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Who will be the GOP candidate in 2024?


Who will be the GOP candidate in 2024?  

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1 hour ago, Ministry of Pain said:

The GOP will need to somehow miraculously seize control of the House...history is on their side but the present climate is going to make this very difficult. 

The GOP just lost Senate seats in Georgia, they are in a total tailspin right now. 

I've never seen a guy leave office after his 1st term and start talking up running again...I just can't recall where a person who just lost an election could be so widely popular still. 

And then there are large groups of civilians who really have not been heard from much, will be interesting to see if the House is even in play in 2022. 

 

He wasn't popular enough to win in 2020, and (I would expect) he will be even less popular in 2024.

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Hopefully Kasich, Bush, Romney or someone with a moderate streak. I can’t take the far right or far left. We need centrists as President.

Shocked to see so many people think Trump is going to run for a third term. 

As I've said a million times in these threads, it's completely baffling that the GOP did NOT see this as their shot of getting rid of him.  It was as obvious to me as it was the the Dems should NOT ha

47 minutes ago, VandyMan said:

He wasn't popular enough to win in 2020, and (I would expect) he will be even less popular in 2024.

Technically he lost the popular vote in 2016 as well.

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3 hours ago, Kal El said:

Technically he lost the popular vote in 2016 as well.

That never stopped the GOP from winning the white house. #minorityparty

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18 hours ago, Leroy Hoard said:

Of all the anti-trumpers Niki seems like a good bet. But she needs to get over the hump of not being his chosen one.

In what actionable way is she considered "anti-Trump"  :confused: 

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25 minutes ago, The Commish said:

In what actionable way is she considered "anti-Trump"  :confused: 

Nikki Haley Slams Trump’s Election Claims: ‘We Shouldn’t Have Followed Him’

Although the former United Nations ambassador calibrated her comments, her sharp criticism represented a departure from other Republicans who are believed to be considering running for president in 2024.

Nikki R. Haley, a former governor of South Carolina, resigned as Donald J. Trump’s ambassador to the United Nations at the end of 2018. Credit... Samuel Corum for The New York Times

Feb. 12, 2021

Nikki R. Haley, a former United Nations ambassador under President Donald J. Trump who left the administration without the drama or ill will that marred most of its high-level departures, sharply criticized her former boss in an interview published on Friday, saying that she was “disgusted” by his conduct on Jan. 6, the day of the Capitol riot.

Ms. Haley, 49, who is widely believed to be considering a run for president in 2024, told Politico she did not believe that the former president would remain a dominant force within the Republican Party or that he would seek office again, arguing that he had “lost any sort of political viability.”

“I don’t think he’s going to be in the picture,” Ms. Haley said. “I don’t think he can. He’s fallen so far.”

Ms. Haley’s comments predictably prompted a backlash from Mr. Trump’s loyal base of support, a constituency that most Republican office holders continue to try to appease — and one that she had assiduously tried to avoid offending since leaving his administration at the end of 2018.

Before her latest comments became public, Ms. Haley seemed to realize that they would go too far for many Republicans. And it was not long before she bowed to the reality of Mr. Trump’s enduring power within the party. In an interview with Laura Ingraham of Fox News that was broadcast late last month — after Ms. Haley had spoken to Politico but before the article was published — Ms. Haley muted her criticism of the former president considerably.

“At some point, I mean, give the man a break,” she said, condemning Democrats for pursuing a second impeachment against him for instigating the Jan. 6 assault on the Capitol. “I mean, move on.” She added: “Does he deserve to be impeached? Absolutely not.”

But the storming of the Capitol last month, and Mr. Trump’s role in inciting it with repeated, false claims of ballot-rigging in the November election, caused Ms. Haley to reassess her relationship with the former president. Her tone changed markedly between interviews with Politico in December and January. At first, she refused to acknowledge that Mr. Trump was doing anything reckless by refusing to concede. She said that he genuinely believed he had not lost, and she would not acknowledge that his actions since the November election were irresponsible.

And she wrongly predicted that Mr. Trump would “go on his way” once he had exhausted his legal options.

But after Jan. 6, Ms. Haley told the publication that she had previously urged Mr. Trump to be more “careful” with his words, to no avail.

“He went down a path he shouldn’t have,” she said, referring to his deception about the election. “And we shouldn’t have followed him, and we shouldn’t have listened to him. And we can’t let that ever happen again.”

In that moment, Ms. Haley’s remarks showed that she was willing to entertain a political proposition that most other Republicans with eyes on the White House had not dared to utter publicly: that Mr. Trump’s hold over the G.O.P. base will loosen, and that he will not be the kingmaker many have predicted.

However calibrated or qualified, Ms. Haley’s approach is a departure from that of other conservatives who are believed to harbor ambitions for higher office. Senator Josh Hawley of Missouri, who lent credibility to Mr. Trump’s voter fraud claims, has refused to acknowledge that his own actions played any role in inciting violence on Jan. 6. And former Vice President Mike Pence has said nothing publicly since being forced to flee the Senate chamber under armed guard as rioters stormed the Capitol, encouraged in part by Mr. Trump’s attacks against the vice president on Twitter for not interfering with the certification of the election.

Ms. Haley was especially pointed about Mr. Trump’s treatment of Mr. Pence, sounding almost dismissive of the former president as she expressed her dismay. “Mike has been nothing but loyal to that man,” she said.

Some Republicans said that Ms. Haley’s comments were simply acknowledging reality. As a politician who is more comfortable with the establishment wing of the G.O.P., she has not always had the trust of Mr. Trump’s base. And in a crowded 2024 presidential primary, she would face stiff competition for those votes.

“You didn’t have to be clairvoyant to see which way Nikki Haley would go once Donald Trump lost,” said Sam Nunberg, a consultant who worked for Mr. Trump. “She was never going to be able to take the Trump mantle.”

To other Republicans, her words of regret were too little, too late given her earlier deference toward Mr. Trump. Representative Adam Kinzinger of Illinois, who has become one of the most outspoken critics of his party since the Capitol attack, accused Ms. Haley of playing “both sides.” On Twitter, he urged her to “Pick Country First or Trump First.”

This is not Ms. Haley’s first reversal on Mr. Trump. Like many leaders of her party, she initially opposed him when he ran for the Republican nomination in 2016. At the time, she was the governor of South Carolina, and she endorsed Senator Marco Rubio of Florida ahead of her state’s pivotal primary. Mr. Trump still won, finishing ahead of Mr. Rubio by 10 percentage points.

But she redeemed herself in the eyes of many Republican voters by signing on to work in the Trump administration, showing how quickly old slights can be forgiven by the former president and his supporters.

Voters may indeed forgive and forget altogether — which is something that critics of Mr. Trump warned would allow Republicans to go unpunished for encouraging him as he undermined faith in American democracy.

“When I got into politics, I was told you could get away with a lot because voters have short-term memories,” said Denver Riggleman, a former Republican congressman from Virginia who has been highly critical of his party’s silence as Mr. Trump spread disinformation about the election.

“What the Nikki Haleys, Ted Cruzes, Josh Hawleys of the world are relying on,” he added, “is the short-term memory of voters.”

https://www.nytimes.com

 

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Just now, Leroy Hoard said:

Nikki Haley Slams Trump’s Election Claims: ‘We Shouldn’t Have Followed Him’

Although the former United Nations ambassador calibrated her comments, her sharp criticism represented a departure from other Republicans who are believed to be considering running for president in 2024.

Nikki R. Haley, a former governor of South Carolina, resigned as Donald J. Trump’s ambassador to the United Nations at the end of 2018. Credit... Samuel Corum for The New York Times

Feb. 12, 2021

Nikki R. Haley, a former United Nations ambassador under President Donald J. Trump who left the administration without the drama or ill will that marred most of its high-level departures, sharply criticized her former boss in an interview published on Friday, saying that she was “disgusted” by his conduct on Jan. 6, the day of the Capitol riot.

Ms. Haley, 49, who is widely believed to be considering a run for president in 2024, told Politico she did not believe that the former president would remain a dominant force within the Republican Party or that he would seek office again, arguing that he had “lost any sort of political viability.”

“I don’t think he’s going to be in the picture,” Ms. Haley said. “I don’t think he can. He’s fallen so far.”

Ms. Haley’s comments predictably prompted a backlash from Mr. Trump’s loyal base of support, a constituency that most Republican office holders continue to try to appease — and one that she had assiduously tried to avoid offending since leaving his administration at the end of 2018.

Before her latest comments became public, Ms. Haley seemed to realize that they would go too far for many Republicans. And it was not long before she bowed to the reality of Mr. Trump’s enduring power within the party. In an interview with Laura Ingraham of Fox News that was broadcast late last month — after Ms. Haley had spoken to Politico but before the article was published — Ms. Haley muted her criticism of the former president considerably.

“At some point, I mean, give the man a break,” she said, condemning Democrats for pursuing a second impeachment against him for instigating the Jan. 6 assault on the Capitol. “I mean, move on.” She added: “Does he deserve to be impeached? Absolutely not.”

But the storming of the Capitol last month, and Mr. Trump’s role in inciting it with repeated, false claims of ballot-rigging in the November election, caused Ms. Haley to reassess her relationship with the former president. Her tone changed markedly between interviews with Politico in December and January. At first, she refused to acknowledge that Mr. Trump was doing anything reckless by refusing to concede. She said that he genuinely believed he had not lost, and she would not acknowledge that his actions since the November election were irresponsible.

And she wrongly predicted that Mr. Trump would “go on his way” once he had exhausted his legal options.

But after Jan. 6, Ms. Haley told the publication that she had previously urged Mr. Trump to be more “careful” with his words, to no avail.

“He went down a path he shouldn’t have,” she said, referring to his deception about the election. “And we shouldn’t have followed him, and we shouldn’t have listened to him. And we can’t let that ever happen again.”

In that moment, Ms. Haley’s remarks showed that she was willing to entertain a political proposition that most other Republicans with eyes on the White House had not dared to utter publicly: that Mr. Trump’s hold over the G.O.P. base will loosen, and that he will not be the kingmaker many have predicted.

However calibrated or qualified, Ms. Haley’s approach is a departure from that of other conservatives who are believed to harbor ambitions for higher office. Senator Josh Hawley of Missouri, who lent credibility to Mr. Trump’s voter fraud claims, has refused to acknowledge that his own actions played any role in inciting violence on Jan. 6. And former Vice President Mike Pence has said nothing publicly since being forced to flee the Senate chamber under armed guard as rioters stormed the Capitol, encouraged in part by Mr. Trump’s attacks against the vice president on Twitter for not interfering with the certification of the election.

Ms. Haley was especially pointed about Mr. Trump’s treatment of Mr. Pence, sounding almost dismissive of the former president as she expressed her dismay. “Mike has been nothing but loyal to that man,” she said.

Some Republicans said that Ms. Haley’s comments were simply acknowledging reality. As a politician who is more comfortable with the establishment wing of the G.O.P., she has not always had the trust of Mr. Trump’s base. And in a crowded 2024 presidential primary, she would face stiff competition for those votes.

“You didn’t have to be clairvoyant to see which way Nikki Haley would go once Donald Trump lost,” said Sam Nunberg, a consultant who worked for Mr. Trump. “She was never going to be able to take the Trump mantle.”

To other Republicans, her words of regret were too little, too late given her earlier deference toward Mr. Trump. Representative Adam Kinzinger of Illinois, who has become one of the most outspoken critics of his party since the Capitol attack, accused Ms. Haley of playing “both sides.” On Twitter, he urged her to “Pick Country First or Trump First.”

This is not Ms. Haley’s first reversal on Mr. Trump. Like many leaders of her party, she initially opposed him when he ran for the Republican nomination in 2016. At the time, she was the governor of South Carolina, and she endorsed Senator Marco Rubio of Florida ahead of her state’s pivotal primary. Mr. Trump still won, finishing ahead of Mr. Rubio by 10 percentage points.

But she redeemed herself in the eyes of many Republican voters by signing on to work in the Trump administration, showing how quickly old slights can be forgiven by the former president and his supporters.

Voters may indeed forgive and forget altogether — which is something that critics of Mr. Trump warned would allow Republicans to go unpunished for encouraging him as he undermined faith in American democracy.

“When I got into politics, I was told you could get away with a lot because voters have short-term memories,” said Denver Riggleman, a former Republican congressman from Virginia who has been highly critical of his party’s silence as Mr. Trump spread disinformation about the election.

“What the Nikki Haleys, Ted Cruzes, Josh Hawleys of the world are relying on,” he added, “is the short-term memory of voters.”

https://www.nytimes.com

 

Thanks....I tend not to be one who believes the words coming out of the mouths of politicians.  The actions are much more meaningful.  She was an actionable lacky through and through.

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1 minute ago, The Commish said:

Thanks....I tend not to be one who believes the words coming out of the mouths of politicians.  The actions are much more meaningful.  She was an actionable lacky through and through.

She might very well become the nominee, I just don't know how much support Trump will give her or visa versa.

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The WSJ says don't count out DJT:

 

William A. Galston

Feb. 16, 2021 12:35 pm 

 

Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell delivered a stinging speech immediately after President Trump was acquitted in his Senate trial over the weekend. The speech has been seen as the opening salvo in Mr. McConnell’s effort to marginalize Mr. Trump’s influence in the Republican Party. It will be an uphill battle.

A Quinnipiac survey released on Monday found that only 11% of Republicans held Mr. Trump responsible for inciting the violence on Capitol Hill on Jan. 6. A mere 9% supported conviction. Only 16% would support even the symbolic rebuke of a censure motion. Not only do 87% of Republicans believe Mr. Trump should be allowed to hold office again; 75% want him to play a “prominent role” in the Republican Party.

What does such a role entail? A recent Gallup survey found that 68% of Republicans want the former president to remain their party’s leader. According to an Axios-Ipsos poll, 66% of Republicans believe that their party is better with Mr. Trump in it, and 57% favor him as their party’s 2024 presidential candidate. These sentiments may change over time. But for now, efforts to weaken Mr. Trump’s influence within the party will not succeed.

If anything, the opposite seems more likely. State and county Republican Party organizations across the country are censuring elected officials who broke with Mr. Trump to support his impeachment in the House and conviction in the Senate. The Trump base has anathematized even Trump loyalists such as former Vice President Mike Pence, who honored their oath of office. These supporters will not countenance anything short of unswerving fealty to Mr. Trump.

 

https://www.wsj.com

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23 minutes ago, Leroy Hoard said:

The WSJ says don't count out DJT:

 

William A. Galston

Feb. 16, 2021 12:35 pm 

 

Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell delivered a stinging speech immediately after President Trump was acquitted in his Senate trial over the weekend. The speech has been seen as the opening salvo in Mr. McConnell’s effort to marginalize Mr. Trump’s influence in the Republican Party. It will be an uphill battle.

A Quinnipiac survey released on Monday found that only 11% of Republicans held Mr. Trump responsible for inciting the violence on Capitol Hill on Jan. 6. A mere 9% supported conviction. Only 16% would support even the symbolic rebuke of a censure motion. Not only do 87% of Republicans believe Mr. Trump should be allowed to hold office again; 75% want him to play a “prominent role” in the Republican Party.

What does such a role entail? A recent Gallup survey found that 68% of Republicans want the former president to remain their party’s leader. According to an Axios-Ipsos poll, 66% of Republicans believe that their party is better with Mr. Trump in it, and 57% favor him as their party’s 2024 presidential candidate. These sentiments may change over time. But for now, efforts to weaken Mr. Trump’s influence within the party will not succeed.

If anything, the opposite seems more likely. State and county Republican Party organizations across the country are censuring elected officials who broke with Mr. Trump to support his impeachment in the House and conviction in the Senate. The Trump base has anathematized even Trump loyalists such as former Vice President Mike Pence, who honored their oath of office. These supporters will not countenance anything short of unswerving fealty to Mr. Trump.

 

https://www.wsj.com

If Mitch would have taken this stance before the email he sent out, and voted to impeach, Trump is probably impeached.  He really did Trump a favor.  

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22 minutes ago, Leroy Hoard said:

The WSJ says don't count out DJT:

 

William A. Galston

Feb. 16, 2021 12:35 pm 

 

Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell delivered a stinging speech immediately after President Trump was acquitted in his Senate trial over the weekend. The speech has been seen as the opening salvo in Mr. McConnell’s effort to marginalize Mr. Trump’s influence in the Republican Party. It will be an uphill battle.

A Quinnipiac survey released on Monday found that only 11% of Republicans held Mr. Trump responsible for inciting the violence on Capitol Hill on Jan. 6. A mere 9% supported conviction. Only 16% would support even the symbolic rebuke of a censure motion. Not only do 87% of Republicans believe Mr. Trump should be allowed to hold office again; 75% want him to play a “prominent role” in the Republican Party.

What does such a role entail? A recent Gallup survey found that 68% of Republicans want the former president to remain their party’s leader. According to an Axios-Ipsos poll, 66% of Republicans believe that their party is better with Mr. Trump in it, and 57% favor him as their party’s 2024 presidential candidate. These sentiments may change over time. But for now, efforts to weaken Mr. Trump’s influence within the party will not succeed.

If anything, the opposite seems more likely. State and county Republican Party organizations across the country are censuring elected officials who broke with Mr. Trump to support his impeachment in the House and conviction in the Senate. The Trump base has anathematized even Trump loyalists such as former Vice President Mike Pence, who honored their oath of office. These supporters will not countenance anything short of unswerving fealty to Mr. Trump.

 

https://www.wsj.com

57% is a great number when you're the challenger and it's early in primary season. But it's a terrible number when you're the leader of the party and its most recent presidential candidate.

 

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3 hours ago, Sea Duck said:

57% is a great number when you're the challenger and it's early in primary season. But it's a terrible number when you're the leader of the party and its most recent presidential candidate.

 

57% is also big enough to basically lock him in as the GOP nominee. 57% is against the field of all possible people. 

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On 2/18/2021 at 10:42 AM, Leroy Hoard said:

....Ms. Haley, 49, who is widely believed to be considering a run for president in 2024, told Politico she did not believe that the former president would remain a dominant force within the Republican Party or that he would seek office again, arguing that he had “lost any sort of political viability.”

“I don’t think he’s going to be in the picture,” Ms. Haley said. “I don’t think he can. He’s fallen so far.”

....

 

 

Strong chance that Kamala Harris has the DNC ticket in 2024. Haley is right, Trump is out of the picture if she won't line up as his VP.  His next best choices will be Kristi Noem and Kayleigh McEnany. I don't think Noem is going to leave her governorship for this kind of brutal pummeling on a day to day basis. 

As a moderate Republican and a minority woman and mother, Haley will attract a bunch of moderate Democrats and independents. Again, she's betting the Trump base will vote for her eventually rather than see a Democrat hold office or take office.

What Haley can trade Trump for his support later is a pardon for him and his children. That's a pretty powerful piece to trade. I think Trump could live with the open hunt for him, however Ivanka Trump is likely going to face some problems via Jared Kushner and his actions in the White House.

No matter what leftists think of Nikki Haley here, she simply doesn't have a lot of wiggle room to attack her in the open press.

I don't care what Vegas says, as of today, right now, she's the favorite to win 2024.

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DeSantis crushes Rubio, Scott in Florida GOP poll

It doesn't surprise me. He's young, used his small children in a build the wall commercial while running for governor, and most Republicans are in favor of his handling of the economy during the pandemic.  Florida is also getting over 600 new residents a day, many fleeing the cold and high tax states like New York. DeSantis is not charismatic - maybe that will appeal to Republicans if Trump doesn't run in 2024.

>> DeSantis had better favorable ratings than Trump in the Florida GOP<<

As the article points out, Rubio would do well in the general, but not in the primary. They haven't forgotten about his effort in 2013 for immigration reform.

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5 hours ago, SoBeDad said:

DeSantis crushes Rubio, Scott in Florida GOP poll

It doesn't surprise me. He's young, used his small children in a build the wall commercial while running for governor, and most Republicans are in favor of his handling of the economy during the pandemic.  Florida is also getting over 600 new residents a day, many fleeing the cold and high tax states like New York. DeSantis is not charismatic - maybe that will appeal to Republicans if Trump doesn't run in 2024.

>> DeSantis had better favorable ratings than Trump in the Florida GOP<<

As the article points out, Rubio would do well in the general, but not in the primary. They haven't forgotten about his effort in 2013 for immigration reform.

Three names that I will never vote for in any capacity.

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On 2/18/2021 at 12:42 PM, Leroy Hoard said:

Nikki Haley Slams Trump’s Election Claims: ‘We Shouldn’t Have Followed Him’

Although the former United Nations ambassador calibrated her comments, her sharp criticism represented a departure from other Republicans who are believed to be considering running for president in 2024.

Nikki R. Haley, a former governor of South Carolina, resigned as Donald J. Trump’s ambassador to the United Nations at the end of 2018. Credit... Samuel Corum for The New York Times

Feb. 12, 2021

Nikki R. Haley, a former United Nations ambassador under President Donald J. Trump who left the administration without the drama or ill will that marred most of its high-level departures, sharply criticized her former boss in an interview published on Friday, saying that she was “disgusted” by his conduct on Jan. 6, the day of the Capitol riot.

Ms. Haley, 49, who is widely believed to be considering a run for president in 2024, told Politico she did not believe that the former president would remain a dominant force within the Republican Party or that he would seek office again, arguing that he had “lost any sort of political viability.”

“I don’t think he’s going to be in the picture,” Ms. Haley said. “I don’t think he can. He’s fallen so far.”

Ms. Haley’s comments predictably prompted a backlash from Mr. Trump’s loyal base of support, a constituency that most Republican office holders continue to try to appease — and one that she had assiduously tried to avoid offending since leaving his administration at the end of 2018.

Before her latest comments became public, Ms. Haley seemed to realize that they would go too far for many Republicans. And it was not long before she bowed to the reality of Mr. Trump’s enduring power within the party. In an interview with Laura Ingraham of Fox News that was broadcast late last month — after Ms. Haley had spoken to Politico but before the article was published — Ms. Haley muted her criticism of the former president considerably.

“At some point, I mean, give the man a break,” she said, condemning Democrats for pursuing a second impeachment against him for instigating the Jan. 6 assault on the Capitol. “I mean, move on.” She added: “Does he deserve to be impeached? Absolutely not.”

But the storming of the Capitol last month, and Mr. Trump’s role in inciting it with repeated, false claims of ballot-rigging in the November election, caused Ms. Haley to reassess her relationship with the former president. Her tone changed markedly between interviews with Politico in December and January. At first, she refused to acknowledge that Mr. Trump was doing anything reckless by refusing to concede. She said that he genuinely believed he had not lost, and she would not acknowledge that his actions since the November election were irresponsible.

And she wrongly predicted that Mr. Trump would “go on his way” once he had exhausted his legal options.

But after Jan. 6, Ms. Haley told the publication that she had previously urged Mr. Trump to be more “careful” with his words, to no avail.

“He went down a path he shouldn’t have,” she said, referring to his deception about the election. “And we shouldn’t have followed him, and we shouldn’t have listened to him. And we can’t let that ever happen again.”

In that moment, Ms. Haley’s remarks showed that she was willing to entertain a political proposition that most other Republicans with eyes on the White House had not dared to utter publicly: that Mr. Trump’s hold over the G.O.P. base will loosen, and that he will not be the kingmaker many have predicted.

However calibrated or qualified, Ms. Haley’s approach is a departure from that of other conservatives who are believed to harbor ambitions for higher office. Senator Josh Hawley of Missouri, who lent credibility to Mr. Trump’s voter fraud claims, has refused to acknowledge that his own actions played any role in inciting violence on Jan. 6. And former Vice President Mike Pence has said nothing publicly since being forced to flee the Senate chamber under armed guard as rioters stormed the Capitol, encouraged in part by Mr. Trump’s attacks against the vice president on Twitter for not interfering with the certification of the election.

Ms. Haley was especially pointed about Mr. Trump’s treatment of Mr. Pence, sounding almost dismissive of the former president as she expressed her dismay. “Mike has been nothing but loyal to that man,” she said.

Some Republicans said that Ms. Haley’s comments were simply acknowledging reality. As a politician who is more comfortable with the establishment wing of the G.O.P., she has not always had the trust of Mr. Trump’s base. And in a crowded 2024 presidential primary, she would face stiff competition for those votes.

“You didn’t have to be clairvoyant to see which way Nikki Haley would go once Donald Trump lost,” said Sam Nunberg, a consultant who worked for Mr. Trump. “She was never going to be able to take the Trump mantle.”

To other Republicans, her words of regret were too little, too late given her earlier deference toward Mr. Trump. Representative Adam Kinzinger of Illinois, who has become one of the most outspoken critics of his party since the Capitol attack, accused Ms. Haley of playing “both sides.” On Twitter, he urged her to “Pick Country First or Trump First.”

This is not Ms. Haley’s first reversal on Mr. Trump. Like many leaders of her party, she initially opposed him when he ran for the Republican nomination in 2016. At the time, she was the governor of South Carolina, and she endorsed Senator Marco Rubio of Florida ahead of her state’s pivotal primary. Mr. Trump still won, finishing ahead of Mr. Rubio by 10 percentage points.

But she redeemed herself in the eyes of many Republican voters by signing on to work in the Trump administration, showing how quickly old slights can be forgiven by the former president and his supporters.

Voters may indeed forgive and forget altogether — which is something that critics of Mr. Trump warned would allow Republicans to go unpunished for encouraging him as he undermined faith in American democracy.

“When I got into politics, I was told you could get away with a lot because voters have short-term memories,” said Denver Riggleman, a former Republican congressman from Virginia who has been highly critical of his party’s silence as Mr. Trump spread disinformation about the election.

“What the Nikki Haleys, Ted Cruzes, Josh Hawleys of the world are relying on,” he added, “is the short-term memory of voters.”

https://www.nytimes.com

 

And about a week or so after she said these things she requested an audience with Trump and he declined to meet her. I suppose one could give her a minute amount credit for giving the look of a Trump critic for longer than the day or so Sen Graham gave. 

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CPAC going on now.  

If you are willing to go full black humor, there will be some really good sound bites this weekend. 

They are currently rolling a mini Trump gold statue around.  :towelwave:

 

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26 minutes ago, massraider said:

CPAC going on now.  

If you are willing to go full black humor, there will be some really good sound bites this weekend. 

They are currently rolling a mini Trump gold statue around.  :towelwave:

Yes, indeed and not coincidentally, #GoldenCalf was trending earlier this morning.

https://twitter.com/search?q=%23GoldenCalf&src=typeahead_click&f=live

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29 minutes ago, massraider said:

They are currently rolling a mini Trump gold statue around.  :towelwave:

I :wub: that statue

 

They should let people tape $$ on it like the Virgin Mary at festivals

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2 minutes ago, HellToupee said:
39 minutes ago, massraider said:

They are currently rolling a mini Trump gold statue around.  :towelwave:

I :wub: that statue

 

They should let people tape $$ on it like the Virgin Mary at festivals

LOL

2 minutes ago, HellToupee said:

Take this religious mumbo jumbo to the religious mumbo jumbo thread.Cripes

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7 minutes ago, HellToupee said:

I :wub: that statue

 

They should let people tape $$ on it like the Virgin Mary at festivals

If Diamond and/or Silk were to faint in it's presence, that would be a power move.

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On 2/19/2021 at 7:40 PM, timschochet said:

It’s up to Trump. If he decides he wants to be the nominee then he likely will be. But will he want to do this again? 

Trump has never been someone to just sit back. If it's not him, he will anoint his chosen one to run in 2024.

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On 2/24/2021 at 10:31 AM, HellToupee said:

DeSantis has been a stellar leader throughout the pandemic . Rock solid leadership 

Speaking as someone who lives in Florida, I can confirm that this is absolutely not the case. He has done pretty much everything wrong, especially pandemic related.

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On 2/24/2021 at 7:31 AM, HellToupee said:

DeSantis has been a stellar leader throughout the pandemic . Rock solid leadership 

:goodposting:

They are starting to refer to Governor DeSantis as America's Governor. 

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4 hours ago, tonydead said:

:goodposting:

They are starting to refer to Governor DeSantis as America's Governor. 

 No, they aren’t. The guy is terrible at his job, and I am voting against him and both senators in 2022.

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5 minutes ago, KingPrawn said:

Hard to take anything he says regarding how politicians handled the virus considering his big brother

I was referring more to DeSantis waxing poetically remarks that came back to bite him in the ###.

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31 minutes ago, Roy L Fewks said:

Both parties would be foolish to nominate any Governor because they'll just get hammered by the other side for their response to COVID.

This actually makes a lot of sense. But it only matters on the Republican side. 

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7 minutes ago, timschochet said:
39 minutes ago, Roy L Fewks said:

Both parties would be foolish to nominate any Governor because they'll just get hammered by the other side for their response to COVID.

This actually makes a lot of sense. But it only matters on the Republican side. 

Any Democrat governor will get hammered for crippling their state's economy. Add in Cuomo's sexual harassment problem and the nursing home deaths and he has no chance whatsoever. Would love to see the Dems nominate him though!

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10 hours ago, Roy L Fewks said:

Any Democrat governor will get hammered for crippling their state's economy. Add in Cuomo's sexual harassment problem and the nursing home deaths and he has no chance whatsoever. Would love to see the Dems nominate him though!

In 2024 the Democrats have a 90% chance of nominating Joe Biden. In the unlikely event he decides to retire, they will nominate Kamala Harris. There are no other choices. 

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10 minutes ago, timschochet said:

In 2024 the Democrats have a 90% chance of nominating Joe Biden. In the unlikely event he decides to retire, they will nominate Kamala Harris. There are no other choices. 

This seems the most likely, but there certainly is room for another candidate should the economy tank, or we get into a prolonged foreign entanglement, or Harris has some huge political misstep, or the Dems get trounced in 2022, etc.

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15 hours ago, Kal El said:

 No, they aren’t. The guy is terrible at his job, and I am voting against him and both senators in 2022.

Odd that both senators plus the governor all come up in the same election.

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If I were a betting person, I'd put some money on Rick Scott, if Trump decides not to run. He's not eloquent, people make fun of the way he looks, but he knows how appeal to the GOP base and moderates. In the Senate run, he strategically reached out multiple times to Peurto Ricans, and his appeal to seniors on taxes with great advertising was a success. He also just said at national TV that Biden is the president. Unequivocally. His message is simple, jobs - let's get to work. Most voters don't care about Medicare fraud that happened over 20 years ago.

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37 minutes ago, The Commish said:

What about Adam Kinzinger?  I've seen two segments of him on TV recently and he appears to be an infinitely better person than most mentioned in this thread so far.

While not mathematically possible,  it still turns out that his chances of winning a GOP primary are somehow less than zero.

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2 hours ago, Leroy Hoard said:

Odd that both senators plus the governor all come up in the same election.

It’s just how the terms lined up this time, at least I think they all did. Doing some research, looks like Scott’s seat isn’t up in ‘22. Oh well, doesn’t change my mind, especially after how he ran Florida into the ground as governor.

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13 hours ago, dawgtrails said:

This seems the most likely, but there certainly is room for another candidate should the economy tank, or we get into a prolonged foreign entanglement, or Harris has some huge political misstep, or the Dems get trounced in 2022, etc.

Mayor Pete. He may be the face of any infrastructure programs that could garner bipartisan support creating the path to beat Harris if Biden isn’t running.

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I don’t get the love for DeSantis or Noem. I get that the base love them but I can’t see them winning back the suburban/moderate/independent voters that lost Trump the election. Trump’s response to the pandemic was a big reason he lost and the two biggest rising stars are maybe the only two that did worse. I get that the base think they did great but they’re not the ones who will decide in 2024. It’s like if Bernie was the candidate and he lost because he was too much of a socialist and AOC becomes the frontrunner. How does it increase their chances?

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It is obvious that as of today Trump is “currently “the GOP favorite 2024 nominee. Even though it’s way too early who do you think currently is the most electable Republican potential candidate that could win a National election? I don’t think it’s Trump or any of his biggest supporting enablers. In 4 years could somewhat like Sen Sasse ever be the guy? He would appeal to more independents and the Never Trump Republicans. Even though the Trump base would be angry,  would they vote for Sasse instead of someone like VP Harris? I have a hard time believing that. 

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