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Campingguys -- Any and all advice welcome for upcoming trip


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3 minutes ago, Jaysus said:

I am anti-water bladder for anything other than day hikes.  Smart water bottles are the way to go for backpacking. 

Just looked and his pack actually has a water bottle holder that you can reach easily from the side. Will likely go that route.

The pack is also reservoir compatible so I only need to get a bladder if we opt that route. 

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9 minutes ago, gianmarco said:

Just looked and his pack actually has a water bottle holder that you can reach easily from the side. Will likely go that route.

I usually carry two bottles with me... I keep a 1L bottle in that pocket and use an AquaClip to keep a 750ml on a shoulder strap.  My shoulders do not like reaching back to that pocket for anything other than refills of the smaller bottle.  (I also carry a 2L dirty water bag that I use for filtering or long water carries. 

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4 minutes ago, Jaysus said:

I usually carry two bottles with me... I keep a 1L bottle in that pocket and use an AquaClip to keep a 750ml on a shoulder strap.  My shoulders do not like reaching back to that pocket for anything other than refills of the smaller bottle.  (I also carry a 2L dirty water bag that I use for filtering or long water carries. 

This is his pack, btw.

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4 minutes ago, gianmarco said:

Nope, he's flying alone (for the first time!). 

My daughter went to maui this year, On her own.  Also her first time,  She loved it. 

She went to see the cousin, that she’s going to camp with. 

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Will there be females his age on the trip?

He's 16--a condom or two may be wise. 

Now, I would put the odds of a bear attack and him getting lucky in the woods as equal. But I bet one of the counselors will bring bear spray--so make sure your son is prepared for the other possibility. 

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1 hour ago, gianmarco said:

Just looked and his pack actually has a water bottle holder that you can reach easily from the side. Will likely go that route.

The pack is also reservoir compatible so I only need to get a bladder if we opt that route. 

Yes, just the bladder.  Trust me.  Go this route.  Much easier to sip and drink while hiking.  And if he's at altitude, he will want to be drinking often.

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5 hours ago, Drunken Cowboy said:

I am now also an overweight middle aged man, but when I lived in Wyoming I was fit and in my late 20s. Even then the altitude took getting used to. If you want to do something like this plan some time to adjust before starting to hike.

:goodposting: Same with me. Went to school out there and took a while acclimating from 200 feet to 7,200 feet of elevation. And then I went to Rocky Mtn Natl Park. :lol:

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21 hours ago, gianmarco said:

Yeah, getting him out on rocky terrain ain't happening, plus he leaves in 3 days.  I spoke with someone from the camp yesterday and she said with what he's done already will put him pretty far ahead of most everyone else that goes typically.  Hopefully that's the case and he'll enjoy it from the start.

They have a pretty specific packing list and warn to make sure you have everything on it but don't bring extra.  They do this a lot.

Wife got him a pair of Teva shoes for camp. 

We got the trekking poles recommended earlier in the thread. 

I'll look into the camelbak.  I need to call them back today and see how they typically manage water and stuff and see what they recommend.

Hat and gloves already there, he'll be getting up to almost 14,000 ft during the summit attempt.

 Is he taking the Owen Spalding route to the summit of Grand Teton? That’s the easiest route I believe, but it still requires roped climbing. And if he’s never been at altitude, ~14k feet will be tough. Although I’m sure they’ll account for acclimatization, you may want to get him some Diamox. Everyone handles altitude differently, but he’ll surely feel some symptoms if he spends any time above 8-10k feet.

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22 hours ago, BassNBrew said:

I'm a trekking pole guy which probably sways my opinion.  That additional boot ankle support is offset by the benefit of being able to feel the terrain with trail shoes.  If I'm taking 20000 steps in a day I would prefer benefit of not having to pick up an additional .5 pound weight each step.

I rarely wear hiking boots, but someone unaccustomed to hiking uneven terrain with a reasonably heavy pack is an ankle sprain waiting to happen.

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18 hours ago, gianmarco said:

So, I have a CamelBak pack that I wear when I run long and it's hot. But I don't see how that would work for a hiking trip while wearing a backpack.

Any recommendations on a specific CamelBak size/style that works for hiking with a large backpack? Does it just go inside the backpack? Wear it separately?

Most modern packs have a sleeve for a hydration bladder. It’d definitely get one, probably 3L as you have a ton of insensible losses at elevation in dry climates.

Don’t get me wrong, I’d bring an insulated bottle as well, but it’s nice to keep moving while you drink, as establishing a consistent pace without a ton of stops is crucial in mountaineering.

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22 hours ago, gianmarco said:

Part of the trip is a summit attempt of Grand Teton. He needs boots. Plus, they are already broken in.

Oh my gawd I'm so jealous.  Always wanted to do a back country hike up around the summit of the Tetons.  

I'm sure the guides have everything covered but I know 'some parts' of those climbs require crampons since some go over ice fields.  

And he'll definitely be in griz country on that hike.  I've camped in the Tetons before in the back country and without any doubt he will be in griz country.

Also he is going to be in one of the best places in the lower 48 for night sky viewing if they catch clear skies at night.  Even if it weighs a couple of pounds look into camera gear that gets a low enough exposure with a slow pan that he can set up and point to the stars to get a shot THIS

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20 hours ago, DaVinci said:

I have a pair of Inov8 Roclite G 345 GTX boots. They are a cross between trail runners and hiking boots. They provide ankle support but are very light compared to my previous hiking boots.

INov8 is a nice shoe.  I've raced in the standard Roclites.

37 minutes ago, Terminalxylem said:

I rarely wear hiking boots, but someone unaccustomed to hiking uneven terrain with a reasonably heavy pack is an ankle sprain waiting to happen.

Looks like I'm in the minority, but i just don't see it.  I roll my ankle on cracks in the sidewalk or during gentle breeze and wouldn't consider boots for long hikes.  I've worn boots turkey hunting the Appalachians and must prefer the train shoes for day treks.  I think once you add in the trekking poles the ankle concerns go completely away.  The suggestion above is a nice compromise.  Nothing worse than hiking in waterlogged boots.

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17 hours ago, Courtjester said:

Will there be females his age on the trip?

He's 16--a condom or two may be wise. 

Now, I would put the odds of a bear attack and him getting lucky in the woods as equal. But I bet one of the counselors will bring bear spray--so make sure your son is prepared for the other possibility. 

GB a business model where you're one pregnancy or bear attack away from being sued out of business.

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10 minutes ago, BassNBrew said:

INov8 is a nice shoe.  I've raced in the standard Roclites.

Looks like I'm in the minority, but i just don't see it.  I roll my ankle on cracks in the sidewalk or during gentle breeze and wouldn't consider boots for long hikes.  I've worn boots turkey hunting the Appalachians and must prefer the train shoes for day treks.  I think once you add in the trekking poles the ankle concerns go completely away.  The suggestion above is a nice compromise.  Nothing worse than hiking in waterlogged boots.

Have you ever hiked on scree/talus? 

I am blessed with cankles which are virtually indestructible, but I wouldn’t backpack in the mountains with trail runners.

Agree the Innov8s + poles is a good compromise. There’s also a decent chance he’ll encounter some ice/snow, cross streams, etc. so whatever he uses should probably be waterproof.

ETA not trying to be argumentative, and it seems he’s already chosen his footwear, so all of this is moot anyway

 

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3 minutes ago, Terminalxylem said:

Have you ever hiked on scree/talus? 

I am blessed with cankles which are virtually indestructible, but I wouldn’t backpack in the mountains with trail runners.

Agree the Innov8s + poles is a good compromise. There’s also a decent chance he’ll encounter some ice/snow, cross streams, etc. so whatever he uses should probably be waterproof.

ETA not trying to be argumentative, and it seems he’s already chosen his footwear, so all of this is moot anyway

 

Correct on your last statement, still an interesting discussion.

No to your first question.  More roots and rocks here.  More of a premium on foot placement and agility than powering through that stuff/debris.  We get a lot of summer thunderstorms in the east.  Waterproof boots are great for snow but are no match for storms and streams.  With the humidity it takes forever for things to dry.  Probably a regional thing as I see as many trail shoes as boots on the AP trail.

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1 minute ago, Terminalxylem said:

Not sure if it's been mentioned, but those stupid looking toe socks are great at preventing blisters. Injini is one brand I've used.

They were mentioned and they were subsequently purchased by us as a result  :)

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14 hours ago, gianmarco said:

These are the shoes we got when they were on sale for under $100.  Definitely not changing shoes at this point.

Love my Keens, but I need to replace them. I walk a little on the outsides of my feet and I finally cut up the sole a little on one of them because of it. Might wanna add some shoe goo to the packing list if the guides don’t include it in the group gear.

 

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14 hours ago, Terminalxylem said:

Not sure if it's been mentioned, but those stupid looking toe socks are great at preventing blisters. Injini is one brand I've used.

Somehow my son has managed to lose the left sock of three pairs of those and he refuses to just turn one of the other ones inside out.

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  • 3 weeks later...
8 minutes ago, Jaysus said:

UPDATE?

He comes home Friday. Can't wait to hear. I otherwise have no idea right now except some pictures. He looks happy, though.

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2 minutes ago, gianmarco said:

He comes home Friday. Can't wait to hear. I otherwise have no idea right now except some pictures. He looks happy, though.

Let us know what you find out, I am curious to hear how things went for him... the weather sounds like it may have made things interesting. 

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1 minute ago, Jaysus said:

Let us know what you find out, I am curious to hear how things went for him... the weather sounds like it may have made things interesting. 

Oh, definitely. Not sure what you mean on the weather. Warm/hot during the day, cool at night, but I thought that was expected.

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1 hour ago, gianmarco said:

Oh, definitely. Not sure what you mean on the weather. Warm/hot during the day, cool at night, but I thought that was expected.

it was 103 degrees, at 9:30am, when i dropped my daughter off on the 27th.  :mellow:  it has since cooled off, into the 90's.

same deal, seems happy in pics.  lots and lots of pics of the kids in the water.  :lmao:  

pick her up Saturday.  excited to hear about her 2 weeks.

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3 minutes ago, Poke_4_Life said:

Do they always hike in the same order or did he just happen to follow pink shorts for two pics?

Lol. It's like Reservoir Camping Dogs :lol:

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4 minutes ago, Poke_4_Life said:

Do they always hike in the same order or did he just happen to follow pink shorts for two pics?

Those aren't his pics.  Those are taken by the camp leaders. 

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8 hours ago, gianmarco said:

This is so awesome.  I have a feeling this experience will have transformed him permanently.

 

My son and I did a 12 day backpacking trip in 2019.  When I asked the kids where they wanted to go on vacation this summer, my oldest said he wanted to explore some national parks.  As a dad, this made me tear up.  So we are heading to Zion and Bryce Canyon in a few weeks.   (Yes, I know it will be hot, but this is what he picked.)

 

I can't wait to hear how @gianmarco Jr felt about this trip.

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He got back yesterday.

Overall, had a great trip. Parts of the outdoor experience he wasn't a fan of. The hiking through backcountry as well as the kayaking. That said, he said it was beautiful. No issues with the physical part of it with one exception. All the gear we got worked out well. He didn't use the trekking poles but did use everything else. The entire trip went smoothly for the whole group. Heard stories of waking up to a moose 20ft from their tents to eating tons of peanut butter to getting charcoal from a tree on him while trying to poop. 

The one thing he couldn't finish was the summit of Grand Teton. He got within 200 ft but then apparently was pretty sick from the altitude and couldn't walk in a straight line. He had to head back down at that point with one of the other campers who had the same thing. That was the only physical part that didn't go well.

But, the best part he said was the friendships he made. They've all been chatting with each other since they got back. He said all the kids were awesome and they all got along great and became friends from the start. The two leaders were also great. That's the part that made me the happiest. 

After not showering for almost two weeks, he surprisingly didn't smell in the car on the way home. His bag, unfortunately, got tagged incorrectly and ended up in DC. They were able to locate it and we got it back this morning. The one it got switched with was some kid that was going to DC for the start of a camping trip. Delta called that mother when they realized what happened and she was freaking out. Felt bad for them. Luckily for us it happened at the end of the trip so it didn't matter at all. 

Anyway, great experience and hopefully provide memories that'll last a long time. 

Thanks to all here for the advice to help make it awesome.

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Glad he had a good trip. Sucks about the altitude sickness, but it could’ve derailed everything and it sounds like it didn’t at least.

Wasn’t the hiking/kayaking like 2/3 of the whole deal though? Lol, kids.

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Just now, Rustoleum said:

Glad he had a good trip. Sucks about the altitude sickness, but it could’ve derailed everything and it sounds like it didn’t at least.

Wasn’t the hiking/kayaking like 2/3 of the whole deal though? Lol, kids.

Heh... It was fine. Yeah, a decent chunk of the trip, and it wasn't that he hated it, but it was just a lot of it. He enjoyed the climbing. He enjoyed the white water rafting. And the stuff they saw while hiking was pretty amazing, he said.

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Glad he had a great trip. Too bad he just missed the Teton summit - if he ever desires to try something like that again, Diamox does wonders to mitigate AMS.

I have a friend who attempted Maura Kea (13,600 ft) multiple times, only to be turned back at 12k with headache, nausea and vomiting. He finally took acetazolamide prophylactically when we went, and easily submitted. I guess some people consider it a PED, but there’s enough suffering intrinsic to mountaineering, I don’t see much harm doing what you can to make it more pleasant.

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20 hours ago, gianmarco said:

...he couldn't finish was the summit of Grand Teton. He got within 200 ft ...

... the best part... all the kids were awesome and they all got along great and became friends from the start... great experience and hopefully provide memories that'll last a long time...

You know he will regret not reaching the summit so plan on a trip.  200 feet, ugh.

That is it.  Things don't matter but memories remain forever.

Oh and more pictures please.

Edited by Bracie Smathers
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