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Question - how come rookies are practicing before they sign contracts (1 Viewer)

KellysHeroes

Footballguy
I've noticed that rookies have been attending voluntary and mandatory camps while their not signed to a contract yet; is this new with the CBA because sounds like its very risky to do with the rash of injuries already this off season.

Thanks

 
it's 'voluntary.' I don't think they can participate in mandatory camps til they get a deal done.

ETA: That can't be right though. Some unsigned rookies have been participating in mandatory minicamp.

 
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Unless you're high 1st rounder, you better start making a good impression sooner than later. You have no leverage to sit out.

 
Most of them have insurance contracts to cover them if they are injured in camp before they sign.

 
Unless you're high 1st rounder, you better start making a good impression sooner than later. You have no leverage to sit out.
Tear an ACL or Achiles while unsigned and its pretty much nice knowing u.

 
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Rookies not under contract typically sign injury protection agreements that provide the same benefits in the event of an injury as would provided to a player under contract. Some RFAs who have not signed their tender offers will also utilize them (Andre Brown signed one earlier this offseason to participate in workouts with the Giants in April).

 
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Rookies not under contract typically sign injury protection agreements that provide the same benefits in the event of an injury as would provided to a player under contract. Some RFAs who have not signed their tender offers will also utilize them (Andre Brown signed one earlier this offseason to participate in workouts with the Giants in April).
Pretty much this, they sign injury contracts while their real contracts are being negotiated on between their agents and the front office. In an ideal world the full contract would be hashed out before they ever touched the field but it just doesn't work that way. And all of these early camps are voluntary without a contract, but good luck making the team if you do not show up to them. This isn't the same situation as say, Victor Cruz not attending mandatory mini-camp. He has leverage with the team. As a rookie you have nothing.

 
Most of them have insurance contracts to cover them if they are injured in camp before they sign.
I highly doubt this.

I'm in the insurance industry, and EVERY company that I know of will want to know the "pre-disability" income before writing the policy. If there hasn't been a contract signed, then there isn't any income to insure.

 
Most of them have insurance contracts to cover them if they are injured in camp before they sign.
I highly doubt this.

I'm in the insurance industry, and EVERY company that I know of will want to know the "pre-disability" income before writing the policy. If there hasn't been a contract signed, then there isn't any income to insure.
A lot of the athletes have done this, and many while in college.

Also, a policy can be written up a billion different ways. It doesnt have to be for 50 million dollars. It could be for a few hundred thousand, where the guy has to pay a few thousand up front.

To my knowledge, out of all the athletes who have done policies like this, NONE have needed to cash in. Insurance companies have been raking it in on these, considering they have not had to pay out one single claim.

But as a player, especially a college player, for a few grand I would absolutely insure myself. If you suck they wont insure you of course, but like I said, there are a million variables that go into it.

edit..............ok, not MANY, but some, lol

 
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Most of them have insurance contracts to cover them if they are injured in camp before they sign.
I highly doubt this.

I'm in the insurance industry, and EVERY company that I know of will want to know the "pre-disability" income before writing the policy. If there hasn't been a contract signed, then there isn't any income to insure.
pretty sure that these guys feel they have to go and if they get injuried they'll get an injury settlement of some kind; still a huge risk and surprised the NFLPA is allowing it. Just another issue the union is losing ground on.

 
Most of them have insurance contracts to cover them if they are injured in camp before they sign.
I highly doubt this.

I'm in the insurance industry, and EVERY company that I know of will want to know the "pre-disability" income before writing the policy. If there hasn't been a contract signed, then there isn't any income to insure.
With the rookie pay scale in place, it should be pretty easy to assess what a player picked #123 overall will make based on the previous year's number, for example.

 
Most of them have insurance contracts to cover them if they are injured in camp before they sign.
I highly doubt this.

I'm in the insurance industry, and EVERY company that I know of will want to know the "pre-disability" income before writing the policy. If there hasn't been a contract signed, then there isn't any income to insure.
With the rookie pay scale in place, it should be pretty easy to assess what a player picked #123 overall will make based on the previous year's number, for example.
True, but I again doubt that "most" players have taken it upon themselves to go out and get an insurance policy to cover them if they are injured before they sign. I would imagine that the insurance policy process would be far more difficult to complete than signing a contract based on a predetermined rookie wage scale. As you state, "it should be pretty easy."

 

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