 25?  That qualifies in NJ.

https://www.calculator.net/bmi-calculator.html

-QG

For example if you are 5'10" and 175 lbs your BMI is 25.1 and you qualify.  And assuming you are the typical FBG that can lift cars over his head and stuff you may have enough weight in muscle :cool:

-QG

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

11 hours ago, shuke said:

Crazy.  I'm sure this is explained somewhere but I don't know what is causing the differences among states.  My 16 year old son will be eligible on March 29, before 60 years olds in your state.

 

That’s amazing.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

10 minutes ago, QuizGuy66 said:

For example if you are 5'10" and 175 lbs your BMI is 25.1 and you qualify.  And assuming you are the typical FBG that can lift cars over his head and stuff you may have enough weight in muscle :cool:

-QG

That's what it is in Georgia and how I qualified - I was telling another guy and he was like, "what, I'm not overweight?!?".  I explained that they base it on BMI and while there's a chance you really are a little overweight, there's a good chance that according to BMI you are.  I'm 5'9" and would need to be under 170 to not qualify - that's where I should be but I put on a COVID 20.

  • Laughing 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

1 hour ago, krista4 said:
13 hours ago, shuke said:

Crazy.  I'm sure this is explained somewhere but I don't know what is causing the differences among states.  My 16 year old son will be eligible on March 29, before 60 years olds in your state.

That’s amazing.

Speaking from a position of ignorance ... nevertheless it's hard to imagine the on-the-ground conditions that make decision-makers in Washington, Pennsylvania, and Maryland lag so far behind states like Louisiana, Georgia, Montana, and Connecticut. And I think "people in the latter states are just refusing the vaccine" is too facile an answer. Part of the puzzle, yes, but not the overwhelming factor IMHO.

@krista4, does the local press in the Seattle area ever ask hard questions of decision makers of why the eligibility stages are being rolled out the way they are? Does it make perfect sense on the ground, and it's just that it's disconcerting having to wait so long? Or is there a sense on the ground that "we could be rolling this out faster, and we aren't for 'reasons'"?

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Moderna and Pfizer promised 210 mil doses by the end of March.  I don't think they will hit that 210 mark (currently just shy of 150mil) , but they are getting close and the speed of delivery has been increasing.  CDC site shows 35 million doses shipped but unused.  That is an amazing surplus that we have right now and it's only going to grow.  States should be opening up sooner than later.  Sorry for those of you waiting around for your turn due to state inaction.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

On 3/15/2021 at 3:02 PM, fatguyinalittlecoat said:

I've done a lot of thinking about the reasons why it's so much harder to get a vaccine in certain places than others, here is my current thinking:

1) Roughly speaking, people can divided into three groups:

A) "really want a vaccine right away will get it at first chance";
B) "will get a vaccine but not in a big rush" and
C) "will not get vaccinated."  

2) A lot of us have been primarily focusing on group C to explain why, for example, it seems really easy to get a vaccine in Texas but not in Maryland.  Places where there are more anti-vaxxers are going to have more supply for everyone else.  But that never really made that much sense to me.  We've only vaccinated like 20-30% of the population, how many anti-vaxxers are there?  Shouldn't it still be tough to get a vaccine in Texas?

3) What I really think is the reason for the disparity is the Group A/B dynamic. I think a lot of cities and blue states have a high percentage of Group A people, whereas more rural and red places have more Group B people.  And that makes sense because . . .

4) People have been living their lives very differently this year.  For example, for me the vaccine will be life changing.  I used to go to the gym like 3-4 times a week, I haven't been in a year.  I haven't seen much of my friends and family in person.  I haven't been able to date nearly as much.  I haven't been to an indoor restaurant or bar all year.  So of course I'm in Group A -- there are huge rewards for me as soon as I'm vaccinated (even besides the not-getting-COVID part),  By contrast, it sounds like in some places life hasn't really even been all that different.  If you've been living your life pretty normally for the last year, there's a lot less urgency to get the shot.  You're not going to make any special effort to get it right away.

Bumping my own thoughts for those of you discussing why some states are rolling out much faster than others. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

1 hour ago, Doug B said:

Speaking from a position of ignorance ... nevertheless it's hard to imagine the on-the-ground conditions that make decision-makers in Washington, Pennsylvania, and Maryland lag so far behind states like Louisiana, Georgia, Montana, and Connecticut. And I think "people in the latter states are just refusing the vaccine" is too facile an answer. Part of the puzzle, yes, but not the overwhelming factor IMHO.

@krista4, does the local press in the Seattle area ever ask hard questions of decision makers of why the eligibility stages are being rolled out the way they are? Does it make perfect sense on the ground, and it's just that it's disconcerting having to wait so long? Or is there a sense on the ground that "we could be rolling this out faster, and we aren't for 'reasons'"?

Excellent questions, but I'm unlikely to have a good answer as I rarely consume local media.  Maybe others on the ground here will be able to speak better to this.  Anecdotally, I'd say there has been huge frustration rather than anything making perfect sense, and the communication has been poor.  The first four phases were communicated, but not with a timeline attached to them, and we got stuck in the second phase for about three months with no indication being given of when we'd move on.

I think some of the issue previously was simply supply and demand, but that appears to be improving.  Fighting to get an appointment for my mom and her husband when they became eligible was a nightmare, and a lot of groups sprung up (which I joined) that were dedicated just to trying to find available appointments for seniors who couldn't get them.  In contrast, ex-Mr. krista became eligible Wednesday due to his job, and I got him an appointment immediately (today at noon!).  We do have mass vaccination sites as well as plenty of smaller spots giving the shots, and plenty of volunteers (my mom, a retired nurse, tried to volunteer and was told she wasn't needed), so maybe that combined with the increased supply will finally start to move us along.  I do worry that the next phase starting 3/31, which contains the people 60-64, also includes people with at least two comorbidities, so we could be there a while, too.

  • Thanks 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

56 minutes ago, fatguyinalittlecoat said:

Bumping my own thoughts for those of you discussing why some states are rolling out much faster than others. 

Read this after you posted it, and your points are good. Here's one thing you wrote, though:

"I think a lot of cities and blue states have a high percentage of Group A people, whereas more rural and red places have more Group B people."

I think that's a little too broad a view to explain all the problems, even if it's largely accurate from 1000 feet up.

In Louisiana, people in and near the large metro areas -- New Orleans, Baton Rouge, Shreveport, etc. -- are having no worse of a time getting vaccination appointments than people in our rural areas. Now, granted, we don't have any huge urban conglomerations like NYC or the Dallas Metroplex in Louisiana. But still ... it's not like people are having to drive away from Louisiana cities to chase appointments in Louisiana's small country towns.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

10 minutes ago, Doug B said:

Read this after you posted it, and your points are good. Here's one thing you wrote, though:

"I think a lot of cities and blue states have a high percentage of Group A people, whereas more rural and red places have more Group B people."

I think that's a little too broad a view to explain all the problems, even if it's largely accurate from 1000 feet up.

In Louisiana, people in and near the large metro areas -- New Orleans, Baton Rouge, Shreveport, etc. -- are having no worse of a time getting vaccination appointments than people in our rural areas. Now, granted, we don't have any huge urban conglomerations like NYC or the Dallas Metroplex in Louisiana. But still ... it's not like people are having to drive away from Louisiana cities to chase appointments in Louisiana's small country towns.

Yeah obviously my analysis is very superficial and there are a million different factors that go into all of this.  My primary point is that the varied speed of the roll outs in different states appears largely to be a result of differences in demand rather than government bungling.  For example, shuke posted above about how 16 year olds in Ohio can get vaccinated before 60 year olds in Washington.  But the stats show that Washington and Ohio have vaccinated almost an identical percentage of their populations. It's not that Washington is vaccinating slower, it's that Washington is still having high demand from the priority groups, while Ohio has had to open up to larger and larger groups because there is less demand.

My suspicion is that the "slow roll out" states like Washington, Illinois and Maryland will be among the first states to reach herd immunity.

Edited by fatguyinalittlecoat
  • Like 2
  • Thanks 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

14 minutes ago, fatguyinalittlecoat said:

Yeah obviously my analysis is very superficial and there are a million different factors that go into all of this.  My primary point is that the varied speed of the roll outs in different states appears largely to be a result of differences in demand rather than government bungling.  For example, shuke posted above about how 16 year olds in Ohio can get vaccinated before 60 year olds in Washington.  But the stats show that Washington and Ohio have vaccinated almost an identical percentage of their populations. It's not that Washington is vaccinating slower, it's that Washington is still having high demand from the priority groups, while Ohio has had to open up to larger and larger groups because there is less demand.

My suspicion is that the "slow roll out" states like Washington, Illinois and Maryland will be among the first states to reach herd immunity.

This last bit is what I’m thinking/hoping.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

19 minutes ago, fatguyinalittlecoat said:

Yeah obviously my analysis is very superficial and there are a million different factors that go into all of this.  My primary point is that the varied speed of the roll outs in different states appears largely to be a result of differences in demand rather than government bungling.  For example, shuke posted above about how 16 year olds in Ohio can get vaccinated before 60 year olds in Washington.  But the stats show that Washington and Ohio have vaccinated almost an identical percentage of their populations. It's not that Washington is vaccinating slower, it's that Washington is still having high demand from the priority groups, while Ohio has had to open up to larger and larger groups because there is less demand.

My suspicion is that the "slow roll out" states like Washington, Illinois and Maryland will be among the first states to reach herd immunity.

The General and I had a discussion about this a couple days ago.  He thinks Washington is doing well based on looking at other states; I think they're a mess looking at Washington.   We do things like open up restaurant capacity, but don't make restaurant workers eligible (that got sort of fixed--capacity increases on March 22 and after the restaurant industry pointed out the lack of eligibility for that industry, they made restaurant workers eligible March 31).   They re-opened high schools, but didn't make 16 year olds eligible.   

My county has an abundance of available appointments that aren't being used, because not enough eligible people are filling them.   I know this because I was mistakenly emailed that I was eligible and found multiple appointments within minutes (I was trying to find the J&J vaccine).   They then emailed me that it was a mistake and I wasn't eligible.   

Link to comment
Share on other sites

1 hour ago, fatguyinalittlecoat said:

Yeah obviously my analysis is very superficial and there are a million different factors that go into all of this.  My primary point is that the varied speed of the roll outs in different states appears largely to be a result of differences in demand rather than government bungling.  For example, shuke posted above about how 16 year olds in Ohio can get vaccinated before 60 year olds in Washington.  But the stats show that Washington and Ohio have vaccinated almost an identical percentage of their populations. It's not that Washington is vaccinating slower, it's that Washington is still having high demand from the priority groups, while Ohio has had to open up to larger and larger groups because there is less demand.

My suspicion is that the "slow roll out" states like Washington, Illinois and Maryland will be among the first states to reach herd immunity.

This is spot on.

To add a little local Illinois intel:

The wait time for an appointment in/near Chicago is in the 2 week range (+ or - one week) based on friends who’ve been vaccinated recently.  In parallel, I’ve found multiple sites that are 2-3 hours away in central Illinois (“red state”) with hundreds of appointments available each week.   
 

Is this a rural vs urban thing?  Red vs blue?  Not sure.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Got my 1st dose of Pfizer around 9:30 this morning at one of the NJ Mega vaccination sites.  Easy peasy process once I was able to secure an appointment. 
 

Less than 30 minutes from enter to exit including the mandatory 15 minute observation period and scheduling of dose #2 in 3 weeks.  The site I went to was very well staffed and organized.  They had the National Guard helping process people.  
 

5 hours in and I feel good.  Minimal arm soreness at the injection site.

Edited by cheeseypoof
  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

My wife got her first Pfizer shot the other night. Waited over an hour. She had a mild case of COVID after I had it the end of last year. Her side effects have been worse than when she had COVID. She was running almost 103 fever even with an extra big does of ibuprofen. Had the other usual symptoms (aches, chills, fatigue, general malaise, hard to concentrate, rotten mood). She snapped out of it somewhere in the 36-48 hour range.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Got signed up for the first round of vaccinations on the 27th here. It was a cluster trying to navigate the different sites (CVS, Walgreens, Giant Eagle, etc.). There is a mass vaccination at an arena downtown Cleveland that I couldn't even find a way to get in. Then during lunch I was checking out our local health website and they just had added some more mass vaccination sites here in my county. Jumped on the one for March 27th. My wife is one the fence as to whether to get the vaccination or not so no matter how bad I feel from any side effects I will pretend that I AM FREAKING FEELING GREAT. Will be the only way I can get her to get the jab. I'll wait until the day she gets jabbed THEN tell her how it went. 😁

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

2 hours ago, fatguyinalittlecoat said:

Yeah obviously my analysis is very superficial and there are a million different factors that go into all of this.  My primary point is that the varied speed of the roll outs in different states appears largely to be a result of differences in demand rather than government bungling.  For example, shuke posted above about how 16 year olds in Ohio can get vaccinated before 60 year olds in Washington.  But the stats show that Washington and Ohio have vaccinated almost an identical percentage of their populations. It's not that Washington is vaccinating slower, it's that Washington is still having high demand from the priority groups, while Ohio has had to open up to larger and larger groups because there is less demand.

My suspicion is that the "slow roll out" states like Washington, Illinois and Maryland will be among the first states to reach herd immunity.

I get your reasoning here and somewhat agree but one big unknown factor is the amount of undiagnosed cases.  There was a definite sense around here that it was overblown and I think many people just wanted to keep life as it was prior to the outbreak.  A lot of those people didn't bother to get tested.  Also - while I know that stats say that schools didn't cause outbreaks, we have had schools open so I think there's a lot of kids in Georgia who got the virus and never showed symptoms and/or didn't infect others.  I think despite our lower numbers as it pertains to vaccinated people we may get to herd immunity pretty quick.

Edited by AAABatteries
  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

To kind of back up my thinking I know for a fact there were parents who intentionally didn't get their kid tested without symptoms so they wouldn't have to be quarantined and/or miss out on activities (a lot of which were open in Georgia).  I'm not making any kind of political statement here, just reporting what I've seen and hear around the state.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Wife and I got the J&J shot yesterday in Idaho. 

They did check our ID's to make sure we were residents. The guy who got the shot 5 mins before me started puking in the waiting area right as the needle entered my arm, so that was encouraging. I feel fine today, no arm soreness, aches, etc. My wife is lousy and stayed home today. So all in all, pretty interesting. 

  • Thinking 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Kansas opened up their 3rd tier starting next week, which includes a whole bunch of people who work in forward facing businesses. So I qualify since our office is open to the public and our techs are out in the public.

First shot of Funky Cold Moderna next Wednesday. 

  • Like 8
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Serious question for the uninformed (me),

I am certainly not anti-VAX but I admit I have no issue with letting a few million of you folks be the guinea pigs prior to getting mine....

 

There seems to be some confusion on if this vaccination prevent you from getting COVID-19. I’ve read both things – I’ve read that it prevents you from contracting it and I’ve also read that it doesn’t prevent you from contracting it, only prevents the severe symptoms.

there seems to be some confusion on if this vaccination prevent you from getting COVID-19. I’ve read both things – I’ve read that it prevents you from contracting it and I’ve also read that it doesn’t prevent you from contracting it, only prevents the severe symptoms.

Does anybody have any links to scientific evidence that states that  prevents getting the virus at all.

 

For example, just reading a study that talks about all three vaccines they have this line in there:

[quote] It’s not yet known if any of these vaccines prevent asymptomatic infection with the SARS-CoV-2 virus. Nor is it known if vaccinated people can transmit the virus if they do become infected but don’t show symptoms.[/quote]
 

:confused:


It seems to me that if these things don’t prevent you or prevent the spread, then it’s essentially creating the worst possible situation of all, a bunch of people who think they can’t get or spread the virus- all mingling together.

Also, which of the three is “best”? After reading the J and J vaccine seems to be a more traditional method whereas the other two “recode your DNA”. :oldunsure: 

 

Thanks in advance. 

Edited by STEADYMOBBIN 22
Link to comment
Share on other sites

30 minutes ago, STEADYMOBBIN 22 said:

Serious question for the uninformed (me),

I am certainly not anti-VAX but I admit I have no issue with letting a few million of you folks be the guinea pigs prior to getting mine....

 

There seems to be some confusion on if this vaccination prevent you from getting COVID-19. I’ve read both things – I’ve read that it prevents you from contracting it and I’ve also read that it doesn’t prevent you from contracting it, only prevents the severe symptoms.

there seems to be some confusion on if this vaccination prevent you from getting COVID-19. I’ve read both things – I’ve read that it prevents you from contracting it and I’ve also read that it doesn’t prevent you from contracting it, only prevents the severe symptoms.

Does anybody have any links to scientific evidence that states that  prevents getting the virus at all.

 

For example, just reading a study that talks about all three vaccines they have this line in there:

[quote] It’s not yet known if any of these vaccines prevent asymptomatic infection with the SARS-CoV-2 virus. Nor is it known if vaccinated people can transmit the virus if they do become infected but don’t show symptoms.[/quote]
 

:confused:


It seems to me that if these things don’t prevent you or prevent the spread, then it’s essentially creating the worst possible situation of all, a bunch of people who think they can’t get or spread the virus- all mingling together.

Also, which of the three is “best”? After reading the J and J vaccine seems to be a more traditional method whereas the other two “recode your DNA”. :oldunsure: 

 

Thanks in advance. 

To know for certain if the vaccines prevented infections, the trial would have had to do testing on all the subjects with high frequency.  Instead they used the number of people who got sick and got tested because they had symptoms and compared the numbers in the trial group to the placebo group.  That got them to the 90+% effective at preventing severe disease and death number.  Everyone believes that the vaccines do prevent most infections, but they don't have the scientific certainty to say so.  

They also believe that the vaccines will prevent most people from passing it along, but again, they don't have scientific certainty so they don't say it.  

They are exceptionally cautious in what they proclaim the vaccines do,  but everyone believes they prevent most people from getting the disease and prevent most people who do get infected from spreading it.   

The mRNA vaccines don't actually recode your DNA.  They send a message to your cells to produce a spike protein that is found on the virus.  Your immune system sees that protein as a threat and creates antibodies that recognize it.  Your DNA (the genetic code that makes up your body) is not touched or altered in any way.  

Edited by worrierking
  • Like 2
  • Thanks 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Transcribing this directly from the CDC Flier in the CVS that I took a picture of while I was waiting my 15 minutes after the shot:

Sorry no cool picture but will type the verbiage, with bolding, the way it was sectioned out.  This applies to Pfizer and Moderna.

 

Understanding the virus that causes COVID-19.

Coronaviruses, like the one that causes COVID-19 are named for the their crown-like spikes on their surface, called spike proteins.  These spike proteins are ideal targets for vaccines.

 

What is mRNA?

Messenger RNA, or mRNA, is genetic material that tells your body how to make proteins. :grad:

 

What is in the vaccine?

The vaccine is made of mRNA wrapped in a coating that makes delivery easy and keeps the body from damaging it.

 

How does the vaccine work?

The mRNA in the vaccine teaches your cells how to make copies of the spike protein.  If you are exposed to the real virus later, your body will recognize it and now how to fight it off. :boxing:

 

When your body responds to the vaccine, it can sometimes cause a mild fever, headache, or chills.  This is completely normal and a sign that the vaccine is working.

 

The vaccine DOES NOT contain ANY virus, so it cannot give you COVID-19.  It cannot change your DNA in any way.

 

After the mRNA delivers the instructions, your cells break it down and get rid of it. 

 

GETTING VACCINATED?

For more information about COVID-19 vaccine, visit:  cdc.gov/coronavirus/vaccines

 

So there ya go :)

-QG

 

  • Like 1
  • Thanks 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

so no, it does not necessarily prevent the infection and spread, it only stops severe symptoms.

Does nobody see the danger in telling people that have the vaccine that they can now mingle in public with other people who have the vaccine? Aren’t you just going to have a bunch of people who potentially have virus and potentially spread it more albeit the symptoms will be less severe? 

Edited by STEADYMOBBIN 22
Link to comment
Share on other sites

1 hour ago, AAABatteries said:

To kind of back up my thinking I know for a fact there were parents who intentionally didn't get their kid tested without symptoms so they wouldn't have to be quarantined and/or miss out on activities (a lot of which were open in Georgia).  I'm not making any kind of political statement here, just reporting what I've seen and hear around the state.

You mean "didn't get their kid tested without symptoms after known exposure" or something like that? Otherwise, it stands to reason that if individual kids had no symptoms, their parents wouldn't feel an urge to get them tested. Unless maybe their schools told them their kids were close contacts with known cases.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

48 minutes ago, worrierking said:

To know for certain if the vaccines prevented infections, the trial would have had to do testing on all the subjects with high frequency.  Instead they used the number of people who got sick and got tested because they had symptoms and compared the numbers in the trial group to the placebo group.  That got them to the 90+% effective at preventing severe disease and death number.  Everyone believes that the vaccines do prevent most infections, but they don't have the scientific certainty to say so.  

They also believe that the vaccines will prevent most people from passing it along, but again, they don't have scientific certainty so they don't say it.  

They are exceptionally cautious in what they proclaim the vaccines do,  but everyone believes they prevent most people from getting the disease and prevent most people who do get infected from spreading it.   

The mRNA vaccines don't actually recode your DNA.  They send a message to your cells to produce a spike protein that is found on the virus.  Your immune system sees that protein as a threat and creates antibodies that recognize it.  Your DNA (the genetic code that makes up your body) is not touched or altered in any way.  

Pfizer traded Israel vaccines for data so most of the current info seems to be coming from there since they are the largest population case study to date. I read last week they found the Pfizer/BioNtech vaccine blocks 94% of asymptomatic infection, which would mean in theory they can't spread it. If true, the article is extremely hopeful, especially if most people get the vaccine.

 

https://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2021-03-11/pfizer-biontech-covid-vaccine-blocks-most-spread-in-israel-study

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

6 hours ago, Willy said:

Moderna and Pfizer promised 210 mil doses by the end of March.  I don't think they will hit that 210 mark (currently just shy of 150mil) , but they are getting close and the speed of delivery has been increasing.  CDC site shows 35 million doses shipped but unused.  That is an amazing surplus that we have right now and it's only going to grow.  States should be opening up sooner than later.  Sorry for those of you waiting around for your turn due to state inaction.

We are entering into the period where the biggest hurdle is not the amount of vaccine but capacity to put shots in arms (espeically with storage requirements on some of the vaccines).  This is a good problem to have but still a problem.  

Link to comment
Share on other sites

37 minutes ago, Doug B said:

You mean "didn't get their kid tested without symptoms after known exposure" or something like that? Otherwise, it stands to reason that if individual kids had no symptoms, their parents wouldn't feel an urge to get them tested. Unless maybe their schools told them their kids were close contacts with known cases.

Yes, didn't get their kids tested with known exposure but no symptoms.  On some level I get it, you may not want them to be exposed by going to get tested, you may not want to put them through it, you may have some other reason but some of these folks were just stubborn or didn't think things were that bad.  We had 2 of our kids get quarantined and we didn't let them around anyone and kept an eye on their symptoms - took temp, etc.   I know two kids who were quarantined from school and were at a school basketball game that evening because their parents just didn't care and thought things were overblown.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

53 minutes ago, STEADYMOBBIN 22 said:

so no, it does not necessarily prevent the infection and spread, it only stops severe symptoms.

Does nobody see the danger in telling people that have the vaccine that they can now mingle in public with other people who have the vaccine? Aren’t you just going to have a bunch of people who potentially have virus and potentially spread it more albeit the symptoms will be less severe? 

They don’t know this yet but early Indications are it prevents transmission. 
 

 

Scientists have been very clear in saying even those vaccinated should wear masks when out in Public but we have idiots like Rand Paul arguing to the contrary for facebook likes. 

Edited by Capella
  • Like 3
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Restore formatting

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    • No registered users viewing this page.
×
  • Create New...