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Wong Vs. Greenwood (1 Viewer)

Who will be the man in Houston?

  • Greenwood

    Votes: 0 0.0%
  • Wong

    Votes: 0 0.0%

  • Total voters
    0
Voted Greenwood, but this is really a tossup. Either or both could post good numbers this year. This week, both will see a lot of Willis headed at them.

 
It sounds like Wong will continue to be a 3-down LBer for the Texans, while Greenwood will be delegated only 2-down duties.I gotta go with Wong, even though I like Greenwood as a sleeper this year.

 
Do you have a link in relation to Wong being a 3-down player? I may start him this week over Sam Cowart.
Ask and you shall receive...link:

http://www.houstontexans.com/news/news_detail.php?PRKey=1715

CAPTAIN KAILEE: Linebacker Kailee Wong’s switch from outside linebacker to inside linebacker has been well-documented this off-season. Yet one facet of Wong’s transition that hasn’t been widely discussed is his added responsibility of calling the plays in the huddle, something he hasn’t done since his days with the Minnesota Vikings.

Changing positions has its difficulties. But assuming a new role as the defensive “captain” is even more challenging. Nevertheless, it’s a responsibility that Wong relishes.

“It’s something I’m pretty comfortable with,” Wong said. “Anything I can do to help the team and win, ultimately, I’m excited to do.”

One of the benefits of being the defensive signal-caller is that it forces a player to raise his awareness level. Aside from knowing what his duties are in a certain set, Wong must know where other players line up and what their jobs are on each play. So far, it has required Wong to raise his concentration level.

“You’re so into the game because you’re always doing something in your mind,” he said. “You’re always making adjustments for people. You’re always calling them out. You’re always doing those various techniques that you have to do in order to be the signal-caller. So absolutely, you stay in the game.”

Capers has developed a comfort level with Wong the past three seasons, which makes him confident that the seven-year veteran can handle the extra duties.

“I like having Kailee out in the front of our defense,” Capers said. “I think he is one of our best leaders. He’s a smart guy. You know you can count on him. He’s an intelligent guy that can handle all the things out there, and he’s a guy that will be on the field all three downs.”

 
It sounds like Wong will continue to be a 3-down LBer for the Texans, while Greenwood will be delegated only 2-down duties.

I gotta go with Wong, even though I like Greenwood as a sleeper this year.
I agree with Weiner Dog.
 
Do you have a link in relation to Wong being a 3-down player? I may start him this week over Sam Cowart.
Ask and you shall receive...link:

http://www.houstontexans.com/news/news_detail.php?PRKey=1715

CAPTAIN KAILEE: Linebacker Kailee Wong’s switch from outside linebacker to inside linebacker has been well-documented this off-season. Yet one facet of Wong’s transition that hasn’t been widely discussed is his added responsibility of calling the plays in the huddle, something he hasn’t done since his days with the Minnesota Vikings.

Changing positions has its difficulties. But assuming a new role as the defensive “captain” is even more challenging. Nevertheless, it’s a responsibility that Wong relishes.

“It’s something I’m pretty comfortable with,” Wong said. “Anything I can do to help the team and win, ultimately, I’m excited to do.”

One of the benefits of being the defensive signal-caller is that it forces a player to raise his awareness level. Aside from knowing what his duties are in a certain set, Wong must know where other players line up and what their jobs are on each play. So far, it has required Wong to raise his concentration level.

“You’re so into the game because you’re always doing something in your mind,” he said. “You’re always making adjustments for people. You’re always calling them out. You’re always doing those various techniques that you have to do in order to be the signal-caller. So absolutely, you stay in the game.”

Capers has developed a comfort level with Wong the past three seasons, which makes him confident that the seven-year veteran can handle the extra duties.

“I like having Kailee out in the front of our defense,” Capers said. “I think he is one of our best leaders. He’s a smart guy. You know you can count on him. He’s an intelligent guy that can handle all the things out there, and he’s a guy that will be on the field all three downs.”
Where does it say or guess that Greenwodd is coming off the field. Wasn't Greenwood a OLB much like Wong before they both moved inside.Tom

 
Do you have a link in relation to Wong being a 3-down player? I may start him this week over Sam Cowart.
Ask and you shall receive...link:

http://www.houstontexans.com/news/news_detail.php?PRKey=1715

CAPTAIN KAILEE: Linebacker Kailee Wong’s switch from outside linebacker to inside linebacker has been well-documented this off-season. Yet one facet of Wong’s transition that hasn’t been widely discussed is his added responsibility of calling the plays in the huddle, something he hasn’t done since his days with the Minnesota Vikings.

Changing positions has its difficulties. But assuming a new role as the defensive “captain” is even more challenging. Nevertheless, it’s a responsibility that Wong relishes.

“It’s something I’m pretty comfortable with,” Wong said. “Anything I can do to help the team and win, ultimately, I’m excited to do.”

One of the benefits of being the defensive signal-caller is that it forces a player to raise his awareness level. Aside from knowing what his duties are in a certain set, Wong must know where other players line up and what their jobs are on each play. So far, it has required Wong to raise his concentration level.

“You’re so into the game because you’re always doing something in your mind,” he said. “You’re always making adjustments for people. You’re always calling them out. You’re always doing those various techniques that you have to do in order to be the signal-caller. So absolutely, you stay in the game.”

Capers has developed a comfort level with Wong the past three seasons, which makes him confident that the seven-year veteran can handle the extra duties.

“I like having Kailee out in the front of our defense,” Capers said. “I think he is one of our best leaders. He’s a smart guy. You know you can count on him. He’s an intelligent guy that can handle all the things out there, and he’s a guy that will be on the field all three downs.”
Where does it say or guess that Greenwodd is coming off the field. Wasn't Greenwood a OLB much like Wong before they both moved inside.Tom
Greenwood has not had much coverage responsibility in his career. Heck...in 62 career games, the lad only has 5 PD's. For comparative purposes, Wong has had a whopping 25 PD's in only his last 32 games alone. Also, Wong presents the opponent's offense a more intimidating pass-rusher than Greenwood. Wong is two inches taller and 10lbs heavier. Greenwood only has three sacks in his four-year career, while Wong has 15 sacks over the past four years.More importantly, the main purpose of having Babin and Peek in the starting lineup is to allow them to pin their ears back and rush the passer. There is no way these two converted DE's will be played on rushing downs only. It would defeat the purpose of having them on the field.

Hope this helps. :thumbup:

 
Do you have a link in relation to Wong being a 3-down player? I may start him this week over Sam Cowart.
Ask and you shall receive...link:

http://www.houstontexans.com/news/news_detail.php?PRKey=1715

CAPTAIN KAILEE: Linebacker Kailee Wong’s switch from outside linebacker to inside linebacker has been well-documented this off-season. Yet one facet of Wong’s transition that hasn’t been widely discussed is his added responsibility of calling the plays in the huddle, something he hasn’t done since his days with the Minnesota Vikings.

Changing positions has its difficulties. But assuming a new role as the defensive “captain” is even more challenging. Nevertheless, it’s a responsibility that Wong relishes.

“It’s something I’m pretty comfortable with,” Wong said. “Anything I can do to help the team and win, ultimately, I’m excited to do.”

One of the benefits of being the defensive signal-caller is that it forces a player to raise his awareness level. Aside from knowing what his duties are in a certain set, Wong must know where other players line up and what their jobs are on each play. So far, it has required Wong to raise his concentration level.

“You’re so into the game because you’re always doing something in your mind,” he said. “You’re always making adjustments for people. You’re always calling them out. You’re always doing those various techniques that you have to do in order to be the signal-caller. So absolutely, you stay in the game.”

Capers has developed a comfort level with Wong the past three seasons, which makes him confident that the seven-year veteran can handle the extra duties.

“I like having Kailee out in the front of our defense,” Capers said. “I think he is one of our best leaders. He’s a smart guy. You know you can count on him. He’s an intelligent guy that can handle all the things out there, and he’s a guy that will be on the field all three downs.”
Where does it say or guess that Greenwodd is coming off the field. Wasn't Greenwood a OLB much like Wong before they both moved inside.Tom
Greenwood has not had much coverage responsibility in his career. Heck...in 62 career games, the lad only has 5 PD's. For comparative purposes, Wong has had a whopping 25 PD's in only his last 32 games alone. Also, Wong presents the opponent's offense a more intimidating pass-rusher than Greenwood. Wong is two inches taller and 10lbs heavier. Greenwood only has three sacks in his four-year career, while Wong has 15 sacks over the past four years.More importantly, the main purpose of having Babin and Peek in the starting lineup is to allow them to pin their ears back and rush the passer. There is no way these two converted DE's will be played on rushing downs only. It would defeat the purpose of having them on the field.

Hope this helps. :thumbup:
Great post and wonderful research, however it does nt answer my question nor it is of any help. Where has it been said, either in that article or elsewhere that Greenwood is a 2 down LB. Are they that dissapointed with their prized FA zquisition that they will relagate him to being a version of Earl Holmes?

Believe me, as a Greenwood owner I would love to know this before I start him.

Tom

 

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