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Whatcha readin now? (book, books, reading, read)

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The Road by Cormack McCarthy

Just a powerful, stunning book. Don't let the fact that this was chosen as one of Oprah's book club selections sway you from reading it. Every father should read this book.

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Hmmm, I can't recall where I left here so ...

Finished:

The Brothers Karamazov by Fyodor Dostoevsky - for some reason it took me forever to finish this book

Last Call by Tim Powers - This book felt rushed; I thought this actually would have worked better as a longer series. Still a pretty good book, though.

The Beach by Alex Garland

Just started War and Peace by Leo Tolstoy - a little over 10% of the way through but I like this much much more than I ever thought I would.

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Just started War and Peace by Leo Tolstoy - a little over 10% of the way through but I like this much much more than I ever thought I would.

Why is that?

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I'm on the third book in the "Left Behind" series by Lehaye.

The unintentional comedy is gold.

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Guest GSCGal

Shantaram by Gregory David Roberts. One of the best books I have read in the last decade, easily. And I guess that means in my life, since I'm 30.

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Shantaram by Gregory David Roberts. One of the best books I have read in the last decade, easily. And I guess that means in my life, since I'm 30.

:) I mentioned this one a few dozen pages ago...I cannot emphasize enough how GOOD this novel is. I consider it a must read.

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I'm on the third book in the "Left Behind" series by Lehaye. The unintentional comedy is gold.

You're seriously reading that series for the unintentional comedy?

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I'm on the third book in the "Left Behind" series by Lehaye. The unintentional comedy is gold.

You're seriously reading that series for the unintentional comedy?
Care to suggest a better purpose? Just interesting to see how the authors interpret Revelations and such. It's entertaining.

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I'm on the third book in the "Left Behind" series by Lehaye. The unintentional comedy is gold.

You're seriously reading that series for the unintentional comedy?
Care to suggest a better purpose? Just interesting to see how the authors interpret Revelations and such. It's entertaining.
Just seems like it'd be a big waste of time if you already think the content is laughable.

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I'm on the third book in the "Left Behind" series by Lehaye. The unintentional comedy is gold.

You're seriously reading that series for the unintentional comedy?
Care to suggest a better purpose? Just interesting to see how the authors interpret Revelations and such. It's entertaining.
Just seems like it'd be a big waste of time if you already think the content is laughable.
It's a light read which is a nice change from a law book and I'm pretty learned on the topic and have had convos with reformed fundementalist evangelicals who refer to the series as if it were non-fiction.

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I'm on the third book in the "Left Behind" series by Lehaye. The unintentional comedy is gold.

You're seriously reading that series for the unintentional comedy?
Care to suggest a better purpose? Just interesting to see how the authors interpret Revelations and such. It's entertaining.
Just seems like it'd be a big waste of time if you already think the content is laughable.
It's a light read which is a nice change from a law book and I'm pretty learned on the topic and have had convos with reformed fundementalist evangelicals who refer to the series as if it were non-fiction.
OK, didn't mean to put you on the defensive, was just curious.

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I'm on the third book in the "Left Behind" series by Lehaye. The unintentional comedy is gold.

You're seriously reading that series for the unintentional comedy?
Care to suggest a better purpose? Just interesting to see how the authors interpret Revelations and such. It's entertaining.
Just seems like it'd be a big waste of time if you already think the content is laughable.
It's a light read which is a nice change from a law book and I'm pretty learned on the topic and have had convos with reformed fundementalist evangelicals who refer to the series as if it were non-fiction.
OK, didn't mean to put you on the defensive, was just curious.
NP, legitimate question. They're actually moderately decent reac purely for the story. Got some engaging characters and, as odd as this sounds, a main character who is a 21 year old girl I have a crush on.

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In anticipation of the release of The Golden Compass in December I am re-reading Philip Pullman's His Dark Materials trilogy. I had forgotten how deeply profound the story line is, yet he still makes it accessible to readers of all ages.

Great work.

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Just finished Jackpot Nation by Sports Illustrated writer Richard Hoffer, who took a year off and traveled the country to report on the pervasiveness of gambling in our society. An fast, funny, informative read.

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Shantaram by Gregory David Roberts. One of the best books I have read in the last decade, easily. And I guess that means in my life, since I'm 30.

going to be a movie of this released next year, starring Johnny Depp.

thanks for the suggestion. added to wish list.

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Just started War and Peace by Leo Tolstoy - a little over 10% of the way through but I like this much much more than I ever thought I would.

Why is that?
Why is what?

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I'm on the third book in the "Left Behind" series by Lehaye.

The unintentional comedy is gold.

You're seriously reading that series for the unintentional comedy?
Care to suggest a better purpose?

Just interesting to see how the authors interpret Revelations and such. It's entertaining.

Just seems like it'd be a big waste of time if you already think the content is laughable.
It's a light read which is a nice change from a law book and I'm pretty learned on the topic and have had convos with reformed fundementalist evangelicals who refer to the series as if it were non-fiction.
:lmao:

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Hmmm, I can't recall where I left here so ...

Finished:

The Brothers Karamazov by Fyodor Dostoevsky - for some reason it took me forever to finish this book

Last Call by Tim Powers - This book felt rushed; I thought this actually would have worked better as a longer series. Still a pretty good book, though.

The Beach by Alex Garland

Just started War and Peace by Leo Tolstoy - a little over 10% of the way through but I like this much much more than I ever thought I would.

what did you think of the beach? I really enjoyed that one.

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The Yiddish Policeman's Union by Michael Chabon

Decent book, but I was a little disappointed. I'd heard a lot of great things about Chabon's work, but this one didn't live up to the hype. The concept and setting of the book got me really excited to read it, but the story fell a little flat.

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The Yiddish Policeman's Union by Michael Chabon

Decent book, but I was a little disappointed. I'd heard a lot of great things about Chabon's work, but this one didn't live up to the hype. The concept and setting of the book got me really excited to read it, but the story fell a little flat.

love this author and this is up next for me.

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In the mood for a thriller so started Deviant Ways by Chris Mooney.

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Rainbow's End by Vernor Vinge - Real solid book. Good pacing, fun characters and subplots. The Alzheimer's 'cure' and regeneration could have been an 400-page novel by itself and been really good.

Currently reading Ghostwritten by David Mitchell. I like Cloud Atlas a lot...and you can tell the same guy wrote this book by the second paragraph. His style is certainly distinct.

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Hmmm, I can't recall where I left here so ...

Finished:

The Brothers Karamazov by Fyodor Dostoevsky - for some reason it took me forever to finish this book

Last Call by Tim Powers - This book felt rushed; I thought this actually would have worked better as a longer series. Still a pretty good book, though.

The Beach by Alex Garland

Just started War and Peace by Leo Tolstoy - a little over 10% of the way through but I like this much much more than I ever thought I would.

what did you think of the beach? I really enjoyed that one.
:goodposting:

Very good read, although the ending felt rushed.

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Just started War and Peace by Leo Tolstoy - a little over 10% of the way through but I like this much much more than I ever thought I would.

Why is that?
Why is what?
Why do you like it much more than you ever thought you would?

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Charlie Wilson's War by George Crile

Pretty good book about Charlie Wilson and his involvement with taking the Afghan war against the Soviets from a small time covert action into a billion dollar-a-year all out war and his meanderings in and out of legal trouble along the way. Made me grin.

First In by Gary Schroen

Account from the lead CIA agent running operation Jawbreaker in Afghanistan after 9/11. I had heard Schroen's name a few times before so I thought I'd give his book a read and it was meh. Not that I don't appreciate all he did for his country but he left right as all the fun got under way. The book to read on the subject would be the guy who took over for him, Gary Berntsen. The Northern Alliance was just breaking out when the switch was made so First In lays the groundwork for what transpired from that point on. Lotta BS in our government, even after 9/11, go figure.

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Playing for Pizza by John Grisham. It's not great literature by any means, but it's a quick read about football, Italy, and redemption of some kind.

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Just started War and Peace by Leo Tolstoy - a little over 10% of the way through but I like this much much more than I ever thought I would.

Why is that?
Why is what?
Why do you like it much more than you ever thought you would?
It is more interesting that I thought it would be. Also, the language is fresh (perhaps its the translation) and the topics timeless.

:thumbup:

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Just started War and Peace by Leo Tolstoy - a little over 10% of the way through but I like this much much more than I ever thought I would.

Why is that?
Why is what?
Why do you like it much more than you ever thought you would?
It is more interesting that I thought it would be. Also, the language is fresh (perhaps its the translation) and the topics timeless.

:lmao:

:thumbup: thanks.

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Couple of book/movie news items I saw in the last few days:

World Without End, the sequel to Pillars of the Earth by Ken Follett, goes on sale next Tuesday, October 9. The reviews have been excellent, basically saying that if you liked the original, you'll love the sequel. Weighs in at a healthy 1024 pages.

The movie to The Kite Runner, Khaled Hosseini's mega-bestseller, is being delayed until December 14 due to fears for the safety of the child stars of the movie. Link to the story on Amazon.

Edited by igbomb

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Playing for Pizza by John Grisham. It's not great literature by any means, but it's a quick read about football, Italy, and redemption of some kind.

FYI, when all is said and done, this book is not very good. It's not horrible, if you're interested in Italy and can find a book about football interesting, but it's a pretty half assed book.

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World Without End, the sequel to Pillars of the Earth by Ken Follett, goes on sale next Tuesday, October 9. The reviews have been excellent, basically saying that if you liked the original, you'll love the sequel. Weighs in at a healthy 1024 pages.

have you seen any reviews yet that reference "a book without end"? MARK IT DOWN.

p.s. thanks for the tips. Really enjoyed Pillars.

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I just finished Game of Shadows. It's kind of draggy at the beginning but really picks up in the middle. Fascinating stuff.

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The Omnivore's Dilema.

Pretty sure it was Maurile who suggested that one. Only about 30 pages in but it is clear that America is slave to the corn industry, boy-howdy.

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I finished Neverwhere last month and it was excellent. Picked up American Gods and Stardust to read more of Gaiman's stuff.Have Jonathon Strange and Mr. Norrell based upon recommendations from the fantasy genre thread and the latest of the Repairman Jack series "infernal" going right now.Shadow of the Wind was excellent for those looking for a great read. Really got into that one. The Historian was good and kept the storyline going for such a long book. It is slow, but a lot of retrospective. I liked the international sense of the book, being set in much of eastern Europe.I also read all of Cussler's book once I started on them, but he lost me in the last several years.Another author I read all of his books one summer, at least the Spencer novels, is Robert Parker. Great detective novels without being serious "whodunits"

Just finished watching a screener of Stardust, very enjoyable for adults as well as kids. A lot of cameos (that I won't give away) that include DeNiro and Ricky Gervais (Extras fans will get a kick out of it).

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Informal book club -- we're going through the classics:

Just finished The Heart Is A Lonely Hunter by Carson McCullers. Can't recommend this book enough. Great treatise on human loneliness and relationships.

Just starting "The Jungle" by Upton Sinclair. Read something the other day suggesting conditions are similar today in the Chinese textiles and manufacturing industries.

For fun on the side:

Re-read Allen Steele's "Coyote" trilogy, including the Amazon short story available through electronic download. A new story is being serialized in the current run of Asimov's magazine so I went back through the already published stuff.

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The Fingerprints of God by Robert Farrar Capon. Subtitled "Tracking the Divine Suspect Through a History of Images". Fascinating. In the prologue, Capon imagines a conversation among the Trinity on the eve of the Big Bang, discussing how they'll leave behind clues in history, and how everything ties together, even though we humans are bound by linear time in understanding it.

Capon takes readers on a sleuthing project, using his own uniquely developed history of images to find evidence of the Divine Suspect in our midst." "Capon first explores various images that prompt proper talk about God and the nature of Scripture. The Bible, he says, is the mystery story of God's hidden presence as the Divine Suspect behind all history. Capon discusses the misuse of Scripture due to literalist interpretation, looks at the ways Christ has suffered at the hands of human image-makers, and proposes a novel understanding of salvation history that clarifies the proper roles of Scripture, the Holy Spirit, and Jesus." "In the second part of the book Capon turns his magnifying glass on major thinkers from church history - Irenaeus, Athanasius, Anselm, Luther, Melanchthon, Calvin, Julian of Norwich, and others - pointing out both the strong and the weak images they have produced. Throughout the centuries, Capon sees God as the "Divine Bowler" trying to knock down the faulty "pins" of ideas that have been set up in the lanes of religious history, while also disclosing himself in profound and powerful ways.

Edited by oso diablo

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Finally got around to American Gods by Gaiman. I'm definitely not the :headbang: many of you in this thread appear to be, but I'm finding it a very enjoyable read.

The premise is pretty fascinating actually, and Gaiman is a fine story writer.

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Been reading a lot of genre fiction lately; Ludlum, Cussler, King, Crichton, Preston and Child.

Currently reading Warlock by Oakley Hall. And next up is either Stardust by Gaiman or Cryptonomicon by Stephenson, depending on when they become available at the library.

Warlock is the first western I have ever read, and so far it's great.

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