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ericttspikes

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  1. Lots of mixing of apples and oranges in here. Teachers are not elected officials.That's my ####### point.It's not your ####### job to evaluate the job and pay of teachers. It's your job to evaluate the job of the people that you elect, just as a shareholder you elect a CEO. Everything that happens underneath is not any more of your concern in one case than the other. So....Scott Walker was elected. I agree with what he is doing. Everything kosher? Walker ran on Fiscal Conservatism, job creation, and getting rid of the crazy spending that is bringing down this state. Liberals want us to treat the election like it was just a suggestion now that they lost. But before this past Novembers elections, all we heard from the liberal crowd was "We won, get over it". You think Walker is stepping on only liberals? Bob Jahn, a highway employee from Green Lake and a “proud conservative,” called the plan an intrusion on individual rights which singles out public employees over other Wisconsin workers and goes against every core conservative principle there is. “I have disagreed with my union in the past,” Jahn said, “but I’ve never been more energized to go out and fight with public employees of this state.” Brenda Kline, a food service worker from Green Bay, said she went to the polls last year to “protect our freedoms from government threat and to create jobs. I never dreamed that this would be the result.” Janice Bobholz, a deputy sheriff in Dodge Country, called the right to collectively bargain “a freedom that many have died to protect.” Despite the fact that law enforcement personnel is exempt from many of the restrictions in the budget proposal, Bobholz said that “an attack on the rights of one American is an attack on the rights of all Americans.” http://news.firedoglake.com/2011/02/14/deb...ublicans-waver/
  2. Is somebody arguing with that?Collective bargaining is not a "right" under most definitions of the word that I know. It is, however, something that developed organically as a part of a free market economy. I take it that you support this government intrusion into this naturally occurring economic phenomenon? The leader of the Wisconsin teacher's union referred to a "God-given right to join a real union", and virtually everyone involved has said that Walker is attempting to remove "workers' rights".Executive Order 10988 was issued by President John F. Kennedy in 1962 and recognizes the rights of federal employees to bargain with management.
  3. From what was posted earlier in the thread, no existing contract is being broken. The contract has already expired.Yes, Walker appears to be overly heavy-handed in his approach to move forward, but best I can tell, he is not planning to renege on promises already made.Could be the case. I can't tell fact from fiction on this one.If that is the case, teachers and whoever else have the right to strike, no? And then the governor has the right to hire scabs. I'd be curious to know how much hiring scabs would cost. My guess is a hell of lot. And the bureaucracy of a "free agent" hiring system also seems like it would be very costly to implement and maintain, also adding to uncertainty and possible service shut downs. Dunno, doesn't seem like a lot of thought has gone into the governor's decision other than politics. Something doesn't seem right when debate is taken off the table.
  4. I've dealt with this topic in the Chris Christie thread. There is a significant difference between private sector unions and public sectors unions. When the public pays the bill through tax monies taken by the government by force, the foundation of the dispute is different. I wouldn't even call this union busting as the term implies what happened in the private sector. We have a different animal here with state and municipal workers. Now, I am not from this state so I have no idea what the real truth is about all the stuff being floated around, but I do live in NJ and know exactly whats going on here.Public unions need to realize the difference and work with the system the states have at this point or, in my opinion, they need to be dissolved and/or destroyed. It has nothing to do with worker's rights and everything to do with the police power and taxing power of the government and how those powers are used to take money from taxpayers to give to public employees. The states that are having this fight - NJ for one - are going to go bankrupt if something doesn't change. When the debt hole to be solved is the size of over 1/3 of the total actual budget and the pension systems are underfunded for prior promises - like NJ - it has to be made up somewhere. Higher and higher taxes cost our state billions and didn't do anything. Bonding to pay for salaries makes the problem worse. The only true fix is to stop the madness. Gov. Christie had a discussion with a cop and I posted the link in that thread. The cop was upset that his last raise, because of the new laws passed including caps on local spending and pension steps and raises including having to now pay for some portion of medical benefits resulted in him only getting a $4 raise in his last check. The answer by Christie was simple and easy - the room was filled with taxpayers of whom 10% are unemployed and others who haven't seen a raise in years. Be happy you still have a check and work with us to fix the system so that you actually ahve a pension in 20 years and not a bankrupt system that can't pay anything leaving you out to dry. The choice is up to the unions in NJ - it's going to be a choice most states force at some point because they won't have a choice if they are anywhere near as screwed up as we were for the past 20 years. This has everything to do with worker's rights and their ability to collectively bargain.Not the way I see it. It's a different animal when the "boss" is the taxpayer who is forced to turn over funds to the government to make these payments.Government employees are taxpayers too, no? There seems like there are, or at least should be, laws in place to address bad contracts other than unilaterally breaking them. Seems that many unions in the private sector have renegotiated their deals based on the exact realities you describe (UAW comes to mind). I wouldn't expect anyone to be happy with someone stripping away agreed upon rights and refusing to negotiate. These are real problems, but I suspect there are other ways to fix them than what Walker seems to be proposing. What I do like about what I think I see out of Christie is that he doesn't seem like an ideologue. I could be wrong. The Wisconsin thing seems way more about ideology than an actual serious attempt to fix the problem. No matter what side your on, corporate interests or workers rights, that is a dangerous precedent IMO.
  5. I've dealt with this topic in the Chris Christie thread. There is a significant difference between private sector unions and public sectors unions. When the public pays the bill through tax monies taken by the government by force, the foundation of the dispute is different. I wouldn't even call this union busting as the term implies what happened in the private sector. We have a different animal here with state and municipal workers. Now, I am not from this state so I have no idea what the real truth is about all the stuff being floated around, but I do live in NJ and know exactly whats going on here.Public unions need to realize the difference and work with the system the states have at this point or, in my opinion, they need to be dissolved and/or destroyed. It has nothing to do with worker's rights and everything to do with the police power and taxing power of the government and how those powers are used to take money from taxpayers to give to public employees. The states that are having this fight - NJ for one - are going to go bankrupt if something doesn't change. When the debt hole to be solved is the size of over 1/3 of the total actual budget and the pension systems are underfunded for prior promises - like NJ - it has to be made up somewhere. Higher and higher taxes cost our state billions and didn't do anything. Bonding to pay for salaries makes the problem worse. The only true fix is to stop the madness.Gov. Christie had a discussion with a cop and I posted the link in that thread. The cop was upset that his last raise, because of the new laws passed including caps on local spending and pension steps and raises including having to now pay for some portion of medical benefits resulted in him only getting a $4 raise in his last check. The answer by Christie was simple and easy - the room was filled with taxpayers of whom 10% are unemployed and others who haven't seen a raise in years. Be happy you still have a check and work with us to fix the system so that you actually ahve a pension in 20 years and not a bankrupt system that can't pay anything leaving you out to dry. The choice is up to the unions in NJ - it's going to be a choice most states force at some point because they won't have a choice if they are anywhere near as screwed up as we were for the past 20 years.I get the other side of this. I own my own business so I really have no experience with unions or even the hiring of union employees other than contractors I choose to hire. But I do know contracts, and when I agree to a bad one it's my responsibility. I wish I could just say "sorry, I screwed up and I can't honor my contract because it will hurt me financially" without legal ramifications. Isn't there some responsibility in negotiating good contracts on the State side? Again, I don't know what the facts are in WI or NJ for that matter in regards to their CBA with the groups in question, but who exactly is agreeing to these contracts if they are bad deals for the States? And if they are bad deals, why not go back an re-negotiate them at the time to renegotiate them? When I write a contract I'm legally bound to it.Another question that I don't know the answer to is that if a State claims it's bankrupt, why not go bankrupt? That would solve the problem of owing money they don't have, right?
  6. I'm a cynic, but I think this chart speaks volumes: http://www.opensecrets.org/pacs/toppacs.ph...010&party=A Top 20 spending PACs for 2009-2010 American Fedn of St/Cnty/Munic Employees $2,316,000 DEMS 99% REPS 0% American Federation of Teachers $2,302,250 DEMS 99% REPS 0% The only 2 with zero political influence with Republicans. Much like the demonizing and the killing of ACORN because they effectively organized the poor to vote Democratic, I don't think it's any mystery why all of a sudden Republican governors are aiming their guns at these two unions in particular. But I also agree with the thought that elections matter. Unfortunately for regular working people, in large part to the Supreme Court over reach on Citizens United, their ability to organize and have a political voice to combat immense corporate interests is being stripped away. Union busting is a corporate tool to remove dissent, organization and to crush political opposition.
  7. That is probably what the governor was shooting for, but he had to play hardball to even get them to the table.On what basis do you say this is what Walker wants? He's been very clear in his statements, which I heard again this morning on the radio - he is not interested in any discussion or compromise on this. He's got his "emergency" and is going to exploit it to cram through legislation that will effectively eliminate public unions (other than fire and police). Personally, I think that might be a good thing, although I actually think the fire and police unions are the worst ones of the bunch.Personally, I'm a little appalled they aren't included in this. I have a very hard time speaking against teachers in any way as a lot of great educators helped sculpt my life and I have a lot of friends currently teaching here in Wisconsin. It's really a shame they are being singled out in all of this.I admit I don't know the facts about this enough to have anything but a gut reaction. I'm trying to understand this and still don't know by reading 7 pages here, but I don't get the scapegoating of teachers either. Perhaps Wisconsin and the other states where teachers are under attack have teachers living high on the hog in million dollar homes, but my wife's parents were life-long teachers in Illinois. Her Dad was a principal, mom a grade school teacher. They didn't do it for the money as evident by the fact they both now live happily in the mountains in Virgina in a palatial double wide. They don't complain about it, and they are very happy, but they surely didn't get rich teaching. Punishing educators seems like probably the worst message you could send as a state and a country IMO.
  8. This is not true:In October 2010, the Center on Budget and Policy Priorities found that Wisconsin’s shortfall in the current budget -- 2010-2011 -- was $3.4 billion, or 23.9 percent of its budget. That indicated Wisconsin was in slightly worse shape than California, whose deficit was $17.9 billion, or 21.6 percent of its state budget. Next Wisconsin governor faces big deficit Wisconsin budget rated in worst 10 Wisconsin has a total state debt of $17,971,519,547 when calculated by adding the total of outstanding debt, pension and OPEB UAAL’s, unemployment trust funds and the 2010 budget gap as of July 2010 Even the ex Governor Doyle admitted there was a huge deficit. So you're saying that the Fiscal Bureau report is a fraud? "In its Jan. 31 memo to legislators on the condition of the state's budget, the Fiscal Bureau determined that the state will end the year with a balance of $121.4 million." PDF of memo here: http://legis.wisconsin.gov/lfb/Misc/2011_0...amp;Darling.pdf
  9. That kind of thinking seems silly in this day and age. We should aspire to be more like Apple, an American company that makes innovative products that both Americans and ROW are happy to pay a premium for. Propping up Ford or GM for making similar quality cars to Honda or Toyota at a higher cost just because the employees are American is a recipe for disaster.Apple uses Chinese labor that can't stop committing suicide at their plants. Now that's a stressful job. But hey, iPads are only 5 bills. http://latimesblogs.latimes.com/technology...-last-year.html
  10. We are engaged in a race to the bottom. The US can't compete with $1 an hour labor, child labor, forced labor, etc.. The bigger question is why should we? Unless you own a business, you're a worker. The trend is cheaper labor, longer hours, lower income and lower quality of life standards. I'm not sure what the answer is, but there was a time when made in America meant something besides being the cheapest. Along with our jobs I think we also exported our pride.Consumers need to figure out that all of this is tied together. There are hidden costs for buying the cheapest foreign made product, and we are paying them.Great. So what should the company do to compete in the meantime? Again, you're demonizing companies which lower wages, and you're demonizing companies that send jobs overseas, so what should they do that will meet with your approval?It doesn't matter what I think. The cat is out of the bag. The US way of life is dying by 1000 paper cuts. Globalization is a zero sum game. For other countries to rise, ours has to sink.Companies who are so enamored with the low wage countries and no taxes should move everything there, not just their manufacturing. Move their families there. Use their schools. Use their roads. Instead we are in a period of reckoning. Corporations are moving jobs away, look to avoid paying US taxes and yet they expect to enjoy the freedoms, infrastructure and safety America affords them and their families.
  11. We are engaged in a race to the bottom. The US can't compete with $1 an hour labor, child labor, forced labor, etc.. The bigger question is why should we? Unless you own a business, you're a worker. The trend is cheaper labor, longer hours, lower income and lower quality of life standards. I'm not sure what the answer is, but there was a time when made in America meant something besides being the cheapest. Along with our jobs I think we also exported our pride.Consumers need to figure out that all of this is tied together. There are hidden costs for buying the cheapest foreign made product, and we are paying them.If the answer is relying on consumers to pay higher prices because it's the right thing to do - we're screwed. You're smart enough to know that.They are paying a higher price in the terms I talked about. I'm old enough to remember my grandfathers generation. There was cheap crap made in Japan and China then too. They didn't buy it. There was a social stigma on foreign made junk. They had pride in the American worker and the American product. He bought American cars only, even when there were cheaper ones out there. That kind of thinking is gone and it isn't a coincidence that wages are stagnant and there are more dual income families than ever. The trade off for cheap goods and services is high. And I do feel that we are screwed. I haven't seen any evidence to the contrary in the past 15 years.
  12. We are engaged in a race to the bottom. The US can't compete with $1 an hour labor, child labor, forced labor, etc.. The bigger question is why should we? Unless you own a business, you're a worker. The trend is cheaper labor, longer hours, lower income and lower quality of life standards. I'm not sure what the answer is, but there was a time when made in America meant something besides being the cheapest. Along with our jobs I think we also exported our pride.Consumers need to figure out that all of this is tied together. There are hidden costs for buying the cheapest foreign made product, and we are paying them.
  13. Which states? People that live in Wisconsin, love it. They aren't going anywhere.Kathy> hi.People love California too. But as taxes began to rise, corporations began to leave. New start up businesses are starting up elsewhere. I'm sure people love living in Wisconsin, but companies see the bottom line as everything. Raising taxes will make your state less competitive.Having crappy schools, poor infrastructure and poor public services also will make a state less competitive.
  14. The millionaires and billionaires couldn't part with a 13k tax increase but a middle class family should shut up and take it in the form of a pay cut? We are screwed as a nation.
  15. I'm pretty sure people were taking acid when they went to see it in 68.
  16. This weeks was really good. I liked the first one too, but there were 3-4 clunkers. Hoping they are back on track.
  17. Or at least blackmail the guy. Can't tell if threatening to out Lee is something he'd do, but I'd assume so by how he treated the Honda guys.
  18. Top notch acting in this one. Hamm was on fire. He was so good that the only sour note for me was the phone call to Anna's niece Stephanie where she wasn't close to being the same league acting as Hamm. That really stood out to me since that was such a powerful moment in the episode. Great mix of ad biz and personal life. This show is one of the best of all time.
  19. The season is really hitting stride. This can't end well for Don. Roger feels like he created him and probably feels that he can take him out. Ted Chaough is gunning for him. Don's drinking is slipping him up. I have a feeling his past life "secret" will be used to try to take him down again. He's in an awful spot.
  20. Love these episodes that have the advertising focus. The personal stuff is great, but I love watching Don and company work. The plan for Honda was brilliant. My favorite episode of the season so far. Nice mix of work and personal story lines.
  21. Decent episode. Watching a Christmas episode in August didn't work for me.
  22. Freddie gave Josh some great advice. Powerful stuff.
  23. My impression is that season in and season out the Time Bandit finds the crab quick. Didn't they have the one year where they got done so quick they went vacationing with the captain of the Kodiak? Anyway, given that I think Wizard captain is a doosh I wouldn't put it past him to mooch crabbing spots from the Time Bandit. But maybe that's how it works. From looking at some of the screens it looks like these boats are all over each other with their strings. Last season Keith/Wizard got caught putting a string of pots right on top of another boats (CM I believe.) Gotta think that's his MO.Oh, and major to the film crew on the Northwestern. The footage from the blue crab trip has been just awesome. Yeah, I hope we see more of that island they showed in the distance. That looked cool.
  24. The Kodiak is hurting at finding crab. Whenever they show a close-up of the screen that shows where the strings are located, like the scene when the Time Bandit ran over the Wizards pot, the screen seems to indicate the name the boat who owns the pots and color codes the strings. I could be wrong, but I thought I saw "Wizard" labeling the string that was right on top of the Time Bandits string. If that's the case, why doesn't the captain of the Kodiak just find where some other successful boats are laying strings down and fish right there? Pride? It almost seems that the Wizard just finds the Time Bandits stings and just fishes off them.
  25. Tix for sale, for cost: (2) 7/2, North Carolina, Pavillion 8, row M, seats 1, 2 (center aisle) $126 for both Plans to go out East for the summer changed. I listed them on Stubhub today but would rather not have to pay them the fees if a phan wants these. I'll split the shipping. Shoot me a message if interested. edited: Portsmouth, VA tix sold.
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