Jump to content
Fantasy Football - Footballguys Forums

Let's lose some weight in 2021. Back to the grind... who else is in?


bostonfred

Recommended Posts

2 hours ago, bostonfred said:

 2) I was talking to @Alex P Keaton about how his hydration probably had more to do with his daily weigh in than his calories. have weighed myself after waking up thirsty and it seems like I should weigh less. So I've put it to the test and been drinking more water including right before bed. It turns out I pee most of it out anyways, because I end up weighing about exactly what I expected. With so many people doing daily weigh ins, just a reminder to stay hydrated. 

I read something about drinking a glass of water first thing in the morning, as soon as you wake up. That is my go-to move now, drinking a glass of water with a squeeze of lemon in it while my coffee brews. It definitely makes a difference on mornings when you wake up really hungry.

And staying fully hydrated is definitely one of the keys to weight loss. 

  • Like 4
Link to comment
Share on other sites

1/1: 213.8
1/2: 214.0
1/3: 213.2
1/4: 213.4
1/5: 212.4
1/6: 212.0
1/7: 211.4
1/8: 211.4
1/9: 210.8
1/10: 211.4
1/11: 211.6

Weekend was not great from an intake standpoint but really only one cheat. Ran nearly 10 miles on Saturday morning but went out for dinner with a couple beers Saturday night, which was the only real splurge. Again goes to show that intake > exercise when it comes to weight.

  • Like 4
Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Date         |  Weight   |   Chg From Start  |   Calories
  • Nov 27         226.1                                           
  • Dec 24         212.9                -13.2                 Avg daily calories during period: 1523
  • NEW START DAY AFTER CHRISTMAS TO VALENTINES DAY
  • Dec 26         213.1                -                         1420
  • Dec 27         212.7                -0.4                    1510
  • Dec 28         212.9                -0.2                    2070
  • Dec 29         212.3                -0.8                    1470
  • Dec 30         212.9                -0.2                    1420
  • Dec 31         211.6                -1.5                    4010
  • Jan 1           211.2                -1.9                    1510
  • Jan 2           213.4                +0.3                   1240
  • Jan 3           210.9                -2.2                    1600
  • Jan 4           209.8                -3.3                    1490
  • Jan 5           209.6                -3.5                    1820
  • Jan 6           210.2                -2.9                    1620
  • Jan 7           210.3                -2.8                    1540
  • Jan 8           210.3                -2.8                    1510
  • Jan 9           209.4                -3.7                    1620
  • Jan 10         209.8                -3.3                    1470
  • Jan 11         209.2                -3.9
  • Like 5
Link to comment
Share on other sites

3 hours ago, bostonfred said:

@Otis @Zow how's it going so far? 

Fell off the food wagon a bit watching football this past weekend but worked out three days in a row and already feel a difference after doing so. Actually anxious to get back into the gym this evening after work - it's incredible how after you stop going for a bit you forget how positive you feel afterwards. 

Snacky foods at home continues to be my crux. Was pretty good this weekend until the evenings hit and I had a glass of wine and relaxed a bit and slipped up. Wasn't horrible, and I would have had some additional calories to consume given the workouts, but I see addressing this as a step two issue. Step one - clean up eating during the week and get back in the gym - is going well. 

  • Like 3
Link to comment
Share on other sites

6 minutes ago, Zow said:

Fell off the food wagon a bit watching football this past weekend but worked out three days in a row and already feel a difference after doing so. Actually anxious to get back into the gym this evening after work - it's incredible how after you stop going for a bit you forget how positive you feel afterwards. 

Snacky foods at home continues to be my crux. Was pretty good this weekend until the evenings hit and I had a glass of wine and relaxed a bit and slipped up. Wasn't horrible, and I would have had some additional calories to consume given the workouts, but I see addressing this as a step two issue. Step one - clean up eating during the week and get back in the gym - is going well. 

If you know you are good until the evenings hit then you can plan ahead by leaving yourself lots of calories for the evening. If you get 1500 calories for the day plus exercise and you have 300 calories for breakfast and 500 for lunch then of course it will be hard to fit in the wine and inevitable snacking that follows.

But if you have a 150 calorie greek yogurt for breakfast, and a 350 calorie salad for lunch, have a 500 calorie dinner, you've got 500 left plus your exercise for wine and a snack. That might be two glasses and some cheese.

Or just decide to have 1500 calories on weekdays and 2000 on weekends. 

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

16 hours ago, bostonfred said:

Interesting article - thanks for sharing.  And I'm totally onboard with this approach to lose weight.  Here's the problem I ran in to and why I'm trying a different route this time.  Once the "game" was over - I kind of lost interest.  Ok, so I went from almost 240+ down to 160 - now what?  I didn't find the same motivation at that point - I was able to "win" the game and then became bored with it.  Now maybe this is just a me problem, issue and maybe I need to get back to this mindset more (especially since I know it works).  I'm going to continue to think about these things in the upcoming weeks.  Right now gamifying it is a fine option to help get to a goal but I know my personality enough to know that I need to change SOMETHING to stay at the goal.

Edited by AAABatteries
  • Like 2
  • Thanks 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

And the reason I know I need something different is I've lost this weight several times.  If you lookup yo-yo dieting in the dictionary I think there's a picture of me.  Because I've done extremes several times over the years - I'm not talking 5/10/20 pounds either.

  • Like 1
  • Sad 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Was invited for a night out bowling on Saturday and didnt go only because I wanted to stick to my diet.

First week was a success and lost 5 lbs. Added plain greek yogurt, unsalted peanuts, 100 calorie/bag popcorn, and avocados to my grocery list for healthy snacks. Still a long way to go but encouraged by my progress.

  • Like 5
Link to comment
Share on other sites

On 12/31/2020 at 4:56 PM, Peak said:

Made it back to 215 as of this morning!  I really wasn't too far off after Xmas.  I think it was about 218/219.  So not too bad a jump.  Target is to get down to about 200 - ideal is 195.  I'm going to keep small targets in mind, about every 5 lbs.  So I"m looking at 210 for now.  If I keep the pace, I'm expecting to be at 205 by Valentine's Day.

Checked in this morning at 213.  On the right path and staying consistent. 

  • Like 3
Link to comment
Share on other sites

3 minutes ago, AAABatteries said:

Interesting article - thanks for sharing.  And I'm totally onboard with this approach to lose weight.  Here's the problem I ran in to and why I'm trying a different route this time.  Once the "game" was over - I kind of lost interest.  Ok, so I went from almost 240+ down to 160 - now what?  I didn't find the same motivation at that point - I was able to "win" the game and then became bored with it.  Now maybe this is just a me problem, issue and maybe I need to get back to this mindset more (especially since I know it works).  I'm going to continue to think about these things in the upcoming weeks.  Right now gamifying it is a fine option to help get to a goal but I know my personality enough to know that I need to change SOMETHING to stay at the goal.

The problem for me has been, I find it "easy" to lose weight. Not really but I know what I have to do and have always been successful doing so. So when I let myself go a little, I say "its only 5 lbs, no big deal" or "its only 10lbs, Ive lost more than that before". However, I just let it keep going and going until I am not longer happy with myself and find myself where I started. I yoyo over 5 years not over one year. 

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Lots of progress being made in here.   It's definitely inspiring.   Congrats to all those on the journey whether you're dropping weight, stagnant or gaining.  It's a process that can be frustrating especially in an instant gratification society.   Be patient, take a second to think about what you're eating and most of all, keep moving.   

  • Like 5
Link to comment
Share on other sites

5 minutes ago, AAABatteries said:

Interesting article - thanks for sharing.  And I'm totally onboard with this approach to lose weight.  Here's the problem I ran in to and why I'm trying a different route this time.  Once the "game" was over - I kind of lost interest.  Ok, so I went from almost 240+ down to 160 - now what?  I didn't find the same motivation at that point - I was able to "win" the game and then became bored with it.  Now maybe this is just a me problem, issue and maybe I need to get back to this mindset more (especially since I know it works).  I'm going to continue to think about these things in the upcoming weeks.  Right now gamifying it is a fine option to help get to a goal but I know my personality enough to know that I need to change SOMETHING to stay at the goal.

I think we talked about this before but you need to set a limit that you won't go past. If you yoyo from 240 to 160 and back to 220 before starting your diet again, then you have set 220 as your upper limit. That's the thing you need to fix. When you get to 170, you need to start your diet again. Or 175. Pick a number you're comfortable with. Then attach real consequences to it. If I go over 175, I will diet until I hit 160.  And not drink until then. And give up chocolate until then. Etc. Once you do this and hate it, you'll see your weight creep up to 172 and go oh no if i put on 3 more pounds I have to go back on that diet. Make sure your accountability buddy or wife or someone is on board with this and will hold your feet to the fire if you don't think you can do it yourself. You will learn good habits to avoid consequences. 

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

4 minutes ago, bostonfred said:

I think we talked about this before but you need to set a limit that you won't go past. If you yoyo from 240 to 160 and back to 220 before starting your diet again, then you have set 220 as your upper limit. That's the thing you need to fix. When you get to 170, you need to start your diet again. Or 175. Pick a number you're comfortable with. Then attach real consequences to it. If I go over 175, I will diet until I hit 160.  And not drink until then. And give up chocolate until then. Etc. Once you do this and hate it, you'll see your weight creep up to 172 and go oh no if i put on 3 more pounds I have to go back on that diet. Make sure your accountability buddy or wife or someone is on board with this and will hold your feet to the fire if you don't think you can do it yourself. You will learn good habits to avoid consequences. 

If you are not maintaining your goal weight then what you think is your baseline needs to be re-evaluated.  One of the largest fallacies/misconceptions is that your base weight BMR is steady state.  It most certainly is not.  For the overwhelming majority of people they will need to eat at their cutting level, for life.  

It's more or less at this point where people should look at a true resistance training protocol.  It's really the only proven way to defend a set point and be able to relax calorie restriction, at least for 24-48 months after reaching a goal weight.  

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

1 minute ago, culdeus said:

If you are not maintaining your goal weight then what you think is your baseline needs to be re-evaluated.  One of the largest fallacies/misconceptions is that your base weight BMR is steady state.  It most certainly is not.  For the overwhelming majority of people they will need to eat at their cutting level, for life.  

It's more or less at this point where people should look at a true resistance training protocol.  It's really the only proven way to defend a set point and be able to relax calorie restriction, at least for 24-48 months after reaching a goal weight.  

I think we're talking about different things.  

You're talking about how to maintain your weight as a healthy person, and that's definitely helpful.

But @AAABatteriesand I are talking about losing 80 lbs and then eating like a fat guy again because we feel like we're done dieting and can go back to what we were doing before.. Which is never going to work, and we both know it.

This isn't a problem with our BMR/TDEE calculation. It's a problem of staying motivated after the weight loss because we stopped counting altogether. 

I agree that if you want to maintain your weight loss you need to keep your calories even lower. But the psychology of it is that you've just spent months or more working towards a goal, reached the light at the end of the tunnel, and then you #### up again because you want to be done. And even as your weight goes up, you think, hey, I know how to lose weight now I can do this again whenever I want. And then you yoyo up to some number you thought you'd never see again before you get back on track. 

Yes, if you want to stay on track, you'll need to continue monitoring calories, adjust your goals to your new weight and lower BMR, and try to supplement that with resistance training and/or cardio so you can keep it off without giving up beer and pizza for life. That's definitely important. It's just a level up from where we're at. 

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

24 minutes ago, bostonfred said:

I think we talked about this before but you need to set a limit that you won't go past. If you yoyo from 240 to 160 and back to 220 before starting your diet again, then you have set 220 as your upper limit. That's the thing you need to fix. When you get to 170, you need to start your diet again. Or 175. Pick a number you're comfortable with. Then attach real consequences to it. If I go over 175, I will diet until I hit 160.  And not drink until then. And give up chocolate until then. Etc. Once you do this and hate it, you'll see your weight creep up to 172 and go oh no if i put on 3 more pounds I have to go back on that diet. Make sure your accountability buddy or wife or someone is on board with this and will hold your feet to the fire if you don't think you can do it yourself. You will learn good habits to avoid consequences. 

Yep - and whoever said that before - I like it and think that's what I will try

Link to comment
Share on other sites

9 minutes ago, bostonfred said:

I think we're talking about different things.  

You're talking about how to maintain your weight as a healthy person, and that's definitely helpful.

But @AAABatteriesand I are talking about losing 80 lbs and then eating like a fat guy again because we feel like we're done dieting and can go back to what we were doing before.. Which is never going to work, and we both know it.

This isn't a problem with our BMR/TDEE calculation. It's a problem of staying motivated after the weight loss because we stopped counting altogether. 

I agree that if you want to maintain your weight loss you need to keep your calories even lower. But the psychology of it is that you've just spent months or more working towards a goal, reached the light at the end of the tunnel, and then you #### up again because you want to be done. And even as your weight goes up, you think, hey, I know how to lose weight now I can do this again whenever I want. And then you yoyo up to some number you thought you'd never see again before you get back on track. 

Yes, if you want to stay on track, you'll need to continue monitoring calories, adjust your goals to your new weight and lower BMR, and try to supplement that with resistance training and/or cardio so you can keep it off without giving up beer and pizza for life. That's definitely important. It's just a level up from where we're at. 

 

To make this simpler, the big gap is people don't realize that it's easy to maintain 240# at 2800 calories.  You cannot maintain 170# at that level.

The next level here is recognizing that by simply existing at 240 pounds for an extended period of time you have now damaged your metabolic system that your neighbor at 170# can now maintain his 170 easier than you.  Your CICO set point is damaged, perhaps forever.  

Having more muscle on board helps, alot.   

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

First off, I hate this new board update. Gross. 

Nov 30: 234.4

------

Jan 1: 224.0

Jan 4: 221.6

Jan 8: 219.8

Jan 11: 219.0

This intermittent fasting really works. Weather has been miserable and work has been crazy - have not been out walking as much as I like. I was getting 6-8 miles a day, now I am down to 2. I've had a stretch of not so great eating, not horrible, yet I continue to drop weight. Food I'm eating is bad, but I am not eating a ton of calories even when I do eat poorly.

  • Like 5
Link to comment
Share on other sites

12 minutes ago, culdeus said:

To make this simpler, the big gap is people don't realize that it's easy to maintain 240# at 2800 calories.  You cannot maintain 170# at that level.

The next level here is recognizing that by simply existing at 240 pounds for an extended period of time you have now damaged your metabolic system that your neighbor at 170# can now maintain his 170 easier than you.  Your CICO set point is damaged, perhaps forever.  

Having more muscle on board helps, alot.   

Yeah, this conversation is like Groundhog's day because you and I had it before.  I think the issue for me isn't that my set point is lower so I have to deprive myself more than a "normal" 170 pound person.  It's that I get to 170 and my mind is like - MISSION ACCOMPLISHED and go back to eating the stuff I enjoy more.  I don't deny what you are saying is correct, I'm just saying I'm not sure I've ever stayed long enough at 170 with regular eating to prove if I would gradually put the weight back on.  It's never gradual for me.  :)

 

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

22 minutes ago, AAABatteries said:

Yeah, this conversation is like Groundhog's day because you and I had it before.  I think the issue for me isn't that my set point is lower so I have to deprive myself more than a "normal" 170 pound person.  It's that I get to 170 and my mind is like - MISSION ACCOMPLISHED and go back to eating the stuff I enjoy more.  I don't deny what you are saying is correct, I'm just saying I'm not sure I've ever stayed long enough at 170 with regular eating to prove if I would gradually put the weight back on.  It's never gradual for me.  :)

 

Yes, it's both psychological and physical.  Worst of both.  One thing I would strongly strongly suggest is to no longer count exercise calories at goal weight as a "CO".  At least the first hour of any activity, no matter how intense.  I have deep misgivings about counting any exercise as CO as part of a CICO protocol though there is enough evidence to support it's inclusion.  

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

19 minutes ago, AAABatteries said:

Yeah, this conversation is like Groundhog's day because you and I had it before.  I think the issue for me isn't that my set point is lower so I have to deprive myself more than a "normal" 170 pound person.  It's that I get to 170 and my mind is like - MISSION ACCOMPLISHED and go back to eating the stuff I enjoy more.  I don't deny what you are saying is correct, I'm just saying I'm not sure I've ever stayed long enough at 170 with regular eating to prove if I would gradually put the weight back on.  It's never gradual for me.  :)

 

exactly 

I think people who never got fat imagine that fat guys eat like they do, just more. Fat guys didn't get fat by eating to their set point each day. My daily consumption has never looked like 2800, 2400, 3200, 2800, 2800... it's more like 2800, 4000, 2000, 4000, 2800. 

For me, sustainable doesn't look like 1800, 1800, 1800, 1800, 1800. It looks like 1500, 2500, 1500, 2000, 1500, plus cardio. Or whatever my TDEE ends up being. I will be counting or at least estimating calories long after I'm done losing weight because if I eat what I want I eat way too much. I am also doing resistance training but that's not likely to move the needle much unless i do a lot of it and I'm just not there yet.  

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

6 minutes ago, culdeus said:

Yes, it's both psychological and physical.  Worst of both.  One thing I would strongly strongly suggest is to no longer count exercise calories at goal weight as a "CO".  At least the first hour of any activity, no matter how intense.  I have deep misgivings about counting any exercise as CO as part of a CICO protocol though there is enough evidence to support it's inclusion.  

Why?  

Link to comment
Share on other sites

18 minutes ago, bostonfred said:

Why?  

 Because it represents too much an excuse to eat those calories.  And when at goal weight 30 min of exercise is as best a ballpark to the reduction in BMR that I know of.  Short of continuing to reduce the CI side.

Other strategies that make sense is to count NEAT type activity.  If for no other reason than to promote that.  

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

33 minutes ago, culdeus said:

 Because it represents too much an excuse to eat those calories.  And when at goal weight 30 min of exercise is as best a ballpark to the reduction in BMR that I know of.  Short of continuing to reduce the CI side.

Other strategies that make sense is to count NEAT type activity.  If for no other reason than to promote that.  

In that case I strongly disagree, at least for me. The issue for me isn't that I'm exercising and now I have an excuse to eat those calories. The issue for me is that I don't want to exercise but if it means I can eat more food I will. I want to reward myself for exercising.

I totally understand that people over count exercise and that they overestimate their TDEE, but that's why I always start with sedentary when estimating my calorie needs. 

Realistically I don't care that the atomic clock says that there's more than 24 hours in a day, I just do a leap year every four years. I don't care if my TDEE is a little higher or lower than my calorie target on myfitnesspal. I'll just diet a little when my weight goes up. If I have good processes in place to know when to diet and about how much I should eat, the margin of error is a lot easier to swallow. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

1 hour ago, bostonfred said:

In that case I strongly disagree, at least for me. The issue for me isn't that I'm exercising and now I have an excuse to eat those calories. The issue for me is that I don't want to exercise but if it means I can eat more food I will. I want to reward myself for exercising.

I totally understand that people over count exercise and that they overestimate their TDEE, but that's why I always start with sedentary when estimating my calorie needs. 

Realistically I don't care that the atomic clock says that there's more than 24 hours in a day, I just do a leap year every four years. I don't care if my TDEE is a little higher or lower than my calorie target on myfitnesspal. I'll just diet a little when my weight goes up. If I have good processes in place to know when to diet and about how much I should eat, the margin of error is a lot easier to swallow. 

Some of this is a desire to keep things simple.  Where there is/are known errors my general bias is to just simply sidestep them entirely. There's more than one way to do this, not everyone wants to weigh in everyday either.  

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

On 1/9/2021 at 6:16 AM, Ministry of Pain said:

Wed-Off

Thursday-120 Minutes

Friday-30 Minutes but in reality it was hours of fresh air activity, hard to gauge the exercise. 

Today-90 Minutes then wall to wall NFL this afternoon like many of you. 

6 Days in 450 Minutes, not really setting the land speed record for minutes in a month. Just checking in. 

Sunday-90 Minutes Tennis

Monday/Today-60 Min Walk, 3 Miles and 60 Min Bike, 12 miles so we totaled up 120 minutes today. 

660 Minutes in 8 Days, still eat/drink like a mad man, today was a step in the right direction but ate a lot of sugar over the weekend and even prior to that. 

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

10 hours ago, AAABatteries said:

Ok, so I went from almost 240+ down to 160 - now what?  

Buy every stitch of clothing you had always wanted to wear but were afraid to, go march down Nordstrom's proudly and ask the little tiny sales clerk to take you by the hand and escort you to where the 32 inch pants are, EURO CUT of course! 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

25 minutes ago, Ministry of Pain said:

Buy every stitch of clothing you had always wanted to wear but were afraid to, go march down Nordstrom's proudly and ask the little tiny sales clerk to take you by the hand and escort you to where the 32 inch pants are, EURO CUT of course! 

This is actually one of the reasons I’m heading back in the right direction - I ditched my fat clothes and won’t go back.  Now my clothes are all just super tight - thank god for WFH!  :lmao:

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Week 1 

I hit all my targets for the week. Started 1/5 due to wife birthday on 1/4.

I am finally seeing my daily calories get closer to 1500.

  • 11 days - > 10,000 steps
  • 7 days - no alcohol
  • 7 days MFP 
  • Peloton 4x 
  • Weights 3x
  • Yoga 5x
  • 7 days PU challenge

Week At A Glance

Great Job! You logged in every day this week.

18,899

Weekly Calorie Goal

14,560

Calories Logged

4,059

Calories Burned

 

  • Like 5
Link to comment
Share on other sites

8 minutes ago, AcerFC said:

Straight edge means I have no friends

It takes a lot of willpower not to drink in today's culture. 

It takes a different kind of willpower for someone who drinks to stop or to take time off.

Some people in this thread have had trouble with their alcohol use, so in addition to taking time off for my own health (and to keep me from cheating at night after a drink or three), I want to model good behavior.  Because it's hard to stop, but once you stop, it gets easier to stay stopped, and taking 3 months off from booze while dieting and exercising is a challenging but realistic approach. Maybe someone sees that and decides to try the same thing, or try it for a couple weeks. 

I think it's awesome that you have stayed "straight edge".  It's just a different life experience than I have had. 

 

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

3 minutes ago, bostonfred said:

It takes a lot of willpower not to drink in today's culture. 

It takes a different kind of willpower for someone who drinks to stop or to take time off.

Some people in this thread have had trouble with their alcohol use, so in addition to taking time off for my own health (and to keep me from cheating at night after a drink or three), I want to model good behavior.  Because it's hard to stop, but once you stop, it gets easier to stay stopped, and taking 3 months off from booze while dieting and exercising is a challenging but realistic approach. Maybe someone sees that and decides to try the same thing, or try it for a couple weeks. 

I think it's awesome that you have stayed "straight edge".  It's just a different life experience than I have had. 

 

I wasnt trying to throw shade on anyone. Was more being playful. I apologize if it came off the wrong way. I dont judge anyone. I am Drug Free. Most of my buds will rake free drugs. 

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

7 minutes ago, AcerFC said:

I wasnt trying to throw shade on anyone. Was more being playful. I apologize if it came off the wrong way. I dont judge anyone. I am Drug Free. Most of my buds will rake free drugs. 

Not at all.

I was talking to @fred_1_15301about how I lacked willpower, while I was in the middle of  a hard push with no alcohol and no days over calories for over two months. He said I had great willpower and pointed out how he had cheated recently. I pointed out that it had taken a lot more willpower for him to avoid getting fat in the first place. It turns out we both are doing things to improve our lives and that's what this thread is for. Kudos to you for staying strong all this time. 

  • Like 2
  • Love 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Official Positioning Statement on Exercise

Revised 1/12/2021

Exercising to lose weight is seemingly a low controversy topic.  Usually it goes hand in hand in any conversation, eat less, move more.  However there are pitfalls.  Everyone at the gym knows the guy that spends his 30 min of downtime reading a cosmo on an elliptical and never makes progress.  The pitfalls are primarily that moderate steady state exercise is a strong hunger cue.  Additionally, your body adapts very quickly to steady state exercise done in the same duration/intensity.  

It is exceptionally easy to over eat your exercise.  

Therefore, I feel exercise must fall into one of two goals:

  1. Set out to gain muscle.
    • Gaining muscle is advantageous as it is more metabolically active and expensive to maintain.  Muscle can host glycogen, smoothing your blood sugar response and reduce inflammation. 
    • Programs to follow incorporate a progressive overload scheme where you gradually add weight in volume, reps, sets over a period of 12 weeks. It's not super important to pick one over another, just pick one.
    • Bodyweight stuff works too, it's just less time efficient and more difficult to overload as when you move closer to failure with BW activity it's usually due to metabolite depletion rather than technical failure.  
  2. Set out to get better at something
    • This is a broad statement.  It can apply to basically anything.  First 5k, run a 10k in 45 minutes, complete a triathlon.  Climb a mountain, finish P90x,  anything.  The key is being goal oriented with a target and a finish line.  Then do something else.
    • What you are trying to avoid is simply cranking out 30 min on the tread and calling it good.  Forever.  

If neither of those two sound good, then don't exercise.  Work on raising your NEAT, which is a complex way of saying walk, stand, move around more.  You will be at least as equally served by raising your NEAT level, rather than going to the gym and ####### about on a few machines for 45 min and looking at asses in yoga pants. 

I would highly advise to never, ever, ever, ever count exercise calories for anything.  Pretend like they don't exist and exercise is free.  There is nearly no demonstrable need for intra-workout nutrition (like Gatorade).  Avoid this.   As always getting sufficient protein is critical to recovery.  The timing of this is not important short of you trying to get on stage to flex. 

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

34 minutes ago, culdeus said:

I would highly advise to never, ever, ever, ever count exercise calories for anything.  Pretend like they don't exist and exercise is free.  

Love the summary but I still don't agree with this at all.  It's one size fits all advice that doesn't fit me. It's like a keto guy saying they strongly advise never eating oatmeal and a vegan saying they strongly advise never eating chicken. You are describing something that works with the style of fitness you recommend. 

I strongly believe that counting exercise calories is a motivator for me to exercise, and has gotten me to work out harder than I otherwise would have, I also strongly believe that counting exercise calories has allowed me to stay on a diet i otherwise wouldn't have, because being able to eat 2000 calories some days without "cheating" means that I can have that dinner I want if I earn it.  

For someone who is learning lifestyle changes, having a process that intrinsically rewards both diet and exercise is more valuable to me than the slight loss of efficiency you're worried about. As part of my overall method, counting exercise calories is extremely important. 

It might be great advice for other people, but for the people who have said they are trying what I am doing, I should be clear that I'm not going to change anything based on this advice. As always, I am not a doctor and this is not medical advice. Consult your doctor before beginning this or any diet or exercise program.

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Pretty much plateud.  Been eating pretty well - might have hit 1900 a couple times not too worried just need to focus a little more on random calories 

I have also had some form of workout everyday but Saturday. Been plowing through T25

Edited by belljr
Info
  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

31 minutes ago, bostonfred said:

I strongly believe that counting exercise calories is a motivator for me to exercise, and has gotten me to work out harder than I otherwise would have, I also strongly believe that counting exercise calories has allowed me to stay on a diet i otherwise wouldn't have, because being able to eat 2000 calories some days without "cheating" means that I can have that dinner I want if I earn it.  

 

I think long term a world where you:

Going for a walk and not having a cheat meal will give better results than exercise and a cheat meal.

By and large people over-weight exercise importance in weight loss goals, when it's at least 80% diet. Probably more.  

Using exercise to promote a cheat meal is going to fail in all but the most extreme corner cases. Maybe it works for a baseline, but that's just as easily explainable by the fact that measuring both exercise calories and intake calories is subject to a lot of error.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

3 minutes ago, culdeus said:

I think long term a world where you:

Going for a walk and not having a cheat meal will give better results than exercise and a cheat meal.

By and large people over-weight exercise importance in weight loss goals, when it's at least 80% diet. Probably more.  

Using exercise to promote a cheat meal is going to fail in all but the most extreme corner cases. Maybe it works for a baseline, but that's just as easily explainable by the fact that measuring both exercise calories and intake calories is subject to a lot of error.

Can I ask your background?  You're obviously extremely knowledgeable about fitness, I'm trying to understand your perspective.  Have you ever been fat? Do you work with fat people? 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Date         |  Weight   |   Chg From Start  |   Calories
  • Nov 27         226.1                                           
  • Dec 24         212.9                -13.2                 Avg daily calories during period: 1523
  • NEW START DAY AFTER CHRISTMAS TO VALENTINES DAY
  • Dec 26         213.1                -                         1420
  • Dec 27         212.7                -0.4                    1510
  • Dec 28         212.9                -0.2                    2070
  • Dec 29         212.3                -0.8                    1470
  • Dec 30         212.9                -0.2                    1420
  • Dec 31         211.6                -1.5                    4010
  • Jan 1           211.2                -1.9                    1510
  • Jan 2           213.4                +0.3                   1240
  • Jan 3           210.9                -2.2                    1600
  • Jan 4           209.8                -3.3                    1490
  • Jan 5           209.6                -3.5                    1820
  • Jan 6           210.2                -2.9                    1620
  • Jan 7           210.3                -2.8                    1540
  • Jan 8           210.3                -2.8                    1510
  • Jan 9           209.4                -3.7                    1620
  • Jan 10         209.8                -3.3                    1470
  • Jan 11         209.2                -3.9                    1520
  • Jan 12         207.4                -5.7

A new low!  Spin bike paying off.  Not doing crazy things on it just getting some work in.

  • Like 5
Link to comment
Share on other sites

43 minutes ago, belljr said:

Pretty much plateud.  Been eating pretty well - might have hit 1900 a couple times not too worried just need to focus a little more on random calories

I've done this a few times in the process as well.  If you've been at a consistently low calorie level, I think the body goes into "starvation" mode, where your body gets used to operating on less calories.  A jolt to the system with a few days above your target (see my NYE blowout of 4000 calories though I don't recommend that much) can let the body know "Hey, there is food available, go back to your normal burn rate".  Stay consistent and it will continue to pay off.  Keep it up!

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

10 minutes ago, bostonfred said:

Can I ask your background?  You're obviously extremely knowledgeable about fitness, I'm trying to understand your perspective.  Have you ever been fat? Do you work with fat people? 

My background is not in nutrition, not a doctor.  I came into a knowledge of nutrition suffering from really bad ulcerative conditions that was close to being operative.  Coming out of that I was fairly fat, but not obese by any stretch.  I was generally unimpressed with the breadth and depth of nutritionist knowledge so read most of the literature I could.  I used that knowledge to lose the excess fat, and started doing competitive-ish cycling for a time.  

Now I mostly weight lift to maintain my weight and strength and no longer have debilitating ulcers without medication.  

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

17 minutes ago, culdeus said:

My background is not in nutrition, not a doctor.  I came into a knowledge of nutrition suffering from really bad ulcerative conditions that was close to being operative.  Coming out of that I was fairly fat, but not obese by any stretch.  I was generally unimpressed with the breadth and depth of nutritionist knowledge so read most of the literature I could.  I used that knowledge to lose the excess fat, and started doing competitive-ish cycling for a time.  

Now I mostly weight lift to maintain my weight and strength and no longer have debilitating ulcers without medication.  

How much did you lose, and how long have you kept it off?

Also, did you yo-yo, at all? What were your biggest obstacles in maintaining goal weight?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • bostonfred changed the title to Let's lose some weight in 2021. Back to the grind... who else is in?

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Restore formatting

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×
×
  • Create New...