Jump to content
Fantasy Football - Footballguys Forums

Derek Chauvin trial. Death of George Floyd. Guilty on all counts.


Recommended Posts

14 minutes ago, Doug B said:

Ben Shapiro can’t credibly broach this. Everyone has bias, but his is too heavy.  Marris loses credibility by even sitting down and talking with Shapiro about this.

It is easy to dismiss people and pointless.  It is more meaning to discuss the merits of the actual points raised.  Sure Shapiro is biased, but he is also intelligent. 

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites
  • Replies 938
  • Created
  • Last Reply

Top Posters In This Topic

Top Posters In This Topic

Popular Posts

As someone who hoped he would be convicted I don't understand why people celebrate convictions or the lack thereof.  I'm glad justice was served, but there is nothing here to celebrate.  It's sad.  No

"We'll have to read the bill to see what's in it. You're gonna like it," and "That's crazy. That's crazy" about the health care mandate indicate that she's actually probably the most partisan; least i

Some thoughts: Police reform is going to be long and hard and fought at every step of the way, especially by the police unions and their political sympathizers, but civilians need control back fr

15 hours ago, GordonGekko said:

 

Direct Headline: INSIGHT: Defense Counsel’s Role in Democracy—Representing Those Accused of Heinous Crimes

Defense attorneys perform a vital job of protecting the rights of the accused, regardless of how heinous the allegations might be. Jeffrey S. Leon, president of the American College of Trial Lawyers, says this role is critically important to a free and democratic society and in upholding the rule of law.

Jeffrey S. Leon July 2, 2019, 1:01 AM

https://news.bloomberglaw.com/business-and-practice/insight-defense-counsels-role-in-democracy-representing-those-accused-of-heinous-crimes

 

******

How would you feel if your daughters were accused of a very public and controversial crime and our society and laws had shifted to the point where there was no safe way for them to have a criminal legal defense at all?

And before you get indignant, you splatter details of your personal life all over these forums all the time. Don't talk about things in public you aren't willing to have be public discussion in general.

I actually don't mind brutal punishments, but I do mind the absolute terror that comes with a society that offers zero legal defense for anyone period. Especially if they are also accused of "wrong think" against the majority.

Take a Soma pill and get some rope and find a tall tree. Is this your answer?

I actually am OK with ropes and tall trees provided there's actually a functional trial first. Treat the guilty as guilty, but when they are actually found guilty, and NOT before then.

Your political views don't trouble me Tim. What bothers me is you are willing to treat others in a manner you would not wish to be treated yourself. It actually makes you the most dangerous kind of person possible to be around because there is nothing more savage than a man without a code.

Another issue is you don't actually understand the law. If it makes you feel better, after spending years reviewing over the mostly menagerie of woe that is the unlimited gaggle of "Proud to wave my law degree around like I'm Little Carmine Lupertazzi" club here at FBG, you aren't alone.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vJggSqCftgA

A pint of blood does cost more than a gallon of gold....

 

 

Oof. 

Link to post
Share on other sites
5 hours ago, jon_mx said:

It is easy to dismiss people and pointless.  It is more meaning to discuss the merits of the actual points raised.  Sure Shapiro is biased, but he is also intelligent. 

He also has a law degree, Harvard I think?  So he knows more about the law than most of the MSM social justice activists.

On his podcast yesterday he reported that the prosecution had a good day Thursday and in his opinion went a long way towards undoing the reasonable doubt the defense had effectively raised in prior days.  Yes he is conservative and biased, but if you listen to him, his bias is more about the MSM misrepresenting the trial and making it seem like the prosecution is a slam dunk (when the defense has eviscerated several prosecution witnesses and points), setting the country up for a bunch of riots which both help their ratings and push their woke narratives.

But, Shapiro pushes unwoke messages and the MSM tells people he is evil and mean, so many people just draw that conclusion.

  • Like 1
  • Love 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Defense has a expert witness up now that is stating that Floyd did NOT die of asphyxia. 
If this expert is credible, the prosecution cannot make their case, IMO.

Link to post
Share on other sites
11 minutes ago, Gawain said:

Defense has a expert witness up now that is stating that Floyd did NOT die of asphyxia. 
If this expert is credible, the prosecution cannot make their case, IMO.

I don't think the prosecution needs to worry unless the defense puts up 9 police officers to say Chauvin acted appropriately. And they need to be more reliable than the Police Chief, Chauvin's direct supervisor, and a field training officer.

Link to post
Share on other sites
13 minutes ago, Gawain said:

Defense has a expert witness up now that is stating that Floyd did NOT die of asphyxia. 
If this expert is credible, the prosecution cannot make their case, IMO.

Part of his argument is that carbon monoxide poisoning was a contributing factor.

 

Only problem with that, even if true, is that Chauvin was kneeling on him and holding him in place right at the exhaust pipe of the police car. 

Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, the moops said:

Part of his argument is that carbon monoxide poisoning was a contributing factor.

 

Only problem with that, even if true, is that Chauvin was kneeling on him and holding him in place right at the exhaust pipe of the police car. 

Do we even know if the vehicle was on?  Did the doctor know?

Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, the moops said:

Only problem with that, even if true, is that Chauvin was kneeling on him and holding him in place right at the exhaust pipe of the police car. 

Was there CO in his blood?

Link to post
Share on other sites
4 minutes ago, Dinsy Ejotuz said:

Was there CO in his blood?

Never tested, so we don't know.
Unsure if that's better for the D or the P.

EDIT: The defense is putting forth the theory that the prosecution didn't test for any other contributory factors, therefore the jury has to take into account what could have been. The prosecution is stating that the jury should trust their eyes, which is what is shown on the video.

Edited by Gawain
Link to post
Share on other sites
6 minutes ago, BladeRunner said:

If it was a cop car then they always leave them on.

This sounds like an assumption...easy to figure out the actual answer to the question. :shrug:

I was just wondering. If it was on, at best, its a contributing factor introduced by the cop. That cant be good for him. 

Edited by The Commish
Link to post
Share on other sites
1 minute ago, The Commish said:

This sounds like an assumption...easy to figure out the actual answer to the question. :shrug:

I was just wondering. If it was on, at best, its a contributing factor introduced by the cop. That cant be good for him. 

Well, the jurors have to be paying attention:
 

Quote

I also love these two descriptions from the pool report: “Juror 13, per usual, seems to have fallen asleep a few times.” And: “When break is called approx. 10:50 they seem relieved.”

 

Link to post
Share on other sites
1 minute ago, Gawain said:

Well, the jurors have to be paying attention:
 

 

:lmao: I have to believe they have made up their minds already...probably before stepping foot in the courtroom for the trial. 

Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, The Commish said:

:lmao: I have to believe they have made up their minds already...probably before stepping foot in the courtroom for the trial. 

That would be a shame. 

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
13 hours ago, the moops said:

Part of his argument is that carbon monoxide poisoning was a contributing factor.

 

Only problem with that, even if true, is that Chauvin was kneeling on him and holding him in place right at the exhaust pipe of the police car. 

If they accept that theory it is not a “problem” in the context of reasonable outcomes for Chauvin, as he could only be convicted of manslaughter. 

Link to post
Share on other sites
13 hours ago, bigbottom said:

That would be a shame. 

Agreed but I honestly don't know how people haven't come to a conclusion (at best a preconceived notion) in a situation like this.

Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)

Derek Chauvin will not take the stand - invoking the 5th.

State wanting to introduce new evidence regarding carbon monoxide levels in GFs blood. Denied by Judge Cahill.

Defense rests. Jury sequestration starts Monday. Cahill instructs the jurors to pack "for long but hope for short" deliberations.

Edited by NorvilleBarnes
Link to post
Share on other sites
  • NorvilleBarnes changed the title to Derek Chauvin trial. Death of George Floyd. Defense rests.
1 hour ago, parasaurolophus said:

This is the worst part about these idiot social justice criminals. They get stuff wrong and target the wrong people all the time. 

So it would be ok if a witness for the defense still lived there?  The WORST part about this story is that he doesn't?  Wow.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, John123 said:

So it would be ok if a witness for the defense still lived there?  The WORST part about this story is that he doesn't?  Wow.

 

This is totally like when my dad said the worst part of being stuck in the hospital was the food. And I was like really?!?! So that tube in your urethra is totally fine???

Oh wait. I didnt say that because that would have been really dumb.

 

  • Laughing 2
Link to post
Share on other sites

https://www.google.com/amp/s/abcnews.go.com/amp/US/vandals-target-barry-brodds-home-testimony-derek-chauvins/story%3fid=77149729

This is cancel culture. Literally. They are looking to intimidate or silence a key witness in a very public trial who's opinion/testimony they disagree with. So many people already have it in their minds that Chauvin is guilty. We have public officials calling for violence if the outcome doesn't go the way they expect. Not interpreted violence like "march to the Capitol". Actual violence. 

Rep. Maxine Waters (D-CA) to BLM protesters in Brooklyn Center, MN:

“[Protestors] got to stay on the street and get more active, more confrontational. They’ve got to know that we mean business.”

"We have to let people know that we're not going to be satisfied unless we have justice in these cases."

The country is going to burn when the verdict comes out regardless of the decision.

Link to post
Share on other sites
33 minutes ago, Insein said:

https://www.google.com/amp/s/abcnews.go.com/amp/US/vandals-target-barry-brodds-home-testimony-derek-chauvins/story%3fid=77149729

This is cancel culture. Literally. They are looking to intimidate or silence a key witness in a very public trial who's opinion/testimony they disagree with. So many people already have it in their minds that Chauvin is guilty. We have public officials calling for violence if the outcome doesn't go the way they expect. Not interpreted violence like "march to the Capitol". Actual violence. 

Rep. Maxine Waters (D-CA) to BLM protesters in Brooklyn Center, MN:

“[Protestors] got to stay on the street and get more active, more confrontational. They’ve got to know that we mean business.”

"We have to let people know that we're not going to be satisfied unless we have justice in these cases."

The country is going to burn when the verdict comes out regardless of the decision.

It will if he is not guilty...why do you think it will if he gets convicted? Youre not alone in this thinking, I see a lot of people saying it. I dont know. 

Link to post
Share on other sites
11 minutes ago, STEADYMOBBIN 22 said:

It will if he is not guilty...why do you think it will if he gets convicted? Youre not alone in this thinking, I see a lot of people saying it. I dont know. 

Celebration riot. The mob will feel emboldened.

Edited by Insein
  • Laughing 1
  • Sad 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
Just now, Insein said:

Celebration riot.

I agree with you, at least on the riot either way part. Much like East lansing when Mich St gets to the final four or doesn’t get to the final four, there will be a couch on fire somewhere. I don’t think a guilty verdict should be celebrated. The whole thing is an embarrassment to the country. I support the right to demonstrate, but you don’t need to break stuff. I really hope no “good guys” swoop in with weapons to “protect the city” either.

Link to post
Share on other sites
Just now, timschochet said:

I think that’s ridiculous, frankly. I certainly hope you’re wrong. 

That's a very naive view. You know how this works. 

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
19 minutes ago, Snorkelson said:

 I don’t think a guilty verdict should be celebrated.

Why not? 
Cops have a long history of getting off scott free in these situations. If this one is convicted, why not celebrate justice prevailing and the changing times? 

Link to post
Share on other sites
1 minute ago, Insein said:

That's a very naive view. You know how this works. 

I don’t, Of course we’ve all seen some sports rioting/celebrations (though I don’t recall them ever involving looting) but I’ve never seen a political celebration, for an outcome that people wanted, turn into rioting, I can’t think of one, you’re welcome to offer an example. 

Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Insein said:

https://www.google.com/amp/s/abcnews.go.com/amp/US/vandals-target-barry-brodds-home-testimony-derek-chauvins/story%3fid=77149729

This is cancel culture. Literally. They are looking to intimidate or silence a key witness in a very public trial who's opinion/testimony they disagree with.

"They" are a few random idiots who should be arrested for what they did. There is no broader cancel culture issues here

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, timschochet said:

Why not? 
Cops have a long history of getting off scott free in these situations. If this one is convicted, why not celebrate justice prevailing and the changing times? 

Sure, I hope for accountability. I think he’s guilty. I don’t think we should have a parade any more than I think people should all take to the streets and light fires if the verdict goes the other way. Someone is guilty of a crime (possibly), someone is dead. 
If you mean celebrate in a different context I probably agree; justice being served should be  celebrated, but shouldn’t that be the case in any verdict?  I’m referring to actually being out in a group celebrating though. 

Link to post
Share on other sites
1 minute ago, Snorkelson said:

Sure, I hope for accountability. I think he’s guilty. I don’t think we should have a parade any more than I think people should all take to the streets and light fires if the verdict goes the other way. Someone is guilty of a crime (possibly), someone is dead. 
If you mean celebrate in a different context I probably agree; justice being served should be  celebrated, but shouldn’t that be the case in any verdict?  I’m referring to actually being out in a group celebrating though. 

I don’t think there would be anything wrong with loud, boisterous, peaceful celebration (or, in the event he is acquitted, with loud, boisterous, angry, peaceful protest.) 

Link to post
Share on other sites
8 hours ago, Snorkelson said:

I agree with you, at least on the riot either way part. Much like East lansing when Mich St gets to the final four or doesn’t get to the final four, there will be a couch on fire somewhere. I don’t think a guilty verdict should be celebrated. The whole thing is an embarrassment to the country. I support the right to demonstrate, but you don’t need to break stuff. I really hope no “good guys” swoop in with weapons to “protect the city” either.

Those couches have been safe lately.

Link to post
Share on other sites
18 minutes ago, Gawain said:

Closing arguments end on, "George Floyd didn't die because his heart was too big, he died because Derek Chauvin's heart was too small."

Ugh.  That is truly awful.   

Link to post
Share on other sites
7 hours ago, timschochet said:

I don’t think there would be anything wrong with loud, boisterous, peaceful celebration (or, in the event he is acquitted, with loud, boisterous, angry, peaceful protest.) 

There is nothing to celebrate.

I would find that objectionable.  The entire story is a tragedy, on both an individual and institutional level.

 

And, I think there is nothing to justify a protest if he is acquitted.  (I know I am in the minority here).  We have a judicial system in place.  State has made its case, the defense has made his case.  The jury is best positioned to determine if the state met its burden.

  • Like 3
  • Love 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Phil Elliott said:

I just hope people stay away from personal residences (and the people) of anyone involved in this case, regardless of what role they were in.

Guess you didn't hear about the former house of one of the defense witnesses that was vandalized over the weekend?

Link to post
Share on other sites
40 minutes ago, Sinn Fein said:

There is nothing to celebrate.

I would find that objectionable.  The entire story is a tragedy, on both an individual and institutional level.

 

And, I think there is nothing to justify a protest if he is acquitted.  (I know I am in the minority here).  We have a judicial system in place.  State has made its case, the defense has made his case.  The jury is best positioned to determine if the state met its burden.

100%.

I was thinking to myself a week or so ago "do I want Chauvin convicted".  I can't say yes.  I want justice.  I want the judge and jury to decide that.  When they do, justice is done, I won't celebrate a conviction because it was a terrible event including for Chauvin (thats not sympathy...thats just not celebrating in someone elses demise).

I'm not going to let my fear of hoodlums destroying property and harming/killing other citizens bully me into celebrating something like this or praying for anything other than justice.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Gawain said:

Closing arguments end on, "George Floyd didn't die because his heart was too big, he died because Derek Chauvin's heart was too small."

I like that line

  • Laughing 2
Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Gawain said:

Closing arguments end on, "George Floyd didn't die because his heart was too big, he died because Derek Chauvin's heart was too small."

 

Just now, the moops said:

I like that line

Feels like a line from Harry Met Sally or something like that.  Maybe the jury is a bunch of 50yr old white women...know your audience.

Link to post
Share on other sites
15 minutes ago, djmich said:

I'm not going to let my fear of hoodlums destroying property and harming/killing other citizens bully me into celebrating something like this or praying for anything other than justice.

You know, I've been guilty of letting hoodlums determine how I feel about the trial. He's presumed innocent until proven otherwise by a reasonable doubt. I think the problem is that we know that a particular subset of people aren't willing to accept the jury's verdict and that it will only reinforce, in their minds, that the system is corrupt and racist.

That's where the problem with the ideological underpinnings of this new wave of civil rights protests has been. It's purely results-oriented, and there is no room for doubt about amorphous or nuanced things like this trial.

Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Sinn Fein said:

There is nothing to celebrate.

I would find that objectionable.  The entire story is a tragedy, on both an individual and institutional level.

 

And, I think there is nothing to justify a protest if he is acquitted.  (I know I am in the minority here).  We have a judicial system in place.  State has made its case, the defense has made his case.  The jury is best positioned to determine if the state met its burden.

I have never celebrated nor wanted to riot about any verdict.  OJ?  Well jury went on the evidence.  Did OJ kill his wife?  Yes but he was aquitted.

Do I think Chauvin should get convicted?  Yes..of what that is up to the jury.  If he gets aquitted will there be riots?  Yes..if he gets manslaughter will there be riots?  Yes..if he get convicted of second degree murder there still might be some type of riots who knows.

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • NorvilleBarnes changed the title to Derek Chauvin trial. Death of George Floyd. Guilty on all counts.

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Restore formatting

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.


×
×
  • Create New...