Hipple, Long, Ware, & Peete

marijuana winning big at the polls. CO/MASS/wash pass

2,344 posts in this topic

Theres talk of Florida possibly becoming the first southern state to legalize medicinal marijuana in 2014. A local big shot attorney is spearheading the campaign to get the 680k signatures to get it on the ballot.

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2013/03/20/florida-medical-marijuana_n_2915919.html

Florida Medical Marijuana Campaign Gets Backing From Top Democratic Fundraisers

ORLANDO, Fla., March 20 (Reuters) - Two top Democratic fundraisers in Florida have committed to providing the money and know-how to get the question of legalizing medical marijuana on the state ballot in 2014.

"I'm prepared to keep raising money and writing checks until I get the signatures to put it on the ballot," attorney John Morgan said late on Tuesday.

Morgan, who routinely hosts presidents and national political figures at his Orlando-area home, recently signed on as chairman of People United for Medical Marijuana-Florida, a grassroots campaign that operated on a shoestring until now.

Morgan was recruited by Ben Pollara, a lobbyist and fundraiser for President Barack Obama's 2012 re-election campaign. Pollara recently became treasurer of the medical marijuana campaign.

By law, the campaign needs to collect signatures of almost 700,000 registered voters to get a constitutional amendment legalizing medical marijuana on the ballot in November 2014.

Pollara estimated the campaign will cost $10 million.

Morgan, who put his money behind a successful 2004 constitutional amendment raising Florida's minimum wage, said he thinks he can recruit an "army of angels" to help gather the necessary signatures for the ballot initiative.

"I believe there is going to be kind of an uprising of people who have needed it in the past or had a loved one who needed it who are going to say I don't want this to happen to someone else," Morgan said.

Well i aint a Democrat, but they got one vote.

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Illinois Senate approves medical marijuana bill
By Monique Garcia
Clout Street

2:56 p.m. CDT, May 17, 2013

SPRINGFIELD --- The Senate today approved legislation that would allow doctors to prescribe medical marijuana to patients with serious illnesses, sending the measure to Gov. Pat Quinn.

The issue pitted supporters arguing for compassion for those suffering from pain they say only cannabis can ease against opponents who contend the legislation would undermine public safety.

Sponsoring Sen. Bill Haine, D-Alton, argued the measure is one of the toughest in the nation. Haine said his bill does not reflect other states that have “sloppily” instituted medical marijuana laws.

“This bill is filled with walls to keep this limited,” said Haine, a former Madison County state’s attorney.

Sen. Kyle McCarter, R-Lebanon, raised concerns about lawmakers endorsing a product that classified as a controlled substance by the federal government, arguing marijuana is a gateway drug that could lead users to harder substances.

“For every touching story we have heard about the benefits to those in pain, I remind you today that there are a thousand time more parents who will never be relieved from the pain of losing a child due to addiction which in many cases started with the very illegal, FDA-unapproved addiction-forming drug that you are asking us to now make a normal part of our communities,” McCarter said.

The proposal would create a four-year trial program in which doctors could prescribe patients no more than 2.5 ounces of marijuana every two weeks. To qualify, patients must have one of 33 serious or chronic conditions -- including cancer, multiple sclerosis or HIV -- and an established relationship with a doctor.

Patients would undergo fingerprinting and a criminal background check and would be banned from using marijuana in public and around minors. Patients also could not legally grow marijuana, and they would have to buy it from one of 60 dispensing centers across Illinois. The state would license 22 growers.

The measure drew strong opposition from the Illinois Association of Chiefs of Police and the Illinois Sheriffs' Association, which sent a letter to the governor and lawmakers warning the proposal would not stop medical marijuana card holders from driving while under the influence. They suggested blood and urine testing be included in the legislation to allow police to determine whether card holders had marijuana in their system while driving.

Haine argued the law has safeguards to prevent that, including designating on a driver's license whether they use medical marijuana.

The Senate vote was 35-21, with 30 needed to pass the bill. It goes to Quinn, who has not indicated whether he will sign it. The Democratic governor recently said he is open minded to the legislation.

:thumbup:

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Illinois Senate approves medical marijuana bill
By Monique Garcia
Clout Street

2:56 p.m. CDT, May 17, 2013

SPRINGFIELD --- The Senate today approved legislation that would allow doctors to prescribe medical marijuana to patients with serious illnesses, sending the measure to Gov. Pat Quinn.

The issue pitted supporters arguing for compassion for those suffering from pain they say only cannabis can ease against opponents who contend the legislation would undermine public safety.

Sponsoring Sen. Bill Haine, D-Alton, argued the measure is one of the toughest in the nation. Haine said his bill does not reflect other states that have “sloppily” instituted medical marijuana laws.

“This bill is filled with walls to keep this limited,” said Haine, a former Madison County state’s attorney.

Sen. Kyle McCarter, R-Lebanon, raised concerns about lawmakers endorsing a product that classified as a controlled substance by the federal government, arguing marijuana is a gateway drug that could lead users to harder substances.

“For every touching story we have heard about the benefits to those in pain, I remind you today that there are a thousand time more parents who will never be relieved from the pain of losing a child due to addiction which in many cases started with the very illegal, FDA-unapproved addiction-forming drug that you are asking us to now make a normal part of our communities,” McCarter said.

The proposal would create a four-year trial program in which doctors could prescribe patients no more than 2.5 ounces of marijuana every two weeks. To qualify, patients must have one of 33 serious or chronic conditions -- including cancer, multiple sclerosis or HIV -- and an established relationship with a doctor.

Patients would undergo fingerprinting and a criminal background check and would be banned from using marijuana in public and around minors. Patients also could not legally grow marijuana, and they would have to buy it from one of 60 dispensing centers across Illinois. The state would license 22 growers.

The measure drew strong opposition from the Illinois Association of Chiefs of Police and the Illinois Sheriffs' Association, which sent a letter to the governor and lawmakers warning the proposal would not stop medical marijuana card holders from driving while under the influence. They suggested blood and urine testing be included in the legislation to allow police to determine whether card holders had marijuana in their system while driving.

Haine argued the law has safeguards to prevent that, including designating on a driver's license whether they use medical marijuana.

The Senate vote was 35-21, with 30 needed to pass the bill. It goes to Quinn, who has not indicated whether he will sign it. The Democratic governor recently said he is open minded to the legislation.

:thumbup:

Saw this due to a couple of god-fearing, uptight righties voicing their outrage on fb.

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Why are the police always bringing up driving under the influence, like this is a whole new issue all of a sudden? Don't most states all ready have laws covering this?

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In Las Vegas, Mayors Go Rogue on Pot Legalization

by Matt Taylor Jul 6, 2013 4:45 AM EDT

A conference of mayors unanimously calls on the federal government to butt out of marijuana policymaking.

782


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Last week in Las Vegas, mayors nationwide told Uncle Sam to let Americans go green.


If only it were that easy.



Advertisement run by NORMAL in 2002. (NORML)


The 180 elected officials attending the annual meeting of the U.S. conference of mayors in Sin City unanimously adopted a resolution urging the federal government to let states and localities make their own marijuana policy. The bipartisan sponsors—including, along with the usual suspects, leaders like Jean Robb, the Tea Party–backed conservative mayor of Deerfield Beach, Florida—seemed to show that the war on the war on drugs is now in full sway, a process that has accelerated since voters in Colorado and Washington state embraced weed legalization at the polls last fall.


The mayors, who claim to know a thing or two about tight budgets and wasted public-safety dollars, don’t want the feds to impose new enforcement burdens on already-strapped police forces and are also keeping an eye on the potential revenue from taxing the always in-demand substance.


So they’re stepping into the void left by a Department of Justice that has essentially been silent on the legalization measures. Attorney General Eric Holder promised a response “relatively soon” way back in February, but has gone mum since then. Perhaps encouraged by that silence, politicians have become increasingly vocal in trashing the war on drugs like never before, a line of criticism that taps into growing liberal and libertarian distrust of the Obama administration’s expansion of the surveillance state and drone warfare.


Considering the messy realities of regulation, the local leaders are offering to take the lead from the federal government, effectively letting cities and states emerge as legalization laboratories.


“It’s akin to the spirit in the country today relative to gays and lesbians and same-sex marriage and so forth,” says William Euille, the first African-American mayor of Alexandria, Virginia, and a co-sponsor of the resolution. “People have come to realize that we need to stop punishing people who want to live their lives a little bit differently.”


The mayors stress that they are joined not in advocating any particular approach to marijuana—be it decriminalization, medicinal programs, or full legalization—but simply in calling on Washington to let local communities decide the matter for themselves. And while gay-rights advocates might bristle at the comparison (which Bill Maher makes regularly on his HBO show Real Time) of their fight for equality before the law with the push for legal pot, Euille is right about one thing: public opinion has moved sharply in favor of both causes over the past few years. Even some longtime foes who maintain that marijuana is a “gateway drug” and that its association with criminality is inextricable concede that they are swimming against the tide, and that it is only a matter of time before some form of legalized pot is a reality of urban life in America.


“People have come to realize that we need to stop punishing people who want to live their lives a little bit differently.”

“The horse is out of the barn,” William J. Bratton, the former police commissioner for New York City, Los Angeles, and Boston, told The Daily Beast in an interview. Though Bratton sees the trend toward legalization as “unfortunate,” he says it’s really just a question of the details at this point, and in particular what the regulatory infrastructure will look like. On that front, he expects police chiefs, regardless of any resolutions their bosses have signed, to be frustrated by the new order.


“It's phenomenal in a country that is so fanatical about ensuring purity of prescription drugs that the regulations governing marijuana are clearly laughable for their lack of effectiveness,” he says, referring to the medical-marijuana laws that have created a certain amount of chaos in Los Angeles, the city council there voting at one point to ban dispensaries entirely before voters moved to restore them at the ballot box, scaring lawmakers into repealing the ban.


New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg, who has dismissed medical marijuana as a “hoax” and been criticized for the pot-related arrests, overwhelmingly of young black and Hispanic men, resulting from his controversial “stop and frisk” program, perhaps appropriately did not attend the conference. “You live with it,” Bratton said of the prospect of an independent inspector general overseeing the NYPD, which he said was inevitable given the electorate’s outrage about the racial impact of marijuana arrests. “Is crime going to basically all of a sudden go out of control? I don’t think so.”


But the mayors who sponsored the resolution said they did so out of frustration with the slow pace of the federal debate on drug policy, and a belief that the long arms of D.C. shouldn’t constrain their respective cities on social questions like this one. As for what the new regulatory environment might look like, Mark Kleiman, UCLA professor and Washington state’s “pot czar,” says he likes the idea of experimenting with different drug laws but has doubts about local politicians possessing the knowledge or resources to set up an effective regulatory scheme.


“I don't think that total deference to local control is going to work well because of the race-to-the-bottom problem,” he says, expressing fear that one or two states or cities with weak regulations might take over the market in the same way that Delaware has become ground zero for the credit-card industry. In a worst-case scenario, the profit motive means any nascent marijuana industry would encourage excessive use and even target children, much as Big Tobacco did before such tactics were banned in the 1990s.


Which is to say that all sorts of sticky details still need to be worked out. But in the meantime, these mayors are trying to advance the conversation.


“I happen to have a relative who has glaucoma and has used marijuana to great relief,” says Las Vegas Mayor Carolyn Goodman. “The reality is that we as mayors work with the people,” she said, while members of Congress in Washington “don't really know the heartbeat of what’s going on every single day.”

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http://www.oregonlive.com/politics/index.ssf/2013/07/medical_marijuana_bill.html

By Noelle Crombie, The Oregonian
Email the author | Follow on Twitter
on July 06, 2013 at 4:10 PM, updated July 06, 2013 at 10:48 PM
Email
The Oregon House on Saturday passed a bill legalizing medical marijuana retail establishments, moving what has been a booming but legally hazy industry squarely into the mainstream and handing medical marijuana advocates a major victory.
House Bill 3460, now headed to Gov. John Kitzhaber’s desk, creates a registry of businesses that sell the medical marijuana. Patients have long sought retail access to cannabis, arguing the state’s rules — grow your own marijuana or have someone do it for you — are unrealistic.
Legislative approval comes a year after an investigation by The Oregonian showed that scant state regulation of medical marijuana allowed widespread diversion to the black market.
The vote means Oregon joins a dozen other states that allow medical marijuana dispensaries or retail outlets.
Oregon voters have twice defeated ballot initiatives creating a regulated dispensary system, but that hasn’t deterred the state’s medical marijuana industry. Multnomah County law enforcement has largely looked the other way when it comes to these establishments, but police in other counties, such as Jackson, Washington and Malheur have cracked down on the sale of medical marijuana out of retail storefronts.
Details about how the registry will work need to be worked out by the Oregon Health Authority, but here’s a quick rundown of what the passage of HB 3460 means for Oregon:
Q: Does the new law mean existing medical marijuana storefronts are now state-sanctioned?
A: Not yet. The Oregon Health Authority, which oversees the state’s medical marijuana program, has until March 2014 to draft rules on security, marijuana testing and other issues. Initially, the bill included a provision potentially limiting criminal liability for existing medical marijuana clubs and collectives. Oregon prosecutors successfully lobbied to strip that protection from the bill.
Q: How much will it cost to buy marijuana in one of these facilities?
A: Operators can set their own prices. The price may reflect the costs of “doing business, including costs related to transferring, handling, security, insuring, testing, packaging and processing usable marijuana and immature marijuana plants and the cost of supplies, utilities, rent or mortgage.”
Q: Will medical marijuana producers be paid?
A: Yes. Operators of a medical marijuana facility may reimburse state-registered cannabis growers for the same expenses listed above.
Q: Can anyone operate a medical marijuana facility?
A: The person responsible for the facility must be an Oregon resident. People convicted of felony manufacturing or delivery of a controlled substance are prohibited.
Q: Are these establishments subject to inspection?
A: The law allows the Oregon Health Authority to perform inspections “at any reasonable time.”
Medical Marijuana
Continuing coverage of medical marijuana by The Oregonian's Noelle Crombie.
Q: What information will police have about these establishments?
A: Law enforcement may verify whether a facility is registered with the state.
Q: Will producers of marijuana-infused brownies, cookies, candies and other edibles be required to register with the state?
A: The law does not address makers of marijuana-infused products.
Q: How much will registration cost?
A: The Oregon Health Authority expects to charge each establishment $4,000 a year.
Q: What does the law mean for the Oregon Medical Marijuana Program?
A: More staff and more work. The Legislative Fiscal Office expects the registry system will require hiring four employees, including two who will inspect establishments for compliance with zoning and other requirements.
Q: How will this new registry be funded?
A: State officials expect registration fees will generate $900,000 in the first two years, covering the cost of staff and other expenses.
Q: Can anyone walk into one of these medical marijuana establishments and buy cannabis?
A: No. Only Oregon medical marijuana patients are allowed. Recreational marijuana use is not legal in the state.
Q: Now that medical marijuana dispensaries, collectives and other outlets are legal in Oregon, does that mean they can open anywhere?
A: The law restricts facilities from operating within 1,000 feet of a school or 1,000 feet of another facility. They may only operate in farm or commercial zones but can’t be in the same location as a medical marijuana grow site. The League of Oregon Cities, which endorsed the bill, noted it doesn’t block municipalities from adopting their own ordinances on medical marijuana outlets. Q: How many outlets will operate under the new law?
A: Officials expect to register about 225 outlets in the first two years.
Q: What about the quality of marijuana sold in retail outlets? Will the product be tested?
A: Yes. The new law requires medical marijuana sold by one of these state-licensed outlets be tested for mold, mildew and pesticides. The law doesn’t address rules for facilities that perform such testing, themselves a cottage industry in Oregon.
-- Noelle Crombie

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DEA raiding marijuana dispensaries in Washington

SEATTLE — Federal agents have raided a number of medical marijuana dispensaries in the Puget Sound region.

Drug Enforcement Administration spokeswoman Jodie Underwood said Wednesday afternoon the operation was under way. She declined to immediately provide details about how many dispensaries were being targeted or how many search warrants were being executed.

Washington state legalized adult possession of up to an ounce of marijuana last fall, but marijuana remains illegal under federal law.

Seattle medical marijuana attorney Douglas Hiatt said the targeted dispensaries include Seattle Cross, Tacoma Cross and Bayside Collective in Olympia.

Bayside employee Addy Norton said agents seized personal cell phones of dispensary workers and pot, but left computers and about $1,000 in cash. Agents told her the raid was part of a two-year investigation, and she said she was ordered to appear before a federal grand jury in Seattle in September.

The raid came just days after Bayside was burglarized on Sunday night.

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I am so sick of the Feds prioritizing marijuana.

:goodposting:

I feel no need to smoke a bowl anymore, but this is just stupid.

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Illinois Senate approves medical marijuana bill
By Monique Garcia
Clout Street

2:56 p.m. CDT, May 17, 2013

SPRINGFIELD --- The Senate today approved legislation that would allow doctors to prescribe medical marijuana to patients with serious illnesses, sending the measure to Gov. Pat Quinn.

The issue pitted supporters arguing for compassion for those suffering from pain they say only cannabis can ease against opponents who contend the legislation would undermine public safety.

Sponsoring Sen. Bill Haine, D-Alton, argued the measure is one of the toughest in the nation. Haine said his bill does not reflect other states that have “sloppily” instituted medical marijuana laws.

“This bill is filled with walls to keep this limited,” said Haine, a former Madison County state’s attorney.

Sen. Kyle McCarter, R-Lebanon, raised concerns about lawmakers endorsing a product that classified as a controlled substance by the federal government, arguing marijuana is a gateway drug that could lead users to harder substances.

“For every touching story we have heard about the benefits to those in pain, I remind you today that there are a thousand time more parents who will never be relieved from the pain of losing a child due to addiction which in many cases started with the very illegal, FDA-unapproved addiction-forming drug that you are asking us to now make a normal part of our communities,” McCarter said.

The proposal would create a four-year trial program in which doctors could prescribe patients no more than 2.5 ounces of marijuana every two weeks. To qualify, patients must have one of 33 serious or chronic conditions -- including cancer, multiple sclerosis or HIV -- and an established relationship with a doctor.

Patients would undergo fingerprinting and a criminal background check and would be banned from using marijuana in public and around minors. Patients also could not legally grow marijuana, and they would have to buy it from one of 60 dispensing centers across Illinois. The state would license 22 growers.

The measure drew strong opposition from the Illinois Association of Chiefs of Police and the Illinois Sheriffs' Association, which sent a letter to the governor and lawmakers warning the proposal would not stop medical marijuana card holders from driving while under the influence. They suggested blood and urine testing be included in the legislation to allow police to determine whether card holders had marijuana in their system while driving.

Haine argued the law has safeguards to prevent that, including designating on a driver's license whether they use medical marijuana.

The Senate vote was 35-21, with 30 needed to pass the bill. It goes to Quinn, who has not indicated whether he will sign it. The Democratic governor recently said he is open minded to the legislation.

:thumbup:

Saw this due to a couple of god-fearing, uptight righties voicing their outrage on fb.

Governor Quinn signed the bill yesterday. :thumbup:

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Uruguay, on the other hand, just went in the other direction.

Highlights:

1. Uruguayan citizens may purchase up to 40 grams monthly from licensed pharmacies for personal use

2. Citizens may grow their own

3. The legislation was passed despite the fact that the majority of voters opposed it. Think about that.

**Edit -- legislation has passed in the House, hasn't gone to the Senate yet. Sorry. rk

Edited by roadkill1292

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Time for the DEA to declare victory and disband.

They had some ####### Chief of Police from the 'burbs on WGN talking about how the cops were all against it. Not one single follow up question on whether they were also against other prescription pain killers.

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Time for the DEA to declare victory and disband.

They had some ####### Chief of Police from the 'burbs on WGN talking about how the cops were all against it. Not one single follow up question on whether they were also against other prescription pain killers.

Yeah he's a ####### liar.

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Time for the DEA to declare victory and disband.

They had some ####### Chief of Police from the 'burbs on WGN talking about how the cops were all against it. Not one single follow up question on whether they were also against other prescription pain killers.

Police chiefs don't want to be losing the ability to seize all of that guilty property.

:stating the obvious:

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The U.S. Attorney for the District of Colorado released a statement today regarding federal marijuana enforcement in Colorado.

STATEMENT BY U.S. ATTORNEY JOHN WALSH REGARDING MARIJUANA ENFORCEMENT IN COLORADO

The U.S. Attorneys Office for the District of Colorado will continue to focus its marijuana enforcement efforts on the investigation and prosecution of cases that implicate the key federal public safety interests highlighted in the todays Department of Justice guidance. The key federal interests set forth in that guidance are also key interests of the people of Colorado. Of particular concern to the U.S. Attorneys Office are cases involving marijuana trafficking directly or indirectly to children and young people; trafficking that involves violence or other federal criminal activity; trafficking conducted or financed by street gangs and drug cartels; cultivation of marijuana on Colorados extensive state and federal public lands; and trafficking across state and international lines. In addition, because the Department of Justices guidance emphasizes the central importance of strong and effective state marijuana regulatory systems, the U.S. Attorneys Office will continue to focus on whether Colorados system, when it is implemented, has the resources and tools necessary to protect those key federal public safety interests. To accomplish these goals, we look forward to closely working with our federal, state and local partners.

John Walsh, United States Attorney, District of Colorado

It sounds like the feds will take a hands off approach towards local recreational marijuana businesses that are in compliance with state law and regulations.

This is perhaps the biggest news on federal marijuana policy in our lifetimes.

Edited by Buckfast 1

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The U.S. Attorney for the District of Colorado released a statement today regarding federal marijuana enforcement in Colorado.

STATEMENT BY U.S. ATTORNEY JOHN WALSH REGARDING MARIJUANA ENFORCEMENT IN COLORADO

The U.S. Attorneys Office for the District of Colorado will continue to focus its marijuana enforcement efforts on the investigation and prosecution of cases that implicate the key federal public safety interests highlighted in the todays Department of Justice guidance. The key federal interests set forth in that guidance are also key interests of the people of Colorado. Of particular concern to the U.S. Attorneys Office are cases involving marijuana trafficking directly or indirectly to children and young people; trafficking that involves violence or other federal criminal activity; trafficking conducted or financed by street gangs and drug cartels; cultivation of marijuana on Colorados extensive state and federal public lands; and trafficking across state and international lines. In addition, because the Department of Justices guidance emphasizes the central importance of strong and effective state marijuana regulatory systems, the U.S. Attorneys Office will continue to focus on whether Colorados system, when it is implemented, has the resources and tools necessary to protect those key federal public safety interests. To accomplish these goals, we look forward to closely working with our federal, state and local partners.

John Walsh, United States Attorney, District of Colorado

It sounds like the feds will take a hands off approach towards local recreational marijuana businesses that are in compliance with state law and regulations.

This is perhaps the biggest news on federal marijuana policy in our lifetimes.

Huge step. Took too long, but don't it always?

When will they be handing out bags of Doritos.

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Yup, great news. Really feels like we're finally moving in the right direction on pot.

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Looks like this isn't just for Colorado and Washington -- the feds are saying they're butting out of all the states where medical marijuana is legal. :thumbup:

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This wouldn't have happened under GW Bush. So YEAH Obama!!!!

This should be reported in Finless's stupid thread.

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I suspect there will be a line of lawyers looking at getting some sentences reduced

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Looks like this isn't just for Colorado and Washington -- the feds are saying they're butting out of all the states where medical marijuana is legal. :thumbup:

What's the legal status in MD?

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Even more than those states who have already legalized in some form, I have to think this speeds it up for the states that were worried about going there. Dominoes are falling faster and faster.

Holder just went from "horrid" to "a tad better than awful" on the Uruk-scale of AGs.

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Looks like this isn't just for Colorado and Washington -- the feds are saying they're butting out of all the states where medical marijuana is legal. :thumbup:

What's the legal status in MD?

Effective in October we will have a very restricted form of medical marijuana treatment available. A 12-member medical commission will decide on a case by case basis which patients qualify for treatment from a recognized program. So basically no independent "clinics" in the near future.

Possession of less than 10 grams is a misdemeanor with a max fine of $500 and max incarceration of 90 days.

An interesting prediction I came across today:

John Kane, a federal judge in Colorado, said in December he sees marijuana following the same path as alcohol in the 1930s. Toward the end of Prohibition, Kane explained, judges routinely dismissed violations or levied fines so trivial that prosecutors quit filing cases.

"The law is simply going to die before it's repealed. It will just go into disuse," Kane said. "It's a cultural force, and you simply cannot legislate against a cultural force."

If the judges won't convict you, the cops won't arrest you. Opponents aren't even going to be aware that this has crept into the mainstream.

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If the demand is so high, and if it cannot be shown that the harm caused far outweighs any benefits... you're fighting a losing battle. And the pot fight is a losing battle. Legalize it, license it, tax it, control it.... whatever... but don't criminalize it.

2 people like this

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This wouldn't have happened under GW Bush. So YEAH Obama!!!!

This should be reported in Finless's stupid thread.

Says the dude with a stooges avatar. I'm all for the legalization of all drugs. War on drugs is the worst war ever...ridiculous. Now should Obama take the credit or should the people. We vote - they but out. There's definitely a combo here but I do give him credit for that. Hes still a serpent though. Probably allowed it to happen so his followers will have less brain cells than they already have. Eat some LSD then talk to me, Shemp.

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This wouldn't have happened under GW Bush. So YEAH Obama!!!!

This should be reported in Finless's stupid thread.

Says the dude with a stooges avatar. I'm all for the legalization of all drugs. War on drugs is the worst war ever...ridiculous. Now should Obama take the credit or should the people. We vote - they but out. There's definitely a combo here but I do give him credit for that. Hes still a serpent though. Probably allowed it to happen so his followers will have less brain cells than they already have. Eat some LSD then talk to me, Shemp.

Is that you, Pasquino?

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all this is fine and dandy but the real issue is employers testing for it, lets end that too.

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all this is fine and dandy but the real issue is employers testing for it, lets end that too.

It'll be interesting to see how my industry (construction) deals with this through the various stages of decriminalization/legalization.

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all this is fine and dandy but the real issue is employers testing for it, lets end that too.

It'll be interesting to see how my industry (construction) deals with this through the various stages of decriminalization/legalization.

in michigan, the MUST program conisders you ineligible if you test positive for THC even with a medical marijuana card.

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If you're getting high in Colorado you know the potency of the #### that coming out. It really is madness. The earwax, shatter, butane hash stuff. People don't even smoke herb because its only around 25% THC. Taking dabs...#### got me higher than the skag ever did. I can see why employers would test for it.

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