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Colin Kaepernick Thread and related anthem kneeling issues/news


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So I came up with some pros and cons for each. I'm probably forgetting some.KaepernickPROS- Less sacks- Seems to be finding receivers more, especially on third down.- Much higher eventual upside than Smith- seems to be really impressing "experts" who agree with the decision to start himCONS- No playoff experience- hasn't exactly been lighting up the stat sheet to match the current hype. - possibility of a "sophomore slump" kind of downturn.SmithPROS- low turnover rate allowing the team to thrive by playing to its strength (defense).- most experienced QB on the team, including valuable playoff experience.CONS- no real big play ability- takes lots of sacks- questionable performance when playing from behind.

Kaep PROS-Intangibles. When it comes to that mysterious thing called 'intangibles' (however you want to wiegh them), Kaep already seems to have that one over Smith. He is fast gained the confidence of his recievers, and his fiery attitude on game day brings the team to another level. -Physical tools. Really nothing to explain here. -Pocket presence, pre and post snap reads, and progressions. -Youth. Not really a detriment here with Harbaugh and the coaching staff-Football IQ. Kaep seems to be a quick study grasping the 49er offense, and then taking it up a notch-Fast trigger and arm strength. Zips the ball downfield with seemingly little effort. Isn't afraid to throw the ball into tight windows. Makes the difficult throws.-Mechanics. Already has good footwork in the pocket, and can throw on the run. CONS-Not much starting experience. Has less NFL starting experience than most QB's in the League right now. But that also includes RG3 and Andrew Luck-Could be starting the December stretch run unproven. Although the sched is relatively easier now than it was earlier this season. -Playoff experience. Not much of a factor as one would think, being that Harbaugh had one last season with zero playoff experience. -Idol is Brett Farve. This could go either way. SmithPROS-Respect of his teammates, a consummate Pro. -Takes care of the ball and defers to the rest of the team to help win games. Doesn't force that many throws.-Can hit big plays when the plays are there.-Has great chemistry with Vernon Davis and Frank Gore.-Is humble and a great asset to the Organization as fas as charachter.CONS-Too self concious when it comes to making throws. Checks down way too often. Always afraid of making the key mistake-Mistakes still come in bunches. Vet QB who still makes those same mistakes. -Doesn't go through all his progressions, or is too slow going through them. -Pre Snap reads are still an issue in his second year of this offense. -Pocket presence. Still real shaky there. Still steps right into a sack. -Is not willing to make the downfield throws when they are there. Does not stretch the field with his arm.-Takes way too many hits, and doesn't help the o-line out with his play. That's all I got right now
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says the guy who is on an internet politics forum while the game is on saying he doesnt want to be bothered by political stuff during the game take that to the bank bromigos 

John Chavez‏ @jchavezfbnm 4h4 hours ago Replying to @realDonaldTrump "Thinking NFL players are 'protesting the flag' is like thinking Rosa Parks was protesting public transportation."

I'm quoting you here, but I am not really directing this at you, since I believe you have no ability to take yourself out of your shoes. But for a second, try to imagine being a black person who has g

If Bwah wins the Superbowl, I think he wins COTY with either Kwah or Smwah at QB, but if its Kwah and he plays very studly then its pretty much a lock because he made the risky decision to go with Kwah over Smwah this early in the year.

:lmso:Bwah might honestly be the worst nickname Ive ever heard. Ever.
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If Bwah wins the Superbowl, I think he wins COTY with either Kwah or Smwah at QB, but if its Kwah and he plays very studly then its pretty much a lock because he made the risky decision to go with Kwah over Smwah this early in the year.

:lmso:Bwah might honestly be the worst nickname Ive ever heard. Ever.
Kaep is named the starter for the third consecutive week, and all is concentrated on a nickname. Glad to see I can grab them with 4 letters. :banned:
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If Bwah wins the Superbowl, I think he wins COTY with either Kwah or Smwah at QB, but if its Kwah and he plays very studly then its pretty much a lock because he made the risky decision to go with Kwah over Smwah this early in the year.

:lmso:Bwah might honestly be the worst nickname Ive ever heard. Ever.
Kaep is named the starter for the third consecutive week, and all is concentrated on a nickname. Glad to see I can grab them with 4 letters. :banned:
Not a nickname. The worst nickname ever. We might as well start referring to Peyton, Aaron, Calvin, Larry, and Jamaal as "Neeng", "Jurrs", "Trawn", "Ruwld", and "Ahrls". Seriously, that is the level of brain-numbing awfulness that is at play, here.
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If Bwah wins the Superbowl, I think he wins COTY with either Kwah or Smwah at QB, but if its Kwah and he plays very studly then its pretty much a lock because he made the risky decision to go with Kwah over Smwah this early in the year.

:lmso:Bwah might honestly be the worst nickname Ive ever heard. Ever.
Kaep is named the starter for the third consecutive week, and all is concentrated on a nickname. Glad to see I can grab them with 4 letters. :banned:
Not a nickname. The worst nickname ever. We might as well start referring to Peyton, Aaron, Calvin, Larry, and Jamaal as "Neeng", "Jurrs", "Trawn", "Ruwld", and "Ahrls". Seriously, that is the level of brain-numbing awfulness that is at play, here.
Glad you dislike it. Now that you got that off your chest, you can go back to posting about the subject.
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Mark Purdy's latest on the move and concussions:

SANTA CLARA -- Jim Harbaugh is doing what he must do. He shouldn't apologize and he is not apologizing.

The 49ers coach is paid to win football games. The NFL is the country's largest sports business entity. It is brutal

commerce with cheerleaders and slow-motion replay.

Tuesday, that commerce included the official naming of Colin Kaepernick as the 49ers' starting quarterback for

Sunday's game in St. Louis and probably beyond. Kaepernick replaces previous starter Alex Smith, who on Nov.

11 left the first half of a game at Candlestick Park when he said his vision was blurry. He was diagnosed with a

concussion.

Since that moment, Smith has not taken a competitive snap, even though he was cleared by doctors to play last

Sunday in New Orleans. Kaepernick has started the last two weeks for the 49ers and won both times, showing

some moxie and skill. Harbaugh, however, has mostly danced around the issue of whether this makes Kaepernick

or Smith the "real" starter moving ahead.

"Both have earned it," Harbaugh said again of the job Tuesday before announcing: "Colin has the hot hand. We'll

go with Colin."

In truth, it is more than "a hot hand." If anything, Harbaugh was bending over backward in being diplomatic to be

Smith. Anyone with a half-educated football eye can see that Kaepernick is bigger and faster than Smith, with a

stronger throwing arm. The 49ers can win with either quarterback but Kaepernick might make three or four plays a

week that Smith can't. Giving Kaepernick the nod is clearly the right call for this week in pure football terms and

in commerce terms.

But the choice Harbaugh made is still dangerous and fraught with risk. For a couple of reasons. One is less

perilous than the other.

Any time a coach decides to bench a veteran player who is popular in the locker room -- and Smith was elected the

49ers' offensive captain by his teammates -- there is the chance that roster chemistry will be discombobulated.

Smith won't likely be fomenting that discombobulation. He is a professional who has been through worse than

this. In the NFL, lots of unfair things happen. Smith understands that being disgruntled will get him nowhere,

either this season or with a future employer. But if 49ers veterans believe that Smith has been treated shabbily, it

could create attitudinal issues -- especially if they start fretting about whether they might lose their own starting

jobs through injury, an unwritten no-no in pro sports.

The initial player reaction to Kaepernick's promotion was as you would expect: Praise for both him and Smith,

focus on the task at hand.

"Alex is a great player, a great person," said offensive lineman Alex Boone when asked how he thought Smith

(who was not available for comment) would react to the move. "He's a team-team-team guy."

"I'm not surprised by anything," said wide receiver Michael Crabtree when asked about the quarterback decision.

"I don't worry about that. I just worry about my job. I'm trying to play my position."

In the end, that part will take care of itself. Kaepernick will play and the 49ers will either win or lose. The team

mindset is all internal stuff that Harbaugh is -- let's say it again -- paid to handle. His record shows he will and he can. It's not your usual path to the Super Bowl when you make a late-season quarterback switch from one of the

league's top passers (as Smith is, according to statistics) to a relatively untested second-year man. But Harbaugh

has been unconventionally successful all along.

The other and more serious danger of Harbaugh's decision is far more troublesome because it involves future

player safety. Given the way Smith's concussion storyline played out, shouldn't there be a concern that other 49ers

will be reluctant to self-report their own woozy heads?

"That would be something to worry about," Harbaugh acknowledged. "I would never want that message to be sent

to our players."

The problem is, the message has already been sent, intentionally or unintentionally.

The blow that led to Smith's concussion Nov. 11 occurred early in a drive that led to a touchdown. He stayed in the

game, called and executed plays while completing three more throws, including the scoring pass to Michael

Crabtree. Only then did Smith come off the field and tell trainers he felt strange. If he had not said so and had

gutted out the rest of the afternoon, would he still be the starter?

The implication is yes, if you believe Harbaugh's contention that Smith is still a starting quarterback. Why would

he have come out of the game that day if he had not reported any symptoms? The 49ers are very involved in NFL

concussion protocol, with team owner Dr. John York serving as chairman of the NFL Committee on Health and

Safety. The fallout of Smith's situation should prompt some interesting discussion.

"I think if you truly had a concussion," said Boone, the offensive lineman, "you are going to report it."

"I think you have to be smart enough about it and worry about your own health," said fullback Bruce Miller said.

But what about Kaepernick? If he starts feeling woozy after a hit -- not enough to knock him down or make him

wobbly, just enough to fog his head -- is there any chance he will tell the trainers? Kaepernick said that such a

scenario was "not something I think about."

He might want to start.

Harbaugh's feelings about all of this are pretty transparent, even if he tries to hide them. He thinks people are

making too big a deal about the quarterback folderol. And he's right. The 49ers are still a defensive-based team

and offensively, will continue to rise and fall mostly on the shoulders of running back Frank Gore.

Yet forever and always in the NFL, quarterback decisions do matter. If the 49ers don't win it all this season,

Harbaugh will be second-guessed, no matter what. That's football. More important is that everyone remains

clear-headed about it. In every way.

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How the hell does this thread have as many pages as the 49er thread?:wacky:

Come up with another really bad nickname and we can double it.
I got a few more if you're interested. Bam Bam? Burnin' Vernon? Captain Checkdown? The Inconvenient Truth? Rollin' with Nolan? Coach Caveman? Edited by drummer
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I watched the news conference today. I play a lot of poker, so I was looking for tells. Trying to "read" Harbaugh rather than listen to what he's saying. Here's my take:

It Kaep's job going forward. He thinks he has a better chance with Kaep. What he says is true, Alex has really improved in the last couple years, but it's clear that Kaepernick is the more dynamic player.

HTH

Edited by OG_GF
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I watched the news conference today. I play a lot of poker, so I was looking for tells. Trying to "read" Harbaugh rather than listen to what he's saying. Here's my take:It Kaep's job going forward. He thinks he has a better chance with Kaep. What he says is true, Alex has really improved in the last couple years, but it's clear that Kaepernick is the more dynamic player.HTH

What do you think you are doing here, talking about Kaepernick and the possibility of him keeping the SF QB job? Don't you know this is a discussion on bad nicknames?
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Crabs on Kaep:

Michael Crabtree first comprehended Colin Kaepernick’s play-making ability four years ago, when they were college phenoms at Texas Tech and Nevada, respectively.

While Crabtree had seven catches for 158 yards and a touchdown in a 35-19 win at Nevada, Kaepernick passed for 264 yards and ran for 92 more in what started as a close game (14-9 Red Raiders’ lead at halftime).

“The guy was putting up points and running. The same thing he’s doing now,” Crabtree said Wednesday about Kaepernick.

Crabtree and Kaepernick are both 25, their birthdays separated by less than two months. (Crabtree’s is Sept. 14, Kaepernick’s Nov. 3). Both were high draft picks: Crabtree a first-round choice (10th overall, 2009) and Kaepernick a second-round selection (36th overall, 2011).

If they’re the 49ers’ future version of a Steve Young/Jerry Rice tandem, they sure seem to have trust in each other. That showed in Kaepernick’s starting debut when he found Crabtree for an improvised, 10-yard touchdown pass in the third quarter against the Bears, and it showed again on a 15-yard completion to get the 49ers out from deep in their own territory against the Saints on Sunday.

Although Crabtree’s kinship with Alex Smith has been questioned in the past, they’ve fared well together under coach Jim Harbaugh. Crabtree had a career-high 72 catches for 874 yards last season with only four touchdowns. This season, Crabtree has 50 receptions for 567 yards and five TDs.

Here is what else Crabtree had to say in the wake of Kaepernick’s appointment Wednesday as the 49ers’ starting quarterback for Sunday’s visit to St. Louis:

What’s your reaction to Kap?

“Let’s go play some ball. That’s two games with Kap, right? It’s time to go play ball.”

Surprised?

“Not in this league. I’m not surprised about anything. I just go out there and play my position. Whoever the quarterback is, I’m just going out there to make plays.”

What do you see of their different styles?

“They’re quarterbacks. They’re running the whole offense. I don’t like to compare them. They’re both good. Like I said, whoever is behind center, I’m trying to make plays for them.”

Can you describe what happened on 15-yard catch that got you guys out of deep in your own territory?

“It was a simple corner route. Something we practice. I knew Kap was going to throw me the ball. We needed the first down. So really we were on the same page, trying to make a play.”

How did you know he would throw the ball to you?

“Because I was open.”

On adjusting as a receiver to Kapernick’s arm strength?

“With Colin Kaepernick, you’ve got to keep your eye on the ball. Last game I dropped a pass I could have caught for a first down. It was kind of low. The guy can throw the ball real fast. It’s hard, too. You’ve got to concentrate.”

On that throw to the sideline, did it surprise you he got it there?

“No, that’s football. We always see Kap make those type of plays, or at least try to make those type of plays. That’s football.”

Have you seen an improvement in his accuracy since training camp?

“I would say sometimes guys don’t look too good in practice but are just gamers. It’s like that sometimes. It’s like that on defense, where you have guys that just know one speed, and that’s go. I think that’s how Alex is, I mean Kap is at quarterback. He just knows one speed and that’s go.”

When did you first sense he was a gamer?

“When we played them in college, we played against Nevada. The guy was putting up points and running. The same thing he’s doing now.”

What does he say in the huddle after a bad play or drop?

“We don’t really have time to discuss a play, until after the game or halftime. We’re on the same page just trying to make a play, keep the chains moving, trying to get in the end zone.”

Have you worked with anyone who throws the ball harder?

“There’s not too many guys that can throw the ball like Kap.”

Even in a workout?

“Troy Smith threw the ball like that, too.”

Do you take a lot of pride in yards after the catch?

“I’m trying to do it all. If I can go deep, I’ll go deep. If I can get some YAC yards, I’ll get some YAC yards. It all boils down to football, you know.”

What do you think of Kaepernick’s delivery, kind of weird?

“Everybody’s different. I’m getting used to it know.”

What is this team capable of with Colin at quarterback?

“We’re capable of doing anything. With the defense we have, whoever is playing quarterback. I’m just loving the fact that we’re trying to get in the end zone and he’s just trying to make plays. The guy, he’s really showing he can be a starter in this league. All I’m doing is going out playing wide receiver and trying to make plays with the guy.”

What’s it like in the huddle?

“You want me to tell you what it’s like in the huddle? In the huddle, you say a play, you try to comprehend that play and you try to make that happen on the field.”

One guy clearer than the other?

“Same thing, same play.”

Do you need to know who QB is rest of the season or week to week?

“I don’t worry about that. I just worry about my job. As receivers, we just worry about our job. We have relationships with both quarterbacks. Whoever is the starter, we’re going to make plays, regardless.”

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NYT's 5th Down on the 49er QB switch

San Francisco 49ers Coach Jim Harbaugh had a difficult decision, and I think he made the right choice by starting Colin Kaepernick over Alex Smith. If Kaepernick’s two recent starts are any indication, he has turned what might have already been the best team in the N.F.C. into a prohibitive Super Bowl favorite.

Despite the small sample size, Kaepernick has clearly outplayed Smith this season. Smith has been at his career peak this season, averaging 5.7 Adjusted Yards per Attempt (AYPA), compared with a career average of just 4.3 YPA. Kaepernick has averaged 7.4 AYPA this season and has averaged 8.8 AYPA in his two starting opportunities. Those two starts were against the league’s very best and very worst pass defenses: the Bears, who allow only 2.9 AYPA, and the Saints, who allow 6.5 AYPA. Kaepernick actually did better against the Bears.

Kaepernick brings a dimension to the 49ers’ passing game that Smith hasn’t shown. Kaepernick has confidence in his deep reads, while Smith tends to look for receivers on shorter patterns. Kaepernick is fourth in the N.F.L. with 24 percent of his passes attempts to deep routes, classified as greater than 15 yards downfield. This season, only 14 percent of Smith’s passes were deep ones, which ranks 36th in the league. Together with his mobility, Kaepernick’s threat to throw deep makes things difficult for defenses.

I’m not suggesting Kaepernick will continue playing at such a high level for the rest of the season. His first two starts went so well that he’s bound to regress. But even if his efficiency falls to around the midpoint between his season average and Smith’s, that still represents a considerable improvement. Every yard of passing efficiency translates into about a 10 percent difference in the chances of beating a league-average opponent, making Kaepernick a significant upgrade in the race for home field in the playoffs.

Regardless of who is under center for the 49ers on Sunday, they’ll be clear favorites on the road at St. Louis.

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Alex Smith speaks on the demotion

The first question posed to Alex Smith: How was the news delivered to you that Colin was the starter?

Smith didn’t answer that question. Instead, he delivered a brief opening statement that neatly capsulized his current situation.

“It sucks,” he said. “I don’t know what else to say.”

In his first public comments since Jim Harbaugh named Colin Kaepernick the 49ers starting quarterback for Sunday’s game in St. Louis (and, presumably, into the foreseeable future) Smith made it clear he’s not in agreement with the coach’s choice.

In his last full game, Smith was named the NFC’s Offensive Player of the Week after completing 18 of 19 passes against the Cardinals on Oct. 29.

“You state your case with your play,” Smith said. “I feel like I’ve done that. I feel like the only thing I did to lose my job was get a concussion.”

That said, Smith, while simmering, surely won’t be rocking the boat in the locker room of an 8-2-1 team that’s won two straight games with Kaepernick at the controls.

“No resentment,” Smith said when asked if he has any bitterness toward Harbaugh. “I don’t get to make those decisions. That’s what he gets paid to do. He’s the head coach. I play football. That’s what I’m going to continue to do. Continue to get ready. And make the most of my next opportunity.”

Here’s the full transcript of Smith’s four-minute meeting with the media:

How was news delivered to you that Colin was the starter?

“It sucks. I don’t know what else to say.”

Did Jim tell the two of you together?

“Yeah.”

Were you prepared for it?

“For sure, yeah. I knew just based off the last couple weeks, the way things had gone, yeah. I didn’t know what was going to happen, but knew that was a possibility.“

Is there anything you can say in terms of stating your case?

“I mean, I don’t think talk’s the place to do it. You state your case with your play. I feel like I’ve done that. I feel like the only thing I did to lose my job was get a concussion.“

Do you think this scenario would have played out two years ago given the attention concussions have gotten?

“I don’t know. Ultimately, the doctors and me had to make that decision. I think it’s a good thing the more and more that’s coming out about it. I don’t think that’s a bad thing.“

You don’t regret telling them you had the symptoms?

“No, I’m not looking back on that. No, no.“

Do you think it will have a stifling effect on other players coming forward?

“I don’t know. That’s a good question. I’m not sure. That’s kind of the deal with all injuries. I think the thing with concussions and the brain … (iaudible).“

You’ve been through some many ups and downs in your career. How does this compare?

“Those are all in the past. For this one, you’re in it right now. Such a great team, such a great group of guys in this locker room, something special going on. Tough pill to swallow, for sure.“

Do have any resentment to coach for making that decision?

“No resentment. I don’t get to make those decisions. That’s what he gets paid to do. He’s the head coach. I play football. That’s what I’m going to continue to do. Continue to get ready. And make the most of my next opportunity.“

There the adage that you don’t lose your job because of an injury …

“That’s not something that I really think about. This game is about opportunities and making the most of them. For each and ever one of us as a team, as a whole. So, no.“

Do you think you’ll be given another opportunity?

“I have no idea. All I can do is just prepare and get ready.“

Does it make it easier or more difficult the way this happened? Your last full game you were NFC Offensive Player of the Week.

“Yeah, it’s tough. That’s what I said. You kind of state your case with your play – I feel like I’d done that. So in that sense it is tough.“

In past seasons, there have been other coaches who have said there’s a better quarterback than you for the job. The fact that it’s Harbaugh, you respect his quarterback evaluation so much, does it sting any more that it’s him saying there’s another quarterback we think is better?

“I don’t know about that. I think it stings the most just because I feel like there’s something special going on here and you sacrifice and invest so much time. Like I said, I really feel like I hadn’t done anything besides get a concussion to really … to facilitate this. Feel like I’m playing good football.“

Some people want to see you angry on the sideline …

“Like I said, you’re in the middle of it right now. I just found out a couple days ago, yeah, it sucks, to be honest.“

Were you given a full explanation?

“Yeah, we sat in there and talked. It wasn’t a one-sentence thing. Yeah, for sure, he explained where he was coming from and (he) felt like it was a difficult situation, but wanted to go in this direction.“

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i was listening to Stink on Mike & Mike the other morning. he brought up an interesting point: players may be reluctant to acknowledge a concussion if they feel it might cost them their jobs. smith gave way to kaepernick because he admitted to the injury - "blurry vision" - and that forced harbaugh to insert kaepernick. kaepernick performed well and has retained the title of starter. however, has harbaugh released anything saying he was planning to demote and permanently smith prior to the injury?

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Found a somewhat interesting comment on the Bay Area's favorite sports columnist Tim "THAT'S NOT TRUE!" Kawakami's latest on Smith:

Bear in mind, this is a biased fan post -

Lets look across the league. I see very few scenarios in which Alex would ever be a starter again in the league. His best case is to be a stopgap for a bad team until they find a real solution for the position.

NFC East: Giants, Skins, Dallas, Philly. No. No, No, Maybe Philly, but probably not.

NFC North: Bears, Packers, Minnesota, Detroit. No, No, No, No.

NFC South: Atlanta, Tampa, New Orleans, Carolina. No. No. No. No.

NFC West: Niners, Seattle, STL, Arizona. No, No, No, No on AZ. They will draft or sign a legitimate solution.

AFC East: Patriots, Dolphins, Buffalo, Jets: No, No, Probably Not, Probably not unless the Jets want to get booed off the field opening day.

AFC North: Baltimore, Pittsburgh, Cincinnati, Cleveland. 4 Nos.

AFC South: Houston, Indy, Tennessee, Jacksonville. No, No, No, maybe Jacksonville if they decide Gabbert can’t do it?

AFC West: Denver, San Diego, Oakland, Kansas City. No, No, Doubtful, Possible, but again nobody in KC would be excited to have Alex as their QB.

So the only even remotely possible places Alex would start next year are: Jacksonville, Kansas City, Arizona, and Philly. Alex would get pulverizied in Oakland, and I just don’t think McKenzie is going to be looking for a stopgap at quarterback, esp. considering what they are gonna have to pay Palmer. Alex will be a losing quarterback in all 4 of those cities and all 4 will have coaching changes. What new coach is going to want to hitch his star to Alex Smith as his starting quarterback. I can answer that for you: Nobody.

ETA: for those wondering about the Kawakami dig:
Edited by drummer
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This makes me want to barf. How self-centered do you have to be to think the change has anything to do with the Giants.

New York Media :rolleyes:

Actually, I've read that reasoning from other media sources outside NY - including some Bay Area media - before yesterday's announcement. It's not just a NY homer thought. I don't buy into it that much, but there is some kernel of truth there.

ETA: SF homers in the comments section of blogs have ran with that one all week and last without using this article as a basis.

Edited by drummer
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This makes me want to barf. How self-centered do you have to be to think the change has anything to do with the Giants.

New York Media :rolleyes:

That said, I would love to see what Kaepernick would do against the Giants.

I also wonder if Greg Roman were to get a HC job somewhere next season, whether he would take Smith along to run his system.

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This makes me want to barf. How self-centered do you have to be to think the change has anything to do with the Giants.

New York Media :rolleyes:

This has a lot to do with the Giants. You think Harbaugh would have confidence in Smith vs the Giants again?
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Kaep on Smith

SAN FRANCISCO—Coming off his second straight win as 49ers quarterback, Colin Kaepernick admitted to reporters Thursday that watching Alex Smith over the past two years has not helped his game in the slightest. “I wish I could say Alex has been an inspiration to me and all that, but I’ve watched the guy play 27 games now, and honest to God, I didn’t get a single thing out of it,” said Kaepernick, who added that seeing the 8-year veteran in practice and in games has taught him nothing about staying cool in the pocket, reading defenses, improvising when protection breaks down, or leadership either on or off the field. “I guess the only thing I did learn was how to completely fall apart during a conference championship game. That and how to rely on a great running back and phenomenal defense to win games for you. Otherwise, it was pretty much useless.” Kaepernick confirmed that his greatest learning experience since entering the league came while watching Eli Manning play against the 49ers.

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Kaep on Smith

SAN FRANCISCO—Coming off his second straight win as 49ers quarterback, Colin Kaepernick admitted to reporters Thursday that watching Alex Smith over the past two years has not helped his game in the slightest. “I wish I could say Alex has been an inspiration to me and all that, but I’ve watched the guy play 27 games now, and honest to God, I didn’t get a single thing out of it,” said Kaepernick, who added that seeing the 8-year veteran in practice and in games has taught him nothing about staying cool in the pocket, reading defenses, improvising when protection breaks down, or leadership either on or off the field. “I guess the only thing I did learn was how to completely fall apart during a conference championship game. That and how to rely on a great running back and phenomenal defense to win games for you. Otherwise, it was pretty much useless.” Kaepernick confirmed that his greatest learning experience since entering the league came while watching Eli Manning play against the 49ers.

Figured this was the Onion. Well played.
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Kaep on Smith

SAN FRANCISCO—Coming off his second straight win as 49ers quarterback, Colin Kaepernick admitted to reporters Thursday that watching Alex Smith over the past two years has not helped his game in the slightest. “I wish I could say Alex has been an inspiration to me and all that, but I’ve watched the guy play 27 games now, and honest to God, I didn’t get a single thing out of it,” said Kaepernick, who added that seeing the 8-year veteran in practice and in games has taught him nothing about staying cool in the pocket, reading defenses, improvising when protection breaks down, or leadership either on or off the field. “I guess the only thing I did learn was how to completely fall apart during a conference championship game. That and how to rely on a great running back and phenomenal defense to win games for you. Otherwise, it was pretty much useless.” Kaepernick confirmed that his greatest learning experience since entering the league came while watching Eli Manning play against the 49ers.

<_<
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This makes me want to barf. How self-centered do you have to be to think the change has anything to do with the Giants.

New York Media :rolleyes:

That said, I would love to see what Kaepernick would do against the Giants.

I also wonder if Greg Roman were to get a HC job somewhere next season, whether he would take Smith along to run his system.

That's all predicated to where Roman would land. If Jerrah decides to can Jason Garrett and get's Roman, Smith still wouldn't start there. SD, he would have Rivers. I doubt Roman would take a HC job without having a say in personnel and with some amount of power to leave SF. Which means he leaving to be an HC with a horrid FO.
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This makes me want to barf. How self-centered do you have to be to think the change has anything to do with the Giants.

New York Media :rolleyes:

That said, I would love to see what Kaepernick would do against the Giants.

I also wonder if Greg Roman were to get a HC job somewhere next season, whether he would take Smith along to run his system.

I'm more interested in seeing what he can do against New England or Houston or Atlanta. Those are the best teams in the NFL. That article about the Giants made it seem like they are the cream of the NFL crop this season, which isn't the case at all.

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QB controversy now about tattoo's

San Francisco 49ers quarterback Colin Kaepernick probably knew that getting pushed into the spotlight as the team's starter was going to make him a target for criticism. He just couldn't have imagined that criticism would be so ridiculous.

In a bizarre column that looks ripped straight out of Onion Sports, David Whitley of AOL Fanhouse and the Sporting News barfed up 750 words on Kaepernick's offensive amount of ... tattoos.

"For dinosaurs like me, NFL quarterbacks were our little Dutch boys," Whitley wrote. "The original hero stuck his finger in the dyke to save Holland. Pro QBs were the last line of defense against the raging sea of ink. When our kids said they wanted a tattoo, we could always point to the Manning brothers."

We could break down Whitley's comments further, but what's the point? It's a silly column simply designed to get attention. It's like criticizing The Jersey Shore for not being realistic. That's the point.

The column created enough of a buzz on Thursday to reach Rick and Teresa Kaepernick, Colin's parents.

"It annoyed me," Teresa Kaepernick told Robert Klemko of USA Today. "You are categorizing this kid on something like tattoos? Really? Saying other guys are role models because they don't have them? Really? Some of these other guys don't have crystal clear reputations. That's how you're going to define this kid? It's pretty irritating, but it is what it is."

Kaepernick was a 4.0 high school student that has never been in any sort of trouble. His tattoos are of bible verses. It's ridiculous that we're even defending Kaepernick against the charge of having tattoos.

"This guy has probably never talked to Colin," Rick Kaepernick said. "Instead of saying that Colin does all these great things and donates his time to children, this guy is going to make him out like a gangster. Really? I guess you just have to roll with the punches.

"Somebody asked me if I got mad about that. I said no. It's just a guy and his opinion. I could have an opinion about him, but I've never met the guy, so I don't know if my opinion would be right."

We've never met Whitley either, but we know enough about him to say one thing: The guy needs an editor.

Another article Edited by drummer
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As I understand it, those tattoos are biblical verses. (Heard on the Murph and Mac show this morning. KNBR 680 AM for the out-of-town folks)
Yeah, the controversy is more about the original article itself, which was posted earlier in this thread. Some are calling it racist.

Kaep was adopted by his parents and is Bi-Racial. He comes from a good family. Dunno why the writer of the article made a big deal over the tats, but with all the news about Kaep, I guess he just threw crap out there to make news.

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Mike Silver on Harbaugh's QB switch

Thanks to the 2012 NFL season's most sudden and surprising quarterback switch, San Francisco 49ers coach Jim Harbaugh has become a polarizing figure. With the Niners (8-2-1) closing in on a second consecutive NFC West title and Colin Kaepernick having displaced Alex Smith, Harbaugh's handling of a delicate situation will be hotly debated until San Francisco's season is complete.

Even after Smith's mildly frustrated comments to reporters Thursday about losing his starting job following a concussion, Harbaugh's dramatic move has yet to mushroom into a full-blown locker-room controversy.

Had Harbaugh been confronted with a similar situation during his 14-year career as an NFL quarterback, however, some of his former teammates believe the fiery competitor would not have accepted his demotion so gracefully. Now that he's the coach, he's handling it like a coach is supposed to," said Ray Buchanan, a standout cornerback who played with Harbaugh on the Indianapolis Colts from 1994-96. "But the Jim Harbaugh who I knew, who was feisty and competitive, he wouldn't have handled it well. I don't think he'd have handled it as well as Alex did. He'd have been a lot more outspoken with the coach. He would cause a little more havoc. And he probably would have spoken out to the media as well."

Retired defensive tackle Tony Siragusa, a teammate of Harbaugh's with the Colts ('94-96) and Baltimore Ravens ('98), agreed with Buchanan's assessment.

"The Jim Harbaugh I knew would be going crazy," Siragusa said. "He would not stand for that. He would be going ballistic. But Jim Harbaugh the player and Jim Harbaugh the coach are like two completely different people."

In separate conversations on Thursday, a half dozen of Harbaugh's former teammates with the Chicago Bears, Colts, Ravens and San Diego Chargers described him as a popular and fiery leader. They spoke glowingly of the quarterback's competitive drive, work ethic, toughness and locker-room demeanor.

"We used to call him 'Dog,' cause he's so feisty, a chip-on-the-shoulder type guy," said former Bears receiver Curtis Conway, who caught passes from Harbaugh as a rookie in 1993. "He wasn't a wimpy quarterback. He's tough. He was a hell of a competitor, and his will to win was incredible. And he wasn't going to back down from anybody."

Harbaugh's ex-teammates also helped shed light on the psyche of a second-year coach who abruptly switched to Kaepernick after a concussion kept Smith — then the league's third-rated passer — out of a Monday night game against the Bears 11 days ago.

Though the Niners' coach initially refused to reveal which quarterback would get the call against the New Orleans Saints last Sunday — and avoided publicly committing to Kaepernick beyond this Sunday's road game against the St. Louis Rams — Harbaugh's ex-teammates do not believe he made the decision cavalierly.

"I'm pretty sure about the fact that this is not a game-playing thing for him," said Hall of Fame halfback Marshall Faulk, who played with Harbaugh in Indy from 1994-97. "It's for the greater good of the team. There is no personal gain for him. Everything he does is for the greater good of that team, and he's not going to deviate from that."

Said former Chargers and New England Patriots safety Rodney Harrison, who shared a locker room with Harbaugh in San Diego in 1999 and 2000: "He has his way of doing things. He has a different personality — everyone knows that. But at the end of the day, he's either going to look like a hero or a complete jerk, and he's fine with that.

"The one thing I can respect about him is, 'Who cares what anybody thinks?' Our game is so driven by public perception. He doesn't care what people think of this decision; he's making it. It's the same way with Bill Belichick. He's going to do what he thinks is right, and that's it."

Whether Harbaugh was conflicted about the decision, however, is another matter. Though he started 140 games in his career, the former first-round pick out of Michigan didn't always enjoy the smoothest of circumstances as a player.

In Chicago, he had a strained relationship with fellow quarterback Mike Tomczak, who once threatened to file a defamation suit against Harbaugh. He also had some celebrated blowups with Bears coach Mike Ditka, including a memorable sideline exchange in a 1992 game after Harbaugh defied his coach's orders not to audible and threw an interception that was returned for a touchdown, triggering a Minnesota Vikings comeback.

Harbaugh, then the NFL's No. 2-rated passer, was benched in favor of Don Majikowski midway through the 1994 season by Colts coach Ted Marchibroda, who later brought Harbaugh to Baltimore after becoming the Ravens' coach. Harbaugh took a seat after one season as the Chargers' starter for former No. 2 overall pick Ryan Leaf, one of the most celebrated busts in NFL history, at the start of his final NFL campaign.

Given those experiences, Harbaugh's ex-teammates believe he understood the magnitude of his recent decision and its potential effect on Smith, Kaepernick and San Francisco's 51 other players.

"Knowing Jim, he's gone out of his way to make this as easy for Alex Smith as possible," said former Bears receiver Tom Waddle, who spent five seasons (1989-93) with Harbaugh in Chicago. "I think in some ways Jim sees a lot of himself in Alex, and vice-versa. He's a talented guy who got hit with a lot of adversity and overcame it through hard work and toughness to put himself in a position to be successful.

"I'd be shocked if this is something that doesn't keep Jim up at night. I don't think it's a decision he takes lightly."

Yet if Harbaugh empathizes with Smith, the maligned quarterback he surprisingly embraced after taking the Niners job before the 2011 season, the coach may relate to Kaepernick on a more instinctive level.

"Kaepernick has a different swagger, an excitement, a confidence about him," Conway says of the second-year passer. "That's Jim. He sees the dog in Kaep, and the confidence, and I feel like he connects with that. Alex lacked confidence when [Harbaugh] got there. He never had a reason to pull him, until the injury. Once that kid got in there and proved what Jim probably felt all along, he was going with him."

Said Buchanan: "You see how excited Colin Kaepernick is — always smiling, always in the players' faces, making a lot of noise. That was Jim. When I saw Kaepernick doing that stuff, I said, 'That's Jim all over again.' I have a picture in my house of Jim all up in our faces after we made a defensive play — him coming over and showing us some love, with that big old wide smile. Trust me, he sees the same things in this kid."

One thing to which some of Harbaugh's former teammates could not relate is his penchant for making deceptive, non-committal and downright implausible statements in interviews. From his assertion last June to espn.com's Mike Sando that anyone who believed the 49ers had pursued then-free agent Peyton Manning was "diabolical" to last week's insistence that Smith is "our starting quarterback," Harbaugh the coach seems to exist in a world of his own rhetorical creation.

"He talks in circles," said Siragusa, a Fox-TV sideline reporter who has interviewed Harbaugh on numerous occasions. "You would hope what's happening in the press is not happening in the locker room."

Waddle, for one, believes Harbaugh is savvy enough not to attempt such blatant spin-doctoring when addressing his players.

"I would think that what's said in the locker room is what resonates with the guys, and everything else is just noise," Waddle said. "I'd be shocked if it was the same message in the locker room as on the podium."

Even after the quarterback switch, it's tough to imagine that a coach who took over a team that went 6-10 the previous year and has since gone 22-6-1 (including playoffs) while nearly reaching Super Bowl XLVI wouldn't be extremely popular in the Niners' locker room. That said, the fun-loving quarterback who once cracked up Colts teammates by showing up for a Halloween party dressed as Star Trek's Mr. Spock is nowhere to be found when the tightly wound coach speaks with reporters.

"When I see him interviewed, like when he said [smith was still the starter], I'm like, 'OK, now the system has got him,' " Buchanan said, laughing. "That's not Jim being Jim. That's Jim being politically correct.

"Cause the Jim Harbaugh I played with would be like, 'OK, we got the hot quarterback and we're gonna play him! Why would we take him out? You're on the bench, Alex Smith. Maybe if Colin Kaepernick gets one of those concussions, you'll go back in.' That's the real Jim. He would've had the whole media laughing."

In Harrison's eyes, his former Chargers teammate is merely executing a masterful gameplan aimed at media manipulation.

"Let's be honest," said Harrison, an analyst on NBC's Football Night In America. "The fact that he's doing this, he's getting national attention for his team. That's what he wants. If he'd just announced the switch and left it at that, it wouldn't be as big a story. Now, people care, and we're all talking about the San Francisco 49ers.

"Now that I'm in the media, I know the tricks of the trade. That's what this is about. He's playing with [the media]. It's a game. And he's winning."

In that sense, at least, maybe Harbaugh the coach isn't so different from Harbaugh the player.

Edited by drummer
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via ESPN's Adam Schefter from Wednesday's SportsCenter:

"After the 49ers beat the Saints, they flew back to San Francisco, landed at 1:00 in the morning," Schefter reported. "Players day off, 'Victory Monday.' As 49ers employees pull up to the training facility the next morning -- seven hours later -- they notice one player on the field running sprints with 50-pound plates attached to his back, sprint after sprint. It turned out to be Colin Kaepernick. That gives you an idea of the type of work ethic he has."

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via ESPN's Adam Schefter from Wednesday's SportsCenter: "After the 49ers beat the Saints, they flew back to San Francisco, landed at 1:00 in the morning," Schefter reported. "Players day off, 'Victory Monday.' As 49ers employees pull up to the training facility the next morning -- seven hours later -- they notice one player on the field running sprints with 50-pound plates attached to his back, sprint after sprint. It turned out to be Colin Kaepernick. That gives you an idea of the type of work ethic he has."

Doesn't sound like he is gonna give the QB job up. :thumbup:
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Whats with this "one more week" nonsense in the title, DrA?Job is Kaps. Period. Smith is done, writing has been on the wall for awhile now. HTH :thumbup:

The job is clearly Kaepernick's moving forward but until Harbaugh makes it official we'll continue rolling with his song and dance routine. With Harbaugh saying both qb's deserve to start but he's going to roll with the hot hand in Kaepernick, the possibility of going back to Alex does exist. Even if that chance is slim. :shrug:
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Whats with this "one more week" nonsense in the title, DrA?Job is Kaps. Period. Smith is done, writing has been on the wall for awhile now. HTH :thumbup:

The job is clearly Kaepernick's moving forward but until Harbaugh makes it official we'll continue rolling with his song and dance routine. With Harbaugh saying both qb's deserve to start but he's going to roll with the hot hand in Kaepernick, the possibility of going back to Alex does exist. Even if that chance is slim. :shrug:
:thumbup: good stuff
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