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From Fat to Fit 2024 - New Year New Goals! (1 Viewer)

Hey, man. I’m on your side. I can’t quit the booze either. I work out 6-7 days a week. Sometimes twice a day. Eat great for the most part. I’ll never lose the last 10-20. If I didn’t drink I’d be ripped. :shrug:
Just got back from gym. The one rowing machine they have is now broken. So much for that.

I gave up bourbon. That's as far as I'm going.

My blood pressure is good, my resting heart rate is lower than it's been since high school, and my bloodwork is all ok. I may have to just accept the fact that it's a win that I can now see where my abs should be, even though I may never actually see them. I've started to replace one meal a day with a prebiotic protein shake, which will give me a bigger calorie deficit. We'll see if that helps me get rid of the last 10 lbs to my goal.

But come summer, there will be a 12 pack of crappy light beer on my boat, dammit.
 
Have read zero of this thread, so I have no clue if anyone may have useful advice.

Last August I started eating healthier and working out regularly. I dropped about 40 lbs and have maintained that, hitting the gym about 5x week, eating a reasonably healthy diet and cutting out liquor (still drink some light beer and/or wine on weekends). I really want to drop about 10 more, but it seems like my body has hit a set point. Not interested in weight loss drugs or gimmicks. Thoughts on shedding the last 20% of my goal?
Find a rowing machine and use it often. Combo cardio/resistance will get you through the stall.
Also time. Eventually, if you maintain a deficit you will lose again.
That's really the basis of the question. I lost 40 lbs through diet and exercise. I am maintaining a slight calorie deficit But went from a steady weight loss to hitting a set point. I agree that over time I should be able to get to my goal weight by continuing to do what I'm doing, but I'm not sure why the plateau and whether I need to change things up.

No, I'm not giving up enjoying a couple light beers on the weekends or wine with dinner here or there. I'd rather be fat.

I have access to a rowing machine and have used it a couple times. I just don't enjoy it. Part of the way I've approached exercise over the last 9 months is to do things I enjoy, or at least that I don't hate. That's part of how I've been able to get myself to the gym 5 times a week. The rowing machine does kick my butt, so I suppose that means it works and it's hitting muscle groups that I'm not otherwise working. I guess I'll try to hit it more often.

The information out there is very contradictory about the ratio of cardio to resistance for weight loss. I'm leaning toward just increasing cardio and keeping the resistance the same, which means more of a time commitment and also leads to the "doing things I don't like" issue. Right now my cardio is mostly elliptical machine and walking. My knees aren't in the best condition from years of aggressive skiing and some very old soccer injuries. Running and stair climbing aren't in the picture. Rowing machine is not great on the knees, but tolerable.
As you’ve lost weight, your basal metabolic needs have changed. So the caloric expenditure to continue losing weight has also changed.

Without dramatic increases in activity level, neither cardiovascular, nor strength training will serve as the basis for continued weight loss. That’s diet’s job. I was commenting on the ratio for maximal mortality benefit from CV and strength training, which is 300-600 versus ~40 minutes/week.

Whatever you do, better to find something you enjoy, as you’re far more likely to stick with it. Surely there are other dietary tweaks and exercise to try, before you settle on a non sustainable routine? Do you have a partner to keep you accountable for your plan?
 
Have read zero of this thread, so I have no clue if anyone may have useful advice.

Last August I started eating healthier and working out regularly. I dropped about 40 lbs and have maintained that, hitting the gym about 5x week, eating a reasonably healthy diet and cutting out liquor (still drink some light beer and/or wine on weekends). I really want to drop about 10 more, but it seems like my body has hit a set point. Not interested in weight loss drugs or gimmicks. Thoughts on shedding the last 20% of my goal?
Find a rowing machine and use it often. Combo cardio/resistance will get you through the stall.
Also time. Eventually, if you maintain a deficit you will lose again.
That's really the basis of the question. I lost 40 lbs through diet and exercise. I am maintaining a slight calorie deficit But went from a steady weight loss to hitting a set point. I agree that over time I should be able to get to my goal weight by continuing to do what I'm doing, but I'm not sure why the plateau and whether I need to change things up.

No, I'm not giving up enjoying a couple light beers on the weekends or wine with dinner here or there. I'd rather be fat.

I have access to a rowing machine and have used it a couple times. I just don't enjoy it. Part of the way I've approached exercise over the last 9 months is to do things I enjoy, or at least that I don't hate. That's part of how I've been able to get myself to the gym 5 times a week. The rowing machine does kick my butt, so I suppose that means it works and it's hitting muscle groups that I'm not otherwise working. I guess I'll try to hit it more often.

The information out there is very contradictory about the ratio of cardio to resistance for weight loss. I'm leaning toward just increasing cardio and keeping the resistance the same, which means more of a time commitment and also leads to the "doing things I don't like" issue. Right now my cardio is mostly elliptical machine and walking. My knees aren't in the best condition from years of aggressive skiing and some very old soccer injuries. Running and stair climbing aren't in the picture. Rowing machine is not great on the knees, but tolerable.
As you’ve lost weight, your basal metabolic needs have changed. So the caloric expenditure to continue losing weight has also changed.

Without dramatic increases in activity level, neither cardiovascular, nor strength training will serve as the basis for continued weight loss. That’s diet’s job. I was commenting on the ratio for maximal mortality benefit from CV and strength training, which is 300-600 versus ~40 minutes/week.

Whatever you do, better to find something you enjoy, as you’re far more likely to stick with it. Surely there are other dietary tweaks and exercise to try, before you settle on a non sustainable routine? Do you have a partner to keep you accountable for your plan?
Thanks for the input. Makes sense.

Certainly there are other dietary changes that I can make. It's an ongoing process. As you pointed out, what worked for the last 9 months isn't working now (although I'm maintaining a steady weight and not gaining anything back, which is a positive). Upping the cardio at the same time seems like the best call. Only so much time in the week and I have a wholly sedentary job, but I can find another 15 minutes each day.
 
Have read zero of this thread, so I have no clue if anyone may have useful advice.

Last August I started eating healthier and working out regularly. I dropped about 40 lbs and have maintained that, hitting the gym about 5x week, eating a reasonably healthy diet and cutting out liquor (still drink some light beer and/or wine on weekends). I really want to drop about 10 more, but it seems like my body has hit a set point. Not interested in weight loss drugs or gimmicks. Thoughts on shedding the last 20% of my goal?
Find a rowing machine and use it often. Combo cardio/resistance will get you through the stall.
Also time. Eventually, if you maintain a deficit you will lose again.
That's really the basis of the question. I lost 40 lbs through diet and exercise. I am maintaining a slight calorie deficit But went from a steady weight loss to hitting a set point. I agree that over time I should be able to get to my goal weight by continuing to do what I'm doing, but I'm not sure why the plateau and whether I need to change things up.

No, I'm not giving up enjoying a couple light beers on the weekends or wine with dinner here or there. I'd rather be fat.

I have access to a rowing machine and have used it a couple times. I just don't enjoy it. Part of the way I've approached exercise over the last 9 months is to do things I enjoy, or at least that I don't hate. That's part of how I've been able to get myself to the gym 5 times a week. The rowing machine does kick my butt, so I suppose that means it works and it's hitting muscle groups that I'm not otherwise working. I guess I'll try to hit it more often.

The information out there is very contradictory about the ratio of cardio to resistance for weight loss. I'm leaning toward just increasing cardio and keeping the resistance the same, which means more of a time commitment and also leads to the "doing things I don't like" issue. Right now my cardio is mostly elliptical machine and walking. My knees aren't in the best condition from years of aggressive skiing and some very old soccer injuries. Running and stair climbing aren't in the picture. Rowing machine is not great on the knees, but tolerable.
As you’ve lost weight, your basal metabolic needs have changed. So the caloric expenditure to continue losing weight has also changed.

Without dramatic increases in activity level, neither cardiovascular, nor strength training will serve as the basis for continued weight loss. That’s diet’s job. I was commenting on the ratio for maximal mortality benefit from CV and strength training, which is 300-600 versus ~40 minutes/week.

Whatever you do, better to find something you enjoy, as you’re far more likely to stick with it. Surely there are other dietary tweaks and exercise to try, before you settle on a non sustainable routine? Do you have a partner to keep you accountable for your plan?
Thanks for the input. Makes sense.

Certainly there are other dietary changes that I can make. It's an ongoing process. As you pointed out, what worked for the last 9 months isn't working now (although I'm maintaining a steady weight and not gaining anything back, which is a positive). Upping the cardio at the same time seems like the best call. Only so much time in the week and I have a wholly sedentary job, but I can find another 15 minutes each day.

Adding some additional cardio (even just a 30 minute walk around the neighborhood) first thing in the morning is a great way to kick start your metabolism. Other than laziness, you won't have many excuses as to why you can get up a little earlier before work. You'll feel better throughout the day and eventually see those 10 pounds melt away if everything else remains consistent. Good luck 💪
 
Have read zero of this thread, so I have no clue if anyone may have useful advice.

Last August I started eating healthier and working out regularly. I dropped about 40 lbs and have maintained that, hitting the gym about 5x week, eating a reasonably healthy diet and cutting out liquor (still drink some light beer and/or wine on weekends). I really want to drop about 10 more, but it seems like my body has hit a set point. Not interested in weight loss drugs or gimmicks. Thoughts on shedding the last 20% of my goal?
Find a rowing machine and use it often. Combo cardio/resistance will get you through the stall.
Also time. Eventually, if you maintain a deficit you will lose again.
That's really the basis of the question. I lost 40 lbs through diet and exercise. I am maintaining a slight calorie deficit But went from a steady weight loss to hitting a set point. I agree that over time I should be able to get to my goal weight by continuing to do what I'm doing, but I'm not sure why the plateau and whether I need to change things up.

No, I'm not giving up enjoying a couple light beers on the weekends or wine with dinner here or there. I'd rather be fat.

I have access to a rowing machine and have used it a couple times. I just don't enjoy it. Part of the way I've approached exercise over the last 9 months is to do things I enjoy, or at least that I don't hate. That's part of how I've been able to get myself to the gym 5 times a week. The rowing machine does kick my butt, so I suppose that means it works and it's hitting muscle groups that I'm not otherwise working. I guess I'll try to hit it more often.

The information out there is very contradictory about the ratio of cardio to resistance for weight loss. I'm leaning toward just increasing cardio and keeping the resistance the same, which means more of a time commitment and also leads to the "doing things I don't like" issue. Right now my cardio is mostly elliptical machine and walking. My knees aren't in the best condition from years of aggressive skiing and some very old soccer injuries. Running and stair climbing aren't in the picture. Rowing machine is not great on the knees, but tolerable.
As you’ve lost weight, your basal metabolic needs have changed. So the caloric expenditure to continue losing weight has also changed.

Without dramatic increases in activity level, neither cardiovascular, nor strength training will serve as the basis for continued weight loss. That’s diet’s job. I was commenting on the ratio for maximal mortality benefit from CV and strength training, which is 300-600 versus ~40 minutes/week.

Whatever you do, better to find something you enjoy, as you’re far more likely to stick with it. Surely there are other dietary tweaks and exercise to try, before you settle on a non sustainable routine? Do you have a partner to keep you accountable for your plan?
Thanks for the input. Makes sense.

Certainly there are other dietary changes that I can make. It's an ongoing process. As you pointed out, what worked for the last 9 months isn't working now (although I'm maintaining a steady weight and not gaining anything back, which is a positive). Upping the cardio at the same time seems like the best call. Only so much time in the week and I have a wholly sedentary job, but I can find another 15 minutes each day.

Adding some additional cardio (even just a 30 minute walk around the neighborhood) first thing in the morning is a great way to kick start your metabolism. Other than laziness, you won't have many excuses as to why you can get up a little earlier before work. You'll feel better throughout the day and eventually see those 10 pounds melt away if everything else remains consistent. Good luck 💪
You don't live in the Pacific Northwest, huh? Waking up early to take a walk in cold rain falls under "things I don't like" and therefore unsustainable.
 
Have read zero of this thread, so I have no clue if anyone may have useful advice.

Last August I started eating healthier and working out regularly. I dropped about 40 lbs and have maintained that, hitting the gym about 5x week, eating a reasonably healthy diet and cutting out liquor (still drink some light beer and/or wine on weekends). I really want to drop about 10 more, but it seems like my body has hit a set point. Not interested in weight loss drugs or gimmicks. Thoughts on shedding the last 20% of my goal?
Find a rowing machine and use it often. Combo cardio/resistance will get you through the stall.
Also time. Eventually, if you maintain a deficit you will lose again.
That's really the basis of the question. I lost 40 lbs through diet and exercise. I am maintaining a slight calorie deficit But went from a steady weight loss to hitting a set point. I agree that over time I should be able to get to my goal weight by continuing to do what I'm doing, but I'm not sure why the plateau and whether I need to change things up.

No, I'm not giving up enjoying a couple light beers on the weekends or wine with dinner here or there. I'd rather be fat.

I have access to a rowing machine and have used it a couple times. I just don't enjoy it. Part of the way I've approached exercise over the last 9 months is to do things I enjoy, or at least that I don't hate. That's part of how I've been able to get myself to the gym 5 times a week. The rowing machine does kick my butt, so I suppose that means it works and it's hitting muscle groups that I'm not otherwise working. I guess I'll try to hit it more often.

The information out there is very contradictory about the ratio of cardio to resistance for weight loss. I'm leaning toward just increasing cardio and keeping the resistance the same, which means more of a time commitment and also leads to the "doing things I don't like" issue. Right now my cardio is mostly elliptical machine and walking. My knees aren't in the best condition from years of aggressive skiing and some very old soccer injuries. Running and stair climbing aren't in the picture. Rowing machine is not great on the knees, but tolerable.
As you’ve lost weight, your basal metabolic needs have changed. So the caloric expenditure to continue losing weight has also changed.

Without dramatic increases in activity level, neither cardiovascular, nor strength training will serve as the basis for continued weight loss. That’s diet’s job. I was commenting on the ratio for maximal mortality benefit from CV and strength training, which is 300-600 versus ~40 minutes/week.

Whatever you do, better to find something you enjoy, as you’re far more likely to stick with it. Surely there are other dietary tweaks and exercise to try, before you settle on a non sustainable routine? Do you have a partner to keep you accountable for your plan?
Thanks for the input. Makes sense.

Certainly there are other dietary changes that I can make. It's an ongoing process. As you pointed out, what worked for the last 9 months isn't working now (although I'm maintaining a steady weight and not gaining anything back, which is a positive). Upping the cardio at the same time seems like the best call. Only so much time in the week and I have a wholly sedentary job, but I can find another 15 minutes each day.

Adding some additional cardio (even just a 30 minute walk around the neighborhood) first thing in the morning is a great way to kick start your metabolism. Other than laziness, you won't have many excuses as to why you can get up a little earlier before work. You'll feel better throughout the day and eventually see those 10 pounds melt away if everything else remains consistent. Good luck 💪
You don't live in the Pacific Northwest, huh? Waking up early to take a walk in cold rain falls under "things I don't like" and therefore unsustainable.
Goonies never say die, and apparently keep living in a rainy area.
 
Have read zero of this thread, so I have no clue if anyone may have useful advice.

Last August I started eating healthier and working out regularly. I dropped about 40 lbs and have maintained that, hitting the gym about 5x week, eating a reasonably healthy diet and cutting out liquor (still drink some light beer and/or wine on weekends). I really want to drop about 10 more, but it seems like my body has hit a set point. Not interested in weight loss drugs or gimmicks. Thoughts on shedding the last 20% of my goal?
Find a rowing machine and use it often. Combo cardio/resistance will get you through the stall.
Also time. Eventually, if you maintain a deficit you will lose again.
That's really the basis of the question. I lost 40 lbs through diet and exercise. I am maintaining a slight calorie deficit But went from a steady weight loss to hitting a set point. I agree that over time I should be able to get to my goal weight by continuing to do what I'm doing, but I'm not sure why the plateau and whether I need to change things up.

No, I'm not giving up enjoying a couple light beers on the weekends or wine with dinner here or there. I'd rather be fat.

I have access to a rowing machine and have used it a couple times. I just don't enjoy it. Part of the way I've approached exercise over the last 9 months is to do things I enjoy, or at least that I don't hate. That's part of how I've been able to get myself to the gym 5 times a week. The rowing machine does kick my butt, so I suppose that means it works and it's hitting muscle groups that I'm not otherwise working. I guess I'll try to hit it more often.

The information out there is very contradictory about the ratio of cardio to resistance for weight loss. I'm leaning toward just increasing cardio and keeping the resistance the same, which means more of a time commitment and also leads to the "doing things I don't like" issue. Right now my cardio is mostly elliptical machine and walking. My knees aren't in the best condition from years of aggressive skiing and some very old soccer injuries. Running and stair climbing aren't in the picture. Rowing machine is not great on the knees, but tolerable.
As you’ve lost weight, your basal metabolic needs have changed. So the caloric expenditure to continue losing weight has also changed.

Without dramatic increases in activity level, neither cardiovascular, nor strength training will serve as the basis for continued weight loss. That’s diet’s job. I was commenting on the ratio for maximal mortality benefit from CV and strength training, which is 300-600 versus ~40 minutes/week.

Whatever you do, better to find something you enjoy, as you’re far more likely to stick with it. Surely there are other dietary tweaks and exercise to try, before you settle on a non sustainable routine? Do you have a partner to keep you accountable for your plan?
Thanks for the input. Makes sense.

Certainly there are other dietary changes that I can make. It's an ongoing process. As you pointed out, what worked for the last 9 months isn't working now (although I'm maintaining a steady weight and not gaining anything back, which is a positive). Upping the cardio at the same time seems like the best call. Only so much time in the week and I have a wholly sedentary job, but I can find another 15 minutes each day.

Adding some additional cardio (even just a 30 minute walk around the neighborhood) first thing in the morning is a great way to kick start your metabolism. Other than laziness, you won't have many excuses as to why you can get up a little earlier before work. You'll feel better throughout the day and eventually see those 10 pounds melt away if everything else remains consistent. Good luck 💪
You don't live in the Pacific Northwest, huh? Waking up early to take a walk in cold rain falls under "things I don't like" and therefore unsustainable.

Haha, these are things a home treadmill can solve.
 
Have read zero of this thread, so I have no clue if anyone may have useful advice.

Last August I started eating healthier and working out regularly. I dropped about 40 lbs and have maintained that, hitting the gym about 5x week, eating a reasonably healthy diet and cutting out liquor (still drink some light beer and/or wine on weekends). I really want to drop about 10 more, but it seems like my body has hit a set point. Not interested in weight loss drugs or gimmicks. Thoughts on shedding the last 20% of my goal?
Find a rowing machine and use it often. Combo cardio/resistance will get you through the stall.
Also time. Eventually, if you maintain a deficit you will lose again.
That's really the basis of the question. I lost 40 lbs through diet and exercise. I am maintaining a slight calorie deficit But went from a steady weight loss to hitting a set point. I agree that over time I should be able to get to my goal weight by continuing to do what I'm doing, but I'm not sure why the plateau and whether I need to change things up.

No, I'm not giving up enjoying a couple light beers on the weekends or wine with dinner here or there. I'd rather be fat.

I have access to a rowing machine and have used it a couple times. I just don't enjoy it. Part of the way I've approached exercise over the last 9 months is to do things I enjoy, or at least that I don't hate. That's part of how I've been able to get myself to the gym 5 times a week. The rowing machine does kick my butt, so I suppose that means it works and it's hitting muscle groups that I'm not otherwise working. I guess I'll try to hit it more often.

The information out there is very contradictory about the ratio of cardio to resistance for weight loss. I'm leaning toward just increasing cardio and keeping the resistance the same, which means more of a time commitment and also leads to the "doing things I don't like" issue. Right now my cardio is mostly elliptical machine and walking. My knees aren't in the best condition from years of aggressive skiing and some very old soccer injuries. Running and stair climbing aren't in the picture. Rowing machine is not great on the knees, but tolerable.
As you’ve lost weight, your basal metabolic needs have changed. So the caloric expenditure to continue losing weight has also changed.

Without dramatic increases in activity level, neither cardiovascular, nor strength training will serve as the basis for continued weight loss. That’s diet’s job. I was commenting on the ratio for maximal mortality benefit from CV and strength training, which is 300-600 versus ~40 minutes/week.

Whatever you do, better to find something you enjoy, as you’re far more likely to stick with it. Surely there are other dietary tweaks and exercise to try, before you settle on a non sustainable routine? Do you have a partner to keep you accountable for your plan?
Thanks for the input. Makes sense.

Certainly there are other dietary changes that I can make. It's an ongoing process. As you pointed out, what worked for the last 9 months isn't working now (although I'm maintaining a steady weight and not gaining anything back, which is a positive). Upping the cardio at the same time seems like the best call. Only so much time in the week and I have a wholly sedentary job, but I can find another 15 minutes each day.

Adding some additional cardio (even just a 30 minute walk around the neighborhood) first thing in the morning is a great way to kick start your metabolism. Other than laziness, you won't have many excuses as to why you can get up a little earlier before work. You'll feel better throughout the day and eventually see those 10 pounds melt away if everything else remains consistent. Good luck 💪
You don't live in the Pacific Northwest, huh? Waking up early to take a walk in cold rain falls under "things I don't like" and therefore unsustainable.

Haha, these are things a home treadmill can solve.
No room. That's why I go to the gym.
 
Have read zero of this thread, so I have no clue if anyone may have useful advice.

Last August I started eating healthier and working out regularly. I dropped about 40 lbs and have maintained that, hitting the gym about 5x week, eating a reasonably healthy diet and cutting out liquor (still drink some light beer and/or wine on weekends). I really want to drop about 10 more, but it seems like my body has hit a set point. Not interested in weight loss drugs or gimmicks. Thoughts on shedding the last 20% of my goal?
Find a rowing machine and use it often. Combo cardio/resistance will get you through the stall.
Also time. Eventually, if you maintain a deficit you will lose again.
That's really the basis of the question. I lost 40 lbs through diet and exercise. I am maintaining a slight calorie deficit But went from a steady weight loss to hitting a set point. I agree that over time I should be able to get to my goal weight by continuing to do what I'm doing, but I'm not sure why the plateau and whether I need to change things up.

No, I'm not giving up enjoying a couple light beers on the weekends or wine with dinner here or there. I'd rather be fat.

I have access to a rowing machine and have used it a couple times. I just don't enjoy it. Part of the way I've approached exercise over the last 9 months is to do things I enjoy, or at least that I don't hate. That's part of how I've been able to get myself to the gym 5 times a week. The rowing machine does kick my butt, so I suppose that means it works and it's hitting muscle groups that I'm not otherwise working. I guess I'll try to hit it more often.

The information out there is very contradictory about the ratio of cardio to resistance for weight loss. I'm leaning toward just increasing cardio and keeping the resistance the same, which means more of a time commitment and also leads to the "doing things I don't like" issue. Right now my cardio is mostly elliptical machine and walking. My knees aren't in the best condition from years of aggressive skiing and some very old soccer injuries. Running and stair climbing aren't in the picture. Rowing machine is not great on the knees, but tolerable.
As you’ve lost weight, your basal metabolic needs have changed. So the caloric expenditure to continue losing weight has also changed.

Without dramatic increases in activity level, neither cardiovascular, nor strength training will serve as the basis for continued weight loss. That’s diet’s job. I was commenting on the ratio for maximal mortality benefit from CV and strength training, which is 300-600 versus ~40 minutes/week.

Whatever you do, better to find something you enjoy, as you’re far more likely to stick with it. Surely there are other dietary tweaks and exercise to try, before you settle on a non sustainable routine? Do you have a partner to keep you accountable for your plan?
Thanks for the input. Makes sense.

Certainly there are other dietary changes that I can make. It's an ongoing process. As you pointed out, what worked for the last 9 months isn't working now (although I'm maintaining a steady weight and not gaining anything back, which is a positive). Upping the cardio at the same time seems like the best call. Only so much time in the week and I have a wholly sedentary job, but I can find another 15 minutes each day.

Adding some additional cardio (even just a 30 minute walk around the neighborhood) first thing in the morning is a great way to kick start your metabolism. Other than laziness, you won't have many excuses as to why you can get up a little earlier before work. You'll feel better throughout the day and eventually see those 10 pounds melt away if everything else remains consistent. Good luck 💪
You don't live in the Pacific Northwest, huh? Waking up early to take a walk in cold rain falls under "things I don't like" and therefore unsustainable.

Haha, these are things a home treadmill can solve.
No room. That's why I go to the gym.

Sounds like you found the answer. Good job buddy!
 
Have read zero of this thread, so I have no clue if anyone may have useful advice.

Last August I started eating healthier and working out regularly. I dropped about 40 lbs and have maintained that, hitting the gym about 5x week, eating a reasonably healthy diet and cutting out liquor (still drink some light beer and/or wine on weekends). I really want to drop about 10 more, but it seems like my body has hit a set point. Not interested in weight loss drugs or gimmicks. Thoughts on shedding the last 20% of my goal?
Find a rowing machine and use it often. Combo cardio/resistance will get you through the stall.
Also time. Eventually, if you maintain a deficit you will lose again.
That's really the basis of the question. I lost 40 lbs through diet and exercise. I am maintaining a slight calorie deficit But went from a steady weight loss to hitting a set point. I agree that over time I should be able to get to my goal weight by continuing to do what I'm doing, but I'm not sure why the plateau and whether I need to change things up.

No, I'm not giving up enjoying a couple light beers on the weekends or wine with dinner here or there. I'd rather be fat.

I have access to a rowing machine and have used it a couple times. I just don't enjoy it. Part of the way I've approached exercise over the last 9 months is to do things I enjoy, or at least that I don't hate. That's part of how I've been able to get myself to the gym 5 times a week. The rowing machine does kick my butt, so I suppose that means it works and it's hitting muscle groups that I'm not otherwise working. I guess I'll try to hit it more often.

The information out there is very contradictory about the ratio of cardio to resistance for weight loss. I'm leaning toward just increasing cardio and keeping the resistance the same, which means more of a time commitment and also leads to the "doing things I don't like" issue. Right now my cardio is mostly elliptical machine and walking. My knees aren't in the best condition from years of aggressive skiing and some very old soccer injuries. Running and stair climbing aren't in the picture. Rowing machine is not great on the knees, but tolerable.
As you’ve lost weight, your basal metabolic needs have changed. So the caloric expenditure to continue losing weight has also changed.

Without dramatic increases in activity level, neither cardiovascular, nor strength training will serve as the basis for continued weight loss. That’s diet’s job. I was commenting on the ratio for maximal mortality benefit from CV and strength training, which is 300-600 versus ~40 minutes/week.

Whatever you do, better to find something you enjoy, as you’re far more likely to stick with it. Surely there are other dietary tweaks and exercise to try, before you settle on a non sustainable routine? Do you have a partner to keep you accountable for your plan?
Thanks for the input. Makes sense.

Certainly there are other dietary changes that I can make. It's an ongoing process. As you pointed out, what worked for the last 9 months isn't working now (although I'm maintaining a steady weight and not gaining anything back, which is a positive). Upping the cardio at the same time seems like the best call. Only so much time in the week and I have a wholly sedentary job, but I can find another 15 minutes each day.

Adding some additional cardio (even just a 30 minute walk around the neighborhood) first thing in the morning is a great way to kick start your metabolism. Other than laziness, you won't have many excuses as to why you can get up a little earlier before work. You'll feel better throughout the day and eventually see those 10 pounds melt away if everything else remains consistent. Good luck 💪
You don't live in the Pacific Northwest, huh? Waking up early to take a walk in cold rain falls under "things I don't like" and therefore unsustainable.
Goonies never say die, and apparently keep living in a rainy area.
They filmed the end of the movie in the bay area. Too much rain in Astoria.
 

Sounds like you found the answer. Good job buddy!
Agree with you on finding time for more cardio. It's just going to be more time at the gym, other than in the summer. I usually just go over lunchtime, but I think your point about kick-starting my metabolism with exercise has some merit. I'll give going before work a shot.
 
Have read zero of this thread, so I have no clue if anyone may have useful advice.

Last August I started eating healthier and working out regularly. I dropped about 40 lbs and have maintained that, hitting the gym about 5x week, eating a reasonably healthy diet and cutting out liquor (still drink some light beer and/or wine on weekends). I really want to drop about 10 more, but it seems like my body has hit a set point. Not interested in weight loss drugs or gimmicks. Thoughts on shedding the last 20% of my goal?
Find a rowing machine and use it often. Combo cardio/resistance will get you through the stall.
Also time. Eventually, if you maintain a deficit you will lose again.
That's really the basis of the question. I lost 40 lbs through diet and exercise. I am maintaining a slight calorie deficit But went from a steady weight loss to hitting a set point. I agree that over time I should be able to get to my goal weight by continuing to do what I'm doing, but I'm not sure why the plateau and whether I need to change things up.

No, I'm not giving up enjoying a couple light beers on the weekends or wine with dinner here or there. I'd rather be fat.

I have access to a rowing machine and have used it a couple times. I just don't enjoy it. Part of the way I've approached exercise over the last 9 months is to do things I enjoy, or at least that I don't hate. That's part of how I've been able to get myself to the gym 5 times a week. The rowing machine does kick my butt, so I suppose that means it works and it's hitting muscle groups that I'm not otherwise working. I guess I'll try to hit it more often.

The information out there is very contradictory about the ratio of cardio to resistance for weight loss. I'm leaning toward just increasing cardio and keeping the resistance the same, which means more of a time commitment and also leads to the "doing things I don't like" issue. Right now my cardio is mostly elliptical machine and walking. My knees aren't in the best condition from years of aggressive skiing and some very old soccer injuries. Running and stair climbing aren't in the picture. Rowing machine is not great on the knees, but tolerable.
As you’ve lost weight, your basal metabolic needs have changed. So the caloric expenditure to continue losing weight has also changed.

Without dramatic increases in activity level, neither cardiovascular, nor strength training will serve as the basis for continued weight loss. That’s diet’s job. I was commenting on the ratio for maximal mortality benefit from CV and strength training, which is 300-600 versus ~40 minutes/week.

Whatever you do, better to find something you enjoy, as you’re far more likely to stick with it. Surely there are other dietary tweaks and exercise to try, before you settle on a non sustainable routine? Do you have a partner to keep you accountable for your plan?
Thanks for the input. Makes sense.

Certainly there are other dietary changes that I can make. It's an ongoing process. As you pointed out, what worked for the last 9 months isn't working now (although I'm maintaining a steady weight and not gaining anything back, which is a positive). Upping the cardio at the same time seems like the best call. Only so much time in the week and I have a wholly sedentary job, but I can find another 15 minutes each day.

Adding some additional cardio (even just a 30 minute walk around the neighborhood) first thing in the morning is a great way to kick start your metabolism. Other than laziness, you won't have many excuses as to why you can get up a little earlier before work. You'll feel better throughout the day and eventually see those 10 pounds melt away if everything else remains consistent. Good luck 💪
Yeah, I was a commuter cyclist for years. The route is 15 miles one-way, but Fridays my friends and I would do a 40 mile loop, starting in the wee hours, to avoid traffic. Waking up early sucked, but biking to work really energized me during my shift.

And it was great to have no easy choice other than biking home, though I swallowed my pride a few times to hitch a ride with my wife.
 
down to 260 after weighing 300 some 18-24 months ago. goal is to get to 250 by end of summer. been lifting weights 2-3 times a week, a bit of cardio, and just eating less.

fwiw, 6'5".
 

Sounds like you found the answer. Good job buddy!
Agree with you on finding time for more cardio. It's just going to be more time at the gym, other than in the summer. I usually just go over lunchtime, but I think your point about kick-starting my metabolism with exercise has some merit. I'll give going before work a shot.

Jumping rope, jumping jacks, burpees, push ups, pull ups, situps, planks and other calisthenics are also great if you can't make it to the gym. Not sure how that stuff will effect your knees but it's worth a shot. When I'm traveling and there's no gym option, that's normally my mode of operation.
 

Sounds like you found the answer. Good job buddy!
Agree with you on finding time for more cardio. It's just going to be more time at the gym, other than in the summer. I usually just go over lunchtime, but I think your point about kick-starting my metabolism with exercise has some merit. I'll give going before work a shot.

Jumping rope, jumping jacks, burpees, push ups, pull ups, situps, planks and other calisthenics are also great if you can't make it to the gym. Not sure how that stuff will effect your knees but it's worth a shot. When I'm traveling and there's no gym option, that's normally my mode of operation.
Yep. I do planks and crunches in the evening watching TV. Jumping jacks and jumping rope aren't viable for me, but calisthenics in general are a good idea that I can add more consistently.
 
awesome thread. I started my journey 11 days ago. I'm 5-10, 255 pounds, and 46 years old. Joined the gym with my thirteen year old son. It's been a great bonding experience and I already feeling better . my goal is to get under 200 pounds by next June. So, 55 pounds over 10 months.
All right, one month in, down to 244 pounds. Lost 11 pounds so far. Feeling great.
two months down.
start- 255 pounds
month 1- 244 pounds
month 2- 238.9 pounds
still making progress. Hitting the point where a few people are starting to notice.
start-255 pounds
month 1- 244 pounds
month 2- 238.9 pounds
month 3- 234.5 pounds
Decided weigh in a little early because I'm about to do a little casino vacation and then follow it up with thanksgiving.
start- 255
August- 244
September- 238.9
October- 234.5
November -230.5

Also, my son has gone from 170 to 157 and has gained some decent strength too.
I didn't realize it's been so long since I posted. From pre-thanksgiving until the super bowl, I actually gained 2 pounds. Blame it on the holidays, a casino trip, and a guys trip to Green Bay. However, I did keep working out consistently and stayed the course. Right now, I'm at 223 pounds. Maybe not at 200 like I hoped, but way better than 255 like I was in August. Besides the gym, I've now also started to play pickleball. I feel great mentally and physically and still plan on getting to 200 eventually.
 
Does anyone drink psyllium husk? I've been drinking two tablespoons of whole psyllium husks every morning for the last month. It is a bulking agent that soaks up water, expands in our digestive track, grabbing trapped stuff from crevices and pushing everything along in a timely fashion. It has greatly improved my gut issues, allowing me to indulge in vices without suffering the consequences. I drink mine first thing in the morning because I'm underweight and don't want to rush any digestible food out of my stomach. In the beginning, I drank it once after a meal and then regretted it when I was hungry again soon after. So if you have a particularly bad cheat meal but then drink psyllium husk right after, your body may not be able to digest and absorb most of the calories.
 

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