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Another killing at the hands of the Police

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13 minutes ago, Ketamine Dreams said:

Somehow there is a still a group of people who think the appropriate reaction is to protest this.  Yeah, let's live in a society where people can randomly shoot their gun in public and be a danger to society without consequence.  No thanks.

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There was a shooting here in Denver where a guy shot an intruder and then a cop came in and shot the homeowner. :mellow: 

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4 minutes ago, tjnc09 said:

Somehow there is a still a group of people who think the appropriate reaction is to protest this.  Yeah, let's live in a society where people can randomly shoot their gun in public and be a danger to society without consequence.  No thanks.

you know, i hate that this has become somewhat a black white thing or a black police thing.  it seems no one with a gun deserves to be shot and the police shouldn’t be concerned they are armed.  they are all great people and good people that don’t deserve to be shot.  

i saw a similar encounter recently on Live PD where the guy was walking with a gun and the cop repeatedly asked him to drop it, finally, he turned and shot the cop 2x point blank.  both were black.  i don’t remember this being on the nightly news though.

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1 hour ago, Ketamine Dreams said:

You can’t fix stupid.

 

Sydnee Brown, Blevins' cousin who has served as a spokesperson for the family, continued calls for Kelly and Schmidt to be charged in the shooting after seeing the video.

"Officers Ryan Kelly and Justin Schmidt should be fired without pay and prosecuted to the full extent of the law," Brown told Minneapolis ABC affiliate KSTP.

 

 

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On 7/17/2018 at 9:47 AM, irish eyes said:

So surrounding a car and intimidating is peaceful,  got it.

people must have forgotten about the Rodney King riots .....i know Reginald Denny hasnt forgotten what its like to be surrounded while driving

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On 7/16/2018 at 4:35 PM, tjnc09 said:

Chicago's homicide rate increased 58% from 2015-16 but decreased only 15% from 2016-17.  Great job everyone! 

probably running out of people to shoot

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2 hours ago, Cjw_55106 said:

You can’t fix stupid.

 

Sydnee Brown, Blevins' cousin who has served as a spokesperson for the family, continued calls for Kelly and Schmidt to be charged in the shooting after seeing the video.

"Officers Ryan Kelly and Justin Schmidt should be fired without pay and prosecuted to the full extent of the law," Brown told Minneapolis ABC affiliate KSTP.

 

 

This is the perfect example of people wanting to believe something and making up their mind before knowing the real story. 

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13 hours ago, parasaurolophus said:

This is the perfect example of people wanting to believe something and making up their mind before knowing not caring about the real story. 

 

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On 6/21/2018 at 6:11 PM, Andy Dufresne said:

Stop...running...from...cops.

Again...

Edit: Oh, and efinitely don't shoot at cops when running away from them.

Edited by Andy Dufresne

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On 7/30/2018 at 10:26 PM, parasaurolophus said:

This is the perfect example of people wanting to believe something and making up their mind before knowing the real story. 

Such is humanity -- no one EVER changes their minds about these kinds of events. And no information, facts, or evidence (aka "someone else's truth") makes a whit of difference. That first initial impression wins every single time -- and no human being ever seems to overcome that.

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22 minutes ago, ren hoek said:

Meet Bob Smith, the fake Facebook profile Memphis police allegedly used to spy on black activists

https://theappeal.org/memphis-police-surveillance-black-lives-matter-facebook-profile-exclusive/

I’m sorry but I have absolutely zero issue with undercover operations on Facebook to read social media posts, but stop short of actively hacking accounts to access private information. This is no different than traditional undercover operations. 

A buddy of mine (non LEO but military) did this for fun and pretty deeply infiltrated the online presence of Memphis gang culture, most notably the Grape Street Crips. It was both highly entertaining and somewhat terrifying to see the open sharing of highly illegal ####...

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On 7/30/2018 at 8:00 PM, avoiding injuries said:

Body cameras are turning out to be a very good thing for police officers. 

:goodposting: 

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22 minutes ago, Da Guru said:

I don’t blame the officer one bit here.

Suspect who has already stabbed one person, is presumably still armed with a knife, and repeatedly advances on officer despite commands to allow the officer to search for the weapon.

He violates the 21ft buffer rule which heightens the officer’s tension, pauses to begin to comply, then advances again well within striking distance, with the last lunge being clearly aggressive. 

Suicide by cop IMO. Zero fault on the officer. 

Edited by [icon]

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47 minutes ago, [icon] said:

I’m sorry but I have absolutely zero issue with undercover operations on Facebook to read social media posts, but stop short of actively hacking accounts to access private information. This is no different than traditional undercover operations. 

A buddy of mine (non LEO but military) did this for fun and pretty deeply infiltrated the online presence of Memphis gang culture, most notably the Grape Street Crips. It was both highly entertaining and somewhat terrifying to see the open sharing of highly illegal ####...

Why stop there?  Maybe they should sweep up all our posts to make sure we're not engaged in a sinister plot.  Perhaps they should extend beyond their surveillance of black organizers into gays, anarchists, alt rights, antifas, oathkeepers and DAPL protesters while they're at it.  I definitely can't foresee any problem at all with this short-sighted mindset.  

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23 minutes ago, ren hoek said:

Why stop there?  Maybe they should sweep up all our posts to make sure we're not engaged in a sinister plot.  Perhaps they should extend beyond their surveillance of black organizers into gays, anarchists, alt rights, antifas, oathkeepers and DAPL protesters while they're at it.  I definitely can't foresee any problem at all with this short-sighted mindset.  

So you're against proactive policing by way of undercover investigations? 

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9 minutes ago, ren hoek said:

Why stop there?  Maybe they should sweep up all our posts to make sure we're not engaged in a sinister plot.  Perhaps they should extend beyond their surveillance of black organizers into gays, anarchists, alt rights, antifas, oathkeepers and DAPL protesters while they're at it.  I definitely can't foresee any problem at all with this short-sighted mindset.  

I haven't read this whole thing, but do you assume privacy on facebook regardless of public or private status?

Thank god I don't have facebook, what a itshow it is.

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10 minutes ago, [icon] said:

So you're against proactive policing by way of undercover investigations? 

Yes.  I wouldn't voluntarily pay for a police force that infiltrates political movements.  

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13 minutes ago, Chemical X said:

I haven't read this whole thing, but do you assume privacy on facebook regardless of public or private status?

Thank god I don't have facebook, what a itshow it is.

No, I don't think there's a real expectation of privacy on public posts.  But I do find it insidious for local police forces to surveil nonviolent political organization.  That's not what I pay them for.  

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1 minute ago, ren hoek said:

No, I don't think there's a real expectation of privacy on public posts.  But I do find it insidious for local police forces to surveil nonviolent political organization.  That's not what I pay them for.  

well, nonviolent may be open to interpretation.  that said, it doesn't effect my life so I have no skin in the game.

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13 minutes ago, ren hoek said:

Yes.  I wouldn't voluntarily pay for a police force that infiltrates political movements.  

:shrug: then don’t live in Memphis.

I do, and I’m happy to see my tax dollars going into proactive investigative police work. :thumbup: 

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46 minutes ago, [icon] said:

:shrug: then don’t live in Memphis.

I do, and I’m happy to see my tax dollars going into proactive investigative police work. :thumbup: 

Do you want police to read your posts on fb for the same reason?  Or, say, your posts on this forum?  For your own good?  

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1 hour ago, ren hoek said:

Do you want police to read your posts on fb for the same reason?  Or, say, your posts on this forum?  For your own good?  

That depends, in your imaginary scenario, am I actively involved in or participating in a FB group for an organization that is at the very least loosely connected to large scale rioting,  vandalism, violence against law enforcement, illegal Protests that obstruct major public thoroughfares, etc? 

Edited by [icon]
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Can we get a thread title change to:

Another justified killing at the hands of the Police?

That would more accurately reflect the percentage of times the Police should be blamed. 

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8 minutes ago, Johnny Rock said:

Can we get a thread title change to:

Another justified killing at the hands of the Police?

That would more accurately reflect the percentage of times the Police should be blamed. 

?

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On 7/16/2018 at 9:18 AM, tjnc09 said:

The homicide rate in Chicago is the highest it has been in 20 years and citizens are more interested in destroying their city, defending criminals, and criticizing the police.  Sounds like they have it all figured out.

66! people shot over the weekend.  12 people killed.  

Edited by tjnc09

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24 minutes ago, tjnc09 said:

66! people shot over the weekend.  12 people killed.  

It’s too bad that they don’t have stringent gun laws in Illinois

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45 minutes ago, Jules Winnfield said:

It’s too bad that they don’t have stringent gun laws in Illinois

That doesn't matter when it takes less than an hour to travel to Indiana where gun laws are more relaxed.  The city of Chicago should be begging for more proactive police presence, not protesting when armed criminals are shot.

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You’ve been arrested by a dishonest cop. Can you win in a system set up to protect officers?

By the time the district attorney’s office learned about Ovalle’s misconduct, he had been a potential witness against 312 defendants. More than 230 were convicted.

A Times investigation last year identified Ovalle and others on a secret Sheriff’s Department list of deputies whose misconduct included falsely testifying in court, pulling over a motorist and receiving oral sex from her while on patrol, and tipping off a drug dealer’s girlfriend about a narcotics bust.

Los Angeles County Sheriff Jim McDonnell wanted to disclose the so-called Brady list of about 300 officers to prosecutors, but the deputies union went to court to stop him.

L.A. Times

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On 5/2/2017 at 8:11 AM, Henry Ford said:

Body cam footage contradicts the original story from the police - a teenager driving away from a pool party cops were breaking up was not reversing toward officers, but rather the car was driving away from them when the officer fired through the vehicle with a rifle, killing the passenger. The story has therefore changed  

http://www.cnn.com/2017/05/02/us/texas-cop-kills-teen-trnd/index.html

Update:  Roy Oliver, the officer, was just found guilty of murder.

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31 minutes ago, Henry Ford said:

Update:  Roy Oliver, the officer, was just found guilty of murder.

Last year police killed 1,147 people. Police were charged with a crime in 14 cases. This is the only case so far where an officer has been convicted.

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https://www.thedailybeast.com/officials-ignored-dying-mans-cries-for-help-as-latest-tragic-death-at-infamous-jail/

Quote

fter just two days in a New Orleans jail last October, 32-year-old Narada Mealey died an excruciating death.

During those 48 hours, Mealey quickly started to complain of abdominal pain, sickness, and nausea, the complaint alleges. Then he began vomiting—and told officials at the Orleans Parish facility that he was in severe pain.

Mealey was suffering from chronic ulcer problems at the time of his arrest and had been addicted to opioids, which he told a jail staff nurse, according to the lawsuit. Health-care staffers allegedly put him on the jail’s opioid-withdrawal protocol, giving him anti-nausea medications, acetaminophen, and an antidiarrheal medication. But the protocol requires staff to monitor his vital signs every eight hours, and the complaint claims health officials failed to do so.

Mealey, who was never given a bed, “made several calls to his family members, reporting to them that he was in tremendous pain, felt like he was going to die, and that medical personnel at the jail were refusing to provide him care,” according to the lawsuit. Though his family members allegedly went to the jail to try to help, staff members only gave him more anti-nausea drugs and acetaminophen, and failed to check his vitals, the complaint claims.

About 2 p.m. on October 29, Mealey collapsed on the floor and began violently vomiting. About 40 minutes later, he was allegedly taken to the jail’s medical unit, where he finally collapsed and went into cardiac arrest. Then he was transported to a local hospital.

“He was begging for help and in excruciating pain for two days, and they just didn’t do anything for him,” said civil-rights attorney Stephen Haedicke, who is representing Mealey’s family. “He was vomiting, he was in horrible pain, he collapsed on the floor—and they didn’t take him to the hospital.”

At University Medical Center, doctors diagnosed Mealey with a perforated gastric ulcer that was bleeding out.

He never regained consciousness and died on Nov. 2, 2017.

Mealey was arrested over a $420 court fee resulting from a 2015 conviction on a charge of misdemeanor simple marijuana possession. He is survived by four children, whose mothers, Bridget Armstrong and Natasha Tolbert, are the named as plaintiffs in the 20-page lawsuit.

The complaint was filed in federal U.S. District Court in the Eastern District of Louisiana and names Sheriff Marlin Gusman, several jail deputies, and health-care workers as defendants. Correct Care Solutions, which is contracted to provide medical and mental-health services to inmates in the jail, is also named as a defendant. The company contracts out services at 333 jails and more than 100 state and federal prisons in the United States. The Daily Beast previously reported that federal records show more than 140 lawsuits, some involving inmate deaths, have been filed against the company since 2005. Correct Care has said it does not comment on open lawsuits.

Mealey’s family has asked for unspecified damages.

“He shouldn’t have died like that,” the family’s attorney, Haedicke, told The Daily Beast on Wednesday. “We don’t know everything about what happened yet, but what’s clear is that the jail medical staff were not following protocols that they have for these situations.”

Mealey was one of six inmates to die at Orleans Parish Prison, which is operated by the Orleans Parish Sheriff's Office, in 2017, according to The New Orleans Advocate.

Just one week after Mealey’s death, deputies reportedly found 27-year-old Evan Sullivan unresponsive in his housing unit. He was taken to a local hospital, where he later died of what officials have said were natural causes.

But the Orleans Parish Prison’s extensive problems began much earlier than 2017.

The U.S. Department of Justice found, after investigations in both 2009 and 2012, that the facility was perpetrating “serious constitutional violations,” including “shockingly high rates of serious prisoner-on-prisoner violence and officer misconduct” and staffers who are “deliberately indifferent to prisoners with serious medical and mental-health needs.”

A federal consent decree in June 2013 outlined steps the parish “must take to ensure prisoner safety and adequate staffing of the facility,” according to the Southern Poverty Law Center, and independent monitors were put in place oversee the agreement to ensure compliance.

Monitors found just last week that the jail “is not safe for inmates or staff” and has “unacceptable” levels of violence, The Advocate reported.

“There’s still a huge laundry list of problems, from bad medical care to excessive violence,” Haedicke told The Daily Beast, adding that, since February 2013, there have been 17 deaths at the jail.

“It’s a terrible danger to people in New Orleans and for people who are sent there,” Haedicke said.

“These families keep having to go through this,” Haedicke said, noting the case of Ryan Miller, who in March 2015 hung himself with a telephone cord at the jail, hours after telling a guard he was having suicidal ideations.

“A lot of my cases have involved suicide at the jail, and Ryan’s case really stands out as one that’s tragic,” said Haedicke, who filed a lawsuit on behalf of Miller’s family in 2016. “It was so clear-cut. There was no dispute that they had left him unattended. There was no dispute that the reason they left him unattended was because they were understaffed.”

Miller’s case was settled out of court in June 2017, the terms of which were not publicly disclosed, said Haedicke.

When reached by The Daily Beast, an official in the sheriff’s office declined to comment on the allegations in the independent monitor’s report or the latest lawsuit.

This wasn't the police actively killing/murdering citizens, but it does fit with the general disregard of the humanity police tend to have toward people they interact with.

@SaintsInDome2006 Is this a big story in your neck of the woods, or nah?

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1 hour ago, Dedfin said:

Is this a big story in your neck of the woods, or nah?

The story about the consent-decree monitors' findings was on the front pages of our two major papers last week. Mealey's death has not "gone viral" locally, however.

I'm not sure how or why, but a lot of these kinds of stories tend to not gain traction in New Orleans. Things happen here that if they happened in St. Louis, Baltimore, or Florida would make national news. 

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2 hours ago, Dedfin said:

https://www.thedailybeast.com/officials-ignored-dying-mans-cries-for-help-as-latest-tragic-death-at-infamous-jail/

This wasn't the police actively killing/murdering citizens, but it does fit with the general disregard of the humanity police tend to have toward people they interact with.

@SaintsInDome2006 Is this a big story in your neck of the woods, or nah?

"General disregard of the humanity police tend to have toward people they interact with" :lmao:

Maybe he should have been more responsible and stayed out of jail.  

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2 hours ago, Dedfin said:

https://www.thedailybeast.com/officials-ignored-dying-mans-cries-for-help-as-latest-tragic-death-at-infamous-jail/

This wasn't the police actively killing/murdering citizens, but it does fit with the general disregard of the humanity police tend to have toward people they interact with.

@SaintsInDome2006 Is this a big story in your neck of the woods, or nah?

As Doug pointed out, reported but met with apathy.

But that's us all over. A few things going on. Our local newspapers have gone to hell. We used to have fantastic investigative reporting and that's largely gone away for a few reasons too lengthy to discuss here. We have a criminal sheriff's office which has been, not kidding, criminally run in the past. We have a court system that caps on fees to poor and rich alike in a variety of ways (sometimes unauthorized by law) but that specific situation - people getting arrested after missing court dates or being unable to pay fines - has been known here for some time, that kind of thing is inevitable and I'm almost certain it's not a first.

I'd like to give credit to the TP or Advocate for dragging this up but no the only reason we know about it is because the family filed a lawsuit. Thing is, in this city, the city makes money off its populace. It's done to the rich too, though obviously they can get out of this sort of jam. Black on black, white on white, whoever is running the show they don't care much about the system. Living here has really shaped almost of all of my admittedly weird views on government, corruption and misfeasance and incompetence and apathy all have a real human cost, this place is tragic at times, but the apathy, that's on the people and it always has been. The only exception was post-Katrina and even then the drive, the spirit ebbed away like many said it would. It's a shame.

Edited by SaintsInDome2006
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1 hour ago, Donkey Derp said:

"General disregard of the humanity police tend to have toward people they interact with" :lmao:

Maybe he should have been more responsible and stayed out of jail.  

:finger:

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1 hour ago, Donkey Derp said:

I know common sense can be difficult, but let's remind everyone why police are needed:

https://wreg.com/2018/09/06/cincinnati-police-respond-to-active-shooter-at-bank/

He says it "could have been much, much worse" if not for the immediate police response to end the threat.

 

:goodposting:

 

How many of the keyboard jockeys regularly bashing police would have the stones to step up to a situation like that? 

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