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Bob Dylan's Thread: Holiday Road For The Moment...

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12 hours ago, Eephus said:

Everything ends but at least we're going out on a high note

Blonde on Blonde (1966)

This thread started off to discuss the best Dylan album for RA to buy on audiophile vinyl.  I guess this one has as good a claim as any.  I've listened to a lot of Dylan this summer from throughout his career.  Although almost every record has its charms I think I agree with the conventional wisdom about peak-Dylan.  The two albums he made in the year between going electric and his motorcycle crash are about as good as rock 'n roll gets.

It's really hard to choose between Blonde on Blonde and Highway 61 Revisited but unless you're paying silly money for special pressings, you really don't have to.  The obvious thing Blonde on Blonde has going for it is it's a double album (more music, more music, more music).  It has 36% more songs and is 41% longer than Highway 61 Revisited.  But basic old school analytics don't tell the story.  Blonde on Blonde was (mostly) recorded in Nashville with local session men and seems to have a more laid back vibe.   The rhythm section swings away and  there are some very interesting guitar parts such as "Absolutely Sweet Marie".   The best known track on Blonde on Blonde is one of Dylan's silliest, "Rainy Day Women #12 & 35".  There's nothing as epic here as "Desolation Row" or "Like A Rolling Stone".  The long closing number "Sad Eyed Lady of the Lowlands" is probably my favorite Dylan song over ten minutes in length, which if you've followed this thread is damning with faint praise.

The playlist wraps tonight as well.  I've consciously avoided the most famous songs but there's no way I can pass Visions of Johanna over.  It's one of Dylan's greatest which is to say it's one of the greatest; sheer brilliance that keeps moving the bar higher with every verse.  It's a song I've loved for almost forty years.  Every mix needs some rockers so I'm moving down the line with Leopard Skin Pillbox Hat.  There are certainly better songs on the album but it's Dylan having some lascivious fun.  Besides, Mrs. Eephus had a leopard print hat when we first starting dating.  It was somewhere between a pillbox hat and a beret.  Thankfully, her dog chewed on it or she'd still have it today.  That was our first dog together although I just came in at the end.

With the death of Robert Hunter yesterday, I reviewed my impressions of two records where he worked with Dylan.  There actually were three but I still remember Tempest.  Boz and I listened to Together Through Life early on in the project in June when Bosley was still going up and down the back steps by himself.  His condition has definitely deteriorated since then. He's less steady on his feet and he gets confused by stairs.  I have to help him either by leading him down or supporting him up.  When I bathed him earlier in the week, I was struck by how small and frail he is under his fur.  He's been having some trouble standing while eating his dog food.  His hind legs slide out from under him on the kitchen floor and he ends up eating while lying on his side.  I bought a rubber mat for him today that he can stand on while eating and drinking.  It seemed to help since his usual kibble debris field was non-existent tonight.

Thanks to Rockaction for letting me barge in on his thread and for keeping things organized.  It made things much easier when I was looking for the Dylan/Hunter records yesterday.   I don't start many threads here and wouldn't have thought to begin one with Dylan and Bosley but I'm happy with the way things turned out.  There were some albums I'll probably never listen to again but great or good or less good, Dylan always offers something provocative.  Thanks to Dylan of course and the many talented musicians who've graced his records.  Dylan has always had exceptional taste when choosing sidemen and I guess you have to be special to keep up with the way he typically records his songs.  Finally, thanks to my pal Bosley for never getting too far ahead or behind me. 

If you made it this far, here's one final plug for the playlist.  I'm biased but I think it's a better career-spanning survey than Spotify's This is Bob Dylan and it's two hours shorter too.  My list will probably make me cry someday but will always remind me of the road of life with Bosley.

I've followed the playlist and listened to some of it but now that it's complete will download it. Great work all around!!

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And these visions of Johanna are now all that remain

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16 hours ago, Eephus said:

Everything ends but at least we're going out on a high note

...

Thanks to Rockaction for letting me barge in on his thread and for keeping things organized.  It made things much easier when I was looking for the Dylan/Hunter records yesterday.   I don't start many threads here and wouldn't have thought to begin one with Dylan and Bosley but I'm happy with the way things turned out.  There were some albums I'll probably never listen to again but great or good or less good, Dylan always offers something provocative.  Thanks to Dylan of course and the many talented musicians who've graced his records.  Dylan has always had exceptional taste when choosing sidemen and I guess you have to be special to keep up with the way he typically records his songs.  Finally, thanks to my pal Bosley for never getting too far ahead or behind me. 

If you made it this far, here's one final plug for the playlist.  I'm biased but I think it's a better career-spanning survey than Spotify's This is Bob Dylan and it's two hours shorter too.  My list will probably make me cry someday but will always remind me of the road of life with Bosley.

 

16 hours ago, rockaction said:

The pleasure, as they say, has been all ours. Thanks for a brief glimpse into your life, Eephus. I know I'm better for this thread.

Yeah. Well said, rock.

I am still catching up on some of the posts I missed earlier, but I'm listening to Blonde on Blonde now.

Also, Eep - while I really like your artistic insight, it is the personal and Bosley that I most enjoyed.

Thanks for sharing. 

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Don't know what to listen to tonight :shrug:

 

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16 hours ago, Eephus said:

Don't know what to listen to tonight :shrug:

 

Nobody asked (or cares) but I went with Honeycomb by Frank Black/Black Francis.

The tenuous Dylan connection is that it's the album Black recorded in Nashville with session musicians including Steve Cropper and Spooner Oldham, so it's kind of like his "Black on Blonde" LP.   It sounds a lot more like Dylan like The Pixies.

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Introducing the Never Ending Thread where I'll listen to a Dylan connected album on the walk every night as long as Bosley is still willing.

Joan - Joan Baez (1967)

I'm pretty sure I've never listened to a Baez album before.  If I have, it would have been back in high school.    At the same time Dylan zigged from folk toward rock, Baez zagged toward being an art song chanteuse.  The ornate arrangements suit her lovely soprano voice although at times they drown her out.  I thought it succeeded best when she stuck to folk/country songs with minimal sweetening.

Song selection:  The Lady Came From Baltimore written by Tim Hardin.  There are no Dylan covers

Fun fact:  The arrangements were done by Peter Schickele who shortly afterwards as P.D.Q. Bach became a big fish in the tiny pond of classical music comedy

I probably won't listen to this one again but I might be interested one of her folk records.

 

Edited by Eephus
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I'd definitely listen to the Frank Black album again.  He's always been a solid songwriter with a weird streak.  It's cool to hear his songs in such a different settings.  Steve Cropper is one of the greats; his leads on this record are just perfect.

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2 minutes ago, Eephus said:

I'd definitely listen to the Frank Black album again.  He's always been a solid songwriter with a weird streak.  It's cool to hear his songs in such a different settings.  Steve Cropper is one of the greats; his leads on this record are just perfect.

Really underrated, not just as a guitarist, but also as a composer/arranger/producer

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Wasn't planning on posting tonight but our show got cancelled.  Went with something connected to Dylan but that doesn't sound remotely like him

Goodbye to Language - Daniel Lanois  (2016)

It's an album of instrumentals from the duo of Lanois on pedal steel and Rocco DeLucca on lap steel.  Lanois' studio functions as an additional instrument processing the guitar sounds through various effects and tapes.  The result is much different than the spacey folk that I'd heard previously from Lanois.  The musicians create an ambient soundscape with snatches of melodies floating in, out and over a background of slowly evolving chords. 

I've never been much for ambient music but lately have been listening to stuff by Eno, Harold Budd and classical composer John Luther Adams.  The Lanois record is similar but retains more of an organic quality; the sound of fingers on strings sets it apart from electronica.

Song selection:  The twelve songs flow into each another so it's hard to pick one out but Deconstruction caught my ear enough to check the song title. 

This record isn't great for dog walking since there's no beat to speak of.  But I'd definitely listen to it again while reading or chilling out.  Like most ambient music, it has a tendency to drift into the background but one man's wallpaper is another man's canvas.

It was windy tonight.  Bosley almost got blown over when a crosswind hit him when he was stumbling on a crack on the sidewalk.

 

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Tried to get too clever and paid the price

The Dylans - The Dylans (1991)

To be fair though, the band was trying to be clever themselves since nobody in the band is named Dylan.  There's no other connection to Bob, except for a distant Byrdsiness on occasion.  The more obvious reference points are The Stone Roses and Inspiral Carpets.  I guess everybody was searching England for bands that sounded like the Madchester trendsetters and The Dylans were right down the A57 in Sheffield.  The boys are pretty adept with melody although the hooks sound like they've been lifted from songs by other bands.  Lyrically, they're definitely no Dylan.

Song selection:  Planet Love because it has a video and the lyrics mention tambourines

Our walk was over before the album and I was dreading going back to listen to the rest.  Fortunately, there were eleven minutes of remixes that I could skip.

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On ‎9‎/‎26‎/‎2019 at 2:53 AM, Eephus said:

If you made it this far, here's one final plug for the playlist.  I'm biased but I think it's a better career-spanning survey than Spotify's This is Bob Dylan and it's two hours shorter too.  My list will probably make me cry someday but will always remind me of the road of life with Bosley.

I've been enjoying the playlist. I've been a Dylan fan for a while but there were a few albums I never got around to like Saved and most of his 80s stuff (outside of Infidels and Down in the Groove) - the playlist gives a great retrospective on all his work. 

Long Live Bosley!!  

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Posted (edited)

Dick Farina & Eric Von Schmidt -  Dick Farina & Eric Von Schmidt (1963)

Von Schmidt holds a unique spot in the Dylan annals as the first person to get a shoutout on record from Bob.  On Dylan's debut album, he thanked Von Schmidt for teaching him "Baby Let Me Follow You Down" in the spoken introduction to the song.  Dick/Richard Farina was another NYC folksinger who married Joan Baez' sister Mimi Farina and is best known for his novel "Been Down So Long It Looks Like Up To Me" that was admired by no less than Thomas Pynchon.  Farina died in a motorcycle accident in 1966 at age 29 shortly after his book was published

Early sixties folk loses much of its power outside of its original context but it was an important building block for Dylan's music.  Like a lot of its contemporaries, the music of Farina and Von Schmidt sounds extremely dated today.  It's the kind of music that would prompt John Blutarsky to smash a folksinger's guitar on the staircase.  Von Schmidt is a particularly unconvincing blues singer.  Farina's tenor fares better but neither can sell a song.

Fun Fact:  Dylan plays harmonica on the album credited as Blind Boy Grunt.

Song selection:  Overseas Stomp a fun little jug band number with a kazoo solo.  I think Dylan/Grunt plays harmonica on it.

Won't listen to this one again.

Edited by Eephus
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Posted (edited)

Levon Helm and the RCO All-Stars - Levon Helm (1977)

Helm and The Band supported Dylan on and off from 1967 to 1974.  This was his first solo album after the breakup of The Band.  He assembled a formidable crew of musicians consisting of Booker T. and the MGs, Paul Butterfield and Doctor John along with assorted horns and backup singers.  It sounds promising on paper but doesn't quite measure up on record for some reason.  It lacks the loose feel of the best albums by The Band and Levon's singing and drumming sometimes gets overwhelmed by the arrangements. 

Song selection:  Sing Sing Sing is a swinging New Orleans blues number by Earl King.  It's the closest Levon comes to sounding like The Band so it gets the call.

The same group recorded a live album on New Year's Eve 1977.  I have a feeling I should have listened to that one instead.

Nothing much new with Bosley.  There's a homeless painter who always hangs out in a doorway on Hayes St.  He paints pieces of scrap wood with palette that's dominated by light and medium blue.  I assume he sells the paintings but I've never seen him do so even though he's very prolific with new works almost every day.   I see him all the time in the neighborhood day so I usually say hi or give him a nod.  Tonight we had the longest conversation we've ever had, one-sided though it was.  He started off talking about how people nowadays don't understand Bob Seger and segued in to how Ann Arbor has become posh like San Francisco.  As I was walking away, he pointed out a storefront across the street and mentioned it's an exact replica of the Holiday Inn in Ottawa.  I was almost as confused as Bosley.

 

ETA:  I listened to the album again while writing this up.  It's really not as bad as I made it sound above.

ETA:  ...except the Chuck Berry cover which is just dismal

Edited by Eephus
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11 hours ago, Eephus said:

Levon Helm and the RCO All-Stars - Levon Helm (1977)

Helm and The Band supported Dylan on and off from 1967 to 1974.  This was his first solo album after the breakup of The Band.  He assembled a formidable crew of musicians consisting of Booker T. and the MGs, Paul Butterfield and Doctor John along with assorted horns and backup singers.  It sounds promising on paper but doesn't quite measure up on record for some reason.  It lacks the loose feel of the best albums by The Band and Levon's singing and drumming sometimes gets overwhelmed by the arrangements. 

Song selection:  Sing Sing Sing is a swinging New Orleans blues number by Earl King.  It's the closest Levon comes to sounding like The Band so it gets the call.

The same group recorded a live album on New Year's Eve 1977.  I have a feeling I should have listened to that one instead.

Listening now. Imma huge Dr. John fan. So far, I likey a lot.

I'll do the live album next.

 

11 hours ago, Eephus said:

Nothing much new with Bosley.  There's a homeless painter who always hangs out in a doorway on Hayes St.  He paints pieces of scrap wood with palette that's dominated by light and medium blue.  I assume he sells the paintings but I've never seen him do so even though he's very prolific with new works almost every day.   I see him all the time in the neighborhood day so I usually say hi or give him a nod.  Tonight we had the longest conversation we've ever had, one-sided though it was.  He started off talking about how people nowadays don't understand Bob Seger and segued in to how Ann Arbor has become posh like San Francisco.  As I was walking away, he pointed out a storefront across the street and mentioned it's an exact replica of the Holiday Inn in Ottawa.  I was almost as confused as Bosley.

😂

 

 

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Posted (edited)
1 hour ago, Man of Constant Sorrow said:

I'll do the live album next.

On the whole, I enjoyed the live album more than the studio. It seemed to have more energy, and I tend to prefer good live cuts in general. 

There are a few new songs, and the one that I enjoyed most was Got My Mojo Working. It is a "jam" (9:00 min) compared to the original, but I like bloat. Plus, the Voodoo is swell.

Edited by Man of Constant Sorrow
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It's time for a tribute album :towelwave:

Bob Dylan in the 80s: Volume One (2012)

Herein 24 assorted B- and C-listers from the 2012 Indie music scene cover songs from Dylan's albums of the 1980s.  It's a genius concept because most of his seven albums of the decade had questionable production decisions.  Tribute albums are always a grab bag but I'm banking on a handful of nice versions.

The runtime is 103 minutes so this one will take a few days.

The early standout is Craig Finn's cover of Sweetheart Like You (off of Infidels) that reminds me a bit of Springsteen.

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15 minutes ago, Eephus said:

It's time for a tribute album :towelwave:

Bob Dylan in the 80s: Volume One (2012)

Herein 24 assorted B- and C-listers from the 2012 Indie music scene cover songs from Dylan's albums of the 1980s.  It's a genius concept because most of his seven albums of the decade had questionable production decisions.  Tribute albums are always a grab bag but I'm banking on a handful of nice versions.

The runtime is 103 minutes so this one will take a few days.

The early standout is Craig Finn's cover of Sweetheart Like You (off of Infidels) that reminds me a bit of Springsteen.

This is a longer one. Beginning it now. I can't say that I recognize any of the artists - I like that.

I'll wait for you to finish before I chime in.

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Fudge. I tried to adjust for brevity and have gotten all the links stuck in spoiler tags. I am going to have to leave it that way and should have just...

It's been a long day. Fudge.

Anyway, all reviews are in the spoiler tags still, I just don't know how to remove them now.

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28 minutes ago, Eephus said:

The early standout is Craig Finn's cover of Sweetheart Like You (off of Infidels) that reminds me a bit of Springsteen.

Yep. Bruce alrighty.

 

6 minutes ago, rockaction said:

Fudge. I tried to adjust for brevity and have gotten all the links stuck in spoiler tags. I am going to have to leave it that way and should have just...

It's been a long day. Fudge.

Anyway, all reviews are in the spoiler tags still, I just don't know how to remove them now.

Thnx, but, I don't know how to see them ...

Are they visible on your screen?

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Okay, I was able to get original formatting for the Dylan albums. The others will be TK (there's only about five or six) after I talk about it and hear back from Eephus.

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5 minutes ago, rockaction said:

Okay, I was able to get original formatting for the Dylan albums. The others will be TK (there's only about five or six) after I talk about it and hear back from Eephus.

I replied via PM.  There's really no need to link any of the post-Dylan stuff.  Now I'm just riffing while walking the dog.

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8 hours ago, Man of Constant Sorrow said:

On the whole, I enjoyed the live album more than the studio. It seemed to have more energy, and I tend to prefer good live cuts in general. 

There are a few new songs, and the one that I enjoyed most was Got My Mojo Working. It is a "jam" (9:00 min) compared to the original, but I like bloat. Plus, the Voodoo is swell.

I listened to Mojo and the song that followed.  Like the studio album, it's OK but not transcendent.

It gets you thinking about what makes a band more than the sum of its parts.  The Band had it, whatever it is but Levon and the All-Stars don't.

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11 minutes ago, Eephus said:

I listened to Mojo and the song that followed.  Like the studio album, it's OK but not transcendent.

It gets you thinking about what makes a band more than the sum of its parts.  The Band had it, whatever it is but Levon and the All-Stars don't.

I won't disagree. As a Dr. John fan, I did "favorite" GMMW, but the rest will never be listened to again.

On your point about "what makes a band ..." - I have been thinking a bit on that in regards to visual art lately. I don't have an answer yet - there is something magic about it. 

Time/place/personal interactions ... they all have such an influence, it is hard for me to untangle. L&tAS have talent - in loads, but ...

That is something I like about this thread. Often, the "why/how/what" is as interesting as the art itself.

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5 hours ago, Eephus said:

 

It gets you thinking about what makes a band more than the sum of its parts.  The Band had it, whatever it is but Levon and the All-Stars don't.

The easy answer is that The Band lived, played, screwed, drank, doped their way together across a continent for years. Levon and The All Stars didn't. Plus, it was the late '70s and I doubt most of those folks were their best selves. Levon's records toward the end of his life were much tighter.

I think another interesting take on your statement above is if it ended after "band" with a "?"

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15 hours ago, Eephus said:

The early standout is Craig Finn's cover of Sweetheart Like You (off of Infidels) that reminds me a bit of Springsteen.

More like Elvis Costello doing a Springsteen impression.

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18 hours ago, Man of Constant Sorrow said:

I won't disagree. As a Dr. John fan, I did "favorite" GMMW, but the rest will never be listened to again.

On your point about "what makes a band ..." - I have been thinking a bit on that in regards to visual art lately. I don't have an answer yet - there is something magic about it. 

Time/place/personal interactions ... they all have such an influence, it is hard for me to untangle. L&tAS have talent - in loads, but ...

That is something I like about this thread. Often, the "why/how/what" is as interesting as the art itself.

 

13 hours ago, Uruk-Hai said:

The easy answer is that The Band lived, played, screwed, drank, doped their way together across a continent for years. Levon and The All Stars didn't. Plus, it was the late '70s and I doubt most of those folks were their best selves. Levon's records toward the end of his life were much tighter.

I think another interesting take on your statement above is if it ended after "band" with a "?"

I'm picturing Levon, Richard Manuel and Robbie Robertson shooting The Last Waltz interview segments with Scorsese.

The director asks them what makes a band which sends Robbie into some long convoluted response.  Levon interrupts him with something like "that's rock 'n roll".  Camera cuts to Manuel rolling his eyes and laughing maniacally.  And scene.

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Night #2 of the 80s Dylan tribute album.

Tribute albums usually play on your preconceptions from the original material.  But the songs here are much more obscure than the ones covered on I'm Not There or most other Dylan tributes.  I think that's mostly a good thing except when it isn't.   There's not much you can say about compilations :shrug:

Highlight for tonight was a song I couldn't place at first called Series of Dreams.  It turned out to be an outtake from Oh Mercy that was released via the Bootleg Series in 1995.  The thing that struck me in the cover was how the singer's voice was similar to the tone Dylan was going for circa 1969-71.  The band is called Yellowbird and I'll seek them out if I remember to.  The video of Dylan's version is superb.

Boz had a good night tonight.  He had a little spring in his step and did better on the stairs than he's done recently.

I foolishly chose the Deluxe Edition which has seven bonus cuts.  I'll finish those next time.

 

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18 hours ago, Eephus said:

... laughing maniacally.

This is my "go-to" response in most scenarios. Can't say that it works well, but it is fun. ;)

 

14 hours ago, Eephus said:

... Highlight for tonight was a song I couldn't place at first called Series of Dreams.  It turned out to be an outtake from Oh Mercy that was released via the Bootleg Series in 1995.  The thing that struck me in the cover was how the singer's voice was similar to the tone Dylan was going for circa 1969-71. The band is called Yellowbird and I'll seek them out if I remember to.  The video of Dylan's version is superb.

Since I am not familiar with these artists, I am not sure if the similarity in voicing is natural or intentional mimicry. If/when you dig into them, let us know if they always sound like Bob. I do like this song, but on the whole, I actually enjoyed the ones that were more original a little better. I can't really say why, yet. Maybe I'll think of something later.

 

14 hours ago, Eephus said:

Boz had a good night tonight.  He had a little spring in his step and did better on the stairs than he's done recently.

That makes me feel better, as my night wasn't too great. I had R. Woods against C. Carson. I'm down pretty big going into Sunday. 

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Finished off the Dylan 80s tribute last night after a day at Hardly Strictly Bluegrass.  Bosley was alone in the house for seven and a half hours.  I cut out early on St. Paul and the Broken Bones in order check on the dog.  He was asleep in his bed and hadn't messed the house.  We were able to walk around the neighborhood and meet Mrs. Eephus at her bus stop back from the festival.

I wasn't expecting much from bonus tracks on a tribute album.  Somebody decided they didn't make the original cut for the CD, which wasn't exactly a high bar to clear.  But I thought The Low Anthem's version of Lenny Bruce was more than good enough to make the album.   Dylan's original on Shot of Love was pretty good but the stately piano and winds arrangement here gives the song more of a funereal quality.

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The line between Pete Seeger and Bruce Springsteen doesn't pass too far from Dylan.

We Shall Overcome (The Seeger Sessions) - Bruce Springsteen (2006)

Even though most of the stories about Newport are myths, Seeger and Dylan had definite differences of opinion about the direction of folk music.  Springsteen started his career as one of many "New Dylans" thanks in part to the John Hammond CBS connection.  The Boss occasionally covered Dylan live beginning with his Dr. Zoom and the Sonic Boom days.

Like a lot of American men of a certain age, Springsteen signifies to me.  I listened to this one when it came out but we never bonded.  Picking it up again I remember why.   The whole Sessions Band thing is sub-optimized for live performances.  I'm sure the shows on this tour were a lot of fun but that spirit doesn't quite make it on record.  The big folk band arrangements overwhelm the charm of the songs.  The banjo player gets more solos than Little Steven has taken in 40 years.  Springsteen affects this weird accent where he sings his vowels through his nose.  It's kind of Dylanesque or more accurately, like Woody Guthrie. 

It was worth a shot but I should have picked The Ghost of Tom Joad.  My song selection is that old chestnut Froggie Went A Courtin'.  Fortunately the horn section was out having a smoke when this was recorded.  Dylan covered the same song on Good As I Been To You and I like his version better, especially the way he sings the many "uh huhs" in the lyrics.

Boz is fine.

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We followed bloodlines tonight

Seeing Things - Jakob Dylan (2008)

Jakob was born in 1969, the fourth child of Sara and Bob Dylan.  His parents divorced when Jakob was seven but they remained on good enough terms to raise their children.  It must have been a double-edged sword for Jakob when he chose to follow the family business but he managed to achieve commercial and artistic success with the Wallflowers in the 90s.

Seeing Things was his first solo album after the band went on hiatus.  It was produced by Rick Rubin in his signature minimalist style.  It's interesting that Bob never worked with Rubin, even when Rubin was president of Columbia Records but late-career Bob likes creative control of his records.  By the time this record was made, the singer/songwriter genre wasn't as popular as it was when Jakob was a kid but there's something timeless about an artist and his or her acoustic guitar.

Jakob's album is quite good.  The simple settings with the occasional second guitar, drums and background singers accentuate his pleasant soulful voice.  As a songwriter, he's not his dad but the tunes and lyrics flow nicely.   My favorite song is the album closing This End of the Telescope, an elliptical song that wouldn't sound out of place on one of Bob's albums. 

I missed the whole Wallflowers thing in the 90s and doubt I've ever listened to a full Wallflowers/Jakob Dylan album until tonight.  Seeing Things isn't enough to make me a big fan but I'm glad I listened to the record.

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Wherein a 21st century folkie supergroup reinterprets lyrics found in Dylan's dry cleaning

Lost On The River - The New Basement Tapes (2014)

I listened to this a few times when it came out and never gave it a second thought until now.  We only made it about 2/3rds through tonight so impressions can wait but it's easier to locate the thread if I bump it every night.

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Love the song at the link.

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13 hours ago, rockaction said:

Love the song at the link.

:shrug:

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Posted (edited)
10 minutes ago, Eephus said:

:shrug:

Oh, it went to "Kansas City," but maybe that's cause I had just YouTube searched the group and that was the first video that came up?

Dunno. The link went to Spotify and Kansas City (the third on the list) as that song.  I gathered it was Mumford from Mumford and Sons. Dug the song, regardless. 

eta* My cursor must have gone there or something. Looks like Down On The Bottom is the actual first song. 

Edited by rockaction

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2 minutes ago, rockaction said:

Oh, it went to "Kansas City," but maybe that's cause I had just YouTube searched the group and that was the first video that came up?

Dunno. The link went to Spotify and Kansas City (the third on the list) as that song.  I gathered it was Mumford from Mumford and Sons. Dug the song, regardless. 

eta* My cursor must have gone there or something. Looks like Down On The Bottom is the actual first song. 

Johnny Depp plays guitar on Kansas City

I'm not sure what to make of The New Basement Tapes.  I want to finish it off tonight and return to a few songs from the first pass.

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Posted (edited)
10 minutes ago, Eephus said:

Johnny Depp plays guitar on Kansas City

I'm not sure what to make of The New Basement Tapes.  I want to finish it off tonight and return to a few songs from the first pass.

Could have sworn it was him in the video, but shrugged that off as unlikely, though he's pretty unmistakable.

I was going to preface my comment that I'm not much on giving a critical ear to this type of music; I'm more of a mass market target. No, really.

eta* Married To My Hack could have been a great Dylan song, but that's all I can hear when I listen to it. Is him doing it.

Edited by rockaction

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On 10/8/2019 at 9:22 PM, Eephus said:

Wherein a 21st century folkie supergroup reinterprets lyrics found in Dylan's dry cleaning

Lost On The River - The New Basement Tapes (2014)

I listened to this a few times when it came out and never gave it a second thought until now.  We only made it about 2/3rds through tonight so impressions can wait but it's easier to locate the thread if I bump it every night.

Finished this tonight, a couple hours later than usual due to the Nats-Dodgers thriller.  The New Basement Tapes project was assembled by T-Bone Burnett to perform songs written around unpublished Dylan lyrics from 1967. 

Last week we went back and forth a little about what makes a band a band.  This record could be exhibit A.  The five members (Jim James, Elvis Costello, Rhiannon Giddens, one of the Mumfords and the singer from Dawes) sing their own songs which ends up sounding more like a various artists compilation than a supergroup.  It's not bad but it's uneven and lacks flow.  One big problem is the voices of the singers don't blend together well.  Harmonies can be a magical thing that make a song soar but this sounds more like the encore of a benefit concert.

None of the songs are particularly Dylanesque but that's just an observation, not a criticism.  The arrangements and recording technique steer clear of trying to recreate the vibe of the original Basement Tapes.  One thing I loved about our dive through the Dylan catalog was every night there was a line or verse that snapped me out of the monotony of dog walking.  These definitely aren't A-game lyrics but you can't really blame Dylan since he didn't see fit to record them in the first place.

I liked the Marcus Mumford songs the best which surprised me because I've never rated his band at all.  Giddens has one stunning song "Spanish Mary" and I like James' "Down on the Bottom" as well.  Taylor Goldsmith's songs are the worst but I'm not a Dawes fan.  Tonight's song selection is Stranger, a Mumford with a fuzzy guitar and a fiddle that includes this Dylan gem:

I wanna tombstone pearl handle revolver
Don't wanna meet a pale man with a halo in his hair
Never fall in love with a stranger
But sometimes I simply do not care

Boz is doing better in the cooler weather.

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Cheated tonight

The Waterboys - 2019 Tour Setlist

I'm a nerd so when I'm going to see a band (especially one where I'm not familiar with their full body of work), I check Setlist.fm beforehand and make a playlist of the songs they're playing.  The Waterboys have been playing a pretty fixed list this tour with a couple of additional covers thrown in.

Mike Scott's look has obviously been influenced by Dylan but I find Scott's lyrics to be more literal that Dylan's generally are.  The strangest album in the Waterboys catalog is the one where he wrote songs to Yeats verse but he's not singing anything off of that this time through.  Tonight's song selection is the most Dylanesque sounding song in their set Still A Freak, a bluesy rocker with an organ that sounds like 1966 Dylan.

Boz was having some problems with his hind legs slipping from beneath him on our hardwood floors.  I'm probably going to have to get him some booties for around the house.  We'll see how he takes to them.  Hopefully it'll be like the goggles.

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The other two guys in the thread title have new material out on the streaming services.

There are two Marvin Gaye songs from a 1972 concert in DC.  It sounds like it came from a two track soundboard source and the drums sound like crap.  Marvin is in good voice though.

Van Morrison has a single teasing his new album at the end of the month.  Van's original composition "Days Gone By" segues into Auld Lang Syne at the end in case you missed the point of the song.  Van's voice has held up much better than Dylan's (or Gaye's for that matter) but he's not the master of phrasing the Dylan has become.

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Hi I'm new here.  What happens in here?

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1 hour ago, shuke said:

Hi I'm new here.  What happens in here?

I started a thread about Bob Dylan with a question about which record of his I should buy. Discussion was had, suggestions were given, critical analysis brought to the fore, and eventually It evolved into Eephus reviewing every Bob Dylan album released, listened to while he takes his a nightly walk with his elderly dog Boswell. Links to reviews are in the OP. There was a brief hiatus in reviews where we discuss Marvin Gaye and Van Morrison, then it was largely back to the nightly sojourns.

Now Eephus is jazz scatting, reviewing albums with Dylan links.

It's cool. Read some. Stick around. 

Edited by rockaction
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10 hours ago, rockaction said:

Now Eephus is jazz scatting,

This made me giggle out loud ... Eep is scatting!

Scat on Eep - scat on.

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Actually Bosley is the scatological one

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