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Hipple, Long, Ware, & Peete

marijuana winning big at the polls. CO/MASS/wash pass

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I'm too lazy and frankly not interested enough to read all the previous posts so forgive me if this has been discussed. Will it be controlled and sold like cigarettes (i.e. taxed)? If so will there be a stiffer penalty for black market marijuana or is this just making it legal to possess?

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I'm too lazy and frankly not interested enough to read all the previous posts so forgive me if this has been discussed. Will it be controlled and sold like cigarettes (i.e. taxed)? If so will there be a stiffer penalty for black market marijuana or is this just making it legal to possess?

It will be handled like a state liquor store.

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I'm too lazy and frankly not interested enough to read all the previous posts so forgive me if this has been discussed. Will it be controlled and sold like cigarettes (i.e. taxed)? If so will there be a stiffer penalty for black market marijuana or is this just making it legal to possess?

It will be handled like a state liquor store.
With addendum that individuals allowed 6 plants for personal use.

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I'm too lazy and frankly not interested enough to read all the previous posts so forgive me if this has been discussed. Will it be controlled and sold like cigarettes (i.e. taxed)? If so will there be a stiffer penalty for black market marijuana or is this just making it legal to possess?

It will be handled like a state liquor store.
With addendum that individuals allowed 6 plants for personal use.
So when ya movin' HIpple?

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Thinking it's time for a Green Acres reboot, where a city couple leave to start a pot farm in the country. The title really works in this case.

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Thinking it's time for a Green Acres reboot, where a city couple leave to start a pot farm in the country. The title really works in this case.

Mr. Haney, Hank Kimball & Eb did seem pretty high most of the time.

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I'm too lazy and frankly not interested enough to read all the previous posts so forgive me if this has been discussed. Will it be controlled and sold like cigarettes (i.e. taxed)? If so will there be a stiffer penalty for black market marijuana or is this just making it legal to possess?

It will be handled like a state liquor store.
With addendum that individuals allowed 6 plants for personal use.
I always get a kick out of the plant thing. You can have one ounce or 6 plants. Do they not know how many ounces come from one plant? Is it illegal to have couple of pounds of bud growing on your plant or curing in your basement?

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Frankly, significant gains in legalization are being made much faster than I ever dreamed. Medical marijuana was a good first step, but really didn't force the Feds to reevaluate their stance. In my opinion, complete legalization noe forces the Feds to take a stance. I hope the Obama administration would make the right decision, but state's rights don't seem to be the prevailing philosophy of this administration.

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http://www.detroitnews.com/article/20121106/METRO01/211060450/1409/METRO/Detroit-proposal-decriminalize-marijuana-winning-early-returnsVEMBER 6, 2012 AT 11:25 PMDetroit proposal to decriminalize marijuana winning in early returnsBY DARREN A. NICHOLS THE DETROIT NEWS 1 COMMENTSDetroit — A controversial city proposal that would allow residents to have small amounts of marijuana at home was winning in early voting returns Tuesday.With just over 1 percent of the city's precincts reporting, Proposal M was leading 65-35 percent.

A similar decrim ordinance passed in Grand Rapids. West Michigan is known for being quite a bit more conservative than the east side, but the city of GR itself is quite liberal. I was glad to see this not only pass, but pass in a pretty big way. Step in the right direction.
I think these local elections in cash strapped cities send Avery strong message to politicians. The war on marijuana needs to end so that local law enforcement can focus on real criminals... and make boatloads of cash in the process.
OT, but it just occured to me that Avery Johnson's nickname should have been 'Big'.

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So today, in the legalized states, are you able to light up in front of a cop or is there still of bunch of legislation before anything happens?

Will be at least 30 days. Possession would be legal but not public use.

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The big benefit for most, is if caught with an ounce or less nothing happens and you are allowed to grow your own. Up to 6 plants. Baby steps.

Edited by Mile High

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The big benefit for most, is if caught with an ounce or less nothing happens and you are allowed to grow your own. Up to 6 plants. Baby steps.

As of right now? I thought it would take a bit of time to get laws changed.Stores able to start selling pipes and seeds?

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In these states where recreational use is liberalizing under the law, judges and juries are simply going to become disinterested in hearing the cases and/or sentencing the convicted. After a while, no one will even notice what a normal part of the fabric of society it has become. And it won't matter what the feds do in the meantime; they're gonna lose interest, too, eventually.

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The big benefit for most, is if caught with an ounce or less nothing happens and you are allowed to grow your own. Up to 6 plants. Baby steps.

As of right now? I thought it would take a bit of time to get laws changed.Stores able to start selling pipes and seeds?
I read it takes 30 days before it becomes law. 2014 before stores start selling. Right now in Colorado it's easy to get a medical marijuana card ($90) and buy from them. It's legal in the city of Denver to have an ounce or less right now, has been for a couple of years. You could still be busted by the state or county though.

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Now the Nuggets can go out and compete for free agent with ease.

Actually, No it doesn't. Employers can still have drug testing of their employees.

My Link

The initiative does not change the ability of employers to maintain their current employment policies, nor does it prevent them from creating whatever policies they see fit. If employers do not currently allow off-site marijuana use by employees, they can continue to prohibit it if Amendment 64 is adopted.

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In these states where recreational use is liberalizing under the law, judges and juries are simply going to become disinterested in hearing the cases and/or sentencing the convicted. After a while, no one will even notice what a normal part of the fabric of society it has become. And it won't matter what the feds do in the meantime; they're gonna lose interest, too, eventually.

:goodposting: It simply going to be a matter of time before a solid majority of the country realizes that legal marijuana won't destroy the fabric of society and will also save taxpayers money.

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My big question...is this the excuse Obama needs to tell the DEA to back off of raids? Politically I think he could now make the case that with some many states passing legal marijuana laws that the DEA's time and money could better spent elsewhere.

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My big question...is this the excuse Obama needs to tell the DEA to back off of raids? Politically I think he could now make the case that with some many states passing legal marijuana laws that the DEA's time and money could better spent elsewhere.

I know this is a contrarian position, but I would rather have Romney in the White House than Obama on this issue. A Republican can have a going-to-China moment on this, but Obama has been wretched on marijuana policy so far, and I'm not sure he has the political freedom to do the right thing on this topic like a Republican would. Of course I hope I'm wrong and I'll give Obama nothing but praise if can get the feds to come around.

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So only members of the Denver Broncos can get high now and Goddell cannot suspend them?

I'm giddy at the prospect of some Broncos player telling the commish to gfh.

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My big question...is this the excuse Obama needs to tell the DEA to back off of raids? Politically I think he could now make the case that with some many states passing legal marijuana laws that the DEA's time and money could better spent elsewhere.

I know this is a contrarian position, but I would rather have Romney in the White House than Obama on this issue. A Republican can have a going-to-China moment on this, but Obama has been wretched on marijuana policy so far, and I'm not sure he has the political freedom to do the right thing on this topic like a Republican would. Of course I hope I'm wrong and I'll give Obama nothing but praise if can get the feds to come around.
I think your position is a very reasonable one. Another alternative, however, would be for the president to act quickly and call off the DEA right away. By the time the next election rolls around, recreational use may be far more extensively accepted and impossible for the 2016 candidates to successfully oppose.

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My big question...is this the excuse Obama needs to tell the DEA to back off of raids? Politically I think he could now make the case that with some many states passing legal marijuana laws that the DEA's time and money could better spent elsewhere.

I know this is a contrarian position, but I would rather have Romney in the White House than Obama on this issue. A Republican can have a going-to-China moment on this, but Obama has been wretched on marijuana policy so far, and I'm not sure he has the political freedom to do the right thing on this topic like a Republican would. Of course I hope I'm wrong and I'll give Obama nothing but praise if can get the feds to come around.
He has significantly less risk in play now. Let's hope it makes a difference.

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My big question...is this the excuse Obama needs to tell the DEA to back off of raids? Politically I think he could now make the case that with some many states passing legal marijuana laws that the DEA's time and money could better spent elsewhere.

I know this is a contrarian position, but I would rather have Romney in the White House than Obama on this issue. A Republican can have a going-to-China moment on this, but Obama has been wretched on marijuana policy so far, and I'm not sure he has the political freedom to do the right thing on this topic like a Republican would. Of course I hope I'm wrong and I'll give Obama nothing but praise if can get the feds to come around.
I think your position is a very reasonable one. Another alternative, however, would be for the president to act quickly and call off the DEA right away. By the time the next election rolls around, recreational use may be far more extensively accepted and impossible for the 2016 candidates to successfully oppose.
That would be excellent. Benign neglect by the federal government would be a great response IMO.

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Now the Nuggets can go out and compete for free agent with ease.

Actually, No it doesn't. Employers can still have drug testing of their employees.

My Link

The initiative does not change the ability of employers to maintain their current employment policies, nor does it prevent them from creating whatever policies they see fit. If employers do not currently allow off-site marijuana use by employees, they can continue to prohibit it if Amendment 64 is adopted.

Exactly. The employer can still do it, unless doing so would violate a CBA or something. PS the NBA doesn't want large scale testing. 60-80% of guys in the NBA smoke weed.

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Peyton Manning is still the smartest athlete. He bought a bunch of Papa John’s Pizza franchises [21, all in the Denver area] just before Colorado legalized marijuana

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Maryland Senator Bobby Zirkin just introduced a bill to decriminalize personal possession of less than 10 grams. It would become a civil violation subject to a fine not greater than $100. Which means no one will bother.I wonder how our governor will take this. He seems pretty intent on running for president in 2016 or 2020; running from a Colorado- or Washington-type state may cost him a few votes in the swing states.

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Maryland Senator Bobby Zirkin just introduced a bill to decriminalize personal possession of less than 10 grams. It would become a civil violation subject to a fine not greater than $100.

:thumbup: Good thing my dealer uses the metric system.

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If only there was another drug which was legal and produces over 10,000 driving fatalities (over 32% of all driving fatalities). The one thing that is concerning is how to test for a DUI if the person is "potted up on weed"
First we will need one of those super smart lawmakers to define what "potted up on weed" is.

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link: Marijuana dealers getting slammed by taxes

Thanks to a decades-old law targeting drug runners, entrepreneurs in the nascent medical marijuana industry face a unique burden: an effective federal income tax rate that can soar as high as 75%.

The hefty levy is the result of a 1982 provision to the tax code, known as 280E, that stemmed from a successful attempt by a convicted drug trafficker to claim his yacht, weapons and bribes as businesses expenses, according to 280E Reform, a group working to overturn the statute.

Enacted in the wake of that PR debacle, the rule bars those selling illegal substances from deducting related expenses on their federal income taxes.

It may have been effective against cocaine dealers and smugglers of other hard drugs, but the law now means purveyors of medical marijuana in the 18 states that have legalized the drug can't can't take typical things like rent or payroll as a business expense. That's taking a heavy toll on this new field.

Jim Marty, an accountant in Colorado specializing in medicinal marijuana tax law, said he has one client that didn't turn a profit in 2009, 2010 or 2011. In 2012, though, she was handed a $300,000 tax bill from the IRS for those three proceeding years.

Entrepreneurs whose businesses are legal under state laws are getting hammered by outdated federal tax rules.

"If you have a license from the state hanging on your wall, that doesn't fit the definition of trafficking," Marty said. "Yet the IRS is aggressively auditing this industry."

He said he often sees clients facing effective tax bills of 65% to 75%. That compares to 15% to 30% for businesses in general.

The Internal Revenue Service did not respond to a request for comment. In a letter to a congressman in 2011, the agency said it was merely enforcing the law, and that Congress needs to change the law if it does not want medicinal marijuana dealers caught up in the provision.

Several groups are working on just that, though it's unclear if the law will be changed anytime soon. The Obama administration has so far not expressed much interest in weighing in on the matter.

Until then, those in the industry will keep looking for crafty ways to minimize their tax bill, and pay the tax man when they can't.

"An emerging industry that can provide hundreds of thousands of jobs is being held back by these crazy tax rates," said Betty Aldworth, deputy director of the National Cannabis Industry Association. "We're like any other small businesses, that just happens to be illegal in some states." To top of page

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Go Pennsylvania! (figured they'd be the last state to consider it)

Pennsylvania: Marijuana Legalization Legislation Introduced

Legislation that seeks to make Pennsylvania the third state to legalize and regulate the adult use of marijuana, Senate Bill 528, has been introduced in the Pennsylvania Senate. Senator Daylin Leach (D-Montgomery County) has pre-filed legislation to be debated by lawmakers this spring. States Sen. Lynch: “Demographics and exposure will in time defeat irrational fears, old wives tales and bad science. This bill furthers the discussion, which hastens the day."

Approximately 25,000 citizens are arrested annually in Pennsylvania for marijuana-related offenses, at a cost of some $325 million dollars.

Pennsylvania is one of a growing number of states where lawmakers are considering full cannabis legalization.

Edited by E-Z Glider

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