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Let's lose some weight in 2021. Back to the grind... who else is in?


bostonfred

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52 minutes ago, Alex P Keaton said:

Great job!!!

 

Anybody else still doing this?   Has everyone packed it in already?  C’mon you all, if you are still doing this, get in here and update us.  It will provide motivation for others and accountability for you.

I’ve been back at it seriously for about a week now.  Had a “cheat day” last Friday while visiting my parents.  Ate homemade brownies with my dad.  It was awesome.   Despite that, I’m down almost 1 lb in the past week, and closing in on my target weight again. (2.5 lbs away)  Have been sticking with the push-up plan and am doing 200-225 3-4x per week.  When I saw my parents (for the first time since starting the push-up plan) they both said “you look stronger somehow, or have you put on a bunch of weight?”  Lol.  I took it as a compliment anyway.

Hope you all are finding ways to keep getting healthier!

 

It's amazing how much of a difference routine push-ups make on your physique.  And it's such an easy exercise to do - very little time commitment and no equipment needed.  I've averaged 100 a day since December with no plans of stopping.  Now if only I had the same interest in Abs.   :angry:

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14 minutes ago, fred_1_15301 said:

It's amazing how much of a difference routine push-ups make on your physique.  And it's such an easy exercise to do - very little time commitment and no equipment needed.  I've averaged 100 a day since December with no plans of stopping.  Now if only I had the same interest in Abs.   :angry:

Very true!   Thanks for reminding me of how simple it is and what a difference it makes.  100/day for that long is awesome.

If.....you figure out how to care as much about abs....let me know the secret.....

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1 hour ago, Alex P Keaton said:

Great job!!!

 

Anybody else still doing this?   Has everyone packed it in already?  C’mon you all, if you are still doing this, get in here and update us.  It will provide motivation for others and accountability for you.

I’ve been back at it seriously for about a week now.  Had a “cheat day” last Friday while visiting my parents.  Ate homemade brownies with my dad.  It was awesome.   Despite that, I’m down almost 1 lb in the past week, and closing in on my target weight again. (2.5 lbs away)  Have been sticking with the push-up plan and am doing 200-225 3-4x per week.  When I saw my parents (for the first time since starting the push-up plan) they both said “you look stronger somehow, or have you put on a bunch of weight?”  Lol.  I took it as a compliment anyway.

Hope you all are finding ways to keep getting healthier!

 

i've still been at it, but have slowed my progress a lot. Probably need to find out why it has slowed so much, but still doing IF 5 days a week. currently 29 hours into a 36-hour fast, and am doing ok. funniest thing though is when i get with-in 5 feet of the kitchen i get soooo hungry. but as long as i can keep my mind busy, it is amazing how well our bodies can adjust.

just need to figure out how to get over this plateau, and also figure out how to best keep energy up, etc. I try the 100 push-ups a day, and some days it is easy as walking down the stairs. other days i try and get like 25 push-ups deep and my body just has nothing in it to keep going. 

So still in it definitely, just need to figure out how best to make this work

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On 4/28/2021 at 10:30 PM, DJackson10 said:

Also finding myself a bit hungry at night and want too snack on something low carb. Maybe something I can eat more of then other things. Looking for possible things with granola in them, crackers with dips/cheeses, certain trail mix type foods I could eat. I have issues sleeping so anything that can help me get to sleep is a plus too. I've read a few ideas but interested what people here do as well as maybe suggestions for more fulfilling food during the day so I'm not as hungry night 

trying different things over the year, i have to recommend trying intermittent fasting. It isn't fun per se, but is the only thing i have done that seems to work and something i think i can do for years. i think you should try like a 16:8 eating window (eat in an 8-hour window, and stop eating at like 8 at night. Eat again at noon the next day). First few weeks are tough, but it gets easier. 

and if there is anything i have learned, it is that there isn't a diet that fits everybody. i think everyone needs to find what works best for them

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17 hours ago, Alex P Keaton said:

Glad that someone else is still here!

@bostonfred where are you at?

I started back up then took a little time off for my covid shot and then a little more because I like eating and drinking more than I should 

Thanks for the call out, I was looking for a reason to get back on track and have been good today.  Going for a 7 miler now. 

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2 hours ago, bostonfred said:

I started back up then took a little time off for my covid shot and then a little more because I like eating and drinking more than I should 

Thanks for the call out, I was looking for a reason to get back on track and have been good today.  Going for a 7 miler now. 

That was a horrible run.  Legs felt like lead the whole way, ended up walking a couple times, just felt bad the whole way.  If only I could somehow deny the reality that it's entirely because I ate like crap yesterday. 

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Ok finished the day under calories (by a couple hundred but I was terrible yesterday so it's just undoing damage).  

106g protein

34g fiber

1630mg sodium

Let's get back to this.  It's playground season and there are moms to impress. #### my stupid ####### life 

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Chin up @bostonfred. You’ve been pumping everyone’s tires and reminding all that will listen that we just need to get back on the wagon. I’ll take my turn to remind you how much of an inspiration you have been.

Ive been reading for months and was inspired by all, but you are the leader of this band of misfits, so keep it up my man.

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1 hour ago, bostonfred said:

Ok finished the day under calories (by a couple hundred but I was terrible yesterday so it's just undoing damage).  

106g protein

34g fiber

1630mg sodium

Let's get back to this.  It's playground season and there are moms to impress. #### my stupid ####### life 

Exactly.  Glad to see you get back to this for all the right reasons.....like impressing moms at the playground!

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2 hours ago, bostonfred said:

Ok finished the day under calories (by a couple hundred but I was terrible yesterday so it's just undoing damage).  

106g protein

34g fiber

1630mg sodium

Let's get back to this.  It's playground season and there are moms to impress. #### my stupid ####### life 

I’m back in with you.  Doctors appointment (bloodwork and all) in exactly one month and I want to nail it.

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8 hours ago, fred_1_15301 said:

I’m back in with you.  Doctors appointment (bloodwork and all) in exactly one month and I want to nail it.

Yeah that's definitely on my list of things I'm excited to do.  Maybe I'll see when I can set up a physical.  

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The hardest parts of getting started again are always the decision to do it, and the first few days of carb cravings while your body adjusts to its new calorie allotment. 

The motivation to get started- and really stick with it- is mostly social for me.  I need a reason to start today and not wait for next Monday or after Christmas or that thing I am doing. Once I'm on the diet, I can stick with it, but the decision to start back up is tough because I know I'm going to stick with it and I know I'm going to miss eating and drinking everything in sight. So a sincere thanks to @Alex P Keatonfor the call out.

The carb cravings thing is going to be weird for me this time around because there are days I'm running 7+ miles and days I'm running zero, and my calorie goal is pretty wildly different when some days I burn almost as much from running as my calorie goal and some days I don't burn any extra at all.  It wasn't a big deal when I was running daily 5ks because I could just normalize around the 500ish calories I was burning and have 2000 calories a day most days.  But alternating between 1500 and 2500 will be tough.  I could just set myfitnesspal to 2000 per day, but then my motivation to run will be kind of screwed. I'm used to running so I can earn extra calories in myfitnesspal... if I've already given myself 2000 for the run I will do later, it will be awfully easy to convince myself that I don't really need to run tonight.  And I would also like to build in some motivation for rowing or swimming or taking my kid out for a hike or whatever other exercise I can get. 

I usually have a goal in mind when I'm getting started, and an idea of how I'm going to do this.  I don't really have either yet, and this won't work without it.  But I'm starting, and I can figure things out as I go.  

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On 5/10/2021 at 9:48 PM, fred_1_15301 said:

It's amazing how much of a difference routine push-ups make on your physique.  And it's such an easy exercise to do - very little time commitment and no equipment needed.  I've averaged 100 a day since December with no plans of stopping.  Now if only I had the same interest in Abs.   :angry:

:goodposting:

I was doing exercise biking and planks only Jan-March and honestly a little disappointed (other than resurfacing my abs). Since then I've added 75 push ups and arm weights to the workout, and it's more encouraging that progress is being made.

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Been stuck between 208-210 for quite a while now. I got mad at somebody recently who said something to the effect of "when you set your mind to it the weight just falls off". The sentiment was kind, but what I heard was "its easy for you to lose weight when you try so you must just be lazy". I mean, yeah, if I can be disciplined the weight does come off fast. But then somebody bakes cookies and I turn into this guy

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2 hours ago, FBG26 said:

Been stuck between 208-210 for quite a while now. I got mad at somebody recently who said something to the effect of "when you set your mind to it the weight just falls off". The sentiment was kind, but what I heard was "its easy for you to lose weight when you try so you must just be lazy". I mean, yeah, if I can be disciplined the weight does come off fast. But then somebody bakes cookies and I turn into this guy

It’s definitely not easy.   It’s simple — but definitely not easy.   Stick around here!

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Posted (edited)

Found this thread when I searched for "Keto".  Looks like I'm late to the party.  I decided I needed to get out of Covid shape as much as I could before multiple beach trips in July.  Started with a personal trainer in the area getting all the info online.  He's giving me workouts and what to eat every week since March.  Started going to the gym by my office and recently have been going M-F before work.

Based on my InBody scale, progress over that time (3/15 to 5/9) has been:

Weight: 200.6 lb to 193.1 lb

Skeletal Muscle Mass: 80.2 lb to 84.0 lb

Body Fat Mass: 59.1 lb to 45.6 lb

Percent Body Fat: 29.5% to 23.6%

The plan changes every two weeks and just started a two-week block of Keto on Monday, not enjoying it so far.

Still pretty jiggly so hoping that will help knock out more fat before July.

Edited by Lehigh98
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On 5/10/2021 at 7:48 PM, fred_1_15301 said:

It's amazing how much of a difference routine push-ups make on your physique.  And it's such an easy exercise to do - very little time commitment and no equipment needed.  I've averaged 100 a day since December with no plans of stopping.  Now if only I had the same interest in Abs.   :angry:

motivated me to drop down and do a few sets right now....

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I posted in the Otis thread but I'll jump in here too. I signed up for Noom last week. Really just looking to reel myself in on weekends and I like the red/yellow/green method they use as a changeup from MyFitnessPal. Weekdays I don't have a problem eating well and exercising but my usual Friday includes a half dozen beers, some wings and maybe some nachos. Saturdays aren't much better and if we go to the family cottage it's even worse.

I started last Wednesday at 227.8 and this morning was 223.4, so a nice week one, if likely mostly water weight. I've been as high as 240 and this 220-225 area is the range where I always seem to plateau and then gradually fluctuate back towards 230, which I guess is where my equilibrium weight lands if I'm not consciously aware of what I'm doing.

Short term goal is 215. Longer term is 200, we'll see from there. I'm running and doing regular circuit training throughout and it will be more focused towards fat loss than the scale number, once I'm down another dozen or so pounds.

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  • bostonfred changed the title to Let's lose some weight in 2021. Back to the grind... who else is in?
Posted (edited)

 

Quote

26 min

bostonfred changed the title to Let's lose some weight in 2021. Back to the grind... who else is in?

On 11/25/2020 at 10:32 AM, FBG26 said:

So in. 

So in. Again.

Edited by FBG26
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7 hours ago, FBG26 said:

Been stuck between 208-210 for quite a while now. I got mad at somebody recently who said something to the effect of "when you set your mind to it the weight just falls off". The sentiment was kind, but what I heard was "its easy for you to lose weight when you try so you must just be lazy". I mean, yeah, if I can be disciplined the weight does come off fast. But then somebody bakes cookies and I turn into this guy

When someone tells you that you're good at this it usually means that they're envious because they aren't, or because other people they know aren't as good at it as you have been.  Sometimes they're trying to give encouragement, like you can do this, you're good at it when you set your mind to it, not thinking that what you hear is "so why didn't you set your mind to it earlier,, fat ###?".  It's a sensitive subject for a reason.  

There are definitely exceptions but it's almost always said with good intentions imo. 

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I’ve been “in” with you guys for awhile but held out from sharing, so here goes.

Been as high as 216 at 5’8” but have hovered between 180 and 190 since my doc told me to stay in the 180’s max and my eventual goal should be low 170’s.

Thanksgiving I hit the scale at 193 and put a post-it on the fridge that said 175 by my birthday this spring. Didn’t quite make it ... hit 177 on my birthday and 175 three weeks later. Back to 177 today but still sticking with all of the good habits as best I can.

Thanks to all for contributing to this thread over the last few months. It has really helped me along with tips, information and, most importantly, motivation when I took a few steps back. You guys rock!

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We have this local donut shop that makes these huge amazing glazed donuts. My sweet friend brought a dozen over as a gift today. So I ate two. Then another friend brought those little ice cream cups over to say how sweet we are. I’m on #3 of those. I was doing so well this week on the treadmill and doing my yoga stuff. And I see it circling the drain!!!!!

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38 minutes ago, Clown Car said:

We have this local donut shop that makes these huge amazing glazed donuts. My sweet friend brought a dozen over as a gift today. So I ate two. Then another friend brought those little ice cream cups over to say how sweet we are. I’m on #3 of those. I was doing so well this week on the treadmill and doing my yoga stuff. And I see it circling the drain!!!!!

Ok I'm going to go on a diatribe here because this was my biggest hurdle too.

One of the hardest parts for me was learning to get used to not having the thing.  There's a thing and I like the thing and I would like to eat all of it but I can't because I'm on this stupid diet and I hate it and I want to quit. 

Then I'd successfully avoid having the thing, temptation is over, and I'm in the clear. For a while. But half an hour later, I'm thinking of that thing again and how I don't get to have it. And eventually I will crack because I never really addressed the problem.  I still want the thing and I'm still denying myself and I don't really want to and even if my willpower wins out 99 percent of the time, if I find myself thinking about that thing a hundred times a day then I'm going to eat it. 

What works for me, and a huge part of the way I gamify weight loss for myself, is to plan on having the thing later.  The second that donut is in my house I know I'm eating the thing so I'm not going to help anyone by lying to myself about it. It's 400 calories, I've eaten 600 calories so far... I can do that and still have something ok for dinner while staying under 1500 for the day.  

By being positive about it, I'm excited about eating the thing later, not worried about whether I'm going to blow my diet later. It's a huge change in the way I see it.  There's zero guilt. 

But what happens if I can't plan for it?  My wife decides to get takeout and we get my favorite thing and it's like 1000 calories?  Well, one thing is I could just eat half and save half for tomorrow.  And that's probably the best answer anyways, but it sucks. Another answer is to do some exercise and hope to burn off all those extra calories I didn't expect to eat. 

But the best answer for me was to recognize that those things happen and they're not isolated incidents.  There's nothing unexpected about being tempted to eat too much at night.  That's when I'm always tempted to eat too much.  Instead of saying, if only I knew I was going to be tempted later, I assume I'm going to be tempted, and start my day with that in mind. 

I have coffee, 4tbsp milk and 4tbsp international delights creamer for breakfast.  That's it. I used to eat something with it, but I don't really need it. Lunch is a big risk for me though, because I'm usually making chicken nuggets or pizza or something for my kid and I just want one little nugget maybe two or ten. So I changed my plan, and when I make his lunch, I make myself a yogurt with berries.  If I cheat and steal one if his nuggets, I log it and I don't lie to myself, so I'm not likely to overeat nuggets because I know it will suck later if I do. At 55 calories per nugget, sometimes I eat one or two anyways. 

The important thing though is that I've still only had about 500 calories between coffee and "second breakfast". I have 1500 per day, not counting exercise, so I'm still sitting on around 1000 calories for lunch and dinner, and I've already had some high protein yogurt and high fiber berries (raspberries are awesome for fiber).  So if someone comes by with donuts... or takeout... or I just go ape #### on the nuggets.... I'm still ok.

Instead of getting blindsided by surprise donuts, I assume there will be surprise donuts and if nobody gives me surprise donuts then I'll have something fun for dinner myself. Tonight, that's a couple glasses of pinot noir because I wasn't quite ready to quit drinking when I decided to get back to the diet. But it was almost a cheeseburger - instead of grilled chicken and vegetables - and probably will be tomorrow. 

Having some healthy foods in my daily routine makes a huge difference. Pretty much every day I'll have skyr/Greek yogurt, raspberries, strawberries and blueberries, and a huge bowl of broccoli and maybe cauliflower and carrots, or an egg sandwich on a high fiber Thomas's light multi grain english muffin.  I drank wine tonight but still hit my protein and fiber goals easily because I start my day with enough protein and fiber to get me half way there. 

It's not easy, but I can build my day around rewarding myself with foods I love instead of denying them, and deal with the unexpected temptations without missing my calorie goal for the day or sacrificing my protein and fiber and other nutrients.  And that is so important to me because it doesn't really matter what I do on any given Wednesday, so much as it matters what I do over the course of several weeks or months. If I can stay under calories every single day and still have some of the things I want... I can do this for months on end.  

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Ugh, after dropping about 60 pounds (290-230) two years ago, I’ve put 45 back on over the past 15 months. Just got blood work back that showed my cholesterol was high. Time to get back on the train. Starting weight of 276, sigh. 

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11 minutes ago, Gawain said:

Ugh, after dropping about 60 pounds (290-230) two years ago, I’ve put 45 back on over the past 15 months. Just got blood work back that showed my cholesterol was high. Time to get back on the train. Starting weight of 276, sigh. 

You've done it once and you can do it again. The good news is you know what it takes and losing 60 lbs is amazing.  It was a hard lesson to learn but I think you've learned that if you wait until you put 45 lbs back on, you'll be really upset.  You need to decide how much you are willing to put back on before you start back on the diet. It sounds like you didn't pick a number in advance, so you let the 45 lbs and the doctor visit decide for you. That's not ideal. Let's do this together and this time when you go to maintenance mode have a plan for how much you are willing to put back on before you go back to the diet. Because if you don't choose a number, one will be chosen for you, as you have just seen.  In the short run, that sucks, but in the long run, this was just a necessary step in the process of you learning to lose it and keep it off.  You've got this.  Just get back to the process that lost you 60 lbs in the first place

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Yesterday was my first run in about two weeks. Got out today as well. 400 calories under goal (after exercise). 

Motto: slow but steady. Can eat some oreos, but can't eat oreos like Otis. 

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1 hour ago, bostonfred said:

What works for me, and a huge part of the way I gamify weight loss for myself, is to plan on having the thing later.  The second that donut is in my house I know I'm eating the thing so I'm not going to help anyone by lying to myself about it. It's 400 calories, I've eaten 600 calories so far... I can do that and still have something ok for dinner while staying under 1500 for the day.

The bolded is so true for me. The first couple months of this I started skipping breakfast so that I was at zero calories until lunch. I'd plan a light lunch and be ok if dinner was bigger or we had dessert. And I knew there would be days where my wife and I would go out for lunch and that those days would go over, but I also knew it's okay as long as it's not every day.

Heck, I knew I wasn't likely to be under 1500 calories most days, and I was perfectly content to be at 1700 if I was doing so in a sustainable way. Aside from a couple of weeks where I got bigly off track, that has generally worked. The last few weeks I've stayed flat because instead of being at 1700 calories I would be closer to 2500. So I'm going to get back to what worked for me the first two or three months and, maybe most importantly, taking it one day at a time. 

 

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21 minutes ago, FBG26 said:

The bolded is so true for me. The first couple months of this I started skipping breakfast so that I was at zero calories until lunch. I'd plan a light lunch and be ok if dinner was bigger or we had dessert. And I knew there would be days where my wife and I would go out for lunch and that those days would go over, but I also knew it's okay as long as it's not every day.

Heck, I knew I wasn't likely to be under 1500 calories most days, and I was perfectly content to be at 1700 if I was doing so in a sustainable way. Aside from a couple of weeks where I got bigly off track, that has generally worked. The last few weeks I've stayed flat because instead of being at 1700 calories I would be closer to 2500. So I'm going to get back to what worked for me the first two or three months and, maybe most importantly, taking it one day at a time. 

 

Yeah I torpedoed myself first thing this morning by not doing my treadmill/yoga routine. Then I got munchy in the mid afternoon and had chips while I watched tv and the kids had a friend over. His grandma brought the “I love you” donuts. She left and another friend asked if she could come hang out while waiting for her kid at play practice and brought her 3yo foster kid with those ice cream cups. And I certainly didn’t need 4 of them. Wth is wrong with me? Can’t have 1 kid, need 10 more! Can’t have 1 ice cream cup, need 10 more! What do healthy people do instead? I come from a long line of alcoholics and it’s like no one in my lineage has an ounce of will power. What do healthy people do that makes them feel as good as eating sweets makes me feel?

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1 hour ago, Clown Car said:

Yeah I torpedoed myself first thing this morning by not doing my treadmill/yoga routine. Then I got munchy in the mid afternoon and had chips while I watched tv and the kids had a friend over. His grandma brought the “I love you” donuts. She left and another friend asked if she could come hang out while waiting for her kid at play practice and brought her 3yo foster kid with those ice cream cups. And I certainly didn’t need 4 of them. Wth is wrong with me? Can’t have 1 kid, need 10 more! Can’t have 1 ice cream cup, need 10 more! What do healthy people do instead? I come from a long line of alcoholics and it’s like no one in my lineage has an ounce of will power. What do healthy people do that makes them feel as good as eating sweets makes me feel?

That’s a really tough, deep question.  And as someone who fits more than one category that you’ve mentioned, I’ve learned that it isn’t about will power.  It’s about creating a set of rules for yourself that you can’t break.   As an example, my rule now is I don’t eat anything UNTIL I’ve first entered that food into the MyFitnessPal app.   Why?  Because once I enter in the food, it forces me to recognize the reality of what I’m eating and what it will do to my caloric goal for the day.  Will it put me behind my goal for the day?  Does it mean to eat the extra donut I need to go run 6 miles to make up the difference?  Does it mean I will only have 500 calories left for the rest of the day?  Maybe then I only eat half the donut. Or maybe I eat half, go for a run, then eat the other half.

My 2nd rule is that I need to end the day within 100 calories of my goal, every day.

My 3rd rule is that if I pass my “danger weight” 3 days in a row, I go back to restrictive diet mode and set the MFP app to lose 1.5 lbs per week.

Some people would say that following these rules is a demonstration of willpower.  But I don’t see it that way.  I see at as tricking my brain into doing things that lead to better results than what would happen if I used my instincts, “gut” or emotions to make decisions about food.

That’s what has worked for me so far.

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3 hours ago, Gawain said:

Ugh, after dropping about 60 pounds (290-230) two years ago, I’ve put 45 back on over the past 15 months. Just got blood work back that showed my cholesterol was high. Time to get back on the train. Starting weight of 276, sigh. 

You can do this!  BF’s reply covers it all — but if you want support, suggestions and accountability, this thread is a good place to be!

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11 hours ago, Lehigh98 said:

Found this thread when I searched for "Keto".  Looks like I'm late to the party.  I decided I needed to get out of Covid shape as much as I could before multiple beach trips in July.  Started with a personal trainer in the area getting all the info online.  He's giving me workouts and what to eat every week since March.  Started going to the gym by my office and recently have been going M-F before work.

Based on my InBody scale, progress over that time (3/15 to 5/9) has been:

Weight: 200.6 lb to 193.1 lb

Skeletal Muscle Mass: 80.2 lb to 84.0 lb

Body Fat Mass: 59.1 lb to 45.6 lb

Percent Body Fat: 29.5% to 23.6%

The plan changes every two weeks and just started a two-week block of Keto on Monday, not enjoying it so far.

Still pretty jiggly so hoping that will help knock out more fat before July.

Good progress here!

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10 hours ago, Northern Voice said:

I posted in the Otis thread but I'll jump in here too. I signed up for Noom last week. Really just looking to reel myself in on weekends and I like the red/yellow/green method they use as a changeup from MyFitnessPal. Weekdays I don't have a problem eating well and exercising but my usual Friday includes a half dozen beers, some wings and maybe some nachos. Saturdays aren't much better and if we go to the family cottage it's even worse.

I started last Wednesday at 227.8 and this morning was 223.4, so a nice week one, if likely mostly water weight. I've been as high as 240 and this 220-225 area is the range where I always seem to plateau and then gradually fluctuate back towards 230, which I guess is where my equilibrium weight lands if I'm not consciously aware of what I'm doing.

Short term goal is 215. Longer term is 200, we'll see from there. I'm running and doing regular circuit training throughout and it will be more focused towards fat loss than the scale number, once I'm down another dozen or so pounds.

Almost exactly where I was. Come up with a plan that works for you and execute. Don’t kill yourself over minor setbacks. Good luck!

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6 hours ago, Alex P Keaton said:

That’s a really tough, deep question.  And as someone who fits more than one category that you’ve mentioned, I’ve learned that it isn’t about will power.  It’s about creating a set of rules for yourself that you can’t break.   As an example, my rule now is I don’t eat anything UNTIL I’ve first entered that food into the MyFitnessPal app.   Why?  Because once I enter in the food, it forces me to recognize the reality of what I’m eating and what it will do to my caloric goal for the day.  Will it put me behind my goal for the day?  Does it mean to eat the extra donut I need to go run 6 miles to make up the difference?  Does it mean I will only have 500 calories left for the rest of the day?  Maybe then I only eat half the donut. Or maybe I eat half, go for a run, then eat the other half.

My 2nd rule is that I need to end the day within 100 calories of my goal, every day.

My 3rd rule is that if I pass my “danger weight” 3 days in a row, I go back to restrictive diet mode and set the MFP app to lose 1.5 lbs per week.

Some people would say that following these rules is a demonstration of willpower.  But I don’t see it that way.  I see at as tricking my brain into doing things that lead to better results than what would happen if I used my instincts, “gut” or emotions to make decisions about food.

That’s what has worked for me so far.

Yup this. Everyone in this thread put on weight because their eating habits put more calories in than out for an extended period of time. If you want to change those habits you can do it without structure but it's so difficult. 

The reason some people succeed with keto or IF or other diets is because they give structure. Don't eat too many carbs is a simple rule. Hard to do, but simple enough.  Don't eat between these hours.  Simple.  

Myfitnesspal does the same thing but with a little more flexibility- they tell you how many calories you get if you want to lose 2 lbs per week, how many you eat and how many you burn from exercise but its up to you to decide what to do from there. 

Noon and weight watchers do the same basic thing as Myfitnesspal but you pay for the additional guidance that's tailored to your needs.  Having weigh ins and recommendations based on your eating habits and helping you to understand food quality vs just calories.  I had to learn a lot of that stuff on my own using myfitnesspal. 

It doesn't matter which one you choose, but if you need structure, you should find a structure that you can stick with.  I like data and making my own decisions and feeling in control.  Myfitnesspal works for me.  Other people hate tracking calories but don't mind following strict rules about when or what they should eat.  Intermittent fasting and keto and other diets like that can be awesome if that's your thing. Some people won't commit no matter what but they hate throwing away money so they grudgingly pay for weight watchers and stick to it just because they spent money on it.  But the points seem to work for people and the red yellow green model of noom seems to work for people too. Pick your thing and if it doesn't work try a new thing but do a thing. 

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8 hours ago, Clown Car said:

Yeah I torpedoed myself first thing this morning by not doing my treadmill/yoga routine. Then I got munchy in the mid afternoon and had chips while I watched tv and the kids had a friend over. His grandma brought the “I love you” donuts. She left and another friend asked if she could come hang out while waiting for her kid at play practice and brought her 3yo foster kid with those ice cream cups. And I certainly didn’t need 4 of them. Wth is wrong with me? Can’t have 1 kid, need 10 more! Can’t have 1 ice cream cup, need 10 more! What do healthy people do instead? I come from a long line of alcoholics and it’s like no one in my lineage has an ounce of will power. What do healthy people do that makes them feel as good as eating sweets makes me feel?

I definitely have that problem.   That always sounds like BS but remember, I got so fat that I lost 75 pounds and I've still got a ways to go.  I definitely. Have. That. Problem.

Some things that help me:

I exercise to earn calories.  I don't want to skip my workouts because I don't want to have fewer calories for the day. That's a huge motivation for me. 

I don't compete with my kid for food.  If those ice cream cups are his, I might have one, but I won't eat them all... because they're his. I can buy more food, he can't.  So I force it's not fair for me to take his food. It's the only way I can have food in the house that he likes and not eat it. 

If someone brings me too much food, I have a little, then say no thank you please don't give me any more I'm trying to lose weight. Once. That helps with the social expectation that you're supposed to accept their gift.

After that, though, I still treat it like a social thing. I don't bring it up again, but I refuse the food and only explain again if they push, and ask them to take the rest home if they bring too much bad food. I want to set their expectations because everyone says they're trying to be good, so people who aren't being good tend to keep pushing food because it just doesn't seem like a big deal. But when you show them that you're actually doing it - not just with results but with your actions like asking them to take the rest home, or refusing foods you used to accept - it becomes a social expectation that they shouldn't push food on you anymore.  Not in a rude way, but in a way that it's clear that you're not going to eat it so they hopefully feel rude for offering it. By making it a social thing instead of a food thing I find it's easier to stick to my guns because I'm a stubborn jerk.

But the most important thing is that I do eat the food. I just don't eat all of it.  I make sure that there's room in my daily calories to have the thing and then I plan to have the thing and I wait as long as possible to have the thing and when I have it I enjoy it. The more you get used to restricting yourself early so you can have something good late, the more you realize the trade off of having that good thing. If you let yourself have a good thing almost every day, you won't feel like this is a rare treat I need to eat all of it because when will I get another chance.  Instead you start to get picky, like I enjoy donuts but I was really planning on having a cheeseburger tonight do I really want to give that up so I can have this donut?  Maybe I could have the cheeseburger tomorrow then. It's not as fun as having the cheeseburger AND the donut today, but if you know that you can have both, it makes it easier to say no to one or the other today because you're not really saying "no", just "not yet".  And the same thing is true with portions.  I would love to have all the donuts, but if I know I can have one today and one tomorrow then I find it easier to wait to have that first one and then to get excited for the second one tomorrow because I was excited about it today and I got to enjoy it.

You develop good habits by rewarding good behavior.  Seeing the scale move is definitely a reward but seeing that you can eat the donut and still lose weight is an even bigger motivator for me.  I really think its important to build in some "bad foods" into your diet especially when you are trying to reinforce the habit early on. 

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Yesterday was a fairly typical weekday for me (lately). I mostly skipped breakfast, had a small pasta salad for lunch then snacked on fruit in the afternoon. 

Dinner was baked samosas with rice and veggies.

Tying in with @bostonfred's post above, my "thing" is beer, I'm not giving it up but I am now logging every calorie from it and planning for it by budgeting calories and exercizing. Yesterday, I allowed myself enough calories left to have a DIPA and a light beer in the evening watching the Leafs/Jays but ended up just having one. 

1650 calories available (did circuit training), 1538 calories used.

Green 434 calories - coffee with silk, orange, clementine, apple, protein shake, corn, broccoli

Yellow 806 calories - pasta salad, 1.5 baked Samosas, rice

Red 298 calories - one pint double IPA

------

Weighed in exactly the same as yesterday which is fine. I am weighing myself every day right now to build the habit mostly to do it on weekends. One of my issues is I've always just not weighed myself at all on weekends and figured weekday NV can deal with all that. 

One of the biggest changes I've found with noom (aside from logging beer and drinking more lighter beers less IPAs/DIPAs/big stouts) is I'm going to fruit rather than cheese for snacks. I have nothing against cheese bit it's easy to mindlessly cut off a few slices and bam, 200+ calories for a snack. 

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Posted (edited)
10 hours ago, Clown Car said:

Yeah I torpedoed myself first thing this morning by not doing my treadmill/yoga routine. Then I got munchy in the mid afternoon and had chips while I watched tv and the kids had a friend over. His grandma brought the “I love you” donuts. She left and another friend asked if she could come hang out while waiting for her kid at play practice and brought her 3yo foster kid with those ice cream cups. And I certainly didn’t need 4 of them. Wth is wrong with me? Can’t have 1 kid, need 10 more! Can’t have 1 ice cream cup, need 10 more! What do healthy people do instead? I come from a long line of alcoholics and it’s like no one in my lineage has an ounce of will power. What do healthy people do that makes them feel as good as eating sweets makes me feel?

To dig in to the idea of that making you feel good I highly recommend reading the book The Hacking of the American Mind by Robert Lustig.  You an also find several of his talks/lectures online.  I could sum it up with - sugar is poison and is one of the main contributing factors to our American health epidemic.

I started a thread on this book and like my diets I did good maintaining it for a while.  My last post in there was early 2019 - I need to revisit it.  I'd love to keep that discussion going in that thread or in here.

https://forums.footballguys.com/topic/771208-the-hacking-of-the-american-mind/

 

Edited by AAABatteries
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@Clown Car - if you don't want to go through all of that thread let me re-post one item here:

He proposes the 4 C's to up your serotonin;  tamp down your dopamine and lower you cortisol:

Connect - face to face, eye to eye human interaction  (spend less time online - go cornhole someone!)
Contribute - do something outside of yourself and for no credit - make the world a better place
Cope - sleep, mindfulness and exercise (these are the typical things you hear people talk about and not so much the first two)
Cook - cook and eat real food - don't buy processed crap;  know what is going in to your food and then sit down with your family and eat it

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Ok, so maybe one more:

These two paragraphs probably sum up why I wanted to read this (AAA edit - "this" is the book The Hacking of the American Mind) originally - I was on a health and fitness journey and thought understanding the science would be my best course of action.  This is sobering for people who are obese and fighting to get "thin".

"And what is America's preferred drug of choice in dealing with stress?  The one that is closest at hand.  And that would be - you guessed it - sugar.  Both animals and humans increase their food intake when stressed or when experiencing negative emotions, regardless of whether or not they are hungry.  The boss is yelling at you?  Krispy Kreme seems as good a solution as any.  And there's actually a reason for this.  High-energy dense food, aka comfort food (think chocolate cake) increases acute energy to the brain and thus reduces the amygdala's output and subsequent stress.  Stress may affect food intake in several ways.  For instance, people with eating disorders tend to show higher levels of cortisol or greater cortisol reactivity.

Alternatively, if stress becomes chronic, and eating is the preferred coping behavior of the individual, then highly palatable food, especially food laced with added sugar, may also become addictive.  Cortisol is an appetite stimulant;  infusion of cortisol into humans rapidly increases food intake.  Those who put out more cortisol in response to chronic stress also consume the most comfort food in response to stress.  It gets worse.  Cortisol actually kills neurons that help to inhibit food intake.  Thus the stress and reward systems are linked, with food (usually sugar) being the drug, breeding a new generation of stress eaters.  Break out the Ben & Jerry's."

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23 minutes ago, AAABatteries said:

@Clown Car - if you don't want to go through all of that thread let me re-post one item here:

He proposes the 4 C's to up your serotonin;  tamp down your dopamine and lower you cortisol:

Connect - face to face, eye to eye human interaction  (spend less time online - go cornhole someone!)
Contribute - do something outside of yourself and for no credit - make the world a better place
Cope - sleep, mindfulness and exercise (these are the typical things you hear people talk about and not so much the first two)
Cook - cook and eat real food - don't buy processed crap;  know what is going in to your food and then sit down with your family and eat it

I’m going to get the book and read it. But in my defense I do all the 4Cs regularly. 
Your next post really nails it though. I’m addicted to sugar and I really need to work on that. That comes from my entire life. A 70s kid that never tried to  grow out of the sugar!! 

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1 minute ago, Clown Car said:

I’m going to get the book and read it. But in my defense I do all the 4Cs regularly. 
Your next post really nails it though. I’m addicted to sugar and I really need to work on that. That comes from my entire life. A 70s kid that never tried to  grow out of the sugar!! 

May I make one suggestion first - while I enjoy the book (haven't finished it) and I agree with a lot of what he says.  He does have some detractors - especially around his stance on sugar.  I would just suggest doing a little research or at least have an open mind with regards to what he is saying.  It's not gospel but a lot of what he says has some level of science behind it.  I think what appeals to me is that my anecdotal evidence matches what he talks about.  Also, I really feel there's an addiction element to this that is hard for science to quantify.  You will see an example of that in the discussion I had with MT about having a glass of apple juice vs. a chicken breast.  My comment was - in a vacuum there's no denying that the apple juice is "better" for you but I do wonder how drinking that can contribute to a sugar addiction whereas eating the chicken has other bad side effects.

Basically what I'm saying here is Fred's disclaimer about not being a doctor, etc.  I'm like most of you and trying to find some right answers to the questions I have and the issues I personally face.  I'm confident I'm a sugar addict too.

 

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My mouth is telling me it needs something, but my stomach says it's fine. Have to remind myself that means I'm actually thirsty and grab some water rather than grab a snack. 

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I'm probably in the minority here but I really don't like the advice that everyone should quit sugar that seems to go around today. A few people have mentioned it either as part of keto or as an approach for dieting and it might work for some people but I think its putting the cart before the horse.

I have definitely cut way down on sugar but I did that as a natural result of cutting calories. 

Quitting sugar also leads to cutting calories.

But quitting sugar also means breaking an addiction that is very good to break... but also very difficult.  And for the people who fail it leads to feeling discouraged and quitting your diet. 

I want the process to be easy and rewarding and make you feel good and that this is sustainable.  Quitting sugar runs counter to that in every way.  It's definitely possible, but what worked for me was gradually looking for ways to cut out calories, which eventually led to me eating more fruits and vegetables to stay full and get my fiber numbers, and having skyr instead of dannon because it's 130 instead of 200 and has more protein, and eventually cutting the sugar out of my coffee which was a big hurdle but I got there... and now I barely have sugar at all most days but I definitely haven't quit it.  

Maybe I'm lucky that I wasn't as addicted to sugar as others, so I can't really say whether my approach will work for everyone.  But I personally wouldn't recommend the more difficult goal of quitting sugar as the first of the many lifestyle changes that will eventually get someone healthy. 

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16 minutes ago, FBG26 said:

My mouth is telling me it needs something, but my stomach says it's fine. Have to remind myself that means I'm actually thirsty and grab some water rather than grab a snack. 

Sometimes it's my allergies/sinuses bothering me and I somehow equate that with hunger. 

Water is a great idea, and I always mention the brushing your teeth trick.  Another good one is writing up the next meal I plan to have in myfitnesspal- sometimes just planning it out is enough to scratch the itch for now.

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1 minute ago, bostonfred said:

I'm probably in the minority here but I really don't like the advice that everyone should quit sugar that seems to go around today. A few people have mentioned it either as part of keto or as an approach for dieting and it might work for some people but I think its putting the cart before the horse.

I have definitely cut way down on sugar but I did that as a natural result of cutting calories. 

Quitting sugar also leads to cutting calories.

But quitting sugar also means breaking an addiction that is very good to break... but also very difficult.  And for the people who fail it leads to feeling discouraged and quitting your diet. 

I want the process to be easy and rewarding and make you feel good and that this is sustainable.  Quitting sugar runs counter to that in every way.  It's definitely possible, but what worked for me was gradually looking for ways to cut out calories, which eventually led to me eating more fruits and vegetables to stay full and get my fiber numbers, and having skyr instead of dannon because it's 130 instead of 200 and has more protein, and eventually cutting the sugar out of my coffee which was a big hurdle but I got there... and now I barely have sugar at all most days but I definitely haven't quit it.  

Maybe I'm lucky that I wasn't as addicted to sugar as others, so I can't really say whether my approach will work for everyone.  But I personally wouldn't recommend the more difficult goal of quitting sugar as the first of the many lifestyle changes that will eventually get someone healthy. 

I would say that trying to hit something 1600-1800 calories daily is nearly impossible to hit protein goals if you include foods with added sugar.  Doing so will nearly certainly squeeze things out that have micronutrients.  

Can you hit those goals eating yoohoos, yes.  Look at the "donut diet" or "twinkie diet"  and lose weight, but I mean going to that absurd level is just dumb we all know that.  

Eating less sugar has other benefits, in that you will not want it as much.  And done long enough something like a birthday cake will make you physically ill.  

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Posted (edited)
15 minutes ago, bostonfred said:

I'm probably in the minority here but I really don't like the advice that everyone should quit sugar that seems to go around today. A few people have mentioned it either as part of keto or as an approach for dieting and it might work for some people but I think its putting the cart before the horse.

I have definitely cut way down on sugar but I did that as a natural result of cutting calories. 

Quitting sugar also leads to cutting calories.

But quitting sugar also means breaking an addiction that is very good to break... but also very difficult.  And for the people who fail it leads to feeling discouraged and quitting your diet. 

I want the process to be easy and rewarding and make you feel good and that this is sustainable.  Quitting sugar runs counter to that in every way.  It's definitely possible, but what worked for me was gradually looking for ways to cut out calories, which eventually led to me eating more fruits and vegetables to stay full and get my fiber numbers, and having skyr instead of dannon because it's 130 instead of 200 and has more protein, and eventually cutting the sugar out of my coffee which was a big hurdle but I got there... and now I barely have sugar at all most days but I definitely haven't quit it.  

Maybe I'm lucky that I wasn't as addicted to sugar as others, so I can't really say whether my approach will work for everyone.  But I personally wouldn't recommend the more difficult goal of quitting sugar as the first of the many lifestyle changes that will eventually get someone healthy. 

Just to be clear - I'm not suggesting you eliminate all sugar - not even sure that's possible.  I do think eliminating all processed food/sugar is a good goal.  Ultimately, I've always said that the best thing for anybody is the thing that they can stick to or be consistent with (vegetarian/vegan, low carb, IF, full fasting, etc.) - I just think there's a lot to the idea of sugar addiction.  And while I say I have it, I realize that maybe I don't really have it like someone who weighs 600 lbs.  Like alcohol or drug addiction there are levels.  I guess my point above was - you wouldn't tell a alcoholic that a glass of alcohol is better than <insert something that is arguably worse but non-addictive>.  I do think there's something to be gained from learning the serotonin dopamine mechanism and how sugar/stress/sleep impact that.

It is/would be nearly impossible for someone to cut out all sugar.

Edited by AAABatteries
No ignorace was showing - I think I meant dopamine.
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My issue is that I eat when I'm bored or need a break. Two years ago I was working on the corner of 39th and 8th. More healthy options within a 5 minute walk than I could count and a great city to then take a brisk walk around during lunch. Now, I'm in the middle of nowhere, with a McDonalds as the only option in driving distance. Add on the pandemic stress and it was easy to run out for a Big Mac when I just needed 30 minutes away from the office. 

Like many here, I'll go back to IF, starting at 16/8 looking to cut down to a 20/4 after a couple weeks of easing into it. Cutting the 800 calorie lunch will do a lot of the work, as well as replacing snack items at home. Watermelon is probably my biggest crutch. Hits the sweet tooth, is filling and hydrating and a pound is less than 150 calories.

Day 1 - 276
Day 2 - 271 (amazing what low sodium for just a day will do)

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This is a thought experiment on nutrient density, when framing the "don't eat sugar" argument it's always better to say "eat this stuff instead"  nutrient dense food by weight and calories are the "instead".  It seems like a no brainer, but for whatever reason it gets really dug in for some people. 

https://renaissanceperiodization.com/expert-advice/nutrient-density-index

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