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$10,000


CicncyKid

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4500 Roth IRAthe rest....who knows.. maybe an engagement ring.

someone is sniffing the laughing gas this morning
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for those answering "pay off my car", why are you putting money into a depreciating asset? serious question

Because they already are with their car loan?The better question is why are you paying twice the selling price for a depreciating asset? The answer is, of course, because I don't have the cash on hand.
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for those answering "pay off my car", why are you putting money into a depreciating asset? serious question

Because they already are with their car loan?The better question is why are you paying twice the selling price for a depreciating asset? The answer is, of course, because I don't have the cash on hand.
so you'd pay cash for your car if you could?
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10K would be a nice windfall. If it were me:$3K bank (rainy day fund)$3K Invest (probably 2 or 3 stocks I think have a chance of taking off)$2K Kids college funds$2K spend on something absolutely stupid and unnecessary for me and my wife.

No taxes where you live, eh? :popcorn:
only if i claimed it. Gifts under 11K fall under the proverbial radar where I'm from.
what about weekly gifts of 2500 up to about 40000?
Who are you getting protection money from?
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for those answering "pay off my car", why are you putting money into a depreciating asset? serious question

Because they already are with their car loan?The better question is why are you paying twice the selling price for a depreciating asset? The answer is, of course, because I don't have the cash on hand.
so you'd pay cash for your car if you could?
Depends on the interest rate you can get. If it is 8%, heck yeah pay cash if you can. If it is 2.5% (what I have on one we purchased a year ago), then no. I could pay that car off now, but it is earning more than that in the bank at the moment. It is also nice to have that amount liquid instead of tied up in a hunk of steel and leather.
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In the sweet old country where I come from

Nobody ever works

Yeah nothing gets done

We hang fire, we hang fire

You know marrying money is a full time job

I don't need the aggravation

I'm a lazy slob

I hang fire, I hang fire

Hang fire, put it on the wire

We've got nothing to eat

We got nowhere to work

Nothing to drink

We just lost our shirts

I'm on the dole

We ain't for hire

Say what the hell

Say what the hell, hang fire

Hang fire, hang fire, put it on the wire

Doo doo doo

Here's ten thousand dollars go have some fun

Put it all off at a hundred to one

Hang fire, hang fire, put it on the wire

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Um, no. Your homeowner's policy should spell out your deductible for stuctural damage. They can't just change those terms without notifying you. Unless that change was made prior to your renewal of the policy and you simply didn't notice the modified language, they can't just change the terms of your coverage.

I remember now. When we moved to our new home (the one that was subsiquently damaged), my wife called AIG to notify them of the move and that we wanted the exact same coverage as we had before.

"Exact same" to them apparently meant the same price point, where to us it meant the same coverage. They didn't bother to detail the differences in coverage when we renewed the policy.

Or something like that. Either way, they weren't very helpful. So now I'm on the hook for around $7k for my roof.

Well, you can certainly handle things as you will, but if I was in your position I'd be raising holy hell and throwing the words "bad faith" around liberally.
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67 posts and nobody would donate any part of the 10k to charity? My parents raised me better than that. Any time we get unexpected money, we give some of it to the less fortunate. My wife and I usually give $100 of our Christmas bonus to the local animal shelter. Not much, but every little bit helps. I am highly disappointed in the FFA right now!

I am going to assume 10k after taxes for easy math:

7k (ish) to credit card/2nd mortgage

2k (ish) to family vacation somewhere nice that we couldn't normally afford

1k (ish) to charity

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67 posts and nobody would donate any part of the 10k to charity? My parents raised me better than that. Any time we get unexpected money, we give some of it to the less fortunate. My wife and I usually give $100 of our Christmas bonus to the local animal shelter. Not much, but every little bit helps. I am highly disappointed in the FFA right now!I am going to assume 10k after taxes for easy math:7k (ish) to credit card/2nd mortgage2k (ish) to family vacation somewhere nice that we couldn't normally afford1k (ish) to charity

The more I'm taxed, the more that I already think I'm contributing to charities. We contribute to charities too, but it's awfully hard to get motivated to contribute more when the government is already giving away so much of my money as part of its social programs.
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67 posts and nobody would donate any part of the 10k to charity? My parents raised me better than that. Any time we get unexpected money, we give some of it to the less fortunate. My wife and I usually give $100 of our Christmas bonus to the local animal shelter. Not much, but every little bit helps. I am highly disappointed in the FFA right now!I am going to assume 10k after taxes for easy math:7k (ish) to credit card/2nd mortgage2k (ish) to family vacation somewhere nice that we couldn't normally afford1k (ish) to charity

The more I'm taxed, the more that I already think I'm contributing to charities. We contribute to charities too, but it's awfully hard to get motivated to contribute more when the government is already giving away so much of my money as part of its social programs.Also, I always dump a dollar or 2 in pretty much any donation bucket I'm confronted with. It's not like I've got a vault full of cash to swim in.
This is sort of how i feel too. Now, I'm, just starting a career, so I'm saving a lot of $$ for important stuff like a car and my own place. However, I know that out of the roughly 1/4 of my paycheck that they take every 2 weeks, a portion of that is going to stuff like welfare and social security. I am not against those things, but i know that i won't ever see any benefit from "giving" that money. Thats charity IMO. Now, some of my money also goes to funding the fire dept, schools, parks and I'll always be in favor of that.
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67 posts and nobody would donate any part of the 10k to charity? My parents raised me better than that. Any time we get unexpected money, we give some of it to the less fortunate. My wife and I usually give $100 of our Christmas bonus to the local animal shelter. Not much, but every little bit helps. I am highly disappointed in the FFA right now!I am going to assume 10k after taxes for easy math:7k (ish) to credit card/2nd mortgage2k (ish) to family vacation somewhere nice that we couldn't normally afford1k (ish) to charity

The more I'm taxed, the more that I already think I'm contributing to charities. We contribute to charities too, but it's awfully hard to get motivated to contribute more when the government is already giving away so much of my money as part of its social programs.
My one humanities professor in college wrote an article that detailed how much people gave to the less fortunate today versus the turn of the 20th century. He included taxes paid that go towards social programs as money that people give today. Not only did people give more money back then, but they gave more of their time as well. The drop in money given correlates pretty well to the rise of federal social programs. If the government is stepping in and taxing people through the nose because they say that the government is going to provide for people, then why would most people give above and beyond that? And if the government is taking care of it, then why would individuals give their own time?
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Let's say you are handed $10,000 you weren't expecting. What would you do with it? I honestly can't come up with anything other than buying a nice hot tub for our deck or putting in a bathroom in our finished basement. Sure, I could take a really nice vacation with the wife, but we can take a great vacation on only $1500. I wouldn't waste the cash on a WSOP spot, but perhaps a $330 satellite.What would you do with 10 grand if you had it?

Pay off all my debt.put $4000.00 in savingsput a down payment on a newer car ( I'll never buy brand new ) like $3,000maybe get a nice big screen tv with HD or whatever the popular thing is nawadays. I've had a 27 inch nothing special for 7 years now.
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67 posts and nobody would donate any part of the 10k to charity? My parents raised me better than that. Any time we get unexpected money, we give some of it to the less fortunate. My wife and I usually give $100 of our Christmas bonus to the local animal shelter. Not much, but every little bit helps. I am highly disappointed in the FFA right now!I am going to assume 10k after taxes for easy math:7k (ish) to credit card/2nd mortgage2k (ish) to family vacation somewhere nice that we couldn't normally afford1k (ish) to charity

The more I'm taxed, the more that I already think I'm contributing to charities. We contribute to charities too, but it's awfully hard to get motivated to contribute more when the government is already giving away so much of my money as part of its social programs.
My one humanities professor in college wrote an article that detailed how much people gave to the less fortunate today versus the turn of the 20th century. He included taxes paid that go towards social programs as money that people give today. Not only did people give more money back then, but they gave more of their time as well. The drop in money given correlates pretty well to the rise of federal social programs. If the government is stepping in and taxing people through the nose because they say that the government is going to provide for people, then why would most people give above and beyond that? And if the government is taking care of it, then why would individuals give their own time?
We studied the same thing in my economics studies in college. It's not a good thing that people have simply surrendered their moral imperative to help others to the large faceless governmental apparatus. Another example: fewer motorists stop to help others in accidents nowadays because they assume that emergency personnel are on their way.
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$500 donation to an animal rescue

$2500 home improvements

$2500 vacation with girlfriend to someplace we both want to go

$1500 seed money for an invention

$2000 invest

$1000 gamble

Do good, improve life at home, make memories, and make progress on self-employment & wealth, while taking a swing for the fences at more money.

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67 posts and nobody would donate any part of the 10k to charity? My parents raised me better than that. Any time we get unexpected money, we give some of it to the less fortunate. My wife and I usually give $100 of our Christmas bonus to the local animal shelter. Not much, but every little bit helps. I am highly disappointed in the FFA right now!

I am going to assume 10k after taxes for easy math:

7k (ish) to credit card/2nd mortgage

2k (ish) to family vacation somewhere nice that we couldn't normally afford

1k (ish) to charity

The more I'm taxed, the more that I already think I'm contributing to charities.

We contribute to charities too, but it's awfully hard to get motivated to contribute more when the government is already giving away so much of my money as part of its social programs.

My one humanities professor in college wrote an article that detailed how much people gave to the less fortunate today versus the turn of the 20th century. He included taxes paid that go towards social programs as money that people give today. Not only did people give more money back then, but they gave more of their time as well. The drop in money given correlates pretty well to the rise of federal social programs.

If the government is stepping in and taxing people through the nose because they say that the government is going to provide for people, then why would most people give above and beyond that? And if the government is taking care of it, then why would individuals give their own time?

We studied the same thing in my economics studies in college. It's not a good thing that people have simply surrendered their moral imperative to help others to the large faceless governmental apparatus.

Another example: fewer motorists stop to help others in accidents nowadays because they assume that emergency personnel are on their way.

Or afraid of getting sued for "helping wrong", or being taken advantage of.
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