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34 years ago today (Nov 15, 1986) Beastie Boys dropped their debut album - “Licensed To Ill.”


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My junior year in high school in Jupiter, FL. I Played this cassette on a continuous loop on my Kraco stereo with the Songs coming out of the Kraco 6 x 9’s as loud as they’d go in my 76’ baby blue Ford Maverick. Was a great time in life. 

Edited by conlilnew
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I actually was the kid in middle school that missed this the first time around and then by senior year, had gotten a touch into rap and realized its genius. I got the younger kids who'd heard it in elementary school back into it (because Paul's Boutique was such a flop in the uncool suburbs that it took convincing) and by the time Check Your Head came out, they'd thought I was forward thinking, which goes to prove that if you're far enough behind, people might think you're winning the race.

Edited by rockaction
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27 minutes ago, rockaction said:

I actually was the kid in middle school that missed this the first time around and then by senior year, had gotten a touch into rap and realized its genius. I got the younger kids who'd heard it in elementary school back into it (because Paul's Boutique was such a flop in the uncool suburbs that it took convincing) and by the time Check Your Head came out, they'd thought I was forward thinking, which goes to prove that if you're far enough behind, people might think you're winning the race.

I will admit the bbs are genius and transcended music.

But you must admit that rap/hip hop as a genre is the worst artistic creation of mankind.

Deal?

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4 minutes ago, grateful zed said:

I will admit the bbs are genius and transcended music.

But you must admit that rap/hip hop as a genre is the worst artistic creation of mankind.

Deal?

No. Rap/Hip Hop is awesome popular music created from the ingenuity of the poor having public parties and gatherings. From figuring out how to isolate breakbeats in funk and jazz and disco and use the best part (the break!) as a repetitive backbeat set to the ingenuity of using live mixers to fade tracks in and out, it was people using professional PA and recording equipment to make a new statement built purely off of music. Add an emcee, or master of ceremonies, to the mix and you had block parties by, of, and for the people.

So we can't shake on that one, my man. 

What it became in certain MCs hands, the gratuitous violence and displays of gauche wealth, or misogynistic sexual braggadocio, is the most pertinent criticism against it. But that's what the people wanted. Violence and money and #####. A truly democratized art becomes democratized in what it is in pursuit of. If anything, rap tells us more about our culture than it informs it.

Off the soapbox.

 

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4 minutes ago, rockaction said:

No. Rap/Hip Hop is awesome popular music created from the ingenuity of the poor having public parties and gatherings. From figuring out how to isolate breakbeats in funk and jazz and disco and use the best part (the break!) as a repetitive backbeat set to the ingenuity of using live mixers to fade tracks in and out, it was people using professional PA and recording equipment to make a new statement built purely off of music. Add an emcee, or master of ceremonies, to the mix and you had block parties by, of, and for the people.

So we can't shake on that one, my man. 

What it became in certain MCs hands, the gratuitous violence and displays of gauche wealth, or misogynistic sexual braggadocio, is the most pertinent criticism against it. But that's what the people wanted. Violence and money and #####. A truly democratized art becomes democratized in what it is in pursuit of. If anything, rap tells us more about our culture than it informs it.

Off the soapbox.

 

Thanks for the respectful reply.

The stuff makes me cringe.  :shrug:

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2 hours ago, grateful zed said:

But you must admit that rap/hip hop as a genre is the worst artistic creation of mankind.

As a kid who grew up on Rap/Hip Hop I’d have to strongly disagree, but even putting that aside, with music like Disco and House/Techno/Trance etc out there this statement is confusing.  

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5 hours ago, dkp993 said:

As a kid who grew up on Rap/Hip Hop I’d have to strongly disagree, but even putting that aside, with music like Disco and House/Techno/Trance etc out there this statement is confusing.  

You forgot country.

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I don't think there's a hip hop related thread in the FFA where Zed hasn't posted to let us know that "hip hop leaves me cold".  Odd to invest so much in something you don't like.   I guess, when a genre/art form/culture takes over music and is so influential in everyday life, it must be quite upsetting.  

And to lump Beastie Boys into the rap category is shortsighted.  You should listen to their music.  

Edited by Major
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7 minutes ago, Navin Johnson said:

Great four hour BB mix from QuestLove back in April.  Lots of background stories, mixing with the songs they sampled, etc.

 

Questlove Presents Beastie Boys Music and Samples

That. sounds. awesome.

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Beastie Boys was considered Rap, but I think part of what made there music good is that I could almost be classified as a cross between hard rock and Rap, it was almost a genre of it's own.  One of the few other acts that I can think of that was able to do this is Kid rock, although as his career has gone on, it has become more southern rock than anything.

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I was in 6th Grade and this kid in the band was a little too cool for the other Band Classmates, he rode a BMX bike with all the gadgets on it so he could pop wheelies and ride the handlebars or whatever, of course he had this "tape" and we used to play it and then we went on a Band-Disney trip and i got to hear the whole thing many times on the way up and the way back in the bus and I never stopped listening to them since. 

Edited by Ministry of Pain
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14 hours ago, snellman said:

Beastie Boys was considered Rap, but I think part of what made there music good is that I could almost be classified as a cross between hard rock and Rap, it was almost a genre of it's own.  One of the few other acts that I can think of that was able to do this is Kid rock, although as his career has gone on, it has become more southern rock than anything.

Paul's Boutique, they quickly let folks know they weren't just gonna be a 3 white man rap group. They could actually play instruments and write music, it took them into a totally different genre, almost an Indie Rock vibe because they didn't fit into rock n roll but "Fight for Your Right" was really a rock anthem not rap it seemed. They are so diverse. 

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1 hour ago, Ministry of Pain said:

I was in 6th Grade and this kid in the band was a little too cool for the other Band Classmates, he rode a BMX bike with all the gadgets on it so he could pop wheelies and ride the handlebars or whatever, of course he had this "tape" and we used to play it and then we went on a Band-Disney trip and i got to hear the whole thing many times on the way up and the way back in the bus and I never stopped listening to them since. 

Every day these days seem to be a humbling reminder that I’m getting old.  I have a not too dissimilar memory of being in 6th grade when this album came out.  My daily reminder today? Today is the 35th anniversary of LL’s Radio being released.  35 years!  WTF man. 

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I didn't fully appreciate how excellent the Beastie Boys are until I got older.  License to Ill was a huge, massive album.  They followed that up with an album that nobody really understood or "got" at the time.  Rather than retreating back to the sound that sparked their break out in the first place, they doubled down on making the music they really wanted to make and ended up with a body of work that holds up exceptionally well today. 

Except for their first album of course, which sounds extremely dated even if they do have rhymes like Abe Vigoda.  

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3 hours ago, Ministry of Pain said:

Paul's Boutique, they quickly let folks know they weren't just gonna be a 3 white man rap group. They could actually play instruments and write music, it took them into a totally different genre, almost an Indie Rock vibe because they didn't fit into rock n roll but "Fight for Your Right" was really a rock anthem not rap it seemed. They are so diverse. 

Most people don't know they were a hard core punk band prior to License to Ill.   The album I copped was Same Ol' Bull####.  Not my cup of tea but yeah,  they're true musicians

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3 hours ago, Major said:

Most people don't know they were a hard core punk band prior to License to Ill.   The album I copped was Same Ol' Bull####.  Not my cup of tea but yeah,  they're true musicians

"Egg Raid on Mojo" was a listenable track. Other than that, I'm a fairly big older HC/punk fan, and the rest of the album isn't as memorable. Their turn on the Roots's Phrenology with that punk/HC interlude was cool, though. Nice switch-up from the Roots. 

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4 hours ago, IvanKaramazov said:

I didn't fully appreciate how excellent the Beastie Boys are until I got older.  License to Ill was a huge, massive album.  They followed that up with an album that nobody really understood or "got" at the time.  Rather than retreating back to the sound that sparked their break out in the first place, they doubled down on making the music they really wanted to make and ended up with a body of work that holds up exceptionally well today. 

Except for their first album of course, which sounds extremely dated even if they do have rhymes like Abe Vigoda.  

It didn't dawn on me until their recent autobiographical show that Rick Rubin, Russell Simmons and the Beasties all got together when they were nobodies.  A strange confluence of talents. 

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8th or 9th grade, 6th hour English class.  I sat at the back of the class, and would get ready to run for my bus as soon as the bell rang.  Walkman headphones on and a copy of licensed to ill on an old TDK cassette.  Cute girl sat right in front of me, and she'd ask a couple times a week what I was listening to.  Licensed to ill the entire quarter or semester.  Looking back on it, I wonder if she thought I was a total weirdo.  Same tape.   Every.  Single.  Day.

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On 11/19/2020 at 5:45 PM, dkp993 said:

Every day these days seem to be a humbling reminder that I’m getting old.  I have a not too dissimilar memory of being in 6th grade when this album came out.  My daily reminder today? Today is the 35th anniversary of LL’s Radio being released.  35 years!  WTF man. 

Coolest story about AdRock discovering him and LL later inducting them into the RR HOF.

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On 11/19/2020 at 1:45 PM, IvanKaramazov said:

I didn't fully appreciate how excellent the Beastie Boys are until I got older.  License to Ill was a huge, massive album.  They followed that up with an album that nobody really understood or "got" at the time.  Rather than retreating back to the sound that sparked their break out in the first place, they doubled down on making the music they really wanted to make and ended up with a body of work that holds up exceptionally well today. 

Except for their first album of course, which sounds extremely dated even if they do have rhymes like Abe Vigoda.  

To you perhaps. They do capture that 80s Bass and several of the tunes on that album that were never released widely still hold up. Paul Revere still sounds pretty good, Posse in Effect has a trippy zip in it and could easily be mixed into modern tracks, New Style has been remixed and sampled so many times I can't count, Brass Monkey still played out everywhere it seems, especially at bars.

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1 hour ago, Ministry of Pain said:

To you perhaps. They do capture that 80s Bass and several of the tunes on that album that were never released widely still hold up. Paul Revere still sounds pretty good, Posse in Effect has a trippy zip in it and could easily be mixed into modern tracks, New Style has been remixed and sampled so many times I can't count, Brass Monkey still played out everywhere it seems, especially at bars.

Yeah I don’t really understand the dated sounding aspect.  It’s like saying the Beatles or Led Zeppelin sound dated. I’m not putting the  Beastie’s that level I’m just saying it’s perfectly encapsulates the time frame.  I understand that music can be dated, but in my opinion the people or groups that defined the music of the time don’t fall into that category.

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On 11/18/2020 at 1:24 AM, rockaction said:

No. Rap/Hip Hop is awesome popular music created from the ingenuity of the poor having public parties and gatherings. From figuring out how to isolate breakbeats in funk and jazz and disco and use the best part (the break!) as a repetitive backbeat set to the ingenuity of using live mixers to fade tracks in and out, it was people using professional PA and recording equipment to make a new statement built purely off of music. Add an emcee, or master of ceremonies, to the mix and you had block parties by, of, and for the people.

So we can't shake on that one, my man. 

What it became in certain MCs hands, the gratuitous violence and displays of gauche wealth, or misogynistic sexual braggadocio, is the most pertinent criticism against it. But that's what the people wanted. Violence and money and #####. A truly democratized art becomes democratized in what it is in pursuit of. If anything, rap tells us more about our culture than it informs it.

Off the soapbox.

 

This might be your best post ever on this forum. 

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On 11/20/2020 at 12:23 PM, Vanilla Guerrilla said:

8th or 9th grade, 6th hour English class.  I sat at the back of the class, and would get ready to run for my bus as soon as the bell rang.  Walkman headphones on and a copy of licensed to ill on an old TDK cassette.  Cute girl sat right in front of me, and she'd ask a couple times a week what I was listening to.  Licensed to ill the entire quarter or semester.  Looking back on it, I wonder if she thought I was a total weirdo.  Same tape.   Every.  Single.  Day.

Come on, you know the answer.

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