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HOF finalists 2011 (1 Viewer)

I'm NEVER a fan of focusing on the guys IN the Hall that we think shouldn't and then throwing in anyone contemporary who may have better stats. RE: Marcus Allen.

Also, you have to look at a player in the context of their era and their place in history at the time.

Marcus Allen was rookie of the year, NFL MVP and comeback player of the year. He also won a Super Bowl and was Super Bowl MVP. He was the only player with 10,000 yards rushing and 5,000 yards receiving at the time he retired, and was the all-time rushing TD leader then, as well.

How many players can say they were rookie of the year, league MVP, Super Bowl MVP, and also retired with among the best statistical careers in history? And let's also not forget that I'm sure voters ascribed some value to the lost portion of Allen's career that came after his feud with Davis.

 
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Marcus Allen made the Pro Bowl 6 times and was first-team All-Pro twice. Testaverde made the Pro Bowl twice and was never an All-Pro. Allen finished #1 in yards from scrimmage twice, top-5 three times, and top-10 five times; Testaverde was never #1, finished top-5 once, and top-10 four times. Allen finished #1 in rushing TDs twice, top-5 five times, and top-10 nine times; Testaverde never finished #1 in passing TDs, finished top-5 twice, and top-10 three times.The only thing similar about their careers is that they were long.
pro bowls are stupid.. that's a bad way to evaluate anyone.all-pro twice - very notable - he did have 2 excellent seasons.One of the seasons leading yards from scrimmage was a strike shortened season, that's nothing special.The TD's are bullcrap because of the Chiefs and giving him EVERY SINGLE 1 yard run.... and I hate the Chiefs for padding his stats like that.I'm just not impressed with a collection of mediocre seasons strung together.... even with one elite season thrown in.I'm impressed with someone who's considered great at his position.For Marcus - 2-3 seasons great - all the rest - good or terrible.I would prefer a player like Gayle Sayers or Terrell Davis in the Hall over marcus.
 
One of the seasons leading yards from scrimmage was a strike shortened season, that's nothing special.The TD's are bullcrap because of the Chiefs and giving him EVERY SINGLE 1 yard run.... and I hate the Chiefs for padding his stats like that.
Leading is leading; if it's nothing special, why didn't everyone lead in rushing yards that year?In TDs, one of his #1s and four of his top-5 came before he went to the Chiefs. And scoring 1-yard TDs isn't padding stats, it's earning stats. Priest Holmes' 1-yard TDs still counted.
I'm just not impressed with a collection of mediocre seasons strung together.... even with one elite season thrown in.
Allen had at least six seasons which could not be construed as mediocre.
 
Rotoworld refers to Sanders as a lock. I hadn't really thought of him in that way. Is he really a lock?
I would think of Faulk as more of a lock than Sanders I guess....
Disagree, Sanders was more dominant at his position.As for the Martin vs. Faulk debate, I do think Faulk was slightly more talented than Martin, but it's a lot closer than some people suggest and I'd like to see both in the HOF eventually. Martin grinded out numbers consistently on some bad/mediocre teams, while Faulk played his prime years on one of the best offenses of all time. When not running behind a godly OL, with godly receivers stretching the field, his YPC was similar to Martin's. His superior receiving skills does put him ahead though.
 
Just Win Baby said:
Bri said:
It is still that he only rocked half the time for FF. I'm not saying he wasn't fantastic when he was "on", but those other years he wasn't.Onto your 7 of 10-In 1996, he had run for 1282 and 1078 and had 55 or so receptions in each year previous. That made him a 1st round pick in FF. However, in 1996 he only ran for 587 yards.In 1997, there were many that still loved the guy. He did have the 55 or so receptions in 1996 and he still went in the first round, just a bit later. He didn't do much better for FF. He got 300 yards the last three weeks of the season (for the FF playoffs) but he only had 700 yards rushing for the previous 13 weeks. Quickly glancing at PFR, most weeks were 50 yards rushing or less.You can look at the year end totals and glean whatever you want from that, ignoring a 13 week FF season or all his games under 50 yards. He was a top top pick and was a first rounder for FF since day 1 in the NFL. He let people down for FF as often as he succeeded.
It isn't clear why you are so focused on rushing yards to the exclusion of everything else. Maybe that's why you aren't getting it. Faulk was arguably the best receiving RB of all time, and he was a TD machine. He didn't have to have a ton of rushing yards to be extremely valuable, but he still ran for more than 12K yards.
this is the third time someone in this thread has stated that I'm excluding receiving yards as they quote me mentioning receptions. You make it a point to say he was arguably the best receiving back as if I didn't say something similar on several occasions in this thread.I said you can glean whatever you want from year end totals and you did just that. You're not looking at game logs and thus this is a waste of time. When a RB fails to run for 20 yards for the day that stinks. You can shine it up however you want but I'm going to remember exactly as it was and look at the game logs. You keep rolling with your year end totals.
You said Martin was the better "runner" which clearly doesn't hold up to the fact that (a) Faulk ran with the football (for many yards) after he caught the football (which he did far more than Martin) and (b) he has a significantly better YPC average than Martin had. The better runner, the better RB, was Marshall Faulk. It's ok to have a fondness for Martin, given that he was part of your hometown team for a while. But, let's not confuse the issues here. Faulk was an elite back, and Martin was a very effective back. Big difference.
 
Marcus Allen had 11 seasons with 1000+ yards from scrimmage and 7 seasons with 10+ TD. Sure, he had a doughnut hole mid career in terms of production, but if he put up the same numbers in a different order people would not have a problem with his productivity. Even with a lot of missed time and playing until he was 37, he still averaged 80 yards from scrimmage a game. It's not like he never did anything . . .
No one is saying he isn't HOF worthy. But, in the food chain of greatness, he's great and all...but just a bit lower on the food chain, that's all.A lot of Pats fans really upset by this. You guys shouldn't be. He was very, very effective. I don't think anyone here is tearing his career apart here. Just trying to maintain some perspective, that's all.
 
http://www.profootballhof.com/enshrinement...2011-finalists/

Five first-year eligible players – Jerome Bettis, Marshall Faulk, Curtis Martin, Deion Sanders, and Willie Roaf – are among the 15 modern-era finalists who will be considered for election to the Pro Football Hall of Fame when the Hall’s Selection Committee meets in North Texas on Saturday, Feb. 5, 2011.

Joining the five first-year eligible players, are nine other modern-era players and a contributor. The 15 modern-era finalists, along with the two senior nominees announced in August 2010 (former Washington Redskins linebacker Chris Hanburger and former Los Angeles Rams linebacker Les Richter) will be the only candidates considered for Hall of Fame election when the 44-member Selection Committee meets. To be elected, a finalist must receive a minimum positive vote of 80 percent.

Also, for the second consecutive year, the Pro Football Hall of Fame has teamed up with Van Heusen and JCPenney to ask fans to voice their choice for whom they think should be included in the Pro Football Hall of Fame’s Class of 2011 at www.fanschoice.com.

The Pro Football Hall of Fame Selection Committee’s 17 finalists (15 modern-era and two senior nominees*) with their positions, teams, and years active follow:

Jerome Bettis– Running Back – 1993-95 Los Angeles/St. Louis Rams, 1996-2005 Pittsburgh Steelers

Tim Brown – Wide Receiver/Kick Returner – 1988-2003 Los Angeles/Oakland Raiders, 2004 Tampa Bay Buccaneers

Cris Carter – Wide Receiver – 1987-89 Philadelphia Eagles, 1990-2001 Minnesota Vikings, 2002 Miami Dolphins

Dermontti Dawson– Center – 1988-2000 Pittsburgh Steelers

Richard Dent – Defensive End – 1983-1993, 1995 Chicago Bears, 1994 San Francisco 49ers, 1996 Indianapolis Colts, 1997 Philadelphia Eagles

Chris Doleman– Defensive End/Linebacker – 1985-1993, 1999 Minnesota Vikings, 1994-95 Atlanta Falcons, 1996-98 San Francisco 49ers

Marshall Faulk – Running Back – 1994-98 Indianapolis Colts, 1999-2005 St. Louis Rams

Charles Haley – Defensive End/Linebacker – 1986-1991, 1999 San Francisco 49ers, 1992-96 Dallas Cowboys

*Chris Hanburger– Linebacker – 1965-1978 Washington Redskins

Cortez Kennedy– Defensive Tackle – 1990-2000 Seattle Seahawks

Curtis Martin – Running Back – 1995-97 New England Patriots, 1998-2005 New York Jets

Andre Reed – Wide Receiver – 1985-1999 Buffalo Bills, 2000 Washington Redskins

*Les Richter – Linebacker – 1954-1962 Los Angeles Rams

Willie Roaf– Tackle – 1993-2001 New Orleans Saints, 2002-05 Kansas City Chiefs

Ed Sabol– Founder/President/Chairman – 1964-1995 NFL Films

Deion Sanders – Cornerback/Kick Returner/Punt Returner – 1989-1993 Atlanta Falcons, 1994 San Francisco 49ers, 1995-99 Dallas Cowboys, 2000 Washington Redskins, 2004-05 Baltimore Ravens

Shannon Sharpe – Tight End – 1990-99, 2002-03 Denver Broncos, 2000-01 Baltimore Ravens

Brown, Carter, Dawson, Dent, Haley, Kennedy, Reed, and Sharpe have all been finalists in previous years. Although they were eligible in previous years, this is the first time Doleman, Hanburger, Richter, and Sabol have been finalists.

From this year’s list, four players – Dawson, Hanburger, Kennedy, and Richter – spent their entire NFL career with just one team.

Hanburger and Richter were selected as senior candidates by the Hall of Fame’s Seniors Committee at their August 2010 meeting. The Seniors Committee reviews the qualifications of those players whose careers took place more than 25 years ago. The remaining 15 modern-era finalists were determined by a vote of the Hall’s 44-member Selection Committee from a list of 114 preliminary nominees that earlier was reduced to a list of 26 semifinalists.

To be eligible for election, modern-era players and coaches must be retired at least five years. Contributors need not be retired.

Dent has been eligible for election for nine years, Doleman and Haley seven years. Dawson, Kennedy, and Reed have each been eligible for election for six years, Carter four years, Sharpe three years and Brown two years. Bettis, Faulk, Martin, Roaf, and Sanders are in their first year of eligibility. Since the retirement minimum for a player prior to 1968 was three years, senior nominee Richter has been eligible for 46 years. Hanburger has been eligible for 28 years.

Selection meeting, Class announcement at Super Bowl XLV in North Texas

The Selection Committee will meet in North Texas, on Saturday, February 5, 2011, to elect the Pro Football Hall of Fame Class of 2011. The election results will be announced at 7 p.m. ET (6 p.m. CT) during a one-hour NFL Network special, live from the Super Bowl Media Center.

At the 2011 selection meeting, the selectors will thoroughly discuss the careers of each finalist. Although there is no set number for any class of enshrinees, the Pro Football Hall of Fame’s current ground rules stipulate that between four and seven new members will be selected each year. No more than five modern-era nominees can be elected in a given year and a class of six or seven can only be achieved if one or both senior nominees are elected. Representatives of the accounting firm Deloitte & Touche will tabulate all votes during the meeting.

At the announcement, Pro Football Hall of Fame President/Executive Director Steve Perry will be presented with an envelope containing the names of the nominees elected. Each newly elected member will be contacted immediately by the Hall of Fame. Members of the Class of 2011 in North Texas for the Super Bowl will be asked to join the live announcement show. Those not able to attend will be asked to join via teleconference.

Ticket info for 2011 Enshrinement Festival

The Pro Football Hall of Fame Enshrinement Festival, a multi-day celebration of the enshrinement of the newest Hall of Fame Class, is held each year in Canton. The festival which culminates with the Enshrinement Ceremony and NFL Hall of Fame Game includes 18 special events over a 11-day period.| 2011 schedule>>>

Fan Packages for the 2011 Enshrinement Festival are on sale now. Individual Enshrinement tickets will go on sale to the public on Tuesday, Feb. 1, 2011 at 11 a.m. ET. More ticket information for the Enshrinement Ceremony, NFL Hall of Fame Game and the Pro Football Hall of Fame Enshrinement Festival events can be found here>>>
Faulk, Deion, and Dent. The rest were good players, but not the best at their position, let alone the best ever. Thank you.

 
Marcus Allen had 11 seasons with 1000+ yards from scrimmage and 7 seasons with 10+ TD. Sure, he had a doughnut hole mid career in terms of production, but if he put up the same numbers in a different order people would not have a problem with his productivity. Even with a lot of missed time and playing until he was 37, he still averaged 80 yards from scrimmage a game. It's not like he never did anything . . .
No one is saying he isn't HOF worthy. But, in the food chain of greatness, he's great and all...but just a bit lower on the food chain, that's all.A lot of Pats fans really upset by this. You guys shouldn't be. He was very, very effective. I don't think anyone here is tearing his career apart here. Just trying to maintain some perspective, that's all.
I guess I don't really have a problem with some guys making it (say Allen, Martin, Bettis). But in MY Hall of Fame, there would be a lot fewer inductees and a number of players would be relocated to the Hall of Very Good. But that's not how it is, so we have to keep everyone that's already in.
 
Marcus Allen had 11 seasons with 1000+ yards from scrimmage and 7 seasons with 10+ TD. Sure, he had a doughnut hole mid career in terms of production, but if he put up the same numbers in a different order people would not have a problem with his productivity. Even with a lot of missed time and playing until he was 37, he still averaged 80 yards from scrimmage a game. It's not like he never did anything . . .
No one is saying he isn't HOF worthy. But, in the food chain of greatness, he's great and all...but just a bit lower on the food chain, that's all.A lot of Pats fans really upset by this. You guys shouldn't be. He was very, very effective. I don't think anyone here is tearing his career apart here. Just trying to maintain some perspective, that's all.
I guess I don't really have a problem with some guys making it (say Allen, Martin, Bettis). But in MY Hall of Fame, there would be a lot fewer inductees and a number of players would be relocated to the Hall of Very Good. But that's not how it is, so we have to keep everyone that's already in.
:thumbup: :goodposting: Doesn't mean we have to keep letting in all these pretty good players. We can stop with the Art Monks anytime.

 
Marcus Allen had 11 seasons with 1000+ yards from scrimmage and 7 seasons with 10+ TD. Sure, he had a doughnut hole mid career in terms of production, but if he put up the same numbers in a different order people would not have a problem with his productivity. Even with a lot of missed time and playing until he was 37, he still averaged 80 yards from scrimmage a game. It's not like he never did anything . . .
No one is saying he isn't HOF worthy. But, in the food chain of greatness, he's great and all...but just a bit lower on the food chain, that's all.A lot of Pats fans really upset by this. You guys shouldn't be. He was very, very effective. I don't think anyone here is tearing his career apart here. Just trying to maintain some perspective, that's all.
I guess I don't really have a problem with some guys making it (say Allen, Martin, Bettis). But in MY Hall of Fame, there would be a lot fewer inductees and a number of players would be relocated to the Hall of Very Good. But that's not how it is, so we have to keep everyone that's already in.
:goodposting: :goodposting: Doesn't mean we have to keep letting in all these pretty good players. We can stop with the Art Monks anytime.
Art Monk is a good example. I've never met the man and he's never done wrong by me. But in telling the story of the history of the NFL, I'm not sure there would be the need to devote a lot of time or space to Monk. IMO, if you have to go out of your way to shoe horn a guy in as one of the all time greats and legends of his time, then he probably shouldn't be there. Before all the Skins fans get out therir torches and pitchforks, yes, Monk was a very good player for a long time and played on however many championship teams. I get that.But in the grand scheme of things, when kids went out in the yard and pretended to be football greats, I don't ever remember anyone in these parts saying they wanted to be Art Monk, just like no one ever picked Craig Biggio in pretend baseball. Both guys were great teammates and players with a lot of longevity, but they weren't exactly the marquee guys of the league.

Kind of like saying Nicholas Cage is a great actor. Sure, he's had a couple of impressive performances and made some entertaining movies . . . but is he a great actor?

 
Marcus Allen had 11 seasons with 1000+ yards from scrimmage and 7 seasons with 10+ TD. Sure, he had a doughnut hole mid career in terms of production, but if he put up the same numbers in a different order people would not have a problem with his productivity. Even with a lot of missed time and playing until he was 37, he still averaged 80 yards from scrimmage a game. It's not like he never did anything . . .
No one is saying he isn't HOF worthy. But, in the food chain of greatness, he's great and all...but just a bit lower on the food chain, that's all.A lot of Pats fans really upset by this. You guys shouldn't be. He was very, very effective. I don't think anyone here is tearing his career apart here. Just trying to maintain some perspective, that's all.
I guess I don't really have a problem with some guys making it (say Allen, Martin, Bettis). But in MY Hall of Fame, there would be a lot fewer inductees and a number of players would be relocated to the Hall of Very Good. But that's not how it is, so we have to keep everyone that's already in.
:confused: :confused: Doesn't mean we have to keep letting in all these pretty good players. We can stop with the Art Monks anytime.
Art Monk is a good example. I've never met the man and he's never done wrong by me. But in telling the story of the history of the NFL, I'm not sure there would be the need to devote a lot of time or space to Monk. IMO, if you have to go out of your way to shoe horn a guy in as one of the all time greats and legends of his time, then he probably shouldn't be there. Before all the Skins fans get out therir torches and pitchforks, yes, Monk was a very good player for a long time and played on however many championship teams. I get that.But in the grand scheme of things, when kids went out in the yard and pretended to be football greats, I don't ever remember anyone in these parts saying they wanted to be Art Monk, just like no one ever picked Craig Biggio in pretend baseball. Both guys were great teammates and players with a lot of longevity, but they weren't exactly the marquee guys of the league.

Kind of like saying Nicholas Cage is a great actor. Sure, he's had a couple of impressive performances and made some entertaining movies . . . but is he a great actor?
Will you marry me? :lol: AMEN!!!

 
Do you not believe the Hall is becoming too watered down, Just Win?
There are currently 232 players and 39 other contributors in the HOF. How many players have played in the league in its history (including AAFC and AFL)? I assume that is less than 1% of all players in league history. I don't generally have a problem with that.To correlate that to today, there were 1696 players on active rosters in every week this season, and probably upwards of 1900 players were active this year. Applying the same 1% to the league today would imply there are 19 HOFers playing today. I am fine with that. Just off the top of my head: Peyton Manning, Tom Brady, Brett Favre, Ladainian Tomlinson, Terrell Owens, Randy Moss, Tony Gonzalez, Alan Faneca, Jason Taylor, Ray Lewis, Champ Bailey, Charles Woodson, Ed Reed, Troy Polamalu. That's 14 guys I expect to make it, and does not account for any younger players who will ultimately prove to have elite careers.

There are certainly players in there who I do not think are worthy, but not that many.
[Not responding to you JWB, just piggybacking...]In 1990, 1515 players appeared in an NFL game. Of those, 38 are currently in the Hall. That's 2.51%. Another handful (like Deion, Sharpe, et al) might add just a bit to that number.

3.19% of all players active in 1980 are now in the Hall.

5.45% of all players active in 1970 are now in the Hall.

5.74% of all players active in 1960 are now in the Hall.

8.07% of all players active in 1950 are now in the Hall.

So how is it that the Hall is getting watered down? No, the deal is that Curtis Martin (or whoever) doesn't feel like a HoFer and Tony Dorsett (or whoever) does, because you were 10 when you watched Dorsett and you were 27 when you watched Martin.

 
3.19% of all players active in 1980 are now in the Hall.5.45% of all players active in 1970 are now in the Hall.5.74% of all players active in 1960 are now in the Hall.8.07% of all players active in 1950 are now in the Hall.So how is it that the Hall is getting watered down?
Every single one of those percentages is higher than it should be.That's how.
 
3.19% of all players active in 1980 are now in the Hall.5.45% of all players active in 1970 are now in the Hall.5.74% of all players active in 1960 are now in the Hall.8.07% of all players active in 1950 are now in the Hall.So how is it that the Hall is getting watered down?
Every single one of those percentages is higher than it should be.That's how.
OK. So you're saying the Hall has always been watered down. You should be happy that it's moving in the right direction.
 
Do you not believe the Hall is becoming too watered down, Just Win?
There are currently 232 players and 39 other contributors in the HOF. How many players have played in the league in its history (including AAFC and AFL)? I assume that is less than 1% of all players in league history. I don't generally have a problem with that.To correlate that to today, there were 1696 players on active rosters in every week this season, and probably upwards of 1900 players were active this year. Applying the same 1% to the league today would imply there are 19 HOFers playing today. I am fine with that. Just off the top of my head: Peyton Manning, Tom Brady, Brett Favre, Ladainian Tomlinson, Terrell Owens, Randy Moss, Tony Gonzalez, Alan Faneca, Jason Taylor, Ray Lewis, Champ Bailey, Charles Woodson, Ed Reed, Troy Polamalu. That's 14 guys I expect to make it, and does not account for any younger players who will ultimately prove to have elite careers.

There are certainly players in there who I do not think are worthy, but not that many.
[Not responding to you JWB, just piggybacking...]In 1990, 1515 players appeared in an NFL game. Of those, 38 are currently in the Hall. That's 2.51%. Another handful (like Deion, Sharpe, et al) might add just a bit to that number.

3.19% of all players active in 1980 are now in the Hall.

5.45% of all players active in 1970 are now in the Hall.

5.74% of all players active in 1960 are now in the Hall.

8.07% of all players active in 1950 are now in the Hall.

So how is it that the Hall is getting watered down? No, the deal is that Curtis Martin (or whoever) doesn't feel like a HoFer and Tony Dorsett (or whoever) does, because you were 10 when you watched Dorsett and you were 27 when you watched Martin.
Wow, that is much worse than I thought. If one day 5% of the players active in 2010 are in the HOF, that's a problem IMO. That would be approximately 100 players currently playing. I get that it's going down, but even 3.2% would probably be more than 60 players. That's too many IMO.I agree with your point on Martin vs. Dorsett, but this data also sways me toward taking a harder line on guys I feel are on the bubble.

Questions:

1. In your numbers above, are you counting (where applicable) players from the NFL, AFL, AAFC, and any other relevant precursor to today's NFL if there are others (can't remember).

2. Do you know how many total players have ever been active in the NFL and its precursor leagues? I'd be interested in knowing what the overall percentage is through a reasonable cutoff date, like 1995, or something like that.

 
5 years from now C Martin will get in -when every one sees that S Jackson,

A Peterson, C Johnson, R Rice, M Forte, M Turner, R Mendenhall, MJ Drew,

F Gore and J Addai don't surpass C Martin's numbers.

A Foster, P Hillis, D McFadden, J Charles won't last long enough to see 10,000

yards and RBBC will kill any one else's chances.

L Tomlinson and C Martin are the last RB's we are going to see hit 14,000 yards.

C Martin not worthy? Your ignorant or stupid or both. The guy "compiled" his way

to 4th ALL TIME, in 11 seasons. We're not talking about Bledsoe or Testeverde

compilers at the QB spot or modern day WR's getting insane numbers every

season.

http://www.pro-football-reference.com/lead..._yds_career.htm

C Martin gets in, not this year, probably not next year, but he gets in.

 
todisco1 Pick a RB that will hit 14,000 yds in less then 11 seasons and we'll

bump this thread in 5 years see how close you get. I say nobody (currently)

 
Here's my point -"compiler" C Martin not worthy, T Davis- Short but dominant

career not worthy. WHAT'S LEFT? J Charles, C Johnson, and R Rice all look

like B Westbrook V2.0. A Peterson, A Foster, and P Hillis -T Davis hopefuls.

Peterson, Foster, Hillis, won't last 11 seasons. The rest might but won't play

as many games or even come close to rush yds as C Martin. What do you

want as HOF worthiness? The days of J Brown and Sweetness are gone.

We're looking at a new era of 10-15 WRs and RBs getting a 1000 yds a season

but few being electric or dominant for more then 7 seasons.

 
Spider- I should have written that better, we are seeing great players.

Sweetness, G Sayers, and J Brown types- just not as long.

I just believe we will see a lot more T Davis type careers and that

could be the new era measuring stick

 
3.19% of all players active in 1980 are now in the Hall.5.45% of all players active in 1970 are now in the Hall.5.74% of all players active in 1960 are now in the Hall.8.07% of all players active in 1950 are now in the Hall.So how is it that the Hall is getting watered down?
Every single one of those percentages is higher than it should be.That's how.
OK. So you're saying the Hall has always been watered down. You should be happy that it's moving in the right direction.
You are looking at numbers that "are now in the Hall." I think a better comparison might be to see how many were in the HOF 20 years after a given year. How many players from 1980 were in by 2000? How many players from 1970 were in by 1990? I doubt it will change it a ton simply because the league is much larger than it used to be, but it could affect it some.
 
nightmare said:
5 years from now C Martin will get in -when every one sees that S Jackson,

A Peterson, C Johnson, R Rice, M Forte, M Turner, R Mendenhall, MJ Drew,

F Gore and J Addai don't surpass C Martin's numbers.

A Foster, P Hillis, D McFadden, J Charles won't last long enough to see 10,000

yards and RBBC will kill any one else's chances.

L Tomlinson and C Martin are the last RB's we are going to see hit 14,000 yards.

C Martin not worthy? Your ignorant or stupid or both. The guy "compiled" his way

to 4th ALL TIME, in 11 seasons. We're not talking about Bledsoe or Testeverde

compilers at the QB spot or modern day WR's getting insane numbers every

season.

http://www.pro-football-reference.com/lead..._yds_career.htm

C Martin gets in, not this year, probably not next year, but he gets in.
One problem among many you have is that you are trying to compare guys from different eras. If all RB in this era are RBBC then of course they won't match the numbers of guys from previous eras. But it doesn't mean they were better or worse players. Terrell Davis' numbers from Martin's era aren't close to his overall numbers. But Davis was dominant. Martin never was. LT, Emmitt, and Sanders were dominant players; not Martin.

 
nightmare said:
5 years from now C Martin will get in -when every one sees that S Jackson,

A Peterson, C Johnson, R Rice, M Forte, M Turner, R Mendenhall, MJ Drew,

F Gore and J Addai don't surpass C Martin's numbers.

A Foster, P Hillis, D McFadden, J Charles won't last long enough to see 10,000

yards and RBBC will kill any one else's chances.

L Tomlinson and C Martin are the last RB's we are going to see hit 14,000 yards.

C Martin not worthy? Your ignorant or stupid or both. The guy "compiled" his way

to 4th ALL TIME, in 11 seasons. We're not talking about Bledsoe or Testeverde

compilers at the QB spot or modern day WR's getting insane numbers every

season.

http://www.pro-football-reference.com/lead..._yds_career.htm

C Martin gets in, not this year, probably not next year, but he gets in.
Let's be cool with the personal insults. Arguing your point is fine, but no need to call people ignorant in a subjective debate.
 

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