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simple question (1 Viewer)

Kleck

Footballguy
The gap between the guard and tackle is called the B gap. If you are a defensive tackle lined up in the B gap, but shifted over a bit towards the guard, you're called a 3-technique. If you were lined up in the same gap but shifted over a couple feet to line up on the tackle's shoulder, you would be a 4-technique. If you line up directly facing the center, you're called a nose tackle.

Nose tackles are two-gap players, and are typically very big and very strong men, usually 350 pounds or more and 6'5" or taller. These guys have the responsibility of clogging up the entire center of the field, of keeping the center and at least one guard busy, and thereby protecting their middle linebacker. The nose tackle will also be responsible in passing plays to push the center back towards the quarterback so that the quarterback cannot step up in the pocket and evade the rush of the defensive ends. A good nose tackle can be hit simultaneously by 650 pounds of center and guard and will not budge as much as one inch.

A 3-technique tackle lines up between the offensive guard and tackle. A 3-technique tackle is supposed to run through his gap immediately. He is a 1-gap player. His job is not to block or get tied up in a block, but rather to be athletic and get himself into the offensive backfield and disrupt their plans. Because of this a 3-technique tackle is a lighter more athletic guy than a nose tackle, typically weighing more like 290 to 300 pounds.
http://football.calsci.com/Positions8.html
 

chedha

Footballguy
The gap between the guard and tackle is called the B gap. If you are a defensive tackle lined up in the B gap, but shifted over a bit towards the guard, you're called a 3-technique. If you were lined up in the same gap but shifted over a couple feet to line up on the tackle's shoulder, you would be a 4-technique. If you line up directly facing the center, you're called a nose tackle.

Nose tackles are two-gap players, and are typically very big and very strong men, usually 350 pounds or more and 6'5" or taller. These guys have the responsibility of clogging up the entire center of the field, of keeping the center and at least one guard busy, and thereby protecting their middle linebacker. The nose tackle will also be responsible in passing plays to push the center back towards the quarterback so that the quarterback cannot step up in the pocket and evade the rush of the defensive ends. A good nose tackle can be hit simultaneously by 650 pounds of center and guard and will not budge as much as one inch.

A 3-technique tackle lines up between the offensive guard and tackle. A 3-technique tackle is supposed to run through his gap immediately. He is a 1-gap player. His job is not to block or get tied up in a block, but rather to be athletic and get himself into the offensive backfield and disrupt their plans. Because of this a 3-technique tackle is a lighter more athletic guy than a nose tackle, typically weighing more like 290 to 300 pounds.
http://football.calsci.com/Positions8.html
Thanks shick!.. I know it's probably common knowledge around here...
 

jurb26

Footballguy
The gap between the guard and tackle is called the B gap. If you are a defensive tackle lined up in the B gap, but shifted over a bit towards the guard, you're called a 3-technique. If you were lined up in the same gap but shifted over a couple feet to line up on the tackle's shoulder, you would be a 4-technique. If you line up directly facing the center, you're called a nose tackle.

Nose tackles are two-gap players, and are typically very big and very strong men, usually 350 pounds or more and 6'5" or taller. These guys have the responsibility of clogging up the entire center of the field, of keeping the center and at least one guard busy, and thereby protecting their middle linebacker. The nose tackle will also be responsible in passing plays to push the center back towards the quarterback so that the quarterback cannot step up in the pocket and evade the rush of the defensive ends. A good nose tackle can be hit simultaneously by 650 pounds of center and guard and will not budge as much as one inch.

A 3-technique tackle lines up between the offensive guard and tackle. A 3-technique tackle is supposed to run through his gap immediately. He is a 1-gap player. His job is not to block or get tied up in a block, but rather to be athletic and get himself into the offensive backfield and disrupt their plans. Because of this a 3-technique tackle is a lighter more athletic guy than a nose tackle, typically weighing more like 290 to 300 pounds.
http://football.calsci.com/Positions8.html
Thanks shick!.. I know it's probably common knowledge around here...
For some reason I doubt that.
 

chedha

Footballguy
Thanks shick!.. I know it's probably common knowledge around here...
For some reason I doubt that.
I also don't think that should be considered common knowledge unless you've played or coached DT.
well yeah maybe your right. I just figured they're so many football junkies on this forum, that it may be common knowledge. Especially since I hear it so much when I listen to different analysts. Especially around this time of year when the draft is coming up, and they start analyzing different teams needs. I'll hear "X team is looking to improve the defense with a DT, preferably a 3-technique". So i had to find out what that meant. Thanks again, now i'll know exactly what they're talking about.
 

GregR_2

Footballguy
A nicely written explanation like the one ! linked to is never a bad thing to read through.

Speaking of which, you always hear about 3-technique, but seldom 4-technique. Does a 4-technique just line up further out, but still have the same 1-gap role in the defense as the 3-technique?

 

Christo

Footballguy
Thanks shick!.. I know it's probably common knowledge around here...
For some reason I doubt that.
I also don't think that should be considered common knowledge unless you've played or coached DT.
Ten years ago, maybe. But with all of the talk of the Tampa-2 and how Sapp was the prototypical 3-technique DT, it only took watching a defensive series or two to figure out what it is.
 

Jene Bramel

Footballguy
Awesome Shick! He knows where it's at - in the trenches.

Come on over to the IDP forum now and then boys. Water is always warm.

We'll coach you up.

:)

Only thing to add is that these guys are also referred to as undertackles.

 
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