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The Next 100 Songs from 1975, aka Sanbornpalooza. #1: Black Friday (1 Viewer)

Bracie Smathers

Footballguy
97. Love Hurts -- Nazareth (from Hair of the Dog)

Is this one of the first power ballads? This song dates back to the early '60s, written by Boudleaux Bryant and first performed by the Everly Brothers. It was then covered by Roy Orbison and Gram Parsons with Emmylou Harris before winding up in the hands of the Scottish hard rockers. Dan McCaffrey's vocal provides the right amount of anguish without going over the top, and Manny Charlton's guitar solo is excellent. 

Fun fact: I saw The Who perform this on their 1989 tour. Roger Daltrey just felt like singing it that year. 
The story behind the song.

Nazareth - Love Hurts | The Story Behind The Song

Pete Agnew and Dan McCafferty of the Scotish band Nazareth about 'Love Hurts', maybe the first Powerballad. A short documentary by Top 2000 a gogo from 2003 (Dutch Public Television).

 

Pip's Invitation

Footballguy
16. If You See Her, Say Hello -- Bob Dylan (from Blood on the Tracks)

On an album full of songs about the end of relationships, some of which may have been inspired by Dylan's impending divorce, this one is the most devastating.

We had a falling-out
Like lovers often will
And to think of how she left that night
It still brings me a chill
And though our separation
It pierced me to the heart
She still lives inside of me
We've never been apart

&

And then to end it with

If she's passin' back this way
I'm not that hard to find
Tell her she can look me up
If she's got the time

&

just captures perfectly how you feel after you've been abandoned by your partner. Bob is a weird dude but he has few peers when writing about the human condition. 

 

BobbyLayne

Footballguy
Pip's Invitation said:
17. In France They Kiss on Main Street -- Joni Mitchell (from The Hissing of Summer Lawns)

Again, I don't understand the people who think Joni started to go off the rails with this album. On this, the first track and first single from Hissing, she sounds EXACTLY like she did on Court and Spark. It only reached #66 but should have been just as big a hit as Help Me and Free Man in Paris. The song tells a story of how the advent of rock and roll in the '50s awakens a girl to the possibilities of life beyond small-town existence. The music draws from folk and jazz, as did Court and Spark's, and would not sound out of place on a Steely Dan album. In fact, the fantastic guitar solo is played by Jeff "Skunk" Baxter, who had recently left the Dan and joined the Doobie Brothers. 
If I had to limit myself to only listening to one artist for the rest of my life it would probably be Joni Mitchell.

I love this period in her career - C&S is my favorite, the live album was sublime, but this one didn't have great reviews when it came out. Which was perplexing to a lot of fans who think it's brilliant lyrically.

I once saw her in concert and she told a lot of stories in between songs, in part because she was tuning her guitar. She played 17 songs in 17 different keys. Try Googling "Joni Mitchell guitar tuning" sometime, it's a delightful rabbit hole.

The voice, the songwriting, the virtuoso guitar picking - she's the whole package.

 

Pip's Invitation

Footballguy
If I had to limit myself to only listening to one artist for the rest of my life it would probably be Joni Mitchell.

I love this period in her career - C&S is my favorite, the live album was sublime, but this one didn't have great reviews when it came out. Which was perplexing to a lot of fans who think it's brilliant lyrically.

I once saw her in concert and she told a lot of stories in between songs, in part because she was tuning her guitar. She played 17 songs in 17 different keys. Try Googling "Joni Mitchell guitar tuning" sometime, it's a delightful rabbit hole.

The voice, the songwriting, the virtuoso guitar picking - she's the whole package.
I’m not a musician and know pretty much zero about guitar tuning, but I know that Joni tunes her guitar in a way that’s completely different from what almost everyone else does, so it doesn’t surprise me that she required so much onstage tuning.

The Shadows and Light live album and video from 1980 is incredible (and are worth checking out separately because the track lists are different). Every single member of her backing band is a legendary jazz musician, and she finally had a band who could play her stuff exactly the way she wanted it. In France... opens both.

 

Pip's Invitation

Footballguy
15. I Wish You Well -- Bill Withers (from Making Music)

And here we have it, the song that represented 1975 on my jukebox draft playlist. It's funky as hell and the interplay between Withers and the backing singers on the chorus is stunning. Much of this, his fourth album, and +justments, his third, concern the end of his marriage, and this track is his graceful kiss-off to his ex. (For a very different kind of message, check out You from +justments). 

 

Pip's Invitation

Footballguy
Most of the top 14 are songs I was really expecting to be on Tim's list but weren't. A couple of them are major personal favorites that I would not necessarily have expected to be there. At least two were released as a single in '75 after appearing on an album in '74, and I don't think Tim considered those. 

14. Love Rollercoaster -- Ohio Players (from Honey)

Those of us in our 40s and younger may know the Red Hot Chili Peppers' version better, but this is the goods. The groove is incessant and the final minute just carries you away on a wave of bliss. 

 

Uruk-Hai

Footballguy
Most of the top 14 are songs I was really expecting to be on Tim's list but weren't. A couple of them are major personal favorites that I would not necessarily have expected to be there. At least two were released as a single in '75 after appearing on an album in '74, and I don't think Tim considered those. 

14. Love Rollercoaster -- Ohio Players (from Honey)

Those of us in our 40s and younger may know the Red Hot Chili Peppers' version better, but this is the goods. The groove is incessant and the final minute just carries you away on a wave of bliss. 
The two big rumors when I was in Junior High during this time were:

1. Ken Osmond (Eddie Haskell on Leave It To Beaver) was actually Alice Cooper.

2. You can hear a secretary scream as she was getting stabbed in "Love Rollercoaster".

 

wikkidpissah

Footballguy
Most of the top 14 are songs I was really expecting to be on Tim's list but weren't. A couple of them are major personal favorites that I would not necessarily have expected to be there. At least two were released as a single in '75 after appearing on an album in '74, and I don't think Tim considered those. 

14. Love Rollercoaster -- Ohio Players (from Honey)

Those of us in our 40s and younger may know the Red Hot Chili Peppers' version better, but this is the goods. The groove is incessant and the final minute just carries you away on a wave of bliss. 
Say what?!

 

Pip's Invitation

Footballguy
13. Houses of the Holy -- Led Zeppelin (from Physical Graffiti)

Houses of the Holy from Physic- wait, what? Why isn't this on Houses of the Holy? As it turned out, Zep left the planned title track off the album. About half of Physical was outtakes from III, IV and Houses, so that's how the title track that wasn't ended up on it. (Which begs the question, they left off this for THE CRUNGE??????)

The main riff is iconic and much-copied. Robert Plant turns in an incredible vocal (especially on the "take me, take me" parts). JPJ and Bonham are locked in amazingly. Everything great about Zep is woven into this four-minute package of bliss. 

 

Pip's Invitation

Footballguy
12. Strange Magic -- Electric Light Orchestra (from Face the Music)

IMO this is Jeff Lynne's best vocal, and the way his voice blends with Kelly Groucott's on the chorus is spine-chilling. The arrangement does a fantastic job of incorporating the string section so they're more than window dressing but don't take over the song. Some of ELO's material drew so heavily from the Beatles that it bordered on parody, but, as with Daisy Jane and the other successful songs on America's Hearts, this shows the Beatle influence without drowning out what the band brings to the table. 

 
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Just Win Baby

Footballguy
Pip's Invitation said:
13. Houses of the Holy -- Led Zeppelin (from Physical Graffiti)

Houses of the Holy from Physic- wait, what? Why isn't this on Houses of the Holy? As it turned out, Zep left the planned title track off the album. About half of Physical was outtakes from III, IV and Houses, so that's how the title track that wasn't ended up on it. (Which begs the question, they left off this for THE CRUNGE??????)

The main riff is iconic and much-copied. Robert Plant turns in an incredible vocal (especially on the "take me, take me" parts). JPJ and Bonham are locked in amazingly. Everything great about Zep is woven into this four-minute package of bliss. 
:goodposting:  

Great song, and great take here.

 

Pip's Invitation

Footballguy
11. Nights on Broadway -- Bee Gees (from Main Course)

Like Jive Talkin', which was on Tim's list, this song represented the shift toward disco that would make the Bee Gees the biggest music act of the late '70s. It's notable for the first appearance of Barry Gibb's falsetto. 

Producer Arif Mardin asked if one of them could do some screaming to make the song more exciting. Barry started doing so, getting higher and higher on each successive take until he had a falsetto going. In the final version, the screaming was replaced by interjections of "blaming it all!" and such. 

Unlike Jive Talkin', which had both feet firmly planted in the disco world, Nights on Broadway is more of an R&B/funk tune, making great use of piano, clavinet and synth at the beginning, and putting the melody (which is fantastic) on equal footing with the rhythm. 

The album version (linked above) includes a slow middle section that was cut out of the single version.

The top 10 is around the corner! 

 

Bracie Smathers

Footballguy
Most of the top 14 are songs I was really expecting to be on Tim's list but weren't. A couple of them are major personal favorites that I would not necessarily have expected to be there. At least two were released as a single in '75 after appearing on an album in '74, and I don't think Tim considered those. 

14. Love Rollercoaster -- Ohio Players (from Honey)

Those of us in our 40s and younger may know the Red Hot Chili Peppers' version better, but this is the goods. The groove is incessant and the final minute just carries you away on a wave of bliss. 
THIS is thee only version and for teen boys that album cover is definitely memorable.   

 

Bracie Smathers

Footballguy
My older brother bought a high-end Marantz stereo and had top-notch headphones.  I remember him playing ELO for me with the sound going back and forth between the two and having my mind blown, lol.  ELO always stands out to me as a distinct sound.

Can't hear this without thinking of a younger girl I worked with who had never heard of the Bee Gees 

and ...

👉   THIS   👈

 

Pip's Invitation

Footballguy
10. America -- Yes (from Yesterdays)

Yes was on hiatus in 1975. To fill the gap, Atlantic issued Yesterdays, a compilation of 8 older tracks, 7 of which were recorded in 1969 and 1970, before Steve Howe and Rick Wakeman joined. The eighth was a cover of Simon and Garfunkel's America that the 1971-72 lineup including Howe and Wakeman had cut. It was included on an Atlantic multi-artist sampler released in the UK in 1972, but didn't appear in the US until Yesterdays. 

Their version completely reinvents the song (and, as you might expect, makes it way longer), with all members bringing their signature style to it. Most notable to me is Chris Squire's thick bass parts, giving the bottom a heft that the S&G version doesn't have. The final minute is one of the most spectacular passages this spectacular lineup committed to vinyl. 

 

Pip's Invitation

Footballguy
9. That's the Way of the World -- Earth, Wind and Fire (from That's the Way of the World)

Another massive EWF hit from '75, this incredibly soulful ballad is one of their most-beloved songs. It breezes along on a fantastic groove and sticks in your head forever. 

The front and back covers of this album have always amused me. What exactly were the band doing when they were captured -- and why is that guy (Al McKay) sideways? Interestingly, the five members on the front cover -- singers Maurice White and Philip Bailey, bassist Verdine White, keyboardist Larry Dunn and guitarist Al McKay -- are the five who were inducted into the Songwriters' Hall of Fame. 

Title tracks in this countdown: 15 (of 91; 16.5%).

 

wikkidpissah

Footballguy
10. America -- Yes (from Yesterdays)

Yes was on hiatus in 1975. To fill the gap, Atlantic issued Yesterdays, a compilation of 8 older tracks, 7 of which were recorded in 1969 and 1970, before Steve Howe and Rick Wakeman joined. The eighth was a cover of Simon and Garfunkel's America that the 1971-72 lineup including Howe and Wakeman had cut. It was included on an Atlantic multi-artist sampler released in the UK in 1972, but didn't appear in the US until Yesterdays. 

Their version completely reinvents the song (and, as you might expect, makes it way longer), with all members bringing their signature style to it. Most notable to me is Chris Squire's thick bass parts, giving the bottom a heft that the S&G version doesn't have. The final minute is one of the most spectacular passages this spectacular lineup committed to vinyl. 
i guess i had given up on these guys before this ever made it to to vinyl. "America" was a feature of their shows from the start, but this is the 1st time i've heard the recording. kul -

 

Pip's Invitation

Footballguy
Here are the songs considered for but cut from the list by artists appearing entries 20 to 11. In spoiler text for those who don't want to know what's not on the list.

Bee Gees:

Fanny (Be Tender with My Love) (from Main Course)

This one's got an incredible melody and was a successful single in its own right, but was dwarfed by the iconic status of the other two hits from this record. At around 3:00 the arrangement makes some subtle nods to Marvin Gaye's What's Going On. 

Bob Dylan:

Meet Me in the Morning (from Blood on the Tracks)

This is a country blues take on the end-of-relationship theme that dominated this album.

They say the darkest hour
Is right before the dawn
But you wouldn't know it by me
Every day's been darkness since you been gone

&

Led Zeppelin:

Night Flight (from Physical Graffiti)

Quite nimble by Zep standards, this one features another fantastic vocal from Plant. It's been remarked that John Bonham's drumming got funkier on this album; this is a prime example of that. 

Sick Again (from Physical Graffiti)

Physical's closer is a wall of glorious guitars and grunting. 

Joni Mitchell: 

Edith and the Kingpin (from The Hissing of Summer Lawns)

Set to a jazz arrangement showcasing Larry Carlton and Wilton Felder, this is a story of a gangster's girlfriend as she learns more about him.

Women he has taken grow old too soon
He tilts their tired faces
Gently to the spoon

&

Don't Interrupt the Sorrow (from The Hissing of Summer Lawns)

The vibe on this one to me presages what Joni would do on Hejira the following year. The lyrics are dense and nonlinear but appear to reference women's liberation and men's resentment of it. And this verse sure seems to apply today:

Truth goes up in vapors
The steeples lean
Winds of change patriarchs
Snug in your bible belt dreams
God goes up the chimney
Like childhood Santa Claus
The good slaves love the good book
A rebel loves a cause

&

Ohio Players:

Fopp (from Honey)

Fun-kay. Amazingly, covered by Soundgarden, which probably shouldn't come as a huge surprise given how heavy the guitar riff is and how over-the-top the vocals get. 

Todd Rundgren's Utopia:

The Wheel (from Another Live)

The six-piece Utopia (very different from the four-piece edition of the band that churned out new wave in the late '70s and early '80s) released a live album in 1975 that was a mix of new material, songs from previous Todd Rundgren solo albums and covers. This is the best of the new songs, an intricate ballad that showcases members on instruments like trumpet, accordion and glockenspiel. And the bass line by John Siegler is amazing. 

And there's just a few things I ain't got sorted out
Sometimes they make my brain get sore
Like if kids were left of all devices
Would they ever come up with a thing like war

&
 
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Pip's Invitation

Footballguy
8. Jackie Blue -- The Ozark Mountain Daredevils (released as a single)

Is this pop? Country rock? Soft rock? Yacht rock? I don't know how to define it, but I know The Ozark Mountain Daredevils never produced anything else that sounded like it.

The band, from rural Missouri, specialized in rustic music influenced by country, bluegrass and folk, with some rock touches thrown in. Their first two albums are logical successors to the the records by the late-period Byrds and the early Flying Burrito Brothers. They are uniformly excellent and should be heard in their entirety.

The sessions for the second, It'll Shine When It Shines, were helmed by legendary producer Glyn Johns. Toward the end of them, he heard drummer Larry Lee, one of the band's four singer/songwriters, mess around on the piano with a song he had written about a bartender/drug dealer the band knew. Immediately, Johns told them that that was the hit from the record, but that the lyrics about drug dealing weren't going to fly, so it should be about a girl instead. Bandmate Steve Cash helped Lee rewrite the song, which became the last one completed for the album.

It'll Shine When It Shines came out in late '74 and Jackie Blue was released as a single in early '75. The American public saw what Johns saw in it, pushing it into the top 5. The incessant piano riffs, keening guitars and distinctive high-pitched vocal from Lee made it a favorite on AM and FM stations, and its appeal has persisted to this day. 

The band and label were then faced with a problem. Nothing else on the album sounded anything remotely like Jackie Blue, so following it up proved difficult. And the band resisted pleas to recreate its sound on subsequent records (but not entirely; you can find more about that later if you know where to look), leading to tension that made its shelf life shorter than it should have been. (Various iterations of the band have re-formed over the years, though Lee has not been involved since the '70s.) 

 

Pip's Invitation

Footballguy
7. Saturday Night Special -- Lynyrd Skynyrd (from Nuthin' Fancy)

The guitars really sizzle on this one and the rhythm section musters up more momentum than what was often heard in Southern rock. The lyrics depict three scenes in which someone with a cheap gun kills someone else in an impulsive act or themselves in an intoxicated/despondent one. But this is not a SJW song; Ronnie Van Zant was a gun owner himself. However, he was appalled at how easily small guns that were otherwise useless ("Ain't good for nuthin'/But put a man six feet in a hole") could wind up in the hands of anyone. 

Given the huge riffage of this song, it's not surprising that it has been covered by metal and thrash bands, including The Accused, Armored Saint, Great White and Tesla. 

 

DocHolliday

Footballguy
7. Saturday Night Special -- Lynyrd Skynyrd (from Nuthin' Fancy)

The guitars really sizzle on this one and the rhythm section musters up more momentum than what was often heard in Southern rock. The lyrics depict three scenes in which someone with a cheap gun kills someone else in an impulsive act or themselves in an intoxicated/despondent one. But this is not a SJW song; Ronnie Van Zant was a gun owner himself. However, he was appalled at how easily small guns that were otherwise useless ("Ain't good for nuthin'/But put a man six feet in a hole") could wind up in the hands of anyone. 

Given the huge riffage of this song, it's not surprising that it has been covered by metal and thrash bands, including The Accused, Armored Saint, Great White and Tesla. 
What a great song.  

 

Pip's Invitation

Footballguy
6. Red Hot Momma -- Funkadelic (released as a single)

And here it is, the song that represented 1974 in my jukebox draft playlist. Wait, what? Well, there wasn't always a whole lot of logic in the decisions made by George Clinton and Westbound Records in the '70s. Red Hot Momma opens the Standing on the Verge of Getting It On album, released in the summer of 1974. But it wasn't released as a single until well in to 1975 -- possibly after at least one single from Funkadelic's 1975 album, Let's Take It to the Stage (not a live album; again, don't look for logic here.) 

Red Hot Momma features some absolutely blistering lead guitar work from Eddie Hazel, in one of his final performances with P-Funk, and some funky as hell clav work from Bernie Worrell. The vocal arrangement, in which various singers trade parts of the verses and then soar together on the choruses, is top notch.

The linked version is my preferred way to hear this song, which is a file that fuses Red Hot Momma with its B-side, Vital Juices, which is just a continuation of the jam that was faded out on the album. The album version has a very weird intro that I'm fine with losing. 

 

Uruk-Hai

Footballguy
6. Red Hot Momma -- Funkadelic (released as a single)

And here it is, the song that represented 1974 in my jukebox draft playlist. Wait, what? Well, there wasn't always a whole lot of logic in the decisions made by George Clinton and Westbound Records in the '70s. Red Hot Momma opens the Standing on the Verge of Getting It On album, released in the summer of 1974. But it wasn't released as a single until well in to 1975 -- possibly after at least one single from Funkadelic's 1975 album, Let's Take It to the Stage (not a live album; again, don't look for logic here.) 

Red Hot Momma features some absolutely blistering lead guitar work from Eddie Hazel, in one of his final performances with P-Funk, and some funky as hell clav work from Bernie Worrell. The vocal arrangement, in which various singers trade parts of the verses and then soar together on the choruses, is top notch.

The linked version is my preferred way to hear this song, which is a file that fuses Red Hot Momma with its B-side, Vital Juices, which is just a continuation of the jam that was faded out on the album. The album version has a very weird intro that I'm fine with losing. 
Got zero airplay on AOR radio, though it rocked harder than any song that did that year. Black radio didn't know what to do with it, either.

Turn the volume up on this one, though at your own peril - your house may rock itself right off of its foundation.

 

Pip's Invitation

Footballguy
5. Slip Kid -- The Who (from The Who By Numbers)

I have always been fascinated with this groove of this song, which is unusual by Who standards. It is driven by percussion and piano and complemented by ascending guitar chords that we didn't usually hear from Pete Townshend (though his solo is very typical of his usual sound). 

Using war imagery, Slip Kid is a cautionary tale to young people thinking about getting into the music industry. It was written as part of Townshend's Lifehouse concept album envisioning of a world in which rock music was banned. As you may know, Lifehouse was the intended follow-up to Tommy, but it proved too stressful for the band to complete, so some of its songs were siphoned off for Who's Next and others trickled out over the years. A demo of the planned Lifehouse version was released on Townshend's Lifehouse Chronicles box set. 

 

northern exposure

Footballguy
I always enjoy these threads because I discover new music I have never heard before, hear music I had forgotten about and hear songs that bring back great memories of my childhood.

Sometimes by clicking on the linked songs, I even find out surprising things by looking at the other videos shown on the same page.

Such as

This song still may appear in Pip's countdown, so I don't want to ruin it. But, I had no idea Joan Jett's "I Love Rock N' Roll" was a cover of a 1975 hit by The Arrows. I know of a Canadian band from the 80s called The Arrows, but not this group. Now I know. 
 

Pip's Invitation

Footballguy
4. (They Just Can't Stop It The) Games People Play -- The Spinners (from Pick of the Litter)

This was one of my favorite car-radio songs as a child. It's just so joyful and bouncy and features outstanding vocal performances. Philippe Wynne got all the attention from the music press, but this one features Bobby Smith, Pervis Jackson and female session singer Evette Benson. This is '70s soul music at its absolute best.

@krista4 This was the nonsensical parenthetical phrase I mentioned in your countdown. It was also the one I accidentally deleted when I was cutting and pasting into the final order. 

The top 3 songs are all serious guitar showcases, in very different ways. 

 
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krista4

Footballguy
4. (They Just Can't Stop It The) Games People Play -- The Spinners (from Pick of the Litter)

This was one of my favorite car-radio songs as a child. It's just so joyful and bouncy and features outstanding vocal performances. Philippe Wynne got all the attention from the music press, but this one features Bobby Smith, Pervis Jackson and female session singer Evette Benson. This is '70s soul music at its absolute best.

@krista4 This was the nonsensical parenthetical phrase I mentioned in your countdown. It was also the one I accidentally deleted when I was cutting and pasting into the final order. 

The top 3 songs are all serious guitar showcases, in very different ways. 
Oh yes, that is indeed non-sensical, irritatingly so.  Great song, though!

 

Pip's Invitation

Footballguy
3. Danger Bird -- Neil Young and Crazy Horse (from Zuma)

If you had cross-referenced this list, Tim's list and my Neil countdown -- and there's no reason that you would have gone to that sort of effort -- you would have known this was coming.

Tim took Cortez the Killer (my #1 Neil and #1 of 1975), but Zuma has a second, lesser-known guitar epic. What I said in the Neil countdown: "Danger Bird is an intense slow burn, grinding along and then exploding with harmonies and guitar outbursts just at the right time. The vocal interplay with Crazy Horse, where people sing different things at the same time, was unusual for him, especially for a long jam."

It features some of Neil's most lyrical guitar playing, yet for some reason was not performed live until 1990. That could well be why it's not as high in the Neil pantheon as Cortez. 

 

Bracie Smathers

Footballguy
Pip's Invitation said:
4. (They Just Can't Stop It The) Games People Play -- The Spinners (from Pick of the Litter)

This was one of my favorite car-radio songs as a child. It's just so joyful and bouncy and features outstanding vocal performances. Philippe Wynne got all the attention from the music press, but this one features Bobby Smith, Pervis Jackson and female session singer Evette Benson. This is '70s soul music at its absolute best.

@krista4 This was the nonsensical parenthetical phrase I mentioned in your countdown. It was also the one I accidentally deleted when I was cutting and pasting into the final order. 

The top 3 songs are all serious guitar showcases, in very different ways. 
Oh god yes.  Love the stuff they did with a certain singer who made San Jose a household name.

 

Pip's Invitation

Footballguy
2. Green Grass and High Tides -- Outlaws (from Outlaws)

FREEBIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIRD! Eff that, this is better than Freebird. The guitar jams are glorious and extend the song to nearly 10 minutes. Aside from the very best Allman Brothers material, this is the pinnacle of Southern Rock for me.

Lots of folks thought the song was about weed, but that's not true. Singer/guitarist, Hughie Thomason, who wrote the song, said: "I wrote that song in Saint Augustine, Florida. We went to a cookout on the beach and everybody forgot to bring their guitars. I was standing by the ocean and there was a breeze and the words kept coming to me. It’s about all the rock stars I liked that died had come back and were playing a show just for me. Like Jimi Hendrix, Janis Joplin and Jim Morrison. And eventually more of course." The title is a reference to the 1966 Rolling Stones greatest hits album, Big Hits (High Tide and Green Grass).

 

Dr. Octopus

Footballguy
2. Green Grass and High Tides -- Outlaws (from Outlaws)

FREEBIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIRD! Eff that, this is better than Freebird. The guitar jams are glorious and extend the song to nearly 10 minutes. Aside from the very best Allman Brothers material, this is the pinnacle of Southern Rock for me.

Lots of folks thought the song was about weed, but that's not true. Singer/guitarist, Hughie Thomason, who wrote the song, said: "I wrote that song in Saint Augustine, Florida. We went to a cookout on the beach and everybody forgot to bring their guitars. I was standing by the ocean and there was a breeze and the words kept coming to me. It’s about all the rock stars I liked that died had come back and were playing a show just for me. Like Jimi Hendrix, Janis Joplin and Jim Morrison. And eventually more of course." The title is a reference to the 1966 Rolling Stones greatest hits album, Big Hits (High Tide and Green Grass).
How was this not in the original 100?

 

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