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“Cancel Culture” and “Woke”


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6 minutes ago, jrt103 said:

One allegedly racist member gets an entire American Legion post shut down?

Sounds about right.

"According to the [press] release, an investigation by the American Legion found that the actions taken at the Memorial Day ceremony in Hudson were “pre-meditated and planned.”

The Legion said that organizers “knew exactly when to turn the volume down and when to turn it back up.”

Prior to the event, retired Army Lt. Col. Barnard Kemter had given a copy of his speech to the chair of the Memorial Day Parade committee and president of the Hudson American Legion Auxiliary, and she asked Kemter to remove a specific part of the speech regarding Black people’s historical role in the holiday, the Legion said."

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Interesting thoughts about what it is to be canceled and who is crying wolf, as well as the origins of "cancel culture" and how it has morphed into current understanding. Read further if you dig the quote below.

https://www.politico.com/news/magazine/2021/06/05/cancel-culture-politics-analysis-491928

"The concept is so amorphous that it’s tempting to dismiss it altogether. Yet even while many of “cancel culture’s” supposed victims can appear to be simple opportunists, or bearers of sour grapes — if you’re doping your horse, it’s maybe a little bit of a stretch to blame nefarious outside forces for your punishment — individual “cancellations” can, in fact, be strung together and understood as something like a “culture.”

But even as it’s evolved into a political tool and feature of modern life, it’s not a strictly ideological phenomenon, as it’s often misrepresented. “Cancel culture” is neither a liberal conspiracy to enforce progressive norms, nor a right-wing straw man built to power the conservative outrage machine, but an ideologically neutral mechanism."

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Twitter Public Policy

@Policy

We are deeply concerned by the blocking of Twitter in Nigeria. Access to the free and #OpenInternet is an essential human right in modern society. We will work to restore access for all those in Nigeria who rely on Twitter to communicate and connect with the world. #KeepitOn

 

Wait, Twitter is deeply concerned about having a free and open Internet?  The same twitter that blocked Trump for political reasons?  :lmao::lmao::lmao::lmao::lmao::lmao::lmao::lmao::lmao::lmao::lmao::lmao::lmao::lmao:

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2 hours ago, Ramblin Wreck said:

Twitter Public Policy

@Policy

We are deeply concerned by the blocking of Twitter in Nigeria. Access to the free and #OpenInternet is an essential human right in modern society. We will work to restore access for all those in Nigeria who rely on Twitter to communicate and connect with the world. #KeepitOn

 

Wait, Twitter is deeply concerned about having a free and open Internet?  The same twitter that blocked Trump for political reasons?  :lmao::lmao::lmao::lmao::lmao::lmao::lmao::lmao::lmao::lmao::lmao::lmao::lmao::lmao:

They didn’t block Trump for political reasons. They blocked him because they determined his tweets were a threat to public safety. 

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Just now, timschochet said:

They didn’t block Trump for political reasons. They blocked him because they determined his tweets were a threat to public safety. 

Yeah, Nigeria felt the same way about Twitter.  I agree with Nigeria here.  In reality, ALL social media should be dismantled immediately (along with the MSM/DNC propoganda machine).

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5 minutes ago, BladeRunner said:

Yeah, Nigeria felt the same way about Twitter.  I agree with Nigeria here.  In reality, ALL social media should be dismantled immediately (along with the MSM/DNC propoganda machine).

You’re in favor of our government dismantling social media? 
If you are, please explain how this point of view is consistent with conservatism ( since you claim to be a conservative.) 

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Just now, timschochet said:

You’re in favor of our government dismantling social media? 
If you are, please explain how this point of view is consistent with conservatism ( since you claim to be a conservative.) 

Social media is a cancer and a threat to all American citizens.  :shrug:

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1 minute ago, BladeRunner said:

Social media is a cancer and a threat to all American citizens.  :shrug:

So you would like to see the government step in and ban it? Because you know what’s good for for American citizens better than they do? 
 

Not only is your position incompatible with conservatism, it’s actually pretty representative of Communist regimes. 

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39 minutes ago, timschochet said:

They didn’t block Trump for political reasons. They blocked him because they determined his tweets were a threat to public safety. 

 

Direct Headline: Social media platforms remove Trump video urging supporters to leave U.S. Capitol

Trump tells protesters to go home

By Patrick Phillips Updated January 6 at 7:21 PM

https://www.live5news.com/2021/01/06/trump-you-have-go-home-now-we-have-have-peace/

 

*******

I have no problem saying Trump made a gigantic senseless mess of the situation regarding the Capitol Protests and Capitol Riots.

However there are two sides to this coin. Twitter and Jack Dorsey apparently wanted public safety so much, that they immediately deleted a video of Trump asking those at the Capitol to cease all violence and go home.

Of course the left leaning MSM just pretends it didn't happen at all.

Trump carries a lot of blame for the Capitol Riots, but if you want to paint Twitter and Jack Dorsey as these flowing angels from the sky full of virtue and love and humanity and goodness and fairness, well I suppose you can only do what's clearly predictable at this point.

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55 minutes ago, timschochet said:

They didn’t block Trump for political reasons. They blocked him because they determined his tweets were a threat to public safety. 

Exactly:

https://blog.twitter.com/en_us/topics/company/2020/suspension.html

After close review of recent Tweets from the @realDonaldTrump account and the context around them — specifically how they are being received and interpreted on and off Twitter — we have permanently suspended the account due to the risk of further incitement of violence. 

[...]

We assessed the two Tweets referenced above under our Glorification of Violence policy, which aims to prevent the glorification of violence that could inspire others to replicate violent acts and determined that they were highly likely to encourage and inspire people to replicate the criminal acts that took place at the U.S. Capitol on January 6, 2021.

[...]

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1 hour ago, timschochet said:

They didn’t block Trump for political reasons. They blocked him because they determined his tweets were a threat to public safety. 

Yeah sure you can go with that one.  Either way, twitter's stance is all of a sudden a little hypocritical and quite hilarious

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1 hour ago, BladeRunner said:

Social media is a cancer and a threat to all American citizens.  :shrug:

I’m surprised.   You seem like a fan of small government.   This seems like a gigantic encroachment on free speech.   Are you pro-gun control?

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Interesting article from Joel Kotkin.

A Middle Class Rebellion Against Progressives Is Gaining Steam

A specter is haunting America, a great revolt that threatens to dwarf the noxious rebellion led by Trump. The echoes of a another potentially larger pushback can already be heard in progressive America. But it's not towards socialism, as many suggest. It's the opposite: a new middle-class rebellion against the excesses of the Left.

This new middle-class rebellion isn't rejecting everything that progressives stand for; the Left's critique of neo-liberal excess is resonating, as is the need for improved access to health care. But the current focus on "systemic racism," coupled with a newfound and heavily enforced cultural conformism and the obsessive focus on a never-ending litany of impending "climate emergences" are less likely to pass muster with most of the middle class, no matter how popular they are with the media, academics, and others in the progressive corner.

And this new middle-class rebellion is being bolstered by a wide-ranging intellectual rebellion by traditional liberals against the Left's dogmatism and intolerance. Indeed, what we're about to see has the potential to reprise the great shift among old liberals that had them embracing Reagan in reaction to the Left's excesses of that generation.

In a way, this should not be surprising. After all, the progressive base is limited: According to a survey conducted by the non-partisan group More in Common, progressives constitute barely eight percent of the electorate. The report also found that fully 80 percent of all Americans believe that "political correctness is a problem," including large majorities of millennials and racial minorities.

Party line journalists may see President Biden as the new champion of the middle class, but every time he adopts central tenets of the new Left, he undermines his pitch. And this happens not infrequently: The Biden Administration has adopted elements of the "anti-racist" agenda, for example, by explicitly favoring Black farmers for subsidies, rather than focusing on all farmers in need. Race issues may be popular on college campuses and in the human relations departments of giant corporations like Lockheed and Amazon, but a recent Yale study found that language based on inclusivity around class was far more popular than one focused largely on race, even with progressive voters.

This is not the message coming out of the Biden administration, which has put a premium on diversity hiring and "equity," despite the fact that racial quotas, in hiring or in college admissions, are unpopular with three out of four Americans, including African-Americans and Hispanics; 65% of Hispanics, 62% of black Americans and 58% of Asians oppose affirmative action in college admissions.

Biden is similarly losing the middle class on immigration. Already many Latinos, particularly in Texas and Arizona, fear the loss of border control that accompanied the shift from Trump to Biden administrations. The crisis at the border has the potential to overwhelm the economies, health and welfare systems in heavily Hispanic border communities, which is sparking alarm among border state Democrats.

None of this is to suggest that minorities will vote for Republicans en masse in the near future, particularly if the party cannot transcend its embarrassing Trump worship. But the growing chasm between what people want and what Biden is offering could prove a potentially immense challenge that could undermine future Democratic gains.

Major pushback on how the progressive Left sees American history is also brewing. Americans by and large remain patriotic, including the poor and working class. This patriotism stands in stark contrast to the prevailing view among progressives, which casts America as the intrinsically and irredeemably evil spawn of slaveholders and racists. This simply does not constitute a popular program to the middle and lower classes, a gap that could become more and more meaningful—especially as the message of the Left spreads.

Take, for example, Hollywood, which used to promote the virtues of the Republic and the heroic struggles of diverse Americans. Now, dominated by people scared to contravene woke progressives, the big media companies have been pushing far Left plotlines and characters—and they have lost markets as a result. The devolution of the once glamorous Academy Awards into a minor, sparsely watched proto-spectacle reflects how much Hollywood's hold is fading.

Of course, it's not just Hollywood. Much more consequential—and potentially more disastrous for the Left—has been the attempted takeover of public education, and, with the support of the Biden Administration, attempts to inject critical race theory into secondary school curricula. This has created a mounting pushback in school districts across the nation, many of them voting to ban critical race theory altogether.

The progressive case also increasingly suffers from its own manifest failures in urban bastions like New York, San Francisco, Los Angeles, and Chicago, which have been losing residents and attracting far fewer immigrants while suffering among the poorest job recoveries since the onset of the pandemic. Meanwhile, there's a clear acceleration of growth in less dense, lower cost "boomtowns" like Nashville, Dallas-Ft. Worth, Austin, Nashville, Columbus and Des Moines.

Democrats who wish to remain in power will need to address critical challenges like a steady rise in urban crime and massive homelessness; citing systemic racism won't clean the streets of New York, San Francisco and central Los Angeles from drug addicts, the mentally ill and the destitute. A failure to solve these problems will impact investment; Walgreens, reeling from thefts and disorder at its San Francisco stores, just announced its intention close 17 shops in the next five years.

But already these failures are beginning to incite opposition. Last month, Austin, the true blue bastion in Texas, overwhelmingly rejected a Council edict to allow camping on city streets. Austinites may want San Francisco's tech jobs, but they absolutely do not want its social rot. Equally revealing is the focus on crime in the New York City mayoral election, as well as recent surveys that found that violent crime has once again become the biggest issue facing the nation. At such a time, the progressive cry to "Defund the police" comes across as unpopular; the proposal is supported barely 18 percent of adults—just one in three Democrats and less than one in three African Americans.

But it's climate policy that may prove the most damaging aspect of the Biden agenda, and the one most likely to inspire a significant backlash. Policies pushing massive electrification are likely to accelerate the current surge in energy prices, and these will hit the household bottom line long after the stimulus checks have stopped coming. And this despite the fact that relatively few Americans—barely three percent, Gallup found— view climate as their primary concern and, according to one recent survey, barely one in ten registered voters would spend $100 a month on climate mitigation.

California provides a precursor for the emerging climate regime. Our state's fixation on renewable energy, along with the closure of natural gas and nuclear plants, has helped drive the cost of electricity and gas to the highest in the continental U.S. It has also systematically undermined key blue collar industries like energy, construction and manufacturing, which have stagnated or shrunk, while regulations designed for climate reasons have helped boost home prices to the nation's highest.

Attempts to squelch fracking could also cause even more havoc in places like the Rockies, Ohio, Pennsylvania, Oklahoma. In Texas alone, as many as a million good-paying jobs would be lost. Overall, a full national ban would cost 14 million jobs, according to a Chamber of Commerce report, which is far more than the 8 million lost in the Great Recession and has the potential to turn even vital smaller towns into instant slums.

You should not expect the middle class to take that quiescently. Indeed, they should not take it quiescently.

More pragmatic Biden advisors will hopefully try to shift course and focus on basic lunch pail concerns like health care, industry and improving worker skills. But they should expect a fight from on the relentlessness, well-financed Left fringe whose maximalist demands are likely to grow.

Without a Trump to unite them, the Democrats, led by a radical fringe unrepresentative even of their own party, may find themselves increasingly isolated. Only then, when reality asserts itself, can sensible alternatives, social democratic or conservative, again gain currency.

Joel Kotkin is the Presidential Fellow in Urban Futures at Chapman University and executive director of the Urban Reform Institute. His new book, The Coming of Neo-Feudalism, is now out from Encounter. You can follow him on Twitter: @joelkotkin.

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11 hours ago, ekbeats said:

Interesting article from Joel Kotkin.

A Middle Class Rebellion Against Progressives Is Gaining Steam

A specter is haunting America, a great revolt that threatens to dwarf the noxious rebellion led by Trump. The echoes of a another potentially larger pushback can already be heard in progressive America. But it's not towards socialism, as many suggest. It's the opposite: a new middle-class rebellion against the excesses of the Left.

This new middle-class rebellion isn't rejecting everything that progressives stand for; the Left's critique of neo-liberal excess is resonating, as is the need for improved access to health care. But the current focus on "systemic racism," coupled with a newfound and heavily enforced cultural conformism and the obsessive focus on a never-ending litany of impending "climate emergences" are less likely to pass muster with most of the middle class, no matter how popular they are with the media, academics, and others in the progressive corner.

And this new middle-class rebellion is being bolstered by a wide-ranging intellectual rebellion by traditional liberals against the Left's dogmatism and intolerance. Indeed, what we're about to see has the potential to reprise the great shift among old liberals that had them embracing Reagan in reaction to the Left's excesses of that generation.

In a way, this should not be surprising. After all, the progressive base is limited: According to a survey conducted by the non-partisan group More in Common, progressives constitute barely eight percent of the electorate. The report also found that fully 80 percent of all Americans believe that "political correctness is a problem," including large majorities of millennials and racial minorities.

Party line journalists may see President Biden as the new champion of the middle class, but every time he adopts central tenets of the new Left, he undermines his pitch. And this happens not infrequently: The Biden Administration has adopted elements of the "anti-racist" agenda, for example, by explicitly favoring Black farmers for subsidies, rather than focusing on all farmers in need. Race issues may be popular on college campuses and in the human relations departments of giant corporations like Lockheed and Amazon, but a recent Yale study found that language based on inclusivity around class was far more popular than one focused largely on race, even with progressive voters.

This is not the message coming out of the Biden administration, which has put a premium on diversity hiring and "equity," despite the fact that racial quotas, in hiring or in college admissions, are unpopular with three out of four Americans, including African-Americans and Hispanics; 65% of Hispanics, 62% of black Americans and 58% of Asians oppose affirmative action in college admissions.

Biden is similarly losing the middle class on immigration. Already many Latinos, particularly in Texas and Arizona, fear the loss of border control that accompanied the shift from Trump to Biden administrations. The crisis at the border has the potential to overwhelm the economies, health and welfare systems in heavily Hispanic border communities, which is sparking alarm among border state Democrats.

None of this is to suggest that minorities will vote for Republicans en masse in the near future, particularly if the party cannot transcend its embarrassing Trump worship. But the growing chasm between what people want and what Biden is offering could prove a potentially immense challenge that could undermine future Democratic gains.

Major pushback on how the progressive Left sees American history is also brewing. Americans by and large remain patriotic, including the poor and working class. This patriotism stands in stark contrast to the prevailing view among progressives, which casts America as the intrinsically and irredeemably evil spawn of slaveholders and racists. This simply does not constitute a popular program to the middle and lower classes, a gap that could become more and more meaningful—especially as the message of the Left spreads.

Take, for example, Hollywood, which used to promote the virtues of the Republic and the heroic struggles of diverse Americans. Now, dominated by people scared to contravene woke progressives, the big media companies have been pushing far Left plotlines and characters—and they have lost markets as a result. The devolution of the once glamorous Academy Awards into a minor, sparsely watched proto-spectacle reflects how much Hollywood's hold is fading.

Of course, it's not just Hollywood. Much more consequential—and potentially more disastrous for the Left—has been the attempted takeover of public education, and, with the support of the Biden Administration, attempts to inject critical race theory into secondary school curricula. This has created a mounting pushback in school districts across the nation, many of them voting to ban critical race theory altogether.

The progressive case also increasingly suffers from its own manifest failures in urban bastions like New York, San Francisco, Los Angeles, and Chicago, which have been losing residents and attracting far fewer immigrants while suffering among the poorest job recoveries since the onset of the pandemic. Meanwhile, there's a clear acceleration of growth in less dense, lower cost "boomtowns" like Nashville, Dallas-Ft. Worth, Austin, Nashville, Columbus and Des Moines.

Democrats who wish to remain in power will need to address critical challenges like a steady rise in urban crime and massive homelessness; citing systemic racism won't clean the streets of New York, San Francisco and central Los Angeles from drug addicts, the mentally ill and the destitute. A failure to solve these problems will impact investment; Walgreens, reeling from thefts and disorder at its San Francisco stores, just announced its intention close 17 shops in the next five years.

But already these failures are beginning to incite opposition. Last month, Austin, the true blue bastion in Texas, overwhelmingly rejected a Council edict to allow camping on city streets. Austinites may want San Francisco's tech jobs, but they absolutely do not want its social rot. Equally revealing is the focus on crime in the New York City mayoral election, as well as recent surveys that found that violent crime has once again become the biggest issue facing the nation. At such a time, the progressive cry to "Defund the police" comes across as unpopular; the proposal is supported barely 18 percent of adults—just one in three Democrats and less than one in three African Americans.

But it's climate policy that may prove the most damaging aspect of the Biden agenda, and the one most likely to inspire a significant backlash. Policies pushing massive electrification are likely to accelerate the current surge in energy prices, and these will hit the household bottom line long after the stimulus checks have stopped coming. And this despite the fact that relatively few Americans—barely three percent, Gallup found— view climate as their primary concern and, according to one recent survey, barely one in ten registered voters would spend $100 a month on climate mitigation.

California provides a precursor for the emerging climate regime. Our state's fixation on renewable energy, along with the closure of natural gas and nuclear plants, has helped drive the cost of electricity and gas to the highest in the continental U.S. It has also systematically undermined key blue collar industries like energy, construction and manufacturing, which have stagnated or shrunk, while regulations designed for climate reasons have helped boost home prices to the nation's highest.

Attempts to squelch fracking could also cause even more havoc in places like the Rockies, Ohio, Pennsylvania, Oklahoma. In Texas alone, as many as a million good-paying jobs would be lost. Overall, a full national ban would cost 14 million jobs, according to a Chamber of Commerce report, which is far more than the 8 million lost in the Great Recession and has the potential to turn even vital smaller towns into instant slums.

You should not expect the middle class to take that quiescently. Indeed, they should not take it quiescently.

More pragmatic Biden advisors will hopefully try to shift course and focus on basic lunch pail concerns like health care, industry and improving worker skills. But they should expect a fight from on the relentlessness, well-financed Left fringe whose maximalist demands are likely to grow.

Without a Trump to unite them, the Democrats, led by a radical fringe unrepresentative even of their own party, may find themselves increasingly isolated. Only then, when reality asserts itself, can sensible alternatives, social democratic or conservative, again gain currency.

Joel Kotkin is the Presidential Fellow in Urban Futures at Chapman University and executive director of the Urban Reform Institute. His new book, The Coming of Neo-Feudalism, is now out from Encounter. You can follow him on Twitter: @joelkotkin.

Thanks for sharing.   Much of it resonates.  Some of it seems like BS (the stuff about the Oscars, for example), but I have little doubt that much of the article is consistent with what my middle of the road family members (swing voters who have voted Reagan, Clinton, W, Trump) are feeling and thinking these days.

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Posted (edited)
34 minutes ago, Alex P Keaton said:

Thanks for sharing.   Much of it resonates.  Some of it seems like BS (the stuff about the Oscars, for example), but I have little doubt that much of the article is consistent with what my middle of the road family members (swing voters who have voted Reagan, Clinton, W, Trump) are feeling and thinking these days.

Honestly, I think many are just sick and tired of the identity politics and the idea that "you are against us" if you are not in lock step with everything they want no matter how extreme it might be. 

I will use LGBT as an example.  Like many, I am all for equal rights and feel that members of LGBT should be treated a lot more fairly than they are, but I feel they have gone way too far with certain things (the whole pronouns thing is ridiculous), and thus I would be labeled as anti-LGBT simply because I do not agree with every single demand they have.  The minority who act this way usually have the biggest mouths and try to shout down and castigate and vilify anyone and everyone who is not of 100% like mind (it happens on Twitter every day), and people are sick of it. 

And this is not exclusive to the left/liberals.  The right/conservatives do it as well.  One guy at work who foolishly still thinks that Trump won last November actually believes I am a hardcore liberal because I do not agree with him. 

Far too many people are off the rails nowadays.  90% of the people that post here in this subforum fall into this category, but of course they do not realize it, as they are too wrapped up in their own ideology and trying to "win" and not giving a damn about those who are not of a similar line of thinking as theirs.  It is sad. 

Edit: Case in point...there is bound to be someone who feels offended if I got the LGBT acronym incorrect (not sure if that is the updated one or not), and odds are that person will feel the need to point it out because, ya know, that kind of nonsense is way more important than actual ideas and discussion. 

Edited by Ghost Rider
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So Rebekah Jones -- the crazy Florida covid-19 conspiracy lady -- has been banned from Twitter.  I don't support Twitter banning people, but it's a clear-cut case of "their site, their rules."  No problem.  

As you probably remember, Ron DeSantis is really, really opposed to big tech companies censoring people.  So much so that Florida recently passed a law banning "de-platforming" on social media.  As expected, he took the high road and remained true to his free-speech principles by defen . . .  no of course he didn't because nobody except for like six libertarians actually supports free speech any more.

 

 

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Just now, IvanKaramazov said:

So Rebekah Jones -- the crazy Florida covid-19 conspiracy lady -- has been banned from Twitter.  I don't support Twitter banning people, but it's a clear-cut case of "their site, their rules."  No problem.  

As you probably remember, Ron DeSantis is really, really opposed to big tech companies censoring people.  So much so that Florida recently passed a law banning "de-platforming" on social media.  As expected, he took the high road and remained true to his free-speech principles by defen . . .  no of course he didn't because nobody except for like six libertarians actually supports free speech any more.

 

 

It's so odd that they can't see even their own stupidity reflected when speaking (or typing as it were)

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30 minutes ago, IvanKaramazov said:

So Rebekah Jones -- the crazy Florida covid-19 conspiracy lady -- has been banned from Twitter.  I don't support Twitter banning people, but it's a clear-cut case of "their site, their rules."  No problem.  

As you probably remember, Ron DeSantis is really, really opposed to big tech companies censoring people.  So much so that Florida recently passed a law banning "de-platforming" on social media.  As expected, he took the high road and remained true to his free-speech principles by defen . . .  no of course he didn't because nobody except for like six libertarians actually supports free speech any more.

 

 

Ugh...it started out so well with DeSantis, too.  :doh:

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50 minutes ago, IvanKaramazov said:

So Rebekah Jones -- the crazy Florida covid-19 conspiracy lady -- has been banned from Twitter.  I don't support Twitter banning people, but it's a clear-cut case of "their site, their rules."  No problem.  

As you probably remember, Ron DeSantis is really, really opposed to big tech companies censoring people.  So much so that Florida recently passed a law banning "de-platforming" on social media.  As expected, he took the high road and remained true to his free-speech principles by defen . . .  no of course he didn't because nobody except for like six libertarians actually supports free speech any more.

 

 

Yep. Had high hopes for him but can't follow through on a basic one. Just another politician.

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Author tries to cancel Apple Pie

“The apple pie is as American as stolen land, wealth and labor. We live its consequences today,” concluded the author, a research professor in the Lyndon B. Johnson School of Public Affairs at the University of Texas."

you can read the rest of the article, but this stuff is just silly.   i don't even pretend to understand how folks end up thinking like this.

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10 hours ago, kodycutter said:

Author tries to cancel Apple Pie

“The apple pie is as American as stolen land, wealth and labor. We live its consequences today,” concluded the author, a research professor in the Lyndon B. Johnson School of Public Affairs at the University of Texas."

you can read the rest of the article, but this stuff is just silly.   i don't even pretend to understand how folks end up thinking like this.

So absurd.  Just makes me want to vote Republican.

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10 hours ago, kodycutter said:

Author tries to cancel Apple Pie

“The apple pie is as American as stolen land, wealth and labor. We live its consequences today,” concluded the author, a research professor in the Lyndon B. Johnson School of Public Affairs at the University of Texas."

you can read the rest of the article, but this stuff is just silly.   i don't even pretend to understand how folks end up thinking like this.

Assuming that this isn't satire, all I can say is that the same exact logic applies to this guy. Basically, we all exist in a world where some classes of people exploited other classes of people. Every single thing or idea can be traced in some way to something bad, somewhere, sometime.

But so what? IMO, it's something that should be neither celebrated nor condemned. It's just a fact of life.

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2 hours ago, IvanKaramazov said:

Hey now, I know everyone's nerves are on edge, but lets not say things we can't take back.

:lmao:  There are lots of things I WANT to do but won’t.   But really, stuff like this is why we have swing voters.   It’s painful that someone with bizarre views like that gets a platform.

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56 minutes ago, Alex P Keaton said:

:lmao:  There are lots of things I WANT to do but won’t.   But really, stuff like this is why we have swing voters.   It’s painful that someone with bizarre views like that gets a platform.

I refuse to give that link a click out of principle, but if my assumptions are right then this sorta thing is only a problem if it comes into power. Y'know, like what's happened on the minion side of the ledger.

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Filing this under woke…

China has nothing on us…86% Gifted

 Beverly Catlin, the division’s gifted coordinator, said 86% of students were identified as gifted this spring, following changes aimed at opening up the label to more students — a label that’s essentially meaningless in that it doesn’t provide anything different for students formally identified as such. 

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4 minutes ago, djmich said:

Filing this under woke…

China has nothing on us…86% Gifted

 Beverly Catlin, the division’s gifted coordinator, said 86% of students were identified as gifted this spring, following changes aimed at opening up the label to more students — a label that’s essentially meaningless in that it doesn’t provide anything different for students formally identified as such. 

That's crazy. In NC ~20% of students score in the "below basic" level of proficiency. 

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On 6/9/2021 at 10:30 AM, kodycutter said:

Author tries to cancel Apple Pie

“The apple pie is as American as stolen land, wealth and labor. We live its consequences today,” concluded the author, a research professor in the Lyndon B. Johnson School of Public Affairs at the University of Texas."

you can read the rest of the article, but this stuff is just silly.   i don't even pretend to understand how folks end up thinking like this.

You totally should too because it has nothing to do with "cancelling" apple pie.  

 

So much fake outrage from articles about articles where people don't even bother to read it.  

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2 hours ago, djmich said:

Filing this under woke…

China has nothing on us…86% Gifted

 Beverly Catlin, the division’s gifted coordinator, said 86% of students were identified as gifted this spring, following changes aimed at opening up the label to more students — a label that’s essentially meaningless in that it doesn’t provide anything different for students formally identified as such. 

I went to a Catholic elementary school which had an advanced math class.  Due to parental pressure, the number of kids in advanced math quickly exceeded the number of kids in the regular class.  I'm sure the pressure from parents to have their kids labeled "gifted" has only intensified further.  As the article said, since the majority of kids are now labelled as gifted, they don't even bother teaching them separately.  Just a feel good label.

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On 6/10/2021 at 7:25 AM, Alex P Keaton said:

:lmao:  There are lots of things I WANT to do but won’t.   But really, stuff like this is why we have swing voters.   It’s painful that someone with bizarre views like that gets a platform.

Raj Patel is a British journalist writing an article in a UK newspaper. Why his opinion should matter to anyone here in the US I do not know. 

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2 hours ago, cockroach said:

You totally should too because it has nothing to do with "cancelling" apple pie.  

 

So much fake outrage from articles about articles where people don't even bother to read it.  

zing!   the sentence you bolded was because i didn't want to drop a wall of text.    i'm not outraged just find this all silly.

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https://reason.com/2021/06/15/daniel-elder-cancel-culture-choral-composer-antifa-blm-gia/

More grist for the mill. This one is a doozy. Real guy, real innocuous statement about the Antifa/BLM riots/arson (a grouping that's right in the link, for all the fools who want to keep arguing only those of us in the PSF have made the correct connection), real cancellation.

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24 minutes ago, rockaction said:

https://reason.com/2021/06/15/daniel-elder-cancel-culture-choral-composer-antifa-blm-gia/

More grist for the mill. This one is a doozy. Real guy, real innocuous statement about the Antifa/BLM riots/arson (a grouping that's right in the link, for all the fools who want to keep arguing only those of us in the PSF have made the correct connection), real cancellation.

The argument against the Antifa/BLM grouping was never that you guys are the only ones that do it; the argument is that it’s a terribly inaccurate grouping. 

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29 minutes ago, rockaction said:

https://reason.com/2021/06/15/daniel-elder-cancel-culture-choral-composer-antifa-blm-gia/

More grist for the mill. This one is a doozy. Real guy, real innocuous statement about the Antifa/BLM riots/arson (a grouping that's right in the link, for all the fools who want to keep arguing only those of us in the PSF have made the correct connection), real cancellation.

Guy says arson is bad and gets cancelled.   smh, like seriously, this is what people support?

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46 minutes ago, kodycutter said:

zing!   the sentence you bolded was because i didn't want to drop a wall of text.    i'm not outraged just find this all silly.

No it isn't.  It's because that was the "juicy" part the article about the article quoted.  It's the headline even. 

You say read the rest like there's more of the same.  I did and there isn't.  In fact the headline that it's a call to "cancel" apple pie is fake-newsy and sensationalist.  

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1 minute ago, cockroach said:

No it isn't.  It's because that was the "juicy" part the article about the article quoted.  It's the headline even. 

You say read the rest like there's more of the same.  I did and there isn't.  In fact the headline that it's a call to "cancel" apple pie is fake-newsy and sensationalist.  

Yes it was!   see how silly this is.  No it isn't, yes it was.

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1 hour ago, rockaction said:

https://reason.com/2021/06/15/daniel-elder-cancel-culture-choral-composer-antifa-blm-gia/

More grist for the mill. This one is a doozy. Real guy, real innocuous statement about the Antifa/BLM riots/arson (a grouping that's right in the link, for all the fools who want to keep arguing only those of us in the PSF have made the correct connection), real cancellation.

This "real guy" never mentioned Antifa, nor did Reason mention them in the article (although for some bizarre reason it is in the link).

Edited by squistion
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2 minutes ago, kodycutter said:

Yes it was!   see how silly this is.  No it isn't, yes it was.

What's silly is anyone posting an article about another article saying it says something that it doesn't.  

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37 minutes ago, timschochet said:

The argument against the Antifa/BLM grouping was never that you guys are the only ones that do it; the argument is that it’s a terribly inaccurate grouping

It is an association that does not exist in reality, and someone including the grouping in a link to an article where Antifa is never mentioned once, is not terribly persuasive 

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Just now, IvanKaramazov said:

"I don't like the url in the link to the article" is certainly a new one.

Someone at Reason, who posted the URL, decided on their own, not to use the actual article title in the link but instead added a Antifa/BLM connection. It is misleading when Antifa was not mentioned once in the entire article. 

 

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21 minutes ago, squistion said:

Someone at Reason, who posted the URL, decided on their own, not to use the actual article title in the link but instead added a Antifa/BLM connection. It is misleading when Antifa was not mentioned once in the entire article. 

 

Yes, that's definitely the main takeaway here and not nitpicky at all.  

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3 minutes ago, IvanKaramazov said:

We know that writers don't write their own headlines.  What probability would you assign to Robby Soave having personally written that url?

Come on, you know it's clickbait and it's the kind of thing that Reason usually avoids because it's beneath their core philosophy. If any other poster besides squistion had pointed this out, you wouldn't have gone out of your way to make 4 posts about it.

 

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