Jump to content


Photo

[Dynasty] 2014 Draft Prospects


  • Please log in to reply
4399 replies to this topic

#951 ZWK

ZWK

    Footballguy

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 802 posts
  • Joined 14-July 08
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:CA

Posted 23 October 2013 - 06:20 PM

Greg Peshek charted broken tackles & yards after contact for Lache Seastrunk, Melvin Gordon, and Bishop Sankey so far this season.  Seastrunk and Gordon have excellent elusiveness numbers; Sankey is just average.





#952 EBF

EBF

    Footballguy

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 17,102 posts
  • Joined 28-December 04
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:California

Posted 23 October 2013 - 06:27 PM

It might be to early to tell but how does this FF draft class compare to the draft classes of the past 3-4 years?

 

Should be one of the better drafts in the last few years. Probably looking at something like 3-4 first round QBs, 1-2 first round RBs, 3-5 first round WRs, and 1-2 first round TEs. Good depth at WR.

 

Certainly a much better class overall than last year's, which IMO was pretty soft.



#953 Faust

Faust

    Footballguy

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 20,499 posts
  • Joined 15-April 03
  • Gender:Male

Posted 23 October 2013 - 06:29 PM

Rotoworld:

 

 

Former Eagles scout John Middlekauff would be "shocked" if Fresno State senior QB Derek Carr is not a top-10 selection in May.

 

Middlekauff believes Carr has the "best pure passing arm" in the class and adds David's younger brother will rise from January to May. Carr will almost certainly be invited to the Senior Bowl, which will put him on an even playing field with other top senior passers. We like that he is not falling away from pressure as much as last season, but Carr isn't traditional from a footwork standpoint.
 

 

 

 

Fresno State senior Derek Carr has "everything you want from your quarterback from a character standpoint," according to one NFL executive.

 

"He's a two-time elected captain at Fresno State," The executive told NFL.com's Daniel Jeremiah. "He has done a ton of community work, he's a man of faith and his family is very important to him. He has always shown resilience in crunch time on the football field. We expect off-field impact to factor into the decision making process more than ever this season, and Carr should impress the national media in the same way during the Senior Bowl and Combine.
 
Source: NFL.com

 

 

 

NFL.com's Daniel Jeremiah spoke with one NFL executive who believes Miami senior QB Stephen Morris has some of the most impressive intangibles in this year's draft class.

 

"He's the face of the program," the executive said. "He is very bright. He already has his degree. He's a big-time leader. He's not a great player, but I wouldn't bet against him because of his intangibles." The last point is important, as Morris has shown very little consistency this season despite having plenty of talent.
 
Source: NFL.com

 

 

 

Virginia Tech senior QB Logan Thomas "has been extremely sharp in his past three games," according to NFL.com's Mike Huguenin.

 

Thomas struggled earlier this season -- and was outright dreadful against Alabama -- but has picked up his play during the Hokies' current three-game ACC winning streak, completing 65.5 percent of his passes with a 5/0 TD/INT ratio. Huguenin notes that Thomas continues to be "one of the most polarizing draft prospects in the nation," writing that the 6-foot-6, 257-pounder's supporters view him as a "sort of poor man's Cam Newton," while detractors need only point to two stats -- 55.1 career completion percentage with a 46/32 TD/INT ratio -- in order to prove that Thomas' accuracy and decision-making aren't NFL-starter material.
 
Source: NFL.com

 

 

 

Washington coach Steve Sarkisian described junior TE Austin Seferian-Jenkins' play as "just a little bit out of sync, a little bit out of sorts."

 

"It hasn't been without trying," Sarkisian said on Tuesday. "I think Austin is working extremely hard." Sarkisian complimented Seferian-Jenkins' blocking, an improvement to his game that should aid his draft stock. "He is becoming more of an overall complete football player," Sarkisian said. "But believe me, we'd like to get him the football more that he has gotten the ball in his hands because he is a very good weapon for us." The 6-foot-6, 276 pound tight end is one of the most physically gifted players in college football, but Seferian-Jenkins has ceded "his title as the top tight end in college football to Eric Ebron of North Carolina," according to NFL.com writer Dan Greenspan, due to a "combination of his offseason DUI arrest and lack of production on the field."
 
Source: NFL.com


#954 Faust

Faust

    Footballguy

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 20,499 posts
  • Joined 15-April 03
  • Gender:Male

Posted 23 October 2013 - 07:11 PM

Prospect Match-up: Week 9

#955 werdnoynek

werdnoynek

    Footballguy

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 3,689 posts
  • Joined 05-September 09
  • Location:Madison, WI

Posted 23 October 2013 - 07:44 PM

 

Breaking: Multiple sources, including law enforcement, tell me that former #Oregon TE Colt Lyerla was arrested this evening. Details coming

 

I've spoken several times with Lane County (Oregon) officials tonight. They'll be releasing information shortly RE: Lyerla.

 


Edited by werdnoynek, 23 October 2013 - 07:54 PM.


#956 EBF

EBF

    Footballguy

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 17,102 posts
  • Joined 28-December 04
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:California

Posted 23 October 2013 - 07:50 PM

Da'Rick Lyerla



#957 BigTex

BigTex

    Don't mess with Texas

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 8,962 posts
  • Joined 22-July 03
  • Location:Deep in the Heart of Texas

Posted 23 October 2013 - 07:56 PM

It might be to early to tell but how does this FF draft class compare to the draft classes of the past 3-4 years?

 

IMHO, the next 2-3 drafts will have some of the most gifted, talented and best skills players we've seen in a long time in EVERY skilled position.

 

QBs being the deepest, WRs next the RBs and TEs but more TEs drafted higher then we've ever seen.

 

I don't think I've ever been this excited about the next few draft classes.

 

Tex


"Football is my religion... the Shark Pool, my temple...the Draft Dominator, my tools of prayer and fear is not an option."

"I must not fear. Fear is the mind-killer. Fear is the little-death that brings total obliteration. I will face my fear. I will permit it to pass over me and through me. And when it has gone past I will turn the inner eye to see its path. Where the fear has gone there will be nothing. Only I will remain..."

#958 BigTex

BigTex

    Don't mess with Texas

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 8,962 posts
  • Joined 22-July 03
  • Location:Deep in the Heart of Texas

Posted 23 October 2013 - 07:58 PM

 

 

Breaking: Multiple sources, including law enforcement, tell me that former #Oregon TE Colt Lyerla was arrested this evening. Details coming

 

I've spoken several times with Lane County (Oregon) officials tonight. They'll be releasing information shortly RE: Lyerla.

 

 

Unfortunately, not surprised he got arrested even if it was a traffic ticket.

 

Tex


"Football is my religion... the Shark Pool, my temple...the Draft Dominator, my tools of prayer and fear is not an option."

"I must not fear. Fear is the mind-killer. Fear is the little-death that brings total obliteration. I will face my fear. I will permit it to pass over me and through me. And when it has gone past I will turn the inner eye to see its path. Where the fear has gone there will be nothing. Only I will remain..."

#959 BigTex

BigTex

    Don't mess with Texas

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 8,962 posts
  • Joined 22-July 03
  • Location:Deep in the Heart of Texas

Posted 23 October 2013 - 08:19 PM

Greg Peshek charted broken tackles & yards after contact for Lache Seastrunk, Melvin Gordon, and Bishop Sankey so far this season.  Seastrunk and Gordon have excellent elusiveness numbers; Sankey is just average.

 

This is very fascinating and thank you for posting. I've watched only a few of Gordon and Sankey's game but at least a dozen or so of Seastrunk the "men in the box" is an interesting metrix so I'll go back a look at some of his games. The fact that he only faced 7 men in the box on 18% of his carries is not a large enough same size for me to really judge. He also omitted the percent that Sanky and Gordon faced 7 men in the box. It would have also been important if he had given the percentages in all his data were possible not just some to give us a better perspective of the athlete.

 

The number of runs Gordon makes to the outside does concern me a bit because that's not going to work in the NFL, he must run between the tackles which Seastrunk doesn't have a problem doing. Very interesting information.

 

Tex


Edited by BigTex, 23 October 2013 - 08:38 PM.

"Football is my religion... the Shark Pool, my temple...the Draft Dominator, my tools of prayer and fear is not an option."

"I must not fear. Fear is the mind-killer. Fear is the little-death that brings total obliteration. I will face my fear. I will permit it to pass over me and through me. And when it has gone past I will turn the inner eye to see its path. Where the fear has gone there will be nothing. Only I will remain..."

#960 alger

alger

    Footballguy

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 44 posts
  • Joined 12-August 11

Posted 23 October 2013 - 08:34 PM

 

 

Great post, thanks! Any initial thoughts about the top 5 draft eligible rb's? 

 

 

Right now I've got Seastrunk as the #1 guy there. Fairly high on him. The production is beyond reproach and he looks the part from an athletic standpoint. Compact, explosive, and fast. He's got good quickness and he can make cuts that few backs can make. As far as weaknesses go, despite being a solid guy he doesn't run with a great deal of power or break many tackles with strength. He's a pure speed/finesse player. I think that's fine for today's NFL. I'd stop short of calling him a slam dunk lock, but there's enough here that I'd feel pretty good about taking him with a top 3 rookie pick in a PPR league.

 

I've tentatively got Gordon as the #2 back. He's different style of player. A little bit taller and leaner. He's got some quickness, but he's more of a glider compared to the jitterbug Seastrunk. As with Seastrunk, there are going to be question marks about whether or not his production has been inflated by his college scheme. I think the answer is obviously yes, but that doesn't mean he isn't a good player. He's got more power than you might think looking at his listed dimensions and his strides are really deadly. He chews up ground in a hurry and is hard to catch from behind. Personally, I'm a little more comfortable trusting the compact slasher types like Seastrunk compared to the speed backs like Gordon. He's probably not going to be a must-draft player for me, but on the other hand I don't hate his game and will probably rank wherever his NFL draft position dictates, which will be pretty high.

 

I think there might be a little bit of a dropoff after those two. My next group is pretty fluid, but I've tentatively got Jeremy Hill, Bishop Sankey, Devonta Freeman, and Michael Dyer in the next tier. I've said quite a bit about most of those guys already in this thread, so I'll keep it pretty brief:

 

Jeremy Hill - An old-fashioned power back. Doesn't have that "wow" kind of explosiveness, but he's compact and strong with good feet. Severe character red flags could limit his draft stock and interfere with his pro potential. If he stays focused, I don't see why he can't be a solid mid-level NFL starter.

 

Bishop Sankey - Good production. Good combination of size and quick feet. Questionable athletic ability. The combine will be important for him.

 

Devonta Freeman - A north-south power runner with the right kind of frame for the NFL. His game lacks flash and he's not the most elusive guy, so his ceiling probably isn't enormous, but he should be a serviceable pro back out of the middle rounds of the NFL draft (3rd-4th IMO).

 

Michael Dyer - Probably the biggest wild card in the RB class. Had he been able to go pro after his first two years at Auburn, he might have been a 1st round pick. His career has stalled out a little bit since then and he's not getting enough carries this season to really show what he's about. All of that points to a big drop in the draft if he decides to declare, but at some point the talent will win out and someone will take a chance on him. He's a bit like Freeman in style. More of a downhill north-south runner than a juker. Not really a make-you-miss kind of guy. He's faster than Freeman though and has a pretty rare combination of bulk and sheer speed. I've compared him to Bryce Brown and Christine Michael because, despite the rocky road he has taken, at the end of the day he's probably just too talented not to become some kind of a factor in the NFL. He's never going to be a great receiver and his game has some limitations, but he'll make it work.

 

After those guys, I also think Ameer Abdullah is a pretty good back and Ka'Deem Carey has a chance to be a fairly high pick.

 

Overall though, if I were forced to draft rookies tomorrow I would probably have Seastrunk as a top 2-3 pick and Gordon as a top 5 pick with the rest of these guys as clear second tier prospects. I think this draft is a little stronger at WR than RB. There could be 5 first round WRs when all is said and done. Probably only 1-2 RBs.

 

I like your description of Gordon as a "glider". He runs a bit upright and reminds me some of a less powerful McFadden. I think I prefer Seastrunk too at this point. For me its Seastrunk, Watkins, Lee in their own tier at this point. Will try and look at some other rb/wr's soon to get a feel.

l



#961 werdnoynek

werdnoynek

    Footballguy

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 3,689 posts
  • Joined 05-September 09
  • Location:Madison, WI

Posted 23 October 2013 - 08:38 PM

 

Lane County (Oregon) officials confirm Colt Lyerla arrested for Unlawful Possession of Cocaine and Interfering with a Police Officer.

 

 

Colt Lyerla's mugshot, courtesy of Lane County Sheriff's Dept. Arrested on charges of Unlawful Possession of Cocaine. pic.twitter.com/6Trat5A3Jk

 

Cocaine is a hell of a drug.


Edited by werdnoynek, 23 October 2013 - 08:38 PM.


#962 BigTex

BigTex

    Don't mess with Texas

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 8,962 posts
  • Joined 22-July 03
  • Location:Deep in the Heart of Texas

Posted 23 October 2013 - 08:40 PM

 

 

Lane County (Oregon) officials confirm Colt Lyerla arrested for Unlawful Possession of Cocaine and Interfering with a Police Officer.

 

 

Colt Lyerla's mugshot, courtesy of Lane County Sheriff's Dept. Arrested on charges of Unlawful Possession of Cocaine. pic.twitter.com/6Trat5A3Jk

 

Cocaine is a hell of a drug.

 

He was never on my board anyway, too many red flags.

 

Tex


"Football is my religion... the Shark Pool, my temple...the Draft Dominator, my tools of prayer and fear is not an option."

"I must not fear. Fear is the mind-killer. Fear is the little-death that brings total obliteration. I will face my fear. I will permit it to pass over me and through me. And when it has gone past I will turn the inner eye to see its path. Where the fear has gone there will be nothing. Only I will remain..."

#963 werdnoynek

werdnoynek

    Footballguy

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 3,689 posts
  • Joined 05-September 09
  • Location:Madison, WI

Posted 23 October 2013 - 08:41 PM

http://bleacherrepor...lyerla-arrested

 

full article on the arrest by Matt Miller.



#964 Penguin

Penguin

    Footballguy

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 3,382 posts
  • Joined 14-April 03
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Antarctica

Posted 23 October 2013 - 08:52 PM

I've been souring on Sankey a bit, he seems like a volume back that needs 25+ carries to produce, I don't think he's good enough to see the number of touches he'll need to really suceed at the next level


5 Time Z31 Champions - ('05, '07, '08, '09 & '10) Runnerup '13


#965 ConnSKINS26

ConnSKINS26

    Footballguy

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 7,302 posts
  • Joined 27-January 11
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Boston
  • Interests:Things. Lots of things.

Posted 23 October 2013 - 08:53 PM


It might be to early to tell but how does this FF draft class compare to the draft classes of the past 3-4 years?

 
IMHO, the next 2-3 drafts will have some of the most gifted, talented and best skills players we've seen in a long time in EVERY skilled position.
 
QBs being the deepest, WRs next the RBs and TEs but more TEs drafted higher then we've ever seen.
 
I don't think I've ever been this excited about the next few draft classes.
 
Tex

You're telling me, Tex. I'm 0-7 with a rebuild, and I'm pretty much a lock for the #1 rookie and #1 Devy picks. I'm excited just thinking about my options.

When your opinion matters, I'll inform you.


Hahaha, read my posts bro.  I'm one of the smarter Fantasy Player on these boards.


#966 Xue

Xue

    Footballguy

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 2,365 posts
  • Joined 20-August 08
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Sacramento, CA

Posted 23 October 2013 - 11:38 PM

 

Greg Peshek charted broken tackles & yards after contact for Lache Seastrunk, Melvin Gordon, and Bishop Sankey so far this season.  Seastrunk and Gordon have excellent elusiveness numbers; Sankey is just average.

 

This is very fascinating and thank you for posting. I've watched only a few of Gordon and Sankey's game but at least a dozen or so of Seastrunk the "men in the box" is an interesting metrix so I'll go back a look at some of his games. The fact that he only faced 7 men in the box on 18% of his carries is not a large enough same size for me to really judge. He also omitted the percent that Sanky and Gordon faced 7 men in the box. It would have also been important if he had given the percentages in all his data were possible not just some to give us a better perspective of the athlete.

 

The number of runs Gordon makes to the outside does concern me a bit because that's not going to work in the NFL, he must run between the tackles which Seastrunk doesn't have a problem doing. Very interesting information.

 

Tex

 

 

Each of the 3 RBs had better YPC to the outside.  Gordon is averaging 7 YPC when he does run up the middle.  Imagine Gordon in that Baylor offense where the linemen have much larger gaps between them.



#967 ConnSKINS26

ConnSKINS26

    Footballguy

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 7,302 posts
  • Joined 27-January 11
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Boston
  • Interests:Things. Lots of things.

Posted 23 October 2013 - 11:52 PM


 


Greg Peshek charted broken tackles & yards after contact for Lache Seastrunk, Melvin Gordon, and Bishop Sankey so far this season.  Seastrunk and Gordon have excellent elusiveness numbers; Sankey is just average.

 
This is very fascinating and thank you for posting. I've watched only a few of Gordon and Sankey's game but at least a dozen or so of Seastrunk the "men in the box" is an interesting metrix so I'll go back a look at some of his games. The fact that he only faced 7 men in the box on 18% of his carries is not a large enough same size for me to really judge. He also omitted the percent that Sanky and Gordon faced 7 men in the box. It would have also been important if he had given the percentages in all his data were possible not just some to give us a better perspective of the athlete.
 
The number of runs Gordon makes to the outside does concern me a bit because that's not going to work in the NFL, he must run between the tackles which Seastrunk doesn't have a problem doing. Very interesting information.
 
Tex
 
 
Each of the 3 RBs had better YPC to the outside.  Gordon is averaging 7 YPC when he does run up the middle.  Imagine Gordon in that Baylor offense where the linemen have much larger gaps between them.
To be fair, yes, Baylor spreads defenses out like no other for Seastrunk. But you're comparing this to a school known for their OL's and for their superior run blocking/blocking schemes as well in Wisconsin.

So let's not pretend that they don't both have their own sets of advantages over some RB's in other programs.

Edited by ConnSKINS26, 23 October 2013 - 11:53 PM.

When your opinion matters, I'll inform you.


Hahaha, read my posts bro.  I'm one of the smarter Fantasy Player on these boards.


#968 BigTex

BigTex

    Don't mess with Texas

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 8,962 posts
  • Joined 22-July 03
  • Location:Deep in the Heart of Texas

Posted 23 October 2013 - 11:58 PM

 

 

Greg Peshek charted broken tackles & yards after contact for Lache Seastrunk, Melvin Gordon, and Bishop Sankey so far this season.  Seastrunk and Gordon have excellent elusiveness numbers; Sankey is just average.

 

This is very fascinating and thank you for posting. I've watched only a few of Gordon and Sankey's game but at least a dozen or so of Seastrunk the "men in the box" is an interesting metrix so I'll go back a look at some of his games. The fact that he only faced 7 men in the box on 18% of his carries is not a large enough same size for me to really judge. He also omitted the percent that Sanky and Gordon faced 7 men in the box. It would have also been important if he had given the percentages in all his data were possible not just some to give us a better perspective of the athlete.

 

The number of runs Gordon makes to the outside does concern me a bit because that's not going to work in the NFL, he must run between the tackles which Seastrunk doesn't have a problem doing. Very interesting information.

 

Tex

 

 

Each of the 3 RBs had better YPC to the outside.  Gordon is averaging 7 YPC when he does run up the middle.  Imagine Gordon in that Baylor offense where the linemen have much larger gaps between them.

 

 

I'm in no way saying Gordon is a bad or horrible back, only that he runs outside too much for my liking. I'd like to see him run up the middle more often. The truth of the matter is we have absolutely no idea what Gordon would or could do at Baylor we only speculate and I'm not into that. I'm more of a numbers, visual, analytical type of person and I selected Seatrunk in my Devy league for several reason but mainly because he passed the eye ball test and the wow factor for me and I wouldn't trade him for Gordon today and Gordon may end up being the better back at the next level but I'm happy with my selection.

 

With that being said if for some reason I have an opportunity to draft Gordon in our draft this off-season, I'd do it in a heartbeat unless Gurley or Yeldon is available then I'm passing on Gordon. I'm not questioning either's YPC only if something drastic happen they'll likely be the first three backs taken in the draft.

 

Tex


"Football is my religion... the Shark Pool, my temple...the Draft Dominator, my tools of prayer and fear is not an option."

"I must not fear. Fear is the mind-killer. Fear is the little-death that brings total obliteration. I will face my fear. I will permit it to pass over me and through me. And when it has gone past I will turn the inner eye to see its path. Where the fear has gone there will be nothing. Only I will remain..."

#969 BigTex

BigTex

    Don't mess with Texas

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 8,962 posts
  • Joined 22-July 03
  • Location:Deep in the Heart of Texas

Posted 24 October 2013 - 12:06 AM

 

 

 

Greg Peshek charted broken tackles & yards after contact for Lache Seastrunk, Melvin Gordon, and Bishop Sankey so far this season.  Seastrunk and Gordon have excellent elusiveness numbers; Sankey is just average.

 
This is very fascinating and thank you for posting. I've watched only a few of Gordon and Sankey's game but at least a dozen or so of Seastrunk the "men in the box" is an interesting metrix so I'll go back a look at some of his games. The fact that he only faced 7 men in the box on 18% of his carries is not a large enough same size for me to really judge. He also omitted the percent that Sanky and Gordon faced 7 men in the box. It would have also been important if he had given the percentages in all his data were possible not just some to give us a better perspective of the athlete.
 
The number of runs Gordon makes to the outside does concern me a bit because that's not going to work in the NFL, he must run between the tackles which Seastrunk doesn't have a problem doing. Very interesting information.
 
Tex
 
 
Each of the 3 RBs had better YPC to the outside.  Gordon is averaging 7 YPC when he does run up the middle.  Imagine Gordon in that Baylor offense where the linemen have much larger gaps between them.
To be fair, yes, Baylor spreads defenses out like no other for Seastrunk. But you're comparing this to a school known for their OL's and for their superior run blocking/blocking schemes as well in Wisconsin.

So let's not pretend that they don't both have their own sets of advantages over some RB's in other programs.

 

Well said, the more I've watched Sea over the last two years the more I've realized that it's not just the system which at first that's what I thought but as I watched my vids to look at Williams, Wright and Ganaway (RBIII was a given) this kid Sea was the one really getting my attention the most even in limited action and he truly is something special.


"Football is my religion... the Shark Pool, my temple...the Draft Dominator, my tools of prayer and fear is not an option."

"I must not fear. Fear is the mind-killer. Fear is the little-death that brings total obliteration. I will face my fear. I will permit it to pass over me and through me. And when it has gone past I will turn the inner eye to see its path. Where the fear has gone there will be nothing. Only I will remain..."

#970 BigTex

BigTex

    Don't mess with Texas

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 8,962 posts
  • Joined 22-July 03
  • Location:Deep in the Heart of Texas

Posted 24 October 2013 - 12:11 AM

 

 

It might be to early to tell but how does this FF draft class compare to the draft classes of the past 3-4 years?

 
IMHO, the next 2-3 drafts will have some of the most gifted, talented and best skills players we've seen in a long time in EVERY skilled position.
 
QBs being the deepest, WRs next the RBs and TEs but more TEs drafted higher then we've ever seen.
 
I don't think I've ever been this excited about the next few draft classes.
 
Tex

You're telling me, Tex. I'm 0-7 with a rebuild, and I'm pretty much a lock for the #1 rookie and #1 Devy picks. I'm excited just thinking about my options.

 

Then you will have some great picks so choose wisely.


"Football is my religion... the Shark Pool, my temple...the Draft Dominator, my tools of prayer and fear is not an option."

"I must not fear. Fear is the mind-killer. Fear is the little-death that brings total obliteration. I will face my fear. I will permit it to pass over me and through me. And when it has gone past I will turn the inner eye to see its path. Where the fear has gone there will be nothing. Only I will remain..."

#971 BigTex

BigTex

    Don't mess with Texas

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 8,962 posts
  • Joined 22-July 03
  • Location:Deep in the Heart of Texas

Posted 24 October 2013 - 12:15 AM

I've been souring on Sankey a bit, he seems like a volume back that needs 25+ carries to produce, I don't think he's good enough to see the number of touches he'll need to really suceed at the next level

 

You took the words right out of my mouth. He reminds me of M. Lattimore from that perspective with the volume of carries at times he was getting some of his numbers. I'm not saying the are built the same, have the same style or anything like that only the looking at the volume of carries.

 

Tex


"Football is my religion... the Shark Pool, my temple...the Draft Dominator, my tools of prayer and fear is not an option."

"I must not fear. Fear is the mind-killer. Fear is the little-death that brings total obliteration. I will face my fear. I will permit it to pass over me and through me. And when it has gone past I will turn the inner eye to see its path. Where the fear has gone there will be nothing. Only I will remain..."

#972 alger

alger

    Footballguy

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 44 posts
  • Joined 12-August 11

Posted 24 October 2013 - 09:00 AM

 

So I'm curious.  What does everyone consider Marquise Lee's value to be right now in a devy league?

 

He's relatively sure to be one of the first 2 or 3 picks in any PPR league next year, so how does his value compare to top 10 or 20 WRs today?  Or top QBs?  Or top RBs?

 

I'm torn on it - I own him in one league and have a real chance to win it all this year, and he's the guy everyone wants from me.... for obvious reasons.

 

I think he's a first round NFL pick, but probably not a top 10 overall pick. He's a supreme athlete though and IMO passes the eyeball test. So for me, he's closer to a can't-miss prospect than the typical first rounder. The only major asterisk being that he probably doesn't have that super elite WR1 ceiling of a Julio/Thomas/Dez. I see him settling in as more of a really good FF WR2 who should at least be a top 15-20 FF WR and could potentially sneak into the back half of top 10 dynasty WRs if it all breaks right for him. He's his own player and no one single comparison will capture what he can do, but at turns he reminds me of Justin Blackmon, Greg Jennings, Santonio Holmes, and Percy Harvin. Those are four very different WRs, but they each have qualities that remind me of Lee. He can line up in the slot and terrorize the middle of the field ala Harvin/Blackmon, but he also has the ability to go long ala Jennings/Holmes.

 

He actually might slide a little bit deeper in rookie drafts than people expect depending on what happens with guys like Gordon, Seastrunk, Evans, and Watkins at the combine/draft. His rookie ADP could be anywhere from 1-5. Add it all up and his market value is probably the #3 rookie pick.

 

In terms of where I'd take him in dynasty, that's going to depend a bit on my roster. For a generic startup, I tend to put a premium on youth. That means I'm going to roll the dice on Lee ahead of aging stars like Andre, Fitz, and VJax. These are the guys I would definitely take ahead of Lee:

 

Calvin

Julio

Green

Demaryius

Dez

Blackmon

 

It starts to become more interesting with these guys and I could see myself being tempted by Lee, but I probably still stick with the veteran:

 

Harvin

Cobb

Cruz

Crabtree

Gordon

 

I'd probably stick Marshall in there as well, but he's not going to appeal to every type of roster because of his age.

 

After those guys, I think it starts to become more of a coin flip with these players:

 

Torrey

Shorts

Hopkins

Jordy

Wallace

And maybe a few others that I'm forgetting.

 

I think you can make a decent case that Lee is the best pure talent of that lot, but it's hard to turn down immediately useful production.

 

Would I take Lee over them? Considering that his dynasty ADP would probably be lower than most of that group, the correct answer is probably that I'd rather have Lee + extras than any one of those individual receivers.

 

 

 

 

So I'm curious.  What does everyone consider Marquise Lee's value to be right now in a devy league?

 

He's relatively sure to be one of the first 2 or 3 picks in any PPR league next year, so how does his value compare to top 10 or 20 WRs today?  Or top QBs?  Or top RBs?

 

I'm torn on it - I own him in one league and have a real chance to win it all this year, and he's the guy everyone wants from me.... for obvious reasons.

 

I think he's a first round NFL pick, but probably not a top 10 overall pick. He's a supreme athlete though and IMO passes the eyeball test. So for me, he's closer to a can't-miss prospect than the typical first rounder. The only major asterisk being that he probably doesn't have that super elite WR1 ceiling of a Julio/Thomas/Dez. I see him settling in as more of a really good FF WR2 who should at least be a top 15-20 FF WR and could potentially sneak into the back half of top 10 dynasty WRs if it all breaks right for him. He's his own player and no one single comparison will capture what he can do, but at turns he reminds me of Justin Blackmon, Greg Jennings, Santonio Holmes, and Percy Harvin. Those are four very different WRs, but they each have qualities that remind me of Lee. He can line up in the slot and terrorize the middle of the field ala Harvin/Blackmon, but he also has the ability to go long ala Jennings/Holmes.

 

He actually might slide a little bit deeper in rookie drafts than people expect depending on what happens with guys like Gordon, Seastrunk, Evans, and Watkins at the combine/draft. His rookie ADP could be anywhere from 1-5. Add it all up and his market value is probably the #3 rookie pick.

 

In terms of where I'd take him in dynasty, that's going to depend a bit on my roster. For a generic startup, I tend to put a premium on youth. That means I'm going to roll the dice on Lee ahead of aging stars like Andre, Fitz, and VJax. These are the guys I would definitely take ahead of Lee:

 

Calvin

Julio

Green

Demaryius

Dez

Blackmon

 

It starts to become more interesting with these guys and I could see myself being tempted by Lee, but I probably still stick with the veteran:

 

Harvin

Cobb

Cruz

Crabtree

Gordon

 

I'd probably stick Marshall in there as well, but he's not going to appeal to every type of roster because of his age.

 

After those guys, I think it starts to become more of a coin flip with these players:

 

Torrey

Shorts

Hopkins

Jordy

Wallace

And maybe a few others that I'm forgetting.

 

I think you can make a decent case that Lee is the best pure talent of that lot, but it's hard to turn down immediately useful production.

 

Would I take Lee over them? Considering that his dynasty ADP would probably be lower than most of that group, the correct answer is probably that I'd rather have Lee + extras than any one of those individual receivers.

 

Good list. I might put Blackmon at the top of the next tier and move Crabtree down a tier. Also I would put Keenan Allen somewhere in that last tier, prefer him to Hopkins



#973 Milkman

Milkman

    Footballguy

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 1,185 posts
  • Joined 19-October 13
  • Gender:Male

Posted 24 October 2013 - 12:23 PM

I guess I'm in the minority here I love Sankey. I think he could be the best RB in this class. I was watching some tape on him and he reminds me of Ray Rice. He looks like he has all the tools to be a 3 down back in the NFL. He has great vision and it seems like he doesn't need that much room to break big runs. Great hands as well. The question on Sankey is if he has the speed to play in the NFL.



#974 EBF

EBF

    Footballguy

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 17,102 posts
  • Joined 28-December 04
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:California

Posted 24 October 2013 - 12:50 PM

Eric Ebron highlights:

 

http://www.youtube.c...h?v=UTUfBK9tmgE

 

He seems to take a lot of bad shots to his lower body, but he's super athletic and fluid for a TE. Very impressive. Wish I had picked him in my devy leagues. He looks like he's going to be a first tier rookie this year along with Lee, Watkins, Seastrunk, and possibly a few others.



#975 Milkman

Milkman

    Footballguy

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 1,185 posts
  • Joined 19-October 13
  • Gender:Male

Posted 24 October 2013 - 01:00 PM

EBF if the rookie draft was today what should the first 6-7 picks look like in a PPR 1qb-2rb-3wr-1flex-1te 6pt passing TD dynasty league look like iyo?


Edited by water1, 24 October 2013 - 01:01 PM.


#976 EBF

EBF

    Footballguy

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 17,102 posts
  • Joined 28-December 04
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:California

Posted 24 October 2013 - 01:05 PM

EBF if the rookie draft was today what should the first 6-7 picks look like in a PPR 1qb-2rb-3wr-1flex-1te 6pt passing TD dynasty league look like iyo?

 

Even with 6 pts per passing TD, I would pass on QBs early in a 1QB league unless I was 95% sure I was getting a star. Too little demand in 1 QB leagues to make the position that valuable. I like this QB class, but don't think any single prospect there is a slam dunk, so that means I'd be focusing on RB/WR/TE. My top 6-7 would probably look like this:

 

RB Lache Seastrunk, Baylor

WR Marqise Lee, USC

WR Sammy Watkins, Clemson

TE Eric Ebron, North Carolina

RB Melvin Gordon, Wisconsin

WR Allen Robinson, Penn State

WR Mike Evans, Texas A&M

 

Moncrief, Hill, and Sankey in the mix for the next few spots.



#977 Milkman

Milkman

    Footballguy

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 1,185 posts
  • Joined 19-October 13
  • Gender:Male

Posted 24 October 2013 - 01:16 PM

Nice. Thanks EBF.

 

That sucks. I was hoping Seastrunk would fall.......This is my first dynasty league and I have 3 picks in the first round (I know nobody cares lol) but my first pick might be the third pick. So I have little shot at Seastrunk. I guess I would be super happy with Lee, Gordon, and Sankey though.


Edited by water1, 24 October 2013 - 01:16 PM.


#978 EBF

EBF

    Footballguy

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 17,102 posts
  • Joined 28-December 04
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:California

Posted 24 October 2013 - 01:19 PM

Nice. Thanks EBF.

 

That sucks. I was hoping Seastrunk would fall.......This is my first dynasty league and I have 3 picks in the first round (I know nobody cares lol) but my first pick might be the third pick. So I have little shot at Seastrunk. I guess I would be super happy with Lee, Gordon, and Sankey though.

 

You can always trade up too. If most people value the top 5 players pretty evenly and you only like one of them, it makes sense to move up for your guy.



#979 Faust

Faust

    Footballguy

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 20,499 posts
  • Joined 15-April 03
  • Gender:Male

Posted 24 October 2013 - 05:09 PM

Rotoworld:

 

 

UCLA redshirt sophomore QB Brett Hundley dropped to No. 14 on Mel Kiper's updated big board.

 

Hundley was previously listed at No. 8 overall. "Hundley struggled with ball placement against Stanford last week, but he's close," Kiper writes. "Hundley is supremely gifted when it comes to raw tools -- his arm strength is obvious, and he might be ahead of schedule in terms of his ability to make plays when a play falls apart." The Bruins, with a diminished offensive line, take on a talented Oreogn defense this weekend.
 
Source: ESPN


#980 Penguin

Penguin

    Footballguy

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 3,382 posts
  • Joined 14-April 03
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Antarctica

Posted 24 October 2013 - 07:55 PM

Josh Norris

NFL Draft Prospects: Top-32

Thursday, October 24, 2013

 

 

1. QB Teddy Bridgewater, Louisville*

 

NFL Comparison: Russell Wilson, but three inches taller.

 

Where He Wins: Excellent pocket movement. Bounces off his back foot to step up against edge pressure and isn’t afraid to slide laterally when faced with an interior rush. Keeps eyes up to survey coverages and works to multiple reads. Placement and touch are there, but has the velocity to hit vertical routes on the move. Not afraid to give a covered receiver in single coverage a chance to win. Reports have stated he takes care of many checks at the line of scrimmage.

 

Where He Fits: He fits any offense. Sustains success from the pocket but also has mobility which isn’t showcased often. Hits every level with placement and timing.

 

2014 Draft Projection: No. 1 or 2 pick.

 

 

2. QB Marcus Mariota, Oregon**

 

NFL Comparison: A more refined Colin Kaepernick out of Nevada.

 

Where He Wins: Does not get enough credit for his success in the pocket. Quick decision maker on short to intermediate routes, which is exactly what up-tempo offenses need. Not afraid to shift off that first read, reset, and fire to another target while inside or outside of the pocket. Placement is improving and obviously has the velocity to hit any throw on a rope. He offers a read option/zone read element as well.

 

Where He Fits: Has plenty of experience in an up-tempo offense, but his pocket skills will translate for any team. Creativity will help use his talents in the best way.

 

Draft Projection: No. 1 or 2 pick.

 

 

3. DE Jadeveon Clowney, South Carolina*

 

NFL Comparison: Uses a J.J. Watt like swim move, athleticism might be Julius Peppers-esque.

 

Where He Wins: Predominantly lines up at right defensive end in a three-point stance as a five, seven, or nine technique. His explosion off the snap is ridiculous, gaining an instant advantage against his competition. Obviously the swarming wingspan and closing speed is there, and he enjoys finishing hits with force. Has frequently taken the inside line this year, likely due to the shorter distance to the backfield. Loves to utilize an arm over swim and athletic footwork is on displays when avoiding cut blocks. Loops inside with ease. A rare power and speed athlete.

 

Where He Fits: Most experience in a four man front, but his talent could be used in any defensive scheme.

 

Draft Projection: The first non-QB off the board. Top-5 pick.

 

Extended Evaluation

 

 

4. Pass rushing OLB Anthony Barr, UCLA

 

NFL Comparison: Athleticism could be similar to Bruce Irvin.

 

Where He Wins: The lightning-quick pass rusher is able to gain an advantage on the edge and keep it thanks to his burst off the line, ability to cut off either foot towards the quarterback, and flexibility to bend around the corner. He closes distances quickly, which can be effective from a variety of alignments, and Barr is a punishing finisher.

 

Where He Fits: Experience as a stand up rusher next to a three man front. Able to loop inside.

 

Draft Projection: Top-5 selection. Has a chance to be drafted over Clowney.

 

Extended Evaluation

 

 

5. T Jake Matthews, Texas A&M

 

NFL Comparison: Jordan Gross

 

Where He Wins: Doesn’t sit back and wait, finds contact through his hands and is an aggressive blocker. Obtains inside hand positioning and adjusts if necessary. Athletic feet to keep proper shoulder alignment, which prevents bending from the waist. Displays ability to bend at the knee to absorb and redirect. Sets up cut blocks and drives through with force. Moving from right to left tackle.

 

Where He Fits: Has experience and played at a high level at left or right tackle.

 

Draft Projection: The top offensive tackle off the board. Top-10.

 

 

6. LB C.J. Mosley, Alabama

 

NFL Comparison: Sean Lee

 

Where He Wins: Very little wasted movement. Lines up as inside linebacker behind three and four man fronts. Has so much range, chases down athletic quarterbacks to the edge. Same range is visible in pass coverage. Contacts crossing routes and keeps footwork to sustain and trail. Works over top of blocks with quick steps. Keeps nice vision at the second level by strafing then attacks uphill. Will finish tackles.

 

Where He Fits: Has transitioned from a coverage linebacker to the complete package. Scheme versatile at inside linebacker. Could potentially see time on the weakside.

 

Draft Projection: Very dependent on how teams react to his injury history. Top-20.

 

 

7. WR Sammy Watkins, Clemson*

 

NFL Comparison: The current Torrey Smith.

 

Where He Wins: The combination of burst and smooth movements in and out of his breaks or after catch moves is great. Hands catcher away from his body. An explosive player with the ball in his hands, gets up to high gear very quickly. Will go across the middle and catch passes in tight windows. Cuts routes off very quickly. Has balance to stay up beyond first defender. Wins from slot or outside.

 

Where He Fits: Will help in a variety of ways, including yards after the catch, vertical routes, and in the return game.

 

Draft Projection: Expected to be the first receiver off the board, unless a team goes for a taller target who specializes winning at the catch point. Top-10.

 

 

8. S Ha Ha Clinton-Dix, Alabama*

 

NFL Comparison: Reshad Jones

 

Where He Wins: Has excellent length for the position. Controlled aggressiveness when closing towards the line of scrimmage. Not a watcher, he gets in the action. Reads run and reacts quickly, even from single high. Has seen time from free or strong safety. Capable in playing man and zone situations, either near or off the line of scrimmage. A really, really good safety.

 

Where He Fits: A likely interchangeable safety that can play near the line of scrimmage or in the deep half.

 

Draft Projection: Top-15 selection.

 

 

9. OLB Ryan Shazier, Ohio State*

 

NFL Comparison: Lavonte David, but with more length. What many want Alec Ogletree to be.

 

Where He Wins: Long and lean. Projects to weakside linebacker. His speed to the edge is excellent. There are some wasted movements when working the backside, but once the target and ally are located he gets there in a hurry. Zone drops are smooth. Asked to blitz from inside and on the edge. Takes tight angles into the backfield on edge runs.

 

Where He Fits: Likely as a weakside linebacker who will stay on in nickel situations.

 

Draft Projection: First-round.

 

 

10. OLB Khalil Mack, Buffalo

 

NFL Comparison: Akeem Ayers

 

Where He Wins: Displays a unique combination of size and strength. Has quickness to get underneath an offensive lineman’s pads and then use his strength to drive that lineman into the backfield. Controls run blockers, maintaining outside leverage and resetting the line of scrimmage. Has enough athleticism to be a factor in coverage and can avoid cut blocks.

 

Where He Fits: As a stand up weakside pass rusher alongside a three man line or could play a strong side linebacker in a 4-3 under.

 

Draft Projection: Has off-field question stemming from a suspension, but likely top-20 pick.

 

Fulton: Mack vs. Miller

 

 

11. DT Dominique Easley, Florida

 

NFL Comparison: Jay Ratliff or Earl Mitchell

 

Where He Wins: Easley’s success inside compared to when on the edge is a no contest. His quickness to force his opposition off balance or shoot face up gaps causes instant disruption, displaying active hands to keep separation and a forward momentum. He impacts games when gaining promising positioning.

 

Where He Fits: Everywhere. Has experience as a five technique end but thrived in a one or zero technique role this season. Could be a disrupting, upfield nose tackle.

 

Draft Projection: This is difficult. Easley is a top-10 talent but has two ACL tears to his name on opposite knees. Played at a high level this season after the first one. I still think top-40, like Cornelius “Tank” Carradine.

 

Extended Evaluation

 

 

12. DT Louis Nix, Notre Dame*

 

NFL Comparison: Flashes of Vince Wilfork

 

Where He Wins: Lines up as a nose tackle or shade in a three man front. Can work over top of a block and create penetration at the same time. Stops momentum very quickly and changes direction well for a big man. Has the leg drive to penetrate face up and strength to shed it close spaces. Can disrupt the run upfield or hold his spot with anchor versus the run. Has some Vince Wilfork to him.

 

Where He Fits: Likely a one or zero shade in a three man front, but don’t rule him out of four man fronts.

 

Draft Projection: Has been a letdown at times this season, but likely top-32.

 

 

13. CB Bradley Roby, Ohio State*

 

NFL Comparison: Jason McCourty

 

Where He Wins: Attacks the jam or blocking receiver, frequently gets into the action. Will play off or press man coverage, attacks the catch point by cutting in front of the target. Even plays on special teams. Trails in close distances and prevents the sliver of separation at the catch point. Makes things difficult on the opposition.

 

Where He Fits: Not locked into one side of the field. Likely better in press due to physical nature, but shows he can attack and drive in off coverage.

 

Draft Projection: Poor performance against Jared Abbrederis, but likely top-20.

 

 

14. TE Jace Amaro, Texas Tech*

 

NFL Comparison: Does some Jimmy Graham-like things, but more along the lines of what many want Vance McDonald to be.

 

Where He Wins: A matchup nightmare. Uses his frame against corners and safeties to gain a positional advantage. Can do the same with safeties while creating space with fluid routes. An easy mover against linebackers. Has always been a willing blocker in space, but he has added an inline blocking element to his game. Getting stronger at the catch point when climbing the ladder. Presents some yards after catch skills.

 

Where He Fits: A receiving tight end in 12 personnel. Can play out on the edge, in the slot, and has added an inline blocking element to his game.

 

Draft Projection: Mentioned he would return for his senior season, but that could change in January. Suffered a major injury in 2012. I expect a top-32 selection.

 

 

15. CB Jason Verrett, TCU

 

NFL Comparison: Stephon Gilmore

 

Where He Wins: Active player who doesn’t wait to react. Keeps close trailing distance and makes tackles for a loss on crossing routes by forcing receivers back. Quick in his movements once diagnosing and locating. Has great vision, baits quarterbacks from off man with success. Coverage versatile. Hides blitz very well.

 

Where He Fits: Plays a lot of off coverage, but that doesn’t mean he lacks physical play. Tends to play boundary (short) side.

 

Draft Projection: First-round.

 

 

16.Cyrus Kouandjio, Alabama*

 

NFL Comparison: Trent Williams

 

Where He Wins: Does occasionally bend at the waist but is athletic enough to recover and regain balance. Best when keeping separation thanks to great length. Can get a bit short in his drops, but again, has the athletic lower half to react and keep positioning. Better in pass protection than run blocking.

 

Where He Fits: Likelyleft tackle but could start on the right side as well. The two aren’t so different anymore.

 

Draft Projection: Has shown weaknesses this season, mainly in the form of overextension or slow feet off the snap, but talent is there. Top-20.

 

 

17. WR Marqise Lee, USC*

 

NFL Comparison: Reggie Wayne

 

Where He Wins: Long, lean strider. Best as a straight-line receiver. Doesn't mind chipping the edge when in motion or finishing off runs with low shoulder. Obvious burst of quickness in first or second step, then it builds after that. Lines up in the slot and outside, smooth runner in his breaks to avoid contact. Frequently sent in motion. Hands catcher. Can make people miss in the open field, but doesn't have outstanding lateral agility.

 

Where He Fits: Likely outside receiver who gets vertical with fluid routes and long speed. Can easily peel back patterns and create separation when working towards the quarterback.

 

Draft Projection: Has dealt with injuries, drops, and bad quarterback play this year. Still a top-40 selection.

 

 

18. DE Aaron Lynch, USF*

 

NFL Comparison: Aldon Smith

 

Where He Wins: Very quick movements in tight spaces. Looked lean in 2011 and has lost weight since, which has made things interesting. Turns poor positioning into positive situations with length and foot speed. Plays high but lifts and shrugs to create leverage. If technique and pad level work out, watch out.

 

Where He Fits: If frame stays the same, he could be a stand up rusher next to a three man line with the ability to close off the edge, use length, and loop back inside.

 

Draft Projection: Lynch is noticeably still rusty, but the talent didn’t just disappear. Top-40.

 

 

19. DT Will Sutton, Arizona State

 

NFL Comparison: La’Roi Glover

 

Where He Wins: Sutton takes advantage of space. Whether it be shooting past reach blocks in the sliver of time afforded to him thanks to an animated first step and forward lean, or hand use and quick feet to generate that separation on his own, Sutton finishes with closing speed. His flexibility to bend and gain positive positioning is tough to find.

 

Where He Fits: Likely as a three technique in a four man front, could play some one in pass rushing situations.

 

Draft Projection: Too much has been made about his added weight. He isn’t a different player. The foundation of Sutton’s game was never quickness, it was leverage and technical hand use. Still, he will get knocked of lack of size or added weight. Top-64.  

 

Extended Evaluation

 

 

20. TE Eric Ebron, UNC*

 

NFL Comparison: A physical Jared Cook Jr.

 

Where He Wins: An outstanding straight-line athlete with some bend/flexibility for his size. Will stretch defenses and then cut his route back to the quarterback. Presents a big target and can separate after the catch. Improving consistency at the catch point and a willing blocker.

 

Where He Fits: An inline option who can be split out to matchup with different defenders.

 

Draft Projection: Top-25.

 

 

21. CB Darqueze Dennard, Michigan State

 

NFL Comparison: Aqib Talib

 

Where He Wins: An extremely physical corner who loves to press at the line of scrimmage. Frequently patient with his jam, not overextending but rather allowing the receiver to enter contact area. Rides inside hip downfield while sustaining position. Hand fights and flips his head quickly when receiver looks back for the football at the top of their route.

 

Where He Fits: Press corner or a few yards off on the edge. Will be physical in run support. Matches up at the catch point in contested situations which is critical.

 

Draft Projection: Might run a slow forty, which will lead to overreaction. Top-40.

 

 

22. T Taylor Lewan, Michigan

 

NFL Comparison: Sebastian Vollmer

 

Where He Wins: Wide stance, wants to find contact through his hands. Has an aggressive mentality, but that can get him in trouble. Even if positioning is off balance, his strong base helps anchor and stop momentum. Better run blocker than pass protector, but wins when gaining a latch in either situation. Asked to pull inside and lead blocks well.

 

Where He Fits: Could see him on the left or right side.

 

Draft Projection: Obviously the NFL values offensive tackles. Possible top-15 selection.

 

 

23. WR Mike Evans, Texas A&M*

 

NFL Comparison: Vincent Jackson

 

Where He Wins: Absolutely dominant at the catch point. Wins on the edge with long speed, excellent body control, strong hands, and high pointing ability. When he is covered he is still open. Winning in these situations might be more important than separation at the NFL level.

 

Where He Fits: Outside receiver with a quarterback who is not afraid to test tight single coverage.

 

Draft Projection: First-round and would not be shocked if he is the first receiver off the board. Slow test times could hurt.

 

 

24. WR Brandin Cooks, Oregon State*

 

NFL Comparison: Victor Cruz

 

Where He Wins: An explosive receiver that wins at every level of the field. Can take short passes for long gains after creating even more separation. Creates space on intermediate patterns. Tracks vertical passes exceptionally well. Takes the top off coverages. Has a large catch radius for someone his size.

 

Where He Fits: Some might only see a slot receiver, but he’s an accomplished edge target as well.

 

Draft Projection: Top-50.

 

 

24. CB Ifo Ekpre-Olomu, Oregon*

 

NFL Comparison: Brandon Flowers

 

Where He Wins: Won’t always engage blockers but will attack full speed when lining up ball carriers in the open field. Attempts to disrupt catch point when receiver high points target. Top end closing speed. Mirrors in tight man coverage but also displays press bail skills.

 

Where He Fits: Experience as field side corner, so can play either half.

 

Draft Projection: First-round.

 

 

25. T Cedric Ogbuehi, Texas A&M*

 

NFL Comparison: Tyron Smith

 

Where He Wins: Outstanding length with footwork to mirror. Does not possess the strongest punch, but he bends in all the right places (knee, ankles). Finds contact through his hands, obtains a latch, and keeps his opposition under control. Understands to ride edge rushers around the pocket and inside armbar prevents a shorter distance on inside rush.

 

Where He Fits: Has experience at guard and right tackle, but he is more than capable to play left tackle in the NFL.

 

Draft Projection: Has stated he will return, but that could draft with a projection from the draft advisory board. First-round.

 

 

26. TE Austin Seferian-Jenkins, Washington*

 

NFL Comparison: Jason Witten

 

Where He Wins: Inline target who has the movement skills to play detached in the slot. Willing to block and improving in that area, even at the second level. Absorbs contact at the catch point, strong in that area. Not a quick twitch athlete, short catches usually stay short, but very reliable in intermediate to downfield areas. Body control is excellent.

 

Where He Fits: Inline tight end that can move outside to take advantage of receiving options.

 

Draft Projection: Top-50.

 

 

27. DE Vic Beasley, Clemson*

 

NFL Comparison: Bruce Irvin with less movement skills

 

Where He Wins: Displays a great get off and bend. Finds contact through his hands from a five technique spot, extends to strafe along the line then close on the outside. Also used as a stand up rusher at times, getting quick depth in the backfield thanks to speed.

 

Where He Fits: Has experience as a right defensive end, but his best projection is likely as a stand up edge rusher.

 

Draft Projection: First-round.

 

 

28. QB Johnny Manziel, Texas A&M**

 

NFL Comparison: Tony Romo

 

Where He Wins: Wearing down defenses with tempo. A master of broken plays. Stretches teams laterally with his feet. Forces defenses to match up with quick passes followed by elongated plays with little time to rest in between.

 

Where He Fits: Has shown development from the pocket, but could thrive in a creative system. Thrives on broken plays. Drops his eye level, but can magically find open space and available passing lanes to connect on ridiculous completions. Will test tight single coverage. Gives his receiver a shot. Can also be a quick decision maker, which is key to Air Raid. Has made more throws outside the numbers and downfield this season. Obviously extremely mobile.

 

Draft Projection: Top-10.

 

 

29. RB Melvin Gordon, Wisconsin**

 

NFL Comparison: Jamaal Charles

 

Where He Wins: One cut back with great vision. Has excellent long speed, but breaks more tackles than many other lean backs thanks to balance. Displays great vision and decisive running style from an I formation or on jet sweeps.

 

Where He Fits: Despite playing in a committee attack at Wisocnsin, Gordon can claim a lead ball carrying role in the NFL.

 

Draft Projection: Lack of pass protection attempts and success will likely keep him out of the first-round. Top-40.

 

 

30. LB Telvin Smith, FSU

 

NFL Comparison: Danny Trevathan

 

Where He Wins: Ridiculous closing speed. Run and chase backer who is improving at fighting through trash. Has all the athleticism necessary to be a solid contributor in nickel situations. Finishes with force.

 

Where He Fits: Likely a weakside backer behind a four man front but could make most of his money in nickel situations.

 

Draft Projection: Third-round.

 

 

31. WR Odell Beckham Jr., LSU*

 

NFL Comparison: Santonio Holmes

 

Where He Wins: Despite sub-5’11 size, he dominates at the catch point. Easily climbs the ladder with great timing and strong hands to win in contested situations. Add on good vertical speed, fluid fleet to break routes off, and a willingness to work back towards the quarterback. Willing blocker.

 

Where He Fits: Outside receiver, unless a team wants to work him in trash over the field to high point.

 

Draft Projection: Top-40, but he could go much, much higher.

 

 

32. WR Jarvis Landry, LSU*

 

NFL Comparison: A compact Brandon Marshall.

 

Where He Wins: Goes up and gets it at the highest point. Will win in tight coverage by creating a sliver of separation at the last moments. Good straight-line speed. The combination makes him a very good downfield receiver.

 

Where He Fits: Outside target that can make a home in the intermediate to downfield levels.

 

Draft Projection: Top-40, but he could go much, much higher.

 

-----

 

Next four: T Antonio Richardson, Tennessee, DL Stephon Tuitt, Notre Dame*, DB Lamarcus Joyner, FSU, T/G La’El Collins, LSU*.

 

Next Tier of QBs: Clemson’s Tajh Boyd, LSU’s Zach Mettenberger, UCLA’s Brett Hundley**, Miami’s Stephen Morris, Fresno State’s Derek Carr.


5 Time Z31 Champions - ('05, '07, '08, '09 & '10) Runnerup '13


#981 EBF

EBF

    Footballguy

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 17,102 posts
  • Joined 28-December 04
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:California

Posted 24 October 2013 - 08:13 PM

That's a lot of skill players in the first round. Not sure we'll be that lucky.

 

I've always liked Beckham, but LSU fans make a lot of negative comments about his hands.

 

Given that he's on the short side and prone to easy drops, I think he's a lot more likely to be a 2nd rounder than a 1st when all is said and done.


Edited by EBF, 24 October 2013 - 08:13 PM.


#982 jurb26

jurb26

    Footballguy

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 25,733 posts
  • Joined 31-May 03
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Charlotte, NC

Posted 25 October 2013 - 11:01 AM

Give me Landry over Beckham all day.

#983 karmarooster

karmarooster

    Footballguy

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 1,653 posts
  • Joined 13-August 09

Posted 25 October 2013 - 11:51 AM

Is there a general consensus that 2015 represents a stronger class than 2014?

If so, is that a top to bottom difference (e.g. A deeper class) or at the top (e.g. Better early picks as compared to this year) or both? And are there a handful of identifiable players on the horizon that are future studs -- maybe Yeldon and/or Gurly?

#984 Concept Coop

Concept Coop

    Footballguy

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 7,902 posts
  • Joined 08-April 10

Posted 25 October 2013 - 11:54 AM

Is there a general consensus that 2015 represents a stronger class than 2014?

If so, is that a top to bottom difference (e.g. A deeper class) or at the top (e.g. Better early picks as compared to this year) or both? And are there a handful of identifiable players on the horizon that are future studs -- maybe Yeldon and/or Gurly?

 

Todd Gurley is my favorite RB prospect in some time.  At least on par with Trent (at the time).  Add Cooper, Davis, Yeldon, Drake, etc, and I do think 2015 is stronger.  At least more top heavy.


The Gronk.


#985 Time Kibitzer

Time Kibitzer

    Footballguy

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 6,450 posts
  • Joined 06-December 10
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Parts Unknown

Posted 25 October 2013 - 12:16 PM

Predicting the relative quality of a current draft class in October is pretty damn tough, yet alone trying to predict the relative quality of a draft class 1-2 years from now. You'll always find people in your league who are infatuated with players in any current draft class, so I'd wait til much closer to draft time before trading away any current rookie picks. 



#986 Xue

Xue

    Footballguy

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 2,365 posts
  • Joined 20-August 08
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Sacramento, CA

Posted 25 October 2013 - 12:35 PM

Give me Landry over Beckham all day.

 

Landry is a solid WR but I don't see much that stands out.



#987 EBF

EBF

    Footballguy

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 17,102 posts
  • Joined 28-December 04
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:California

Posted 25 October 2013 - 12:43 PM

Is there a general consensus that 2015 represents a stronger class than 2014?

If so, is that a top to bottom difference (e.g. A deeper class) or at the top (e.g. Better early picks as compared to this year) or both? And are there a handful of identifiable players on the horizon that are future studs -- maybe Yeldon and/or Gurly?

 

I think a lot of people would say that 2015 is stronger, but I don't know if that's actually true.

 

2014 is shaping up to be a really nice class. I think Ebron is an animal at TE and I'd tentatively rank Seastrunk over any 2015 RB. Where I think you'll see the biggest gap is at WR. When the dust settles and the picks are in, I would not be surprised to see 5 first round WRs this year. Watkins, Lee, and Evans are already projected that high by most mocks. I think Allen Robinson will have a decent case for being a late 1st if he has a good combine. He's not really the workout warrior type, but he's a ballplayer and he's in the midst of a monster season. There's a lot of upside since he'll only be 20 years old when training camps start next summer. I also think Donte Moncrief could squeeze in there with a convincing pro day. He's got a few little issues, but there's an interesting toolbox there for a team to work with. He's a big target who really gets off the line well and would be a great fit for someone like the Steelers who value vertical receivers.

 

I have what's looking like a top 2-3 dev pick with the whole 2015 class in the pool and I'm not really that blown away by the talent. Gurley and Yeldon look like 1st round backs and that's nice, but I'm not sold that they're difference-maker NFL talents just yet. Cooper looks more like a late 1st-2nd than dominant force. Diggs is a nice player, but not the biggest target. Green-Beckham is looking more and more like a recruiting disappointment. I like Ebron > Funchess at TE and I'm not seeing too many people outside of Winston who really look like the next big thing. So while it's still very early, I would actually rather have a pick in 2014.



#988 BigTex

BigTex

    Don't mess with Texas

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 8,962 posts
  • Joined 22-July 03
  • Location:Deep in the Heart of Texas

Posted 25 October 2013 - 06:14 PM

Is there a general consensus that 2015 represents a stronger class than 2014?

If so, is that a top to bottom difference (e.g. A deeper class) or at the top (e.g. Better early picks as compared to this year) or both? And are there a handful of identifiable players on the horizon that are future studs -- maybe Yeldon and/or Gurly?

 

Trying to gauge which up and coming draft class is better than the other is difficult because 9 times out of 10 the Jrs that declare are better than the Srs. So it depends on the Jrs and redshirt sophs that declare for the draft but both classes seem to be strong today. Another thing that takes place that you absolutely can't account for are those players that pop out of nowhere and produce outstanding numbers.

 

Tex

 

ETA: Agree with the posters that have answered the question.


Edited by BigTex, 25 October 2013 - 06:16 PM.

"Football is my religion... the Shark Pool, my temple...the Draft Dominator, my tools of prayer and fear is not an option."

"I must not fear. Fear is the mind-killer. Fear is the little-death that brings total obliteration. I will face my fear. I will permit it to pass over me and through me. And when it has gone past I will turn the inner eye to see its path. Where the fear has gone there will be nothing. Only I will remain..."

#989 Faust

Faust

    Footballguy

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 20,499 posts
  • Joined 15-April 03
  • Gender:Male

Posted 25 October 2013 - 08:30 PM

Big Board: Big matchups reveal future stars, prospects' flaws
 

by Rob Rang | NFLDraftScout.com Senior Analyst
 
Oct. 25, 2013 2:51 PM ET

 

 

The highly anticipated head-to-head matchups in several marquee games last weekend led to significant reshuffling of the Big Board, with two talented but inconsistent quarterbacks taking a tumble.

 

One can't blame NFL scouts for falling in love with the guts and athleticism of UCLA's Brett Hundley and Clemson's Tajh Boyd, but both struggled in critical conference showdowns, raising questions about their NFL readiness.

 

While two of the nation's most prominent passers struggled, terrific performances from several others, including top-ranked prospect Jadeveon Clowney, Florida State offensive tackle Cameron Erving and Texas A&M wideout Mike Evans, has their stock skyrocketing at the midway point of the season.

 

The Big Board isn't a mock draft. There is no attention given to team needs or the projected selection order. It is simply a ranking of the 32 best prospects potentially eligible for the 2014 NFL Draft.

 

1. Jadeveon Clowney*, DE, South Carolina (6-6, 268): Clowney has failed to live up to our astronomical expectations, but scouts aren't as concerned about his mediocre production as the media seems to be. When on the field, Clowney remains a dominant presence capable of making game-changing plays on each snap of the ball. He produced his best game of 2013 in a highly anticipated rematch with Tennessee left tackle Antonio Richardson.

 

2. Teddy Bridgewater*, QB, Louisville (6-3, 220): In an era in which college quarterbacks' numbers are often inflated by short passes and relatively simplistic schemes, Bridgewater's sparkling production is due to Pro Bowl-caliber accuracy. His success (72 percent completion rate with 20 touchdowns against just two interceptions) comes out of a pro-style offense that forces him to make tough throws. Bridgewater's slight frame and level of competition are concerns.

 

3. Anthony Barr, OLB, UCLA (6-4, 238): A running back until last season, Barr exploded in 2012 to the tune of 21½ tackles for loss and 13½ sacks. He has been equally dominant this year (34 tackles, 11 tackles for loss, four sacks, three forced fumbles in six games) but was largely held in check by Stanford's Andrus Peat. He faces a different kind of challenge this week traveling to Eugene to face Marcus Mariota and the ultra-athletic Oregon offense.

 

4. Jake Matthews, OT, Texas A&M (6-5, 305): Any question about Matthews' ability to hold up at left tackle may have been answered with a dominating performances against Arkansas' speedy Chris Smith and Mississippi's powerful Robert Nkemdiche this season. The son of Hall of Famer Bruce Matthews, Jake proves the cliché -- the apple doesn't fall far from the tree.

 

5. Marcus Mariota*, QB, Oregon (6-3, 214): In completing a season-high 77.4 percent of his passes against a talented Washington defense in Seattle two weeks ago, Mariota demonstrated great accuracy and poise. Moments after the loss, Huskies head coach Steve Sarkisian assessed the redshirt quarterback as a "top-five pick." Couldn't agree more, coach.

 

6. Taylor Lewan, OT, Michigan (6-7, 310): With an incredible combination of size and athletic ability, Lewan has earned comparisons to former Michigan standout Jake Long throughout his career with the Wolverines. Lewan has been the obvious bright spot up front for Michigan, which has struggled with injuries and penalties.

 

7. Sammy Watkins*, WR, Clemson (6-1, 200): Watkins was one of the few Clemson players who appeared unfazed by Florida State's speed. Watkins accounted for nearly double the all-purpose yardage of any other Tiger against the Seminoles, demonstrating the explosiveness and soft, reliable hands that help him project as a No. 1 receiver in the NFL.

 

8. C.J. Mosley, OLB, Alabama (6-2, 232): While a bit undersized, Mosley might be the best pound-for-pound player in the country. Athletic and instinctive, he is a true three-down linebacker capable of making plays against the run and pass.

 

9. Eric Ebron*, TE, North Carolina (6-4, 245): Ebron doesn't get nearly the national attention of Washington's Austin Seferian-Jenkins or other highly regarded tight ends, but scouts are fascinated with his rare combination of size and speed. The UNC staff was so enamored with Ebron's athleticism and physicality that they lined him at defensive end at times last season. The junior needs polish, but is precisely the type of physical mismatch the NFL is looking for in today's tight end.

 

10. Khalil Mack, OLB, Buffalo (6-3, 248): With an eye-popping 56 tackles for loss, 18 sacks and 11 forced fumbles already on his résumé entering the 2013 season, rest assured that scouts knew Mack well. The best player outside of BCS schools, he stepped up with dominating efforts against Ohio State and Connecticut this year to establish himself as a legitimate top-20 prospect.

 

11. Cameron Erving*, OT, Florida State (6-5, 310): Erving played in 13 games as a redshirt freshman defensive tackle but looked like a natural when moved to left tackle a season ago. Long, balanced and athletic, he's a hidden factor in the dynamic play of freshman quarterback Jameis Winston. On Saturday, Erving erased Clemson's Vic Beasley, who entered the big ACC matchup leading the country with eight sacks.

 

12. Johnny Manziel*, QB, Texas A&M (5-11, 210): After the season scouts will poke holes in Manziel's grade due to less-than-ideal size and the distraction he may prove to be off the field. During the season, however, it is impossible not to simply marvel at his magical ability. Showing the same remarkable elusiveness as a year ago and improved arm strength, Manziel is a first-round pick whenever he elects to leave College Station.

 

13. Brett Hundley*, QB, UCLA (6-3, 227): Another of the extraordinary redshirt sophomore class of quarterbacks, Hundley has an ideal blend of size, athleticism and arm talent. He's a fluid athlete with an easy throwing motion whose success comes from a pro-style attack, making him an easy projection to the NFL. While scouts love Hundley's upside, he struggled against Stanford, missing several open targets in the loss.

 

14. Mike Evans*, WR, Texas A&M (6-5, 225): Like his famous quarterback, Evans is just a redshirt sophomore, but he could have quite the decision to make after the season if he continues to dominate the SEC. Deceptively fast with great body control as well as timing, Evans is an exciting split end prospect who reminds scouts of Tampa Bay Buccaneers star Vincent Jackson.

 

15. Antonio Richardson*, OT, Tennessee (6-6, 332): Boasting an exciting combination of size, athleticism and power, "Tiny" looks like the second coming of former Dallas Cowboys Pro Bowl tackle Erik Williams. After containing Clowney a year ago, however, Richardson struggled in his rematch with the South Carolina star, consistently getting beaten off the snap.

 

16. Cyrus Kouandjio*, OT, Alabama (6-5, 312): Some questioned the wisdom of moving Barrett Jones from left tackle (where he won the Jacobs Blocking Trophy as the SEC's best lineman) to center in 2012. The reason for the switch was Kouandjio, a physically blessed athlete who some have compared to former Redskins Pro Bowl tackle Chris Samuels, the No. 3 overall pick out of Alabama in 2000.

 

17. Marqise Lee*, WR, Southern Cal (6-0, 195): Lee has been hampered by a knee injury and unsteady play at quarterback this season, but he has also dropped too many passes. A year after scoring 14 touchdowns as part of a Biletnikoff-winning campaign, Lee only has one this year. Further, he missed USC's Oct. 12 win over Arizona and didn't play in the second half of an Oct. 19 loss to Notre Dame due to a knee injury.

 

18. Cyril Richardson, OG, Baylor (6-5, 335): A dominating drive blocker who projects best at guard but spent the 2011 season protecting Robert Griffin III at left tackle, Richardson is massive, powerful and shockingly athletic. Scouts love Richardson's talent, but the extended splits in Art Briles' scheme fooled us before with former first-round picks Jason Smith (No. 2 overall in 2009) and Danny Watkins (No. 23 in 2011).

 

19. Trent Murphy, DE/OLB, Stanford (6-6, 261): A true outside linebacker in Stanford's 3-4 scheme, Murphy is asked to not only rush the passer but also drop into coverage. While an impressive athlete for his size, Murphy's future likely lies as a 4-3 defensive end. He recorded two sacks in tough matchups against Washington and UCLA.

 

20. Ryan Shazier*, OLB, Ohio State (6-2, 226): Shazier may be 10-15 pounds lighter than scouts would prefer but his instincts, speed and bone-jarring hits make him a fearful defender that offenses must account for on every snap. The Buckeyes' leading tackler and most consistent defender, Shazier stood out in a comeback win against Iowa.

 

21. Cedric Ogbuehi*, OT, Texas A&M (6-5, 300): Overshadowed by the other talent on the Aggies' roster, Ogbuehi is an exciting prospect in his own right. A standout at right guard a year ago, Ogbuehi (pronounced ah-BOO-hee) stands to make a lot of money if he continues his stellar play at right tackle.

 

22. Vic Beasley*, OLB, Clemson (6-3, 235): Beasley led Clemson with eight sacks in limited duty as a sophomore and already has nine through seven games in 2013. Like most of the Tigers, Beasley struggled against Florida State, recording just two tackles. Beasley is similar to surprise 2012 first-round pick Bruce Irvin with his slim frame and explosive burst, but Beasley also flashes rather than dominates.

 

23. Ha Ha Clinton-Dix*, FS, Alabama (6-1, 208): Death, taxes and a Nick Saban-coached defensive back earning first-round grades from NFL scouts are among the sure things in life. Clinton-Dix has an exciting combination of athleticism and instincts. He quickly proved back to his playmaking ways following a two-week suspension for accepting a loan from an Alabama coach by logging five tackles and recording his first interception of the season against Arkansas.

 

24. Tajh Boyd, QB, Clemson (6-1, 225): Boyd's stout frame, toughness and dual-threat capabilities have earned him comparisons to Russell Wilson and the late Steve McNair, but he sure didn't look the part of a future NFL star against Florida State's speedy defense. Boyd appeared flustered and misfired on multiple occasions. He also turned the ball over three times (two interceptions, fumble).

 

25. Louis Nix III*, DT, Notre Dame (6-3, 326): With broad shoulders, a thick lower half and surprisingly quick feet, Nix III is a classic run-stuffer with enough burst and determination to also threaten the pocket. The junior hasn't been as dominant in 2013 as he was a year ago, but remains a standout in a less-than-inspiring crop of defensive tackles.

 

26. Jason Verrett, CB, TCU (5-10, 182): Verrett lacks the size so en vogue in today's NFL, but agility and ball skills never go out of style for cornerbacks. Verrett led the Big 12 with 22 passes defended and six interceptions in 2012. His stellar coverage (six tackles, two passes broken up) against Oklahoma on Oct. 5 made him the top prospect of Week 6.

 

27. Stephon Tuitt*, DL, Notre Dame (6-5, 303): Offseason sports hernia surgery may have played a role in Tuitt adding 20 pounds this season, and early on the extra weight seemed to be slowing him. He has played much better of late, however, and is simply too gifted to fall far on draft day should the junior elect to leave South Bend early.

 

28. Kyle Van Noy, OLB, BYU (6-3, 235): While Ziggy Ansah received most of the hype at BYU, Van Noy was far and away the Cougars' more consistent defender, registering an eye-popping 22 tackles for loss, 13 sacks, six forced fumbles, two interceptions and two blocked kicks in 2013. Van Noy isn't as physically dominating as his former teammate, but his instincts and agility make him a playmaker, nonetheless.

29. DaQuan Jones, DT, Penn State (6-3, 333): Jones was the Nittany Lions' most dominant player in an instant classic four-overtime victory against Michigan. Stout but athletic enough to handle duties all over Penn State's defensive line, Jones' strength and quickness is tough to handle.

 

30. Bishop Sankey*, RB, Washington (5-10, 203): Sankey is winning over scouts with his vision, balance and surprising combination of power and speed. He has proven his toughness against Stanford's physical defense and his big-play ability against Oregon's speed, and is a true three-down back due to excellent hands and awareness in pass protection.

 

31. Ra'Shede Hageman, DT, Minnesota (6-6, 311): Penn State's Jones may be the Big Ten's most impressive defensive lineman but Hageman may be its most gifted. The Golden Gopher's length and athleticism make him a schematic fit in the 3-4 and 4-3. He flashes dominant ability but has struggled with consistency.

 

32. Austin Seferian-Jenkins*, TE, Washington (6-6, 267): His unique combination of size, body control and soft hands made him an immediate standout in each of his two seasons at Washington. However, an offseason arrest for DUI and broken pinkie served as an inauspicious start to Seferian-Jenkins' junior year and the Huskies have featured other playmakers thus far in 2013.

 

 

Just missed the cut

 

Lache Seastrunk*, RB, Baylor
Kevin Hogan*, QB, Stanford
David Yankey, OG, Stanford
Jordan Matthews, WR, South Carolina
Justin Gilbert, CB, Oklahoma State
Denzel Perryman*, OLB, Miami
Aaron Donald, DT, Pittsburgh
Zach Mettenberger, QB, LSU
Ifo Ekpre-Olomu, CB, Oregon
Derek Carr, QB, Fresno State


Edited by Faust, 25 October 2013 - 08:31 PM.


#990 Milkman

Milkman

    Footballguy

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 1,185 posts
  • Joined 19-October 13
  • Gender:Male

Posted 25 October 2013 - 08:55 PM

It's good to see someone else sees Sankey as the top back in this draft. I think it's close between him and Seastrunk. I just loved some of the inside runs I saw him make against Oregon.

#991 ConnSKINS26

ConnSKINS26

    Footballguy

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 7,302 posts
  • Joined 27-January 11
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Boston
  • Interests:Things. Lots of things.

Posted 25 October 2013 - 09:32 PM

It's good to see someone else sees Sankey as the top back in this draft. I think it's close between him and Seastrunk. I just loved some of the inside runs I saw him make against Oregon.


I just have a feeling the measurables aren't going to back up what some people see in him. Me, I haven't decided either way yet.

When your opinion matters, I'll inform you.


Hahaha, read my posts bro.  I'm one of the smarter Fantasy Player on these boards.


#992 ZWK

ZWK

    Footballguy

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 802 posts
  • Joined 14-July 08
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:CA

Posted 25 October 2013 - 09:51 PM

Peshek has added Ka'Deem Carey and Antonio Andrews to the elusiveness comparison, and is now including the per-carry average for Yards After Contact Capped at 15 yards:

Player           Btk%   YaC Capped
Melvin Gordon   12.5%   2.95
Antonio Andrews  8.7%   2.92
KaDeem Carey     6.7%   2.88
Lache Seastrunk 11.1%   2.74
Bishop Sankey    7.0%   2.48


#993 werdnoynek

werdnoynek

    Footballguy

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 3,689 posts
  • Joined 05-September 09
  • Location:Madison, WI

Posted 25 October 2013 - 10:31 PM

 

It's good to see someone else sees Sankey as the top back in this draft. I think it's close between him and Seastrunk. I just loved some of the inside runs I saw him make against Oregon.


I just have a feeling the measurables aren't going to back up what some people see in him. Me, I haven't decided either way yet.

 

 

  :hifive:



#994 r0llin_game

r0llin_game

    Footballguy

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 2,127 posts
  • Joined 29-October 08
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Miami

Posted 25 October 2013 - 10:46 PM

They keep listing Jordan Matthews as a WR from South Carolina, not Vanderbilt.
Interested in buying authentic jerseys. CLICK HERE for a list of what can be ordered. PM Me for prices and details etc.

#995 Penguin

Penguin

    Footballguy

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 3,382 posts
  • Joined 14-April 03
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Antarctica

Posted 26 October 2013 - 01:09 AM

It's good to see someone else sees Sankey as the top back in this draft. I think it's close between him and Seastrunk. I just loved some of the inside runs I saw him make against Oregon.

 

No way I could see myself drafting Sankey over Seastrunk or Gordan at this time. My opinion might change between now and August but right now I couldn't pull the trigger on him as the 1st or 2nd RB.


5 Time Z31 Champions - ('05, '07, '08, '09 & '10) Runnerup '13


#996 Bob Magaw

Bob Magaw

    Footballguy

  • Moderator
  • Pip
  • 8,119 posts
  • Joined 11-April 03
  • Gender:Male
  • Interests:Connective patterns in nature, science and art, actor Larry Storch's body of work

Posted 26 October 2013 - 02:24 AM

who is a good comp for seastrunk...

 

and how does mike evans game compare to that of alshon jeffery...

 

similar size, sounds like he will test slower, interested in movement skills...


"The universe speaks in patterns." (paraphrase of Heraclitus) - Roger Von Oech 

"Luck is the residue of design." - Branch Rickey

"Winning is our business." - Bill Parcells  

#997 lyon812

lyon812

    Footballguy

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 2,459 posts
  • Joined 17-August 06
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Olympia, WA

Posted 26 October 2013 - 09:47 AM

who is a good comp for seastrunk...

 

 

Seastrunk reminds me of McCoy with his ability to plant his foot and change direction. He cuts on a dime while maintaining good power to break tackles. In the offseason there were reports about Seastrunk really taking things seriously in terms of discipline and training, and he put on a lot of muscle without it slowing him down a bit. I think all of this is extremely positive and I can't see anyone knocking him out of the #1 spot.



#998 Xue

Xue

    Footballguy

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 2,365 posts
  • Joined 20-August 08
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Sacramento, CA

Posted 26 October 2013 - 10:18 AM

who is a good comp for seastrunk...

 

and how does mike evans game compare to that of alshon jeffery...

 

similar size, sounds like he will test slower, interested in movement skills...

 

I see a lot of McCoy comparisons for Seastrunk, but they are totally different builds.  This isn't meant to be a slight, but, in terms of build and movement skills, Seastrunk reminds mostly of Jerome Harrison and JJ Arrington.

 

Evans reminds me of a taller Michael Floyd.  He doesn't look any slower than Jeffery, though, who looks lumbering at times and rarely "separates" 1-on-1.



#999 ConnSKINS26

ConnSKINS26

    Footballguy

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 7,302 posts
  • Joined 27-January 11
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Boston
  • Interests:Things. Lots of things.

Posted 26 October 2013 - 11:09 AM

who is a good comp for seastrunk...
 
and how does mike evans game compare to that of alshon jeffery...
 
similar size, sounds like he will test slower, interested in movement skills...

 
I see a lot of McCoy comparisons for Seastrunk, but they are totally different builds.  This isn't meant to be a slight, but, in terms of build and movement skills, Seastrunk reminds mostly of Jerome Harrison and JJ Arrington.
 
Evans reminds me of a taller Michael Floyd.  He doesn't look any slower than Jeffery, though, who looks lumbering at times and rarely "separates" 1-on-1.

Not really sure what you mean, but Seastrunk is built pretty thickly, pretty low to the ground. Good weight distribution IMO, he's bottom heavy.

When your opinion matters, I'll inform you.


Hahaha, read my posts bro.  I'm one of the smarter Fantasy Player on these boards.


#1000 JohnnyU

JohnnyU

    Footballguy

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 16,177 posts
  • Joined 14-April 03

Posted 26 October 2013 - 11:16 AM

 

 

who is a good comp for seastrunk...
 
and how does mike evans game compare to that of alshon jeffery...
 
similar size, sounds like he will test slower, interested in movement skills...

 
I see a lot of McCoy comparisons for Seastrunk, but they are totally different builds.  This isn't meant to be a slight, but, in terms of build and movement skills, Seastrunk reminds mostly of Jerome Harrison and JJ Arrington.
 
Evans reminds me of a taller Michael Floyd.  He doesn't look any slower than Jeffery, though, who looks lumbering at times and rarely "separates" 1-on-1.

Not really sure what you mean, but Seastrunk is built pretty thickly, pretty low to the ground. Good weight distribution IMO, he's bottom heavy.

 

Exactly !!!


Hopes that were high in the heat of September ... can wilt and die in the chill of November. November can be cold and grey, November can be surly with bitter rain upon the world and winter coming early.
- John Facenda



 





0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users