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Whatcha readin now? (book, books, reading, read)

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I'm a little more than half way through Republic Of Thieves. Lynch can turn a phrase in a way I've never heard with the best of them. The "witty reparte" of just about every main (or, semi-main) character bugs a bit as it did in the earlier novels (I don't always know who's talking just by his/her voice during a long dialogue). But that's a niggling thing, and I'm not sure I care of there's a BIG PAYOFF or not by book's end. As someone who came of age in the 1970s, reading Lynch is the equivalent of watching The Rockford Files. It may never be rated the absolute best at any one time, but it's a ton of fun and has a good amount of attention to craft to boot.

Next up is probably Dan Simmons & Abominable.

However, I've also bought both of the WOOL add-ons. I've already read the Original Five via the Omnibus. Which is the sequel and which is the prequel? Which order should I read them in?

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I'm a little more than half way through Republic Of Thieves. Lynch can turn a phrase in a way I've never heard with the best of them. The "witty reparte" of just about every main (or, semi-main) character bugs a bit as it did in the earlier novels (I don't always know who's talking just by his/her voice during a long dialogue). But that's a niggling thing, and I'm not sure I care of there's a BIG PAYOFF or not by book's end. As someone who came of age in the 1970s, reading Lynch is the equivalent of watching The Rockford Files. It may never be rated the absolute best at any one time, but it's a ton of fun and has a good amount of attention to craft to boot.

Next up is probably Dan Simmons & Abominable.

However, I've also bought both of the WOOL add-ons. I've already read the Original Five via the Omnibus. Which is the sequel and which is the prequel? Which order should I read them in?

The Shift omnibus is generally called a prequel but it jumps around in time and merges with the main storyline. You need to read Shift before Dust.

It's essentially one long story from Wool to Shift to Dust. Sequence is pretty critical.

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I'm a little more than half way through Republic Of Thieves. Lynch can turn a phrase in a way I've never heard with the best of them. The "witty reparte" of just about every main (or, semi-main) character bugs a bit as it did in the earlier novels (I don't always know who's talking just by his/her voice during a long dialogue). But that's a niggling thing, and I'm not sure I care of there's a BIG PAYOFF or not by book's end. As someone who came of age in the 1970s, reading Lynch is the equivalent of watching The Rockford Files. It may never be rated the absolute best at any one time, but it's a ton of fun and has a good amount of attention to craft to boot.

Next up is probably Dan Simmons & Abominable.

However, I've also bought both of the WOOL add-ons. I've already read the Original Five via the Omnibus. Which is the sequel and which is the prequel? Which order should I read them in?

The Shift omnibus is generally called a prequel but it jumps around in time and merges with the main storyline. You need to read Shift before Dust.

It's essentially one long story from Wool to Shift to Dust. Sequence is pretty critical.

Danke, iggie!

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Finished Wool last night.

Personally, I thought it was a terrific ending to one of my favorite series ever. To me, nothing beats those first few installments of Wool where the entire story was told from one POV and you were figuring things out right along with the main character. As he expanded into multiple POVs in the later books, some of that immersion was lost to me but I still think it was one hell of a story.

The best part of Wool to me was that it still continued to kick the characters in the ### like the earlier novels. I think too often the final volume of a series is just a long walk of everything lining up for the good guys until the final denouement. I loved that things continued to get worse for most of this book. Also, I dig that we don't get a complete resolution of everything.

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Reading Blood Gospel now. James Rollins had some fun books before he started writing Cussler- esque crappy Sigma books. Nothing he's written is great but his Crichton-esque stuff was at least decent. BG is co written so hopefully that influence will pull him out of the cesspool he wallows in recently. So far with the Christian history artifacts this one looks like a blend of Chricton and Dan Brown.

Oooof. Horrible. It's like they took all the worse parts of Dan Brown and Twilight into one craptastic waste of brain cells. Yet it's still better than the Ambercrombie books...

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Started "Lone Survivor" last night. Having trouble putting it down. Best book I think I've ever read so far.

Yup. Best I've read, although the sample isn't huge. Any recommendations since I liked this one so much?

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Started "Lone Survivor" last night. Having trouble putting it down. Best book I think I've ever read so far.

Yup. Best I've read, although the sample isn't huge. Any recommendations since I liked this one so much?

18 Hours: The True Story of an SAS War Hero - this book is about an Australian who fought in Operation Anaconda. I really liked the guy, and the story was crazy.

Joker One: A Marine Platoon's Story of Courage, Leadership, and Brotherhood - not SpecOps, but a really interesting story of an average Marine infantry officer in Iraq.

Roughneck Nine-One: The Extraordinary Story of a Special Forces A-team at War - Green Beret in Iraq. Dude is a trip...doesn't give a flip.

And one fiction book. The author was the co-author of American Sniper, which is the story of "the most lethal sniper in us history" Chris Kyle. This one was really action-packed, and high on realism. Or so I think.

18631207.jpg

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Started reading The Windup Girl based on a couple of comments from this thread. I like it so far, very interesting world.

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Thank you.

Did you read American Sniper? Any good?

No not yet. It's on my list.

I read it and liked it better then "Lone Survivor"

Chris Kyle and Marcus were very good friends,

American Sniper leaves out pretty much all of the Seal training that Marcus did such a good job telling that story, so your not reading the same the same ole poop, and I don't remember many political rants that Marcus went off on.

The one thing I really liked about Chris's story is the passages that his wife writes, She talks about the difficulties of raising children while her husband is gone and the cold distance she feels from him on his return home.

It's pretty chilling to hear him speak of killing so many people, and having absolutely no remorse at all.

The men that do these jobs are truly of a different breed.

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For Gaiman fans, the new edition of the first volume of The Sandman graphic novel is on sale at Amazon today for $2.99.

Most likely, you will spend more on the rest of them, but it is a wonderful series and well worth the price of admission.

http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B0064W67IM/ref=amb_link_386016582_13?pf_rd_m=ATVPDKIKX0DER&pf_rd_s=center-2&pf_rd_r=0BXSBCZTWHZ60NE5GSQZ&pf_rd_t=1401&pf_rd_p=1646388142&pf_rd_i=1000677541

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RE: Wool/Shift

MONTGOMERY, Ala. -

Microscopic robots may soon be detecting and even preventing diseases instantly at doctors' offices across the nation, eliminating the need for multiple tests or treatment plans.

It may sound like science fiction, but one of the nation's top nanotechnology scientists said it could be only four or five years away.

"I think it's coming pretty soon," said Dr. Shree Singh, the director of the Center for NanoBiotechnology Research at Alabama State University. "In the near future, you will have some small nanomachines that will basically cure the disease before it even happens. Basically any kind of disease diagnosis or prevention can be done through nanobiotechnology."

LOL, I call bull#### on that spoiler. Didn't realize Dust was out but I'll have to download err, pick it up.

Thank you.

Did you read American Sniper? Any good?

Read it, thought it was pretty cool, not great, not bad. Dude was a pretty solid badass.

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Anyone read anything by Victor LaValle? His stories and books usually involve mental illness and take place in Queens. Really funny, dark themes. I've read all of this stuff so far: short-story collection, Slapboxing with Jesus and three novels, The Ecstatic, Big Machine and The Devil in Silver.

He is only 41 so hopefully he'll be around for a while.

dot

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Spin by Robert Wilson. best sci-fi I've read in a long time. couldn't put it down.

Read the description - big black dot on this one.

dot

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Spin by Robert Wilson. best sci-fi I've read in a long time. couldn't put it down.

Read the description - big black dot on this one.

dot

Spin was great. I really enjoy Robert Charles Wilson. He's not afraid to tackle some really far out concepts. Sort of like vinge.

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Just finishing The Blood of Heaven by Kent Wascom, and I really enjoyed it. It's receiving excellent critical reviews. It is a first novel by a New Orleans/LSU guy who is heavily influenced by the darker Cormac McCarthy. Set in the founding of our country down in Louisiana it is a story about the raw border country outside of New Orleans and the men who tried to create their own nation there in the beginning of the 19th century.

Highly recommend to all of you Blood Meridian fanboys (like me).

Sounds good. In.

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I'm almost finished with Phillip Meyers' "The Son". It's a multi-generational story of a Texas family from around the time of the Alamo to modern-day. I'd recommend this one highly, especially if you like Westerns and the other big Texas authors (or if you just like good writing).

Hmm, just happened to start this one the other day...looking forward to it. http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B009NF6YLM/ref=s9_simh_bw_p351_d0_i2?pf_rd_m=ATVPDKIKX0DER&pf_rd_s=center-3&pf_rd_r=1N2K8D8YGRRVAMW7E0F9&pf_rd_t=101&pf_rd_p=1560405482&pf_rd_i=154606011

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Finished Elantris by Sanderson. Not bad. I can see why he was chosen to finish the Wheel of Time series. Just started book 1 of the Wheel of Time series, now that I know it was finished.

That's one series I wish I could unread. It started off so good and then meeeeeeeeeeeeeeeh.

Enjoy the 11,916 pages!

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Scott Lynch's Republic of Thieves has finally come out. I liked the first two (lies of Locke Lamora and Red Seas Under Red Skies). It's not groundbreaking literature, but it's better than Clive Cussler. Two orphans trained as thieves bouncing around from scam to scam, but with magic and weird, unnatural cities as backdrop. Fun, but not life changing. Be interesting to see if whatever drama he went through that delayed the book will make his writing darker, it's already on the grim side, like a fantasy Michael Connely.

Just finished Red Seas -- a little too boaty for me, but I liked it. Turns out my wife went to school with the author. She ran into him at a wedding and afterwards she asked if I'd heard of his books; I just happened to be halfway through Red Seas. Weird.

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I'm almost finished with Phillip Meyers' "The Son". It's a multi-generational story of a Texas family from around the time of the Alamo to modern-day. I'd recommend this one highly, especially if you like Westerns and the other big Texas authors (or if you just like good writing).

Hmm, just happened to start this one the other day...looking forward to it. http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B009NF6YLM/ref=s9_simh_bw_p351_d0_i2?pf_rd_m=ATVPDKIKX0DER&pf_rd_s=center-3&pf_rd_r=1N2K8D8YGRRVAMW7E0F9&pf_rd_t=101&pf_rd_p=1560405482&pf_rd_i=154606011

thoughts?

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Thank you.

Did you read American Sniper? Any good?

I did and I did not care for it much. It was to much bravado for me. Lone Survivor was much better.

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FYI, at least right now Brandon Sanderson's The Way of Kings is on sale for Kindle for $1.26. Great book.

Edited to add: The Hundred Thousand Kingdoms is on sale, as well. Another really good book.

Edited by Sand

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Finished listening to SEAL Target Geronimo on the way to work today. https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/12727473-seal-target-geronimo

I think this book more than any other had more information about the backgroup of OBL and the lead up to the raid than any other. There is no doubt which way the author leans, but it was a really good listen, and pretty affordable to boot.

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FYI, at least right now Brandon Sanderson's The Way of Kings is on sale for Kindle for $1.26. Great book.

Edited to add: The Hundred Thousand Kingdoms is on sale, as well. Another really good book.

I liked this much more than his work in the Jordan series, but it's hard to blame him for that since I don't know how much say he had. Is the second one of those out yet?

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I'm almost finished with Phillip Meyers' "The Son". It's a multi-generational story of a Texas family from around the time of the Alamo to modern-day. I'd recommend this one highly, especially if you like Westerns and the other big Texas authors (or if you just like good writing).

Hmm, just happened to start this one the other day...looking forward to it. http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B009NF6YLM/ref=s9_simh_bw_p351_d0_i2?pf_rd_m=ATVPDKIKX0DER&pf_rd_s=center-3&pf_rd_r=1N2K8D8YGRRVAMW7E0F9&pf_rd_t=101&pf_rd_p=1560405482&pf_rd_i=154606011

thoughts?

Only about 6 chapters in. The bouncing around in the timeline early kind of pissed me off, but the guy can write. I'm glad we got into some violence early.

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Deep Survival by Laurence Gonzalez.

Pretty good read about those who survive disaster, getting lost in the woods, 9/11, etc. Why they survive while others with better training may not, why young kids are more likely to survive than older ones. Why rule followers often don't survive but those who think for themselves do.

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I just finished Salinger by David Shields and Shane Salerno.

While it covers his life and works quite well, and integrates all the interviews and public comments into a seamless narrative (the entire book is composed of fragments from a multitude of people), after I was done I wanted to reach out and punch David Shields in the face.

What a colossal a-hole.

And I used to like Shields. I loved Reality Hunger. But his persistent, snide, dismissive, and even somewhat angry attacks on Salinger were both tiresome, and at times even disgusting (such as suggesting that Salinger liked young women because they reminded him of the emaciated concentration camp survivors he found in WWII - a grotesque and troubling psuedo-psychoanalytical leap).

At one point Shields adroitly notes how Salinger was all too aware of how writers can be vampires of other writers. All I could think was, yea, no shit David.

Part of Shields' intent was to demythologize the man and show you how incredibly flawed and even reprehensible he could be, but frankly I came away from the book losing more respect for Shields than I did for Salinger.

Edited by flysack

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BTW - at the end they reveal the contents of the famous "vault" Salinger kept of all the writing he refused to publish over the past 50something years.

- There's a few more Glass stories, mostly focusing on Seymour Glass' life before he killed himself in Bananafish. They'll be eventually published together in a collection about the Glass family (eta: though I wouldn't be surprised to see a couple pop up in The New Yorker, which was Salinger's favorite venue).

- There's a novel about Sergeant X, the shellshocked soldier from the short story To Esme - With Love and Squalor. It's about his experiences in WWII, including his discovery of the Holocaust.

- There's another collection of stories meant to illustrate and popularize Vendata Hinduism, a religion Salinger was committed to for most of his life.

I think that's it. Publication is slated to begin in 2015 and 2020 and be released in "irregular" installments. It's controlled by the J.D. Salinger Trust, which was set up by Salinger himself in 2008 and has only two members: his widow Colleen and his son Mathew.

Edited by flysack

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Just finished:

Into the wild - krakauer. I'm obviously late to the party on this. It's a decent read. Better than Thin Air

David and Goliaths- Malcolm Gladwell. If you like past Gladwell books ( i do), then you'll like this one. The usual mix of anecdote with counter-intuitive facts presented in thought provoking way. It hit on a couple of angles that I'd been thinking about so timely for me.

I'm also reading random first hand memoirs of Holocaust survivors online. Makes one want to cry.

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Currently reading House of Leaves by Mark Z. Danielewski.

It's fantastic.

Been meaning to read that... and I like his sister.

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Currently reading House of Leaves by Mark Z. Danielewski.

It's fantastic.

:hifive:

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Just finished Doctor Sleep Stephen King's sequel to The Shining. Good read, goes quick but certainly not on The Shining level of scary page turner.

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I just finished Dr Sleep last night..

I enjoyed it quite a bit, it was an easy read. That being said, I guess I was a little disappointed..

I expeced more carnage... more main characters dying.. All the good main characters survive. I kept waiting for one of them to bite the

dust Stephen King style, but it never happened.

I have to agree, it was fine but a little to easy for everything to work out in the end. For King it was a bit disappointing.

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FYI, at least right now Brandon Sanderson's The Way of Kings is on sale for Kindle for $1.26. Great book.

Edited to add: The Hundred Thousand Kingdoms is on sale, as well. Another really good book.

I liked this much more than his work in the Jordan series, but it's hard to blame him for that since I don't know how much say he had. Is the second one of those out yet?

March.

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Currently reading House of Leaves by Mark Z. Danielewski.

It's fantastic.

Fixed

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Currently reading House of Leaves by Mark Z. Danielewski.

It's fantastic.

Fixed

:lol:

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