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Whatcha readin now? (book, books, reading, read)

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Ford County, a collection of short stories by John Grisham. He's a guilty pleasure of mine. These stories are pretty good.

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Got done reading Confessions of an Economic Hitman for the second time lat week.

Started The Creature From Jekyll Island: A Second Look at the Federal Reserve. About 100pgs in, and it's a good book. I've had to read over a couple things twice, but still an in depth book for a lay person to get a perspective on the Fed.

Also, I've been reading The Lovely Bones and have found that to be a surprisingly good read as well.

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This really didn't hold my attention. I expected much more. 4/10

About 100 pages into George RR Martin's A Clash of Kings. Not sure if I'm turning into a fantasy nerd, but this series is AWESOME.

The next book is the one that smacks everyone upside the head, though ACOK has some damned rfine twists itself. There are 3 or 4 episodes in A Storm Of Swords that had me throwing the book across the room. I'm actually jealous you're working towards it for the first time.

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I just finished reading the first 3 Dragonlance novels. Not bad. I might get some more of them but I am not sure which.

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Percy Jackson - The Lighting Thief by Rick Riordan

My 8 year old wanted to read it so I thought I better check it out first to make sure she didn't freak out. That's my story and I'm sticking to it :mellow:

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Just finished "Twilight" by Stephanie Meyer last night. It was okay, but could have been a lot better. I'm sure I would have liked it more if I was a teenager or had ovaries. I can certainly see why every chick I know is addicted to this series though. It's basically a teen romance novel with a vampire setting. I may pick up the next book as there is some good stuff in there, you just have to wade thru some occasional teen lovey dovey stuff to get to it.

I read her new unrelated book "The Host" before this one and it was much better and more adult oriented (which is why I was willing to try Twilight out.) An interesting take on the classic invasion of the body snatchers plot.

I'm in the middle of The Host now and I think it's the most interesting novel I've read in quite a while.

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I'm on the last few pages of Anathem and I have to say I enjoyed this alot more than I thought I would considering I don't know much about Philosophy or Quantum Mechanics. A great adventure/ first contact novel with a dose of parallel realities thrown in, plus it has a satisfying albeit slightly confusing ending what with the multiple Narratives and whatnot. The best thing about Stephensons novels is that I always feel like I learn something by the end of them, peaks my interest on whatever topic he's basing it on which is usually about a dozen.

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I finished Stephen King's The Dead Zone recently. Good read, not as creepy as King's horror stuff, but definitely a page-turner.

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One Second After by William R. Forstchen. Post-apocalyptic novel about what happens in a small town after America is paralyzed by EMP. The topic is really interesting and he brings up some consequences I haven't seen in other p-a novels, but the dialogue is just awful. The only people who refer to others by their first names in conversation this often ("John, I have to tell you..." "John, don't you see?") are used-car salesman. If you can ignore that crutch, though, the book is worth a read.

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One Second After by William R. Forstchen. Post-apocalyptic novel about what happens in a small town after America is paralyzed by EMP. The topic is really interesting and he brings up some consequences I haven't seen in other p-a novels, but the dialogue is just awful. The only people who refer to others by their first names in conversation this often ("John, I have to tell you..." "John, don't you see?") are used-car salesman. If you can ignore that crutch, though, the book is worth a read.

Indeed. As I noted in post 3241, the storyline was pretty interesting but the grammar was horrendous and far too many sentences needed an axe taken to them for improvement. It was almost like he self-published.

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I'm really struggling through Blood Meridian, which is a shame as I'd been looking forward to reading it for a while. I think if you took 5 pages and studied the writing, it would be amazing. But I'm trying to read the whole book and is SO thick - 10 pages describing dirt and such.

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10 pages describing dirt and such.

:rant: Don't worry about the pace. If you can only read 2 pages at a time, just enjoy them.

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One Second After by William R. Forstchen. Post-apocalyptic novel about what happens in a small town after America is paralyzed by EMP. The topic is really interesting and he brings up some consequences I haven't seen in other p-a novels, but the dialogue is just awful. The only people who refer to others by their first names in conversation this often ("John, I have to tell you..." "John, don't you see?") are used-car salesman. If you can ignore that crutch, though, the book is worth a read.

:rant:

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philip k. dick's library of america novel collection (13 in three volumes, including classics like ubik, the three stigmata of palmer eldritch, do androids dream of electric sheep, a scanner darkly, martian time slip, now wait for last year, flow my tears the policeman said & dr. bloodmoney...

also the five volume collection of his short stories.

he has become one of my favorite writers.

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One Second After by William R. Forstchen. Post-apocalyptic novel about what happens in a small town after America is paralyzed by EMP. The topic is really interesting and he brings up some consequences I haven't seen in other p-a novels, but the dialogue is just awful. The only people who refer to others by their first names in conversation this often ("John, I have to tell you..." "John, don't you see?") are used-car salesman. If you can ignore that crutch, though, the book is worth a read.

Indeed. As I noted in post 3241, the storyline was pretty interesting but the grammar was horrendous and far too many sentences needed an axe taken to them for improvement. It was almost like he self-published.
Just went back and read 3241, and you are spot-on. It DOES almost seem like he self published. In fact

*** SPOILER ALERT! Click this link to display the potential spoiler text in this box. ***
");document.close(); Edited by facook

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Just started Drood by Dan Simmons after waiting a year for it to hit paperback. If it's close to as good as The Terror, I'll be a very happy reader for the next 6 weeks or so.

Really liked this one. Some reviews said it was slow, but I didn't think so.
Finished Drood March 26. My estimate on time it took to read was accurate. :D

I would have to say that I found it a little slow at points. But overall I really enjoyed trying to understand the motivations of the narrator, and the last 25% of the book was pretty epic, imo. I'd recommend it.

Now on to Rain Gods by James Lee Burke, one of my favorites.

Ok, I'll keep going. Slogging through it, about halfway right now. It's really hard to stay interested. Didn't realize it was the Terror author when I started. Slogged through that one as well. hoping for the payoff.
:hot: Hmm...Well, I LOVED The Terror, so I thought it paid off from page 1. Drood would agree was a "slog" until the last quarter. Then I got into it and really enjoyed it, particularly the development of Collins and his relationship to Dickens.
I'm really glad I stuck with it. Now I will be able to easily resist ever picking up a Dan Simmons book again. I might not even return it to the library, just to save anyone else the effort of reading it. If that's what you call am epic 25%, and no offense meant here at all, I would hate to see what you consider mundane and boring. Maybe in a few weeks I'll look up some reviews and essays on it to see what I'm missing in it, but at this point I think it's 800 pages of my life I want back.

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Just started Drood by Dan Simmons after waiting a year for it to hit paperback. If it's close to as good as The Terror, I'll be a very happy reader for the next 6 weeks or so.

Really liked this one. Some reviews said it was slow, but I didn't think so.
Finished Drood March 26. My estimate on time it took to read was accurate. :D

I would have to say that I found it a little slow at points. But overall I really enjoyed trying to understand the motivations of the narrator, and the last 25% of the book was pretty epic, imo. I'd recommend it.

Now on to Rain Gods by James Lee Burke, one of my favorites.

Ok, I'll keep going. Slogging through it, about halfway right now. It's really hard to stay interested. Didn't realize it was the Terror author when I started. Slogged through that one as well. hoping for the payoff.
:hot: Hmm...Well, I LOVED The Terror, so I thought it paid off from page 1. Drood would agree was a "slog" until the last quarter. Then I got into it and really enjoyed it, particularly the development of Collins and his relationship to Dickens.
I'm really glad I stuck with it. Now I will be able to easily resist ever picking up a Dan Simmons book again. I might not even return it to the library, just to save anyone else the effort of reading it. If that's what you call am epic 25%, and no offense meant here at all, I would hate to see what you consider mundane and boring. Maybe in a few weeks I'll look up some reviews and essays on it to see what I'm missing in it, but at this point I think it's 800 pages of my life I want back.

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I'm really glad I stuck with it. Now I will be able to easily resist ever picking up a Dan Simmons book again. I might not even return it to the library, just to save anyone else the effort of reading it. If that's what you call am epic 25%, and no offense meant here at all, I would hate to see what you consider mundane and boring. Maybe in a few weeks I'll look up some reviews and essays on it to see what I'm missing in it, but at this point I think it's 800 pages of my life I want back.

:D No offense taken. Looking back, maybe I overstated it a bit. I really did feel like the story picked up in interest the last 1/4 of the book, but I can definitely see how someone would still find it slow/boring. I just thought the resolution of Collins' character and his relationship w/ Dickens was very satisfying. :coffee:

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One Second After by William R. Forstchen. Post-apocalyptic novel about what happens in a small town after America is paralyzed by EMP. The topic is really interesting and he brings up some consequences I haven't seen in other p-a novels, but the dialogue is just awful. The only people who refer to others by their first names in conversation this often ("John, I have to tell you..." "John, don't you see?") are used-car salesman. If you can ignore that crutch, though, the book is worth a read.

Indeed. As I noted in post 3241, the storyline was pretty interesting but the grammar was horrendous and far too many sentences needed an axe taken to them for improvement. It was almost like he self-published.
Just went back and read 3241, and you are spot-on. It DOES almost seem like he self published. In fact

*** SPOILER ALERT! Click this link to display the potential spoiler text in this box. ***

");document.close();

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One Second After by William R. Forstchen. Post-apocalyptic novel about what happens in a small town after America is paralyzed by EMP. The topic is really interesting and he brings up some consequences I haven't seen in other p-a novels, but the dialogue is just awful. The only people who refer to others by their first names in conversation this often ("John, I have to tell you..." "John, don't you see?") are used-car salesman. If you can ignore that crutch, though, the book is worth a read.

Indeed. As I noted in post 3241, the storyline was pretty interesting but the grammar was horrendous and far too many sentences needed an axe taken to them for improvement. It was almost like he self-published.
Just went back and read 3241, and you are spot-on. It DOES almost seem like he self published. In fact

*** SPOILER ALERT! Click this link to display the potential spoiler text in this box. ***

");document.close();

How ironic that I choose now to look at this thread, and this is the very book I am listening to on CD right now. Now that you guys mention it some of the dialogue is not very real-world, but that doesnt seem to bother me with books on CD as it does with books I actually read. I have been researching EMP as a result of reading this and it seems we are very susceptible.

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The Watch by Dennis Danvers, an odd little time travel novel wrapped around an anarchy theme, or at least an anti-statist theme.

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Red Seas Under Red Skies by Scott Lynch. It's the second in his series of Gentlemen Bastard novels. The Lies Of Locke Lamora was the first & the 3rd isn't out yet. It isn't one episodic series - it's more like each one is like a season of 24 on TV.

Anyway, there's nothing real heavy going on with Lynch - basically it's a cross between Mission Impossible, Oceans Eleven, and Pirates Of The Carribbean. What sets Lynch apart is his characterization (even many of the side characters are in 3D), his great ear for dialogue, and his world-building. But even though these books are set in a fictional, quasi-medievel world they really could be anywhere & still be enjoyable. I'm about 1/3 through and am enjoying it as much as the first book.

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I just read The Hunger Games, which is a book we got for my 10-year-old son. Yes, it's a kid's book, but the subject matter was sort of grim, so I wanted to read it first. It was actually pretty good, even if the premise isn't particularly novel. It's set in a sort of post-apocalyptic U.S.A. after what's left of the country has been concentrated in a capital city that rules over 12 outlying districts. Each year, as part of the Hunger Games, each district must choose by lottery and send to the games one boy and one girl between the ages of 12 and 18, to compete in the wilderness in a battle to the death. It was a fast and enjoyable read. Probably akin to spun sugar for you literary types, but I enjoyed it well enough.

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Red Seas Under Red Skies by Scott Lynch. It's the second in his series of Gentlemen Bastard novels. The Lies Of Locke Lamora was the first & the 3rd isn't out yet. It isn't one episodic series - it's more like each one is like a season of 24 on TV.

Anyway, there's nothing real heavy going on with Lynch - basically it's a cross between Mission Impossible, Oceans Eleven, and Pirates Of The Carribbean. What sets Lynch apart is his characterization (even many of the side characters are in 3D), his great ear for dialogue, and his world-building. But even though these books are set in a fictional, quasi-medievel world they really could be anywhere & still be enjoyable. I'm about 1/3 through and am enjoying it as much as the first book.

The third book has been out for almost year iirc. Republic of Thieves I believe. Not as entertaining as the first two but sone good character building.

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A Demon of Our Own Design

By Richard Bookstabber

Best book I have read on systematic financial risk and related topics.

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Red Seas Under Red Skies by Scott Lynch. It's the second in his series of Gentlemen Bastard novels. The Lies Of Locke Lamora was the first & the 3rd isn't out yet. It isn't one episodic series - it's more like each one is like a season of 24 on TV.

Anyway, there's nothing real heavy going on with Lynch - basically it's a cross between Mission Impossible, Oceans Eleven, and Pirates Of The Carribbean. What sets Lynch apart is his characterization (even many of the side characters are in 3D), his great ear for dialogue, and his world-building. But even though these books are set in a fictional, quasi-medievel world they really could be anywhere & still be enjoyable. I'm about 1/3 through and am enjoying it as much as the first book.

The third book has been out for almost year iirc. Republic of Thieves I believe. Not as entertaining as the first two but sone good character building.
Really? Amazon doesn't have it so I assumed it wasn't yet in print.

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Red Seas Under Red Skies by Scott Lynch. It's the second in his series of Gentlemen Bastard novels. The Lies Of Locke Lamora was the first & the 3rd isn't out yet. It isn't one episodic series - it's more like each one is like a season of 24 on TV.

Anyway, there's nothing real heavy going on with Lynch - basically it's a cross between Mission Impossible, Oceans Eleven, and Pirates Of The Carribbean. What sets Lynch apart is his characterization (even many of the side characters are in 3D), his great ear for dialogue, and his world-building. But even though these books are set in a fictional, quasi-medievel world they really could be anywhere & still be enjoyable. I'm about 1/3 through and am enjoying it as much as the first book.

The third book has been out for almost year iirc. Republic of Thieves I believe. Not as entertaining as the first two but sone good character building.
Really? Amazon doesn't have it so I assumed it wasn't yet in print.
I'm having a weird time warp here. I could've sworn I read it, but maybe I just re-read the 2nd?

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I just read The Hunger Games, which is a book we got for my 10-year-old son. Yes, it's a kid's book, but the subject matter was sort of grim, so I wanted to read it first. It was actually pretty good, even if the premise isn't particularly novel. It's set in a sort of post-apocalyptic U.S.A. after what's left of the country has been concentrated in a capital city that rules over 12 outlying districts. Each year, as part of the Hunger Games, each district must choose by lottery and send to the games one boy and one girl between the ages of 12 and 18, to compete in the wilderness in a battle to the death. It was a fast and enjoyable read. Probably akin to spun sugar for you literary types, but I enjoyed it well enough.

I talked about that somewhere in this thread -- basically a Running Man for the Young Adult set. Totally enjoyable (and I'm one of those literary types). The sequel isn't as good, but I'm still looking forward to the finale (and the movie).

That was the first book my 12-year-old really insisted I read in a while and I liked it. Now, he's got me reading another: "Legacy" by Thomas E. Sniegoski. It's about a dead-end kid finding out his dad is a superhero (like a Dark Knight-style Batman) and getting trained to replace him all the while worrying about the evil-good line that his father straddles. Good stuff.

Also reading "Call of the Wild" with my 7-year-old. Last night, after a sled plunges through the ice, killing all men and animals on board, following a fatal dogfight in the previous chapter, and an injured dog being put down in the previous chapter, and a dog going mad and having to be killed with an axe in the chapter before that, she said: "Dad, this is really getting to be a doggie snuff book."

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Red Seas Under Red Skies by Scott Lynch. It's the second in his series of Gentlemen Bastard novels. The Lies Of Locke Lamora was the first & the 3rd isn't out yet. It isn't one episodic series - it's more like each one is like a season of 24 on TV.

Anyway, there's nothing real heavy going on with Lynch - basically it's a cross between Mission Impossible, Oceans Eleven, and Pirates Of The Carribbean. What sets Lynch apart is his characterization (even many of the side characters are in 3D), his great ear for dialogue, and his world-building. But even though these books are set in a fictional, quasi-medievel world they really could be anywhere & still be enjoyable. I'm about 1/3 through and am enjoying it as much as the first book.

The third book has been out for almost year iirc. Republic of Thieves I believe. Not as entertaining as the first two but sone good character building.
Really? Amazon doesn't have it so I assumed it wasn't yet in print.
I'm having a weird time warp here. I could've sworn I read it, but maybe I just re-read the 2nd?

*** SPOILER ALERT! Click this link to display the potential spoiler text in this box. ***

");document.close();

The third one is not out yet. Lynch has been dealing with some personal issues, including anxiety disorder, which has led to a lot of delays of the book. There still isn't a release date for the next one.

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I just read The Hunger Games, which is a book we got for my 10-year-old son. Yes, it's a kid's book, but the subject matter was sort of grim, so I wanted to read it first. It was actually pretty good, even if the premise isn't particularly novel. It's set in a sort of post-apocalyptic U.S.A. after what's left of the country has been concentrated in a capital city that rules over 12 outlying districts. Each year, as part of the Hunger Games, each district must choose by lottery and send to the games one boy and one girl between the ages of 12 and 18, to compete in the wilderness in a battle to the death. It was a fast and enjoyable read. Probably akin to spun sugar for you literary types, but I enjoyed it well enough.

I talked about that somewhere in this thread -- basically a Running Man for the Young Adult set. Totally enjoyable (and I'm one of those literary types). The sequel isn't as good, but I'm still looking forward to the finale (and the movie).

That was the first book my 12-year-old really insisted I read in a while and I liked it. Now, he's got me reading another: "Legacy" by Thomas E. Sniegoski. It's about a dead-end kid finding out his dad is a superhero (like a Dark Knight-style Batman) and getting trained to replace him all the while worrying about the evil-good line that his father straddles. Good stuff.

Also reading "Call of the Wild" with my 7-year-old. Last night, after a sled plunges through the ice, killing all men and animals on board, following a fatal dogfight in the previous chapter, and an injured dog being put down in the previous chapter, and a dog going mad and having to be killed with an axe in the chapter before that, she said: "Dad, this is really getting to be a doggie snuff book."

Call of the Wild! What a great book. I'm going to have to pick that one up for my oldest son.

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Red Seas Under Red Skies by Scott Lynch. It's the second in his series of Gentlemen Bastard novels. The Lies Of Locke Lamora was the first & the 3rd isn't out yet. It isn't one episodic series - it's more like each one is like a season of 24 on TV.

Anyway, there's nothing real heavy going on with Lynch - basically it's a cross between Mission Impossible, Oceans Eleven, and Pirates Of The Carribbean. What sets Lynch apart is his characterization (even many of the side characters are in 3D), his great ear for dialogue, and his world-building. But even though these books are set in a fictional, quasi-medievel world they really could be anywhere & still be enjoyable. I'm about 1/3 through and am enjoying it as much as the first book.

The third book has been out for almost year iirc. Republic of Thieves I believe. Not as entertaining as the first two but sone good character building.
Really? Amazon doesn't have it so I assumed it wasn't yet in print.
I'm having a weird time warp here. I could've sworn I read it, but maybe I just re-read the 2nd?

*** SPOILER ALERT! Click this link to display the potential spoiler text in this box. ***

");document.close();

The third one is not out yet. Lynch has been dealing with some personal issues, including anxiety disorder, which has led to a lot of delays of the book. There still isn't a release date for the next one.That is really bizarre, I would've bet money that I got it from the library and found it to be less than the first two. Maybe I just wasn't as impressed with book 2 when I re-read it.

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I started and finished Michael Lewis new book (The Big Short) yesterday. This is a fascinating read about the financial crisis.

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I started and finished Michael Lewis new book (The Big Short) yesterday. This is a fascinating read about the financial crisis.

I'm about three quarters through this one now and am enjoying it very much. I like the way he uses the perspective of guys who foresaw the crash and put up hard cash because they felt so strongly about how badly wrong wrong wrong Wall Street was. Being a financial idiot, I still have trouble getting my head wrapped around credit default swaps and CDOs and whatnot but basically the guys in The Big Short saw that all of the bad loans pushed at unqualified and undisciplined borrowers was the rotten foundation around which the whole building would crumble. After seeing what the Street guys were routinely doing, I could only think "Dear Lord."

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Heading on a 5 day poolside vacation tomorrow. I'm bringing:

Columbine - Dave Cullen

With the Old Breed - EB Sledge

Eating the Dinosaur - Klosterman

Might add I am Ozzy if the library has it. I will need something lighter after Columbine and WWII books.

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Heading on a 5 day poolside vacation tomorrow. I'm bringing:

Columbine - Dave Cullen

With the Old Breed - EB Sledge

Eating the Dinosaur - Klosterman

Might add I am Ozzy if the library has it. I will need something lighter after Columbine and WWII books.

Columbine is an excellent read..

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Night Angel trilogy by Brent Weeks - I haven't read many of the newer fantasy authors/series so I don't have much to compare it to, but I would place both Sanderson's Mistborn trilogy and Abercrombie's First Law trilogy well ahead of this. The main character is a street urchin turned assassin's apprentice. It's not exactly an orignial premise and I didn't find him to be very likable. In fact, most of the characters were pretty mediocre. Beyond that, however, there was a lot of well-written action and for the most part the story moved at a brisk pace. It turned out to be a much bigger, more complex story than I had anticipated.

The Angel's Game by Carlos Ruiz Zafon - I was really looking forward to this one. And while it was definitely a good book, I can't help but compare it to The Shadow of the Wind. Like Shadow, it has a fantastic setting and the perfect writing style of Zafon's. But unlike Shadow, there wasn't a single character that I was really drawn to. The only characters that I actually liked were the Sempere's and Isabella. And, of course, there was no one even in the same ballpark as Fermin. The story in this one was very dark, and had a great deal more mystical/supernatural elements. It also took quite a while to get going. All in all, this was a very good novel. Unfortunately, though not unexpectedly, it's nowhere near as good as his previous effort.

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Anyone read The Art of Racing in the Rain by Garth Steiner?

I'm liking it so far. I like the dog's perspective.

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Over the last five months I've read or gone back to re-read;

"You're Okay, It's Just a Bruise" by Rob Huizenga

"Ham on Rye" by Charles Bukowski

"Post Office" by Charles Bukowski

"'77: Denver, The Broncos and a Coming of Age" by Terry Frei

"Kardiac Kids: The Story of the 1980 Cleveland Browns" by Jonathan Knight

"The Zombie Survival Guide: Recorded Attacks" by Max Brooks

"Abandoned Cars" by Tim Lane

"Handling the Undead" by John Ajvide Lindqvist

"The Gashlycrumb Tinies" by Edward Gorey

"The Damned United" by David Peace

"Junky" by William S. Burroughs

"Tim the Tiny Horse" by Harry Hill

"Baseball: A History of America's Favorite Game" by George Vecsey

"Tim the Tiny Horse at Large" by Harry Hill

"A Confederacy of Dunces" by John Kennedy Toole

"King Dork" by Frank Portman

"The Big Sleep" by Raymond Chandler

Currently re-reading "On the Road" by Jack Kerouac. Tempted to read some more Raymond Chandler next or go back and rediscover some Hunter S. Thompson or Hermann Hesse.

Edited by Horrorshow

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"The Zombie Survival Guide: Recorded Attacks" by Max Brooks

Is "Recorded Attacks" different from "The Zombie Survival Guide"? I loved WWZ, is the Survival Guide a must read? It's not really a story though right, it's written as a guide book?I just finished the awesome "Ghost Wars" by Steve Coll. Does anyone know of a good book that picks up after 9/11 with such detail without interjecting too much political opinion either way.

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"The Zombie Survival Guide: Recorded Attacks" by Max Brooks

Is "Recorded Attacks" different from "The Zombie Survival Guide"? I loved WWZ, is the Survival Guide a must read? It's not really a story though right, it's written as a guide book?
"Recorded Attacks" is different from "TZSG", yes. It's in graphic form and very short. I wouldn't go out of your way to read it unless you're a completist or you just want to kill thirty minutes reading it on your lunch break.I'd most certainly recommend "TZSG" to anyone who enjoyed "WWZ". As you say, it's not a story or a novel but it doesn lay the foundation for the excellent "WWZ".

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The Halo Effect by Phil Rosenzweig - After reading the awful Good to Great by Jim Collins, one of my strategy professors recommended this book as a nice rebuttal of Collins' nonsense. Simply put, this is the best business book I've ever read. Rosenzweig essentially evaluates the popular business books on the market that proclaim to have the secrets to business success. He examines the methodologies used and the conclusions drawn. He then goes on to explain in dispassionate detail why the large majority of these books are completely wrong and ignore some key elements of rigorous scientific research. While he does offer some thoughts on what does drive company success (strategy, execution and a lot of luck), he takes care to not declare that you'll find success by following any set of advice. This book was a refreshing alternative to the checklist style books of the month that claim to have it all figured out.

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Just about to finish Aburdistan by Gary Shteyngart.

It is going to rank pretty high on my list of favorite books of all time.

:pickle:

Just started reading this a few days ago. Hugely entertaining book!

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Here is the reading list I've completed over the last 6 months or so:

Fool by Christopher Moore. I love everything he writes and they are all quick and funny reads.

Blackwater by Jeremy Scahill. Dense, and made me angry.

The First Annual Grand Prairie Rabbit Festival by Ken Wheaton

World War Z by Max Brooks

Bite Me by Christopher Moore

currently reading the Amazing adventures of Kavalier and Clay by Michael Chabon. I have tried a couple of times to read it and couldn't get into it. But now I'm a quarter of the way in and am loving it.

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Ragtime by E.L. Doctorow, so far pretty good.

Very entertaining read, reminded me of Kavalier & Klay with its panoramic scope, galloping pace, and blend of real historical figures with fictional characters. Not a novel of great depth in terms of character development, but it works as an engaging study of pre-WWI America.

On to Howard's End by E.M. Forster.

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