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***Music 1982 Top 100*** - Ranked by sum of artist output - TOP FIVE, HERE WE GO!!!: 5. Peter Gabriel, 4. Tom Petty, 3. John Mellencamp, 2. Toto, 1. INXS


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8 hours ago, Andy Dufresne said:

Roger Daltrey claimed he "hated" It's Hard and considered this the only song worthy of release.

As with his 1980-81 accusations that Townshend was saving his best songs for his solo albums, he was right.

It's Hard is garbage except for the brilliant Eminence Front. Athena is catchy but feels kind of empty -- Daltrey's comments you mentioned help explain why. 

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5 hours ago, Pip's Invitation said:

As with his 1980-81 accusations that Townshend was saving his best songs for his solo albums, he was right.

It's Hard is garbage except for the brilliant Eminence Front. Athena is catchy but feels kind of empty -- Daltrey's comments you mentioned help explain why. 

Perfect review of this album.  

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2 hours ago, Navin Johnson said:
13 hours ago, zamboni said:

Funny how The Who’s “Farewell Tour” was in 1982. And here we are 40 years later.

The Eagles named their farewell tour (early 2000's) "Farewell I",  openly admitting up front that there would be further cash grabs. 

At least they were honest about it.

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4 minutes ago, Navin Johnson said:
8 minutes ago, zamboni said:

At least they were honest about it.

They joked that you couldn't have a Farewell II without a Farewell I, but weren't sure what they would do after Farewell IV because musicians can't count that high.

These reunions often go to 11.

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Posted (edited)

78. On the Wings of Love - Jeffrey Osborne - September

Osborne knew the song had hit potential but his producer wasn't convinced. The instrumental demo was a faster tempo and he didn't have the benefit of hearing Osborne's romantic lyrics. "I fought with George Duke over that," the singer told The New Orleans Advocate. "Probably my all-time favorite person in life was George Duke. I absolutely loved that guy. He produced most of my solo records. I brought the demo of 'On the Wings of Love' to him; it was just a piano player. He's like, 'I don't know, man. It's too fast. I don't know what you're going to say. Then I came in with the lyrics, and we slowed it down, and he was like, 'OK, I hear what you're hearing now.'"

On guitar is Michael Sembello of "Maniac" fame.

Peaked at #29 on the U.S. Billboard Hot 100, #13 R&B, and #7 Adult Contemporary. 

It likely doesn't deserve to be this high (but does deserve to be on the list) but it was an emergency replacement for "The Girl Is Mine" by McCartney/Jackson. After I listened to that song again, I realized I didn't like it as much as I thought and the critics seem to agree - it's not a great song.

Edited by Andy Dufresne
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77. Our House - Madness - November

Madness was very popular in their native UK, where this was their 11th Top 10 hit. They barely got noticed in America though, where "Our House" was their only substantial hit. Much of the song's success in the US was down to its witty music video that went over well during the early days of MTV. It was also a time when British bands were trending in the States, with colorful acts like The Human League, Culture Club and Eurythmics making an impact.

The song's video features the band as a cloth-cap wearing family squashed into a terraced house. Drummer Dan "Woody" Woodgate recalled to Q Magazine August 2008: "The knocking-on-the-door bit where somebody comes out, goes, 'Where are they?' and the others sneak in and close the door... That's The Flintstones. We stole lots of ideas from the Keystone Kops and Benny Hill."
 

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  • Andy Dufresne changed the title to ***Music 1982 Top 100*** - Ranked by sum of artist output - Next up: 78. Jeffrey Osborne, 77. Madness
3 minutes ago, Andy Dufresne said:

78. On the Wings of Love - Jeffrey Osborne - September

Osborne knew the song had hit potential but his producer wasn't convinced. The instrumental demo was a faster tempo and he didn't have the benefit of hearing Osborne's romantic lyrics. "I fought with George Duke over that," the singer told The New Orleans Advocate. "Probably my all-time favorite person in life was George Duke. I absolutely loved that guy. He produced most of my solo records. I brought the demo of 'On the Wings of Love' to him; it was just a piano player. He's like, 'I don't know, man. It's too fast. I don't know what you're going to say. Then I came in with the lyrics, and we slowed it down, and he was like, 'OK, I hear what you're hearing now.'"

On guitar is Michael Sembello of "Maniac" fame.

Peaked at #29 on the U.S. Billboard Hot 100, #13 R&B, and #7 Adult Contemporary. 

It like doesn't deserve to be this high (but does deserve to be on the list) but it was an emergency replacement for "The Girl Is Mine" by McCartney/Jackson. After I listened to that song again, I realized I didn't like it as much as I thought and the critics seem to agree - it's not a great song.

Nice song - Osbourne had some serious pipes.

And good call leaving off "The Girl Is Mine" - that song is dreck, especially that cringeworthy banter between Paul and Michael at the end. 

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3 minutes ago, Andy Dufresne said:

77. Our House - Madness - November

Madness was very popular in their native UK, where this was their 11th Top 10 hit. They barely got noticed in America though, where "Our House" was their only substantial hit. Much of the song's success in the US was down to its witty music video that went over well during the early days of MTV. It was also a time when British bands were trending in the States, with colorful acts like The Human League, Culture Club and Eurythmics making an impact.

The song's video features the band as a cloth-cap wearing family squashed into a terraced house. Drummer Dan "Woody" Woodgate recalled to Q Magazine August 2008: "The knocking-on-the-door bit where somebody comes out, goes, 'Where are they?' and the others sneak in and close the door... That's The Flintstones. We stole lots of ideas from the Keystone Kops and Benny Hill."
 

Like a lot of '80s tunes, good song but has gotten very overplayed. Solid ska band overall - they always looked like they were having a good time.

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2 minutes ago, zamboni said:

Like a lot of '80s tunes, good song but has gotten very overplayed. Solid ska band overall - they always looked like they were having a good time.

It has been but unlike a lot of such songs, I find myself staying with it because it's just so catchy and fun.

Unlike this, however, is "Your Love" by The Outfield. I swear the local stations have five songs they rotate and this one and Bohemian Rhapsody are two of them. I feel bludgeoned now with "JOSIE'S ON A VACATION FAR AWAY!!!" :wall:

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11 minutes ago, zamboni said:

Nice song - Osbourne had some serious pipes.

 

He did. He wasn't just a balladeer, either (though he made a killing from this song). Check out his work with LTD in the '70s - great funk, pop, and ballad singer. 

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I had never heard anything other than Our House by Madness until last year, and was surprised at how many of their songs I ended up liking. Fun band with a lot of catchy tunes, and their videos were almost always hilarious.  Struck me as what videos would have looked like had Monty Python written songs on a regular basis. :lol: 

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32 minutes ago, Andy Dufresne said:

78. On the Wings of Love - Jeffrey Osborne - September

On guitar is Michael Sembello of "Maniac" fame.

Sembello also played in Stevie Wonder's band in the '70s. The guitarist with the big mustache in this video is him: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cqKCx0T--GU

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7 minutes ago, Ghost Rider said:

I had never heard anything other than Our House by Madness until last year, and was surprised at how many of their songs I ended up liking. Fun band with a lot of catchy tunes, and their videos were almost always hilarious.  Struck me as what videos would have looked like had Monty Python written songs on a regular basis. :lol: 

Monty Python did write songs on a regular basis - they were called The Bonzo Dog Doo-dah Band. Death Cab For Cutie named themselves after one of their songs and they wrote Rutles and most Python's music.

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15 minutes ago, Pip's Invitation said:
49 minutes ago, Andy Dufresne said:

78. On the Wings of Love - Jeffrey Osborne - September

On guitar is Michael Sembello of "Maniac" fame.

Sembello also played in Stevie Wonder's band in the '70s. The guitarist with the big mustache in this video is him: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cqKCx0T--GU

Good call - was going to mention Sembello's connection with Stevie. He played on much of Songs In The Key Of Life, including Sir Duke. You know you've arrived when Stevie has you play with him.

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Love revisiting some of these pop songs. Takes me back to Sunday mornings when I would listen all the way through Casey Kasem's "America's Top 40" and write them all down for posterity.

Edited by zamboni
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2 hours ago, Andy Dufresne said:

77. Our House - Madness - November

Madness was very popular in their native UK, where this was their 11th Top 10 hit. They barely got noticed in America though, where "Our House" was their only substantial hit. Much of the song's success in the US was down to its witty music video that went over well during the early days of MTV. It was also a time when British bands were trending in the States, with colorful acts like The Human League, Culture Club and Eurythmics making an impact.

The song's video features the band as a cloth-cap wearing family squashed into a terraced house. Drummer Dan "Woody" Woodgate recalled to Q Magazine August 2008: "The knocking-on-the-door bit where somebody comes out, goes, 'Where are they?' and the others sneak in and close the door... That's The Flintstones. We stole lots of ideas from the Keystone Kops and Benny Hill."
 

Liked this song when it came out and still like it today.  It is one of those songs that takes me back to 1982 and hanging with my brother and friends as a young teen.  Those were glorious years.  

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16 hours ago, zamboni said:

Funny how The Who’s “Farewell Tour” was in 1982. And here we are 40 years later.

Saw em at Folsom Field in Boulder Colorado with Jethro Tull and a guy named John Cougar who the crowd booed off the stage.  

Amazing show especially Tull.

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  • Andy Dufresne changed the title to ***Music 1982 Top 100*** - Ranked by sum of artist output - Next up: 78. Jeffrey Osborne, 77. Madness, 76. Loverboy
1 minute ago, Andy Dufresne said:

76. When It's Over - Loverboy

Peaking at #26 on the charts for two weeks in June 1982, this isn't the most popular Loverboy tune...but at least it's not overplayed.

Didn’t Tim draft this or just “Working for the Weekend”? 
 

There’s a different song from the album I really like, but won’t spotlight.

 

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8 minutes ago, zamboni said:

Didn’t Tim draft this or just “Working for the Weekend”? 
 

There’s a different song from the album I really like, but won’t spotlight.

Yep. -  No spotlighting as Tim had that one.

79. “Working For the Weekend” Loverboy

I had a few tunes leftover from Loverboy for 81 that may or not qualify for Andy's list.

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75. It's Raining Again - Supertramp - October

The song's video was directed by future Highlander director Russell Mulcahy. 

The song debuted at No. 31 on 30 October 1982 on the Billboard Hot 100, becoming the highest debut on that chart for all of 1982, and peaked at No. 11. The record was a big success on the European charts, reaching the top 10 in Austria, the Netherlands, Germany, Norway, and Switzerland, and No. 1 in France. This was the group's last top 40 hit on the United Kingdom singles chart.
 

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  • Andy Dufresne changed the title to ***Music 1982 Top 100*** - Ranked by sum of artist output - Next up: 78. Jeffrey Osborne, 77. Madness, 76. Loverboy, 75. Supertramp

74. '65 Love Affair - Paul Davis - February

Hit #6 for two weeks on the Billboard Hot 100 in May 1982. It spent 20 weeks on the chart, and on the Billboard Year-End Hot 100 chart, it placed at #39.

The style of "'65 Love Affair" was reminiscent of such blue-eyed soul groups as Hall & Oates, a vein that Davis had not explored before. Davis had originally titled the song "'55 Love Affair", but Arista felt that some modernization was needed to target an audience whose teenage years had occurred in the 1960s, including Davis himself. As Arista pointed out, Davis was only 7 years old in 1955, too young for a "love affair", but was 17 years old in 1965, perfect for the song.
 

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  • Andy Dufresne changed the title to ***Music 1982 Top 100*** - Ranked by sum of artist output - Next up: 78. Jeffrey Osborne, 77. Madness, 76. Loverboy, 75. Supertramp, 74. Paul Davis
31 minutes ago, Andy Dufresne said:

74. '65 Love Affair - Paul Davis - February

Hit #6 for two weeks on the Billboard Hot 100 in May 1982. It spent 20 weeks on the chart, and on the Billboard Year-End Hot 100 chart, it placed at #39.

The style of "'65 Love Affair" was reminiscent of such blue-eyed soul groups as Hall & Oates, a vein that Davis had not explored before. Davis had originally titled the song "'55 Love Affair", but Arista felt that some modernization was needed to target an audience whose teenage years had occurred in the 1960s, including Davis himself. As Arista pointed out, Davis was only 7 years old in 1955, too young for a "love affair", but was 17 years old in 1965, perfect for the song.
 

Dude had a serious head of hair.

Big fan of his first top ten hit I Go Crazy. Didn't know this about it until now. Per Wiki: "...peaking at #7 on the Billboard chart in 1978. The song entered the Billboard Hot 100 pop singles chart on 27 August 1977 and began slowly climbing, peaking in March and April 1978, before dropping off the chart the week after 27 May 1978. Overall, it spent 40 weeks (nine months and one week) on the Billboard Hot 100 charts, setting what was then the record for the longest run on that chart, of consecutive weeks or not". 

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On 3/26/2021 at 12:06 PM, Andy Dufresne said:

75. It's Raining Again - Supertramp - October

The song's video was directed by future Highlander director Russell Mulcahy. 

The song debuted at No. 31 on 30 October 1982 on the Billboard Hot 100, becoming the highest debut on that chart for all of 1982, and peaked at No. 11. The record was a big success on the European charts, reaching the top 10 in Austria, the Netherlands, Germany, Norway, and Switzerland, and No. 1 in France. This was the group's last top 40 hit on the United Kingdom singles chart.
 

As much as I love Supertramp, I never listen to this song. I will have to revisit this one. 

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As much as i love gaping, bleeding sores, my herpes hardly ever cycles anymore and i might start trolling behind bus station dumpsters for company again

Edited by wikkidpissah
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On 3/24/2021 at 6:28 PM, Andy Dufresne said:

Point of order here. I could not like this post for Come on Eileen without liking the post with Do You Really Want to Hurt Me. Bad form, recommend you use separate posts here. 😬

Edited by Just Win Baby
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1 hour ago, Ghost Rider said:

As much as I love Supertramp, I never listen to this song. I will have to revisit this one. 

It was a band I could never relate to, and especially this song.  I didn’t realize it came out in 82.  

Edited by FairWarning
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3 minutes ago, FairWarning said:
1 hour ago, Ghost Rider said:

As much as I love Supertramp, I never listen to this song. I will have to revisit this one. 

It was a band I could never relate to, and especially this song.  I didn’t realize it came out in 82.  

They were a really good band through the ‘70s and peaked with Breakfast in America in 1979. This 1982 album ...Famous Last Words was their first album since Breakfast after a long hiatus and didn’t quite come up to snuff - although “It’s Raining Again” is innocuous enough IMO.

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7 minutes ago, FairWarning said:

It was a band I could never relate to, and especially this song.  I didn’t realize it came out in 82.  

So just Hide In Your Shell.

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Just now, zamboni said:

They were a really good band through the ‘70s and peaked with Breakfast in America in 1979. This 1982 album ...Famous Last Words was their first album since Breakfast after a long hiatus and didn’t quite come up to snuff - although “It’s Raining Again” is innocuous enough IMO.

It was a band that just totally missed the Mark with me.  My area mainly listened to rock or country, a little early rap, a little new wave from MTV only.  Pretty rudimentary tastes actually.  

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5 hours ago, zamboni said:

They were a really good band through the ‘70s and peaked with Breakfast in America in 1979. This 1982 album ...Famous Last Words was their first album since Breakfast after a long hiatus and didn’t quite come up to snuff - although “It’s Raining Again” is innocuous enough IMO.

While Breakfast in America was their mainstream peak, I am on board with the many who feel that Crime of the Century was their creative peak. But it is hard to find much fault with their 1974-1979 run. 

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1 hour ago, Ghost Rider said:
6 hours ago, zamboni said:

They were a really good band through the ‘70s and peaked with Breakfast in America in 1979. This 1982 album ...Famous Last Words was their first album since Breakfast after a long hiatus and didn’t quite come up to snuff - although “It’s Raining Again” is innocuous enough IMO.

While Breakfast in America was their mainstream peak, I am on board with the many who feel that Crime of the Century was their creative peak. But it is hard to find much fault with their 1974-1979 run. 

I agree - did mean BIA was their commercial peak. 

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Let's ease you into Monday with a couple easy listeners...

73. You & I - Eddie Rabbit and Crystal Gayle - October

In 2005, the song was ranked number seven on CMT's 100 Greatest Duets in Country Music. On the Billboard Hot 100, the song spent 29 weeks on the chart, peaking at number seven and making it the 12th biggest song of the year.
 

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Posted (edited)

72. Any Day Now - Ronnie Milsap - April

First recorded by Chuck Jackson, an R&B singer born in South Carolina in 1937; it reached number twenty-three in 1962 with the title "Any Day Now (My Wild Beautiful Bird)" and spent six weeks in the Top 40.

Elvis Presley recorded a cover version of "Any Day Now". Although not released as a single in its own right, the song appeared as the B-side to Presley's No. 3 US pop hit "In the Ghetto".

Milsap's version peaked at No. 14 on the Billboard Hot 100 chart, spending nine weeks in the Top 40. In addition, this version went to No. 1 on both the Billboard Hot Country Singles chart (for one week) as well as the Hot Adult Contemporary Singles chart (for five weeks). It also went to No. 1 on the Canadian Country and Adult Contemporary Chart for three weeks.

Milsap's producer, Tom Collins, encouraged Milsap to make the song sound different from the original by Chuck Jackson. As a result, Milsap recorded it in a different key and sang it softly.
 

Edited by Andy Dufresne
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  • Andy Dufresne changed the title to ***Music 1982 Top 100*** - Ranked by sum of artist output - Next up: 73: Rabbit & Gayle, 72: Milsap
1 hour ago, Andy Dufresne said:

Let's ease you into Monday with a couple easy listeners...

73. You & I - Eddie Rabbit and Crystal Gayle - October

In 2005, the song was ranked number seven on CMT's 100 Greatest Duets in Country Music. On the Billboard Hot 100, the song spent 29 weeks on the chart, peaking at number seven and making it the 12th biggest song of the year.
 

Very nice duet here. Always had a thing for Loretta Lynn's little sister. That hair :wub: 

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71. New World Man/Subdivisions - Rush - August/October

These were the two songs that I had to move up considerably from where I originally had them. Again, not the biggest Rush fan, but these don't have the annoying stuff most of their other songs contain. - AD


New World Man is by far their highest-charting single, and their only Canadian #1. In America, it was the the only Rush song to crack the Top 40. And it was an afterthought that nearly didn't make it on the album.
The working title for this song was "Project 3:57" because they were writing it in order to fill the three minutes and 57 seconds of record space left after the album's first seven songs were done.

Subdivisions is about how narrow-minded and judgmental people can get when they are confined to certain groups - a common occurrence in the suburbs. (Yeah, doesn't happen in metro areas. :rolleyes: - AD)

This song marked a turning point for Neil Peart, whose early Rush lyrics were based in fantasy. "I didn't believe yet that I could put something real into a song," he told Rolling Stone. "'Subdivisions' happened to be an anthem for a lot of people who grew up under those circumstances, and from then on, I realized what I most wanted to put in a song was human experience."
 

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  • Andy Dufresne changed the title to ***Music 1982 Top 100*** - Ranked by sum of artist output - Next up: 73: Rabbit & Gayle, 72: Milsap, 71: Rush
33 minutes ago, Andy Dufresne said:

71. New World Man/Subdivisions - Rush - August/October

These were the two songs that I had to move up considerably from where I originally had them. Again, not the biggest Rush fan, but these don't have the annoying stuff most of their other songs contain. - AD


New World Man is by far their highest-charting single, and their only Canadian #1. In America, it was the the only Rush song to crack the Top 40. And it was an afterthought that nearly didn't make it on the album.
The working title for this song was "Project 3:57" because they were writing it in order to fill the three minutes and 57 seconds of record space left after the album's first seven songs were done.

Subdivisions is about how narrow-minded and judgmental people can get when they are confined to certain groups - a common occurrence in the suburbs. (Yeah, doesn't happen in metro areas. :rolleyes: - AD)

This song marked a turning point for Neil Peart, whose early Rush lyrics were based in fantasy. "I didn't believe yet that I could put something real into a song," he told Rolling Stone. "'Subdivisions' happened to be an anthem for a lot of people who grew up under those circumstances, and from then on, I realized what I most wanted to put in a song was human experience."
 

Since no one has indicated they'll be doing another 100, I'll throw out another really good one from the album: The Analog Kid

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1 hour ago, Andy Dufresne said:

71. New World Man/Subdivisions - Rush - August/October

These were the two songs that I had to move up considerably from where I originally had them. Again, not the biggest Rush fan, but these don't have the annoying stuff most of their other songs contain. -
 

 

54 minutes ago, zamboni said:

Since no one has indicated they'll be doing another 100, I'll throw out another really good one from the album: The Analog Kid

i prefer the longer pieces

Edited by wikkidpissah
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On 3/25/2021 at 3:30 PM, Andy Dufresne said:

Eminence Front

It was the 80s up in a mountain town of a 5 star steakhouse with a kitchen full of 20 something guys when this song starts playing. 

No one knew the lyrics but the last few syllables sounded suspiciously 'somelike' UNT.

The over worked and bored kitchen staff starts singing at the top of their lungs.

...  dabba dabba UUUUNT.... dabba dabba UUUUNT! 

Which is soo loud that it causes a commotion as the entire wait staff and hostess come running in and crack up.  

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  • Andy Dufresne changed the title to ***Music 1982 Top 100*** - Ranked by sum of artist output - TOP FIVE, HERE WE GO!!!: 5. Peter Gabriel, 4. Tom Petty, 3. John Mellencamp, 2. Toto, 1. INXS

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