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WR Jahan Dotson, WAS (3 Viewers)

When I watch him, I can’t help but have similar thoughts as to what I had when watching Reagor in college.  What’s Dotson hang his hat on as an NFL wideout?  Sure, he’s a good route runner, solidly fast, and has good hands…but 178 pounds?  I don’t at all trust him to win consistently against NFL level corners.  Feels like a solid #2, not a player you grab at 16 overall.  

 
And what is the deal with Penn State players I like going to the NFC East? Barkley to the Giants, Sanders to the Eagles, Parsons to the Cowboys and now Dotson to the (sigh) Commanders. I'm a Bills fan, I tend to root against the NFC East for some reason...
I got it. (Commanders fan from back then)

 
When I watch him, I can’t help but have similar thoughts as to what I had when watching Reagor in college.  What’s Dotson hang his hat on as an NFL wideout?  Sure, he’s a good route runner, solidly fast, and has good hands…but 178 pounds?  I don’t at all trust him to win consistently against NFL level corners.  Feels like a solid #2, not a player you grab at 16 overall.  
I thought he was probably the biggest reach in the draft until the Patriots picked. I agree with you, Dotson is small, and not particularly quick. He feels like a guy who's best case scenario is he's Doug Baldwin. Only Washington doesn't have anything close to Russell Wilson. 

Is Dotson better than a healthy Curtis Samuel? Is he a better long term prospect than Dyami Brown? I'm not sure the answer to either of those questions is yes. 

If Washington wanted a WR, I have no idea why they didn't just stay put and take Williams or Olave. 

 
When I watch him, I can’t help but have similar thoughts as to what I had when watching Reagor in college.  What’s Dotson hang his hat on as an NFL wideout?  Sure, he’s a good route runner, solidly fast, and has good hands…but 178 pounds?  I don’t at all trust him to win consistently against NFL level corners.  Feels like a solid #2, not a player you grab at 16 overall.  
I thought Dotson was a better route runner and by all accounts has excellent hands.  Raegor has struggled with the dropsy's in the NFL.

He's still my 6th WR.  And I won't be surprised if he's the kind of kid that has more value to an NFL team than your fantasy team.  But short version, I like him more than I liked Raegor. 

 
jm192 said:
I think he's a fine player.  Don't feel super confident that the WFTCommanders and Wentz are going to support two good fantasy receivers.  Obviously the future at QB isn't decided and McLAurin is set to be an unrestricted free agent after this season.  Could be in an interesting position come year 2/3.
I'd say its almost a given Terry is resigned to a long term deal. He's literally the face of the franchise (along with Chase) and the coaches LOVE him. Seriously, it would cause a mutiny within the building and fan base if they let him walk. 

 
jm192 said:
I think he's a fine player.  Don't feel super confident that the WFTCommanders and Wentz are going to support two good fantasy receivers. 
That's the million dollar question to our season. Wentz could elevate the offense and we become a playoff team or we could be looking at the suckiest bunch of sucks that ever sucked (Homer   :bowtie:

 
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NFL Films @NFLFilms

"He got the best hands in the whole draft!"

@JahanDotson crushed his Pro Day and his biggest fans were there to cheer him on 💙 @PennStateFball
https://twitter.com/nflfilms/status/1519331974212734976?s=21

PFF Draft @PFF_College

Jahan Dotson: Zero drops on 27 deep targets in 2021 (Most in Big Ten)
Terry McLaurin: Zero drops on 33 deep targets in 2021 (2nd most in NFL)

@Commanders 💨
https://twitter.com/pff_college/status/1521884103959736320?s=21

 
Probably more heralded coming out of Penn St than Godwin and ARob, don’t you think?  That has to count for something.

 
I thought Dotson was a better route runner and by all accounts has excellent hands.  Raegor has struggled with the dropsy's in the NFL.

He's still my 6th WR.  And I won't be surprised if he's the kind of kid that has more value to an NFL team than your fantasy team.  But short version, I like him more than I liked Raegor. 
That's where I am too. He's like a version of Reagor, but he runs routes better and catches the ball better. Well, that's pretty important for being a WR. The two guys are both fast and small, I don't see many other similarities. 

 
Probably more heralded coming out of Penn St than Godwin and ARob, don’t you think?  That has to count for something.
It does make you wonder if certain colleges have better positional coaching at a specific position that better prepares them to make an immediate impact. I remember Miami TE's used to make an immediate impact in the NFL as well.

 
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Reactions: Hoh
Specifically, that dream where you in your underwear at school and it feels like everyone but you knows that this is not a good day until you actually to stand up and tell the teacher you forgot your homework. 


Was it that dream where you see yourself standing in sort of sun-god robes on a pyramid with a thousand naked women screaming and throwing little pickles at you?

 
Washington first-round WR Jahan Dotson is expected to start at outside receiver.

Coach Ron Rivera said the team had “zero questions” to Dotson’s game before taking him with the No. 16 pick. The likely Week 1 starter opposite Terry McLaurin, Dotson (5'11/178) played Z receiver in college but size concerns had some projecting him to the slot. It won't be surprising if Washington gives Dotson a larger share of the snaps on the outside over Curtis Samuel, who had a 54% slot rate with the Panthers in 2020 before missing 12 games last year. With TE Logan Thomas coming off knee surgery and questionable for Week 1, Dotson has a clear path to targets in Washington behind McLaurin.

RELATED: 

Terry McLaurin

, Curtis Samuel

SOURCE: Sports Illustrated

May 6, 2022, 8:15 PM ET

 
Rookie camp recap: Notes on Dotson, Howell, Turner and more

Excerpt:

Jahan Dotson can be described in many words, and almost all of them point to him being an early contributor in the regular season. The rookie receiver is smooth, polished and agile, but there's definitely explosiveness to his game, too. His sticky hands were also immediately apparent, especially during a route-running portion of practice where he speared a Sam Howell pass on a hitch just after turning around. Overall, Dotson already looks prepared to mix it up with the veterans at OTAs and training camp: 

https://twitter.com/ethan_cadeaux/status/1522671069777256449?s=21

https://twitter.com/ethan_cadeaux/status/1522671527090663424?s=21

 
I don't see the Reagor comp in anyway at all. Reagor was 20 pounds heavier, way more explosive. However he had questionable hands and routes. Dotson's calling card are his hands and his zone beating route running skills. 

 
I don't see the Reagor comp in anyway at all. Reagor was 20 pounds heavier, way more explosive. However he had questionable hands and routes. Dotson's calling card are his hands and his zone beating route running skills. 
Hands and route running are skills.  You can improve both with practice.  Size and speed are more about physical talent.  There's a reason "you can't teach speed" is a cliche. You can work out and maximize your explosiveness and pliability and all that, but at some point, you reach your ceiling. 

You can not succeed in the NFL as a wide receiver without skill.   Ask David Boston what size and speed alone are worth.  Or Denzel Mims. I remember a receiver named Cordarelle Patterson who had all the physical talent in the world but never really figured out the nuances of route running.  

GMs and coaches see talent and think, I can teach him how to play. It's the siren song of nfl talent evaluators.  Someone will always reach on talent and get fired before they get the chance to coach them up. 

Sometimes they get away with it - DK Metcalf isn't particularly skilled and he turns like a cruise liner but he is really big and does two things really well - run fast and stop suddenly.   All of his routes are variations of run fast and I'll throw it deep, or run fast and then stop and I'll throw it to where you're going to be.  

The guys who get drafted early because of their route running and hands sometimes turn out to be guys like Christian Kirk or sterling shepherd... but sometimes they turn out to be Calvin Ridley or Cooper Kupp. 

Height, weight, speed and 3-cone matter, but if NFL talent evaluators say that this guy is an early first round pick because of his skills, I've heard enough.  That's a high upside, serviceable floor kind of player. 

 
Hands and route running are skills.  You can improve both with practice.  Size and speed are more about physical talent.  There's a reason "you can't teach speed" is a cliche. You can work out and maximize your explosiveness and pliability and all that, but at some point, you reach your ceiling. 

You can not succeed in the NFL as a wide receiver without skill.   Ask David Boston what size and speed alone are worth.  Or Denzel Mims. I remember a receiver named Cordarelle Patterson who had all the physical talent in the world but never really figured out the nuances of route running.  

GMs and coaches see talent and think, I can teach him how to play. It's the siren song of nfl talent evaluators.  Someone will always reach on talent and get fired before they get the chance to coach them up. 

Sometimes they get away with it - DK Metcalf isn't particularly skilled and he turns like a cruise liner but he is really big and does two things really well - run fast and stop suddenly.   All of his routes are variations of run fast and I'll throw it deep, or run fast and then stop and I'll throw it to where you're going to be.  

The guys who get drafted early because of their route running and hands sometimes turn out to be guys like Christian Kirk or sterling shepherd... but sometimes they turn out to be Calvin Ridley or Cooper Kupp. 

Height, weight, speed and 3-cone matter, but if NFL talent evaluators say that this guy is an early first round pick because of his skills, I've heard enough.  That's a high upside, serviceable floor kind of player. 
I agree with pretty much everything you said but I’m not sure what it has to do with a Dotson to Reagor comp. 

 
I hope he is good, but a lot of people have their doubts about him.  I wasn’t in position to draft any shares, but I will be watching him with interest.

 
Reagor ran a 4.47. Dotson ran a 4.43. How much more comparable, speed-wise, are you going to get? I mean, looks like advantage Dotson. 

Dotson runs that plus routes plus hands plus senior production. Reagor never had that production and it was blamed on poor QB play. 

I guess Reagor was heavier and tested better than Dotson when taking that into account, but Reagor's three cone was worse than even Metcalf's from what it looks like. 

 
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Reagor ran a 4.47. Dotson ran a 4.43. How much more comparable, speed-wise, are you going to get? I mean, looks like advantage Dotson. 

Dotson runs that plus routes plus hands plus senior production. Reagor never had that production and it was blamed on poor QB play. 

I guess Reagor was heavier and tested better than Dotson when taking that into account, but Reagor's three cone was worse than even Metcalf's from what it looks like. 
I was thinking more of the insane vertical Reagor had and speed score given the weight difference but good points 

 
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I was thinking more of the insane vertical Reagor had and speed score given the weight difference but good points 
I'd actually written the first two sentences and neglected the weight difference. I went and checked Player Profiler and found that it indeed mattered, and that Reagor had tested well in either the broad or vertical, so you made solid points also about explosiveness and speed score. Then I adjusted my comment. That's why it might seem disjointed. 

But still, the essential point was that Dotson is actually faster than Reagor if we discount weight. Which we shouldn't. 

 
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Commanders signed No. 16 overall pick WR Jahan Dotson to a four-year, $15.05 million contract.

The deal is fully guaranteed and comes with a fifth-year team option, as is the case with all first-rounders. Dotson is expected to handle outside, Z receiver duties opposite X wideout Terry McLaurin. He's drawn some loose comparisons to Darnell Mooney.

May 18, 2022, 2:12 PM ET

 
The ONLY thing that gives me pause if people seem to have buried Curtis Samuel, and by all reports he's healthy and flying around. There may be a 3 headed monster at WR in DC. 

 
The ONLY thing that gives me pause if people seem to have buried Curtis Samuel, and by all reports he's healthy and flying around. There may be a 3 headed monster at WR in DC. 
In redraft that might be a small concern at most.  I don't have huge expectations for his rookie year but he's already been named a starter.

In dynasty it shouldn't be on your radar. I don't like him because he's on a team with no good receivers or because he's not good enough to demand targets over Curtis Samuel.  I like him because he was a first round pick and a fairly early one at that, was a beast in college and has skills that translate to the pro game.  

 
The ONLY thing that gives me pause if people seem to have buried Curtis Samuel, and by all reports he's healthy and flying around. There may be a 3 headed monster at WR in DC. 


Definitely something to pay attention to...they gave Samuel a very nice contract so if he plays up to it you could have a 3-headed monster...Dyami Brown went from being a sleeper Dynasty WR this time last year to being pretty much forgotten now...will be interesting to see if he contributes anything this year.

 
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Definitely something to pay attention to...they gave Samuel a very nice contract so if he plays up to it you could have a 3-headed monster...Dyami Brown went from being a sleeper Dynasty WR this time last year to being pretty much forgotten now...will be interesting to see if he contributes anything this year.
I agree for this year but for the future, Washington has an out after this season.

 
Not a huge fan of the Dotson pick.  Hopefully he proves me wrong.  But honestly this offense has to be better with Wentz running it.  The worst version of Wentz is a better QB than anything they've had since Cousins.  So all these WRs numbers should be up based solely on the fact that Wentz has the arm of an NFL QB.

 
Commanders rookie Jahan Dotson is a calm, steady and fast presence

In February, on the shaded sideline of a field in Phoenix, Jahan Dotson may have heard something he didn’t like. A tour guide was showing a visitor around the campus of Exos, a high-end athletic performance center where many NFL prospects train for the combine.

“There’s Garrett Wilson,” the guide said, pointing at the Ohio State wideout stretching across the field. “He’s going to be the number one receiver in the draft.”

Nearby, a group of wide receivers groused. “Man, I’m not trying to hear that,” one grumbled. Another waved his hand, dismissing the comment. Dotson, if he heard, didn’t react — except to walk away and toward the next drill. Told this story later, trainer Nic Hill thought it was classic Dotson, whom he nicknamed “the silent assassin.”

In the 12 weeks Dotson was at Exos, Hill learned the calm, steady, dragonfly-fast wide receiver didn’t need to be praised or challenged or cajoled. During 40-yard dash practice — a big, raucous spectacle with thunderous beats and staccato shouting — Dotson was often subdued and at the back of the line. Hill noticed Dotson was at his best when he appeared withdrawn.

“You see him get focused and kind of glass over the eyes,” Hill said. “It’s like: ‘Okay, that’s what I want to see. That’s what I need to see.’ That calm confidence — you know he’s about to go off.”

In Dotson, 22, the Washington Commanders seem to have a mature, polished wideout who’s ready to produce. He was the 16th draft pick — and, as it turned out, the fifth wide receiver taken. While analysts have concerns about his size (5-foot-11, 182 pounds) and strength, they also gush about his hands (“Best in the draft,” said NFL Network’s Daniel Jeremiah) and catch radius (“Maybe the largest . . . of any sub-5-foot-11 receiver I have ever scouted,” wrote Dane Brugler of the Athletic).

In the Commanders’ offense, Dotson’s skill set figures to be valuable with a big-armed, imprecise quarterback in Carson Wentz. Offensive coordinator Scott Turner could move him around the formation with other versatile weapons such as Curtis Samuel, Terry McLaurin and Antonio Gibson.

“We have really big expectations for [Dotson],” General Manager Martin Mayhew said. “He’s going to fit right in to what we’re doing offensively.”

In a way, Dotson has been preparing for this his whole life. When he was 3 or 4, he said, he went to the park with his older cousins to play catch — and one of them forced him to do 10 push-ups for each drop.

“I got tired of that real quick,” Dotson deadpanned.

In the late 2000s, Dotson’s parents, Al and Robin, moved from East Orange, N.J., to the small town of Nazareth, Pa., to raise Jahan and his brother Al in a safer environment. They commuted to New Jersey every day for work — more than an hour each way — as Jahan became a standout athlete, including in track and basketball. But every day, from bed to school to field, he always seemed to be carrying a football.

“It was always football,” Robin said, smiling.

Early in his senior year, Dotson committed to UCLA. But Josh Gattis, then the passing game coordinator at Penn State, said he heard Dotson might be interested in staying closer to home. Even though Dotson was “kind of frail,” Gattis said, he was a complete receiver. Not only was he an elite athlete — jumping, body control, ball skills — he was smart. He had a game plan to beat the defense and executed it with crisp routes. Dotson’s stats were gaudy, too.

“The buzz that he was creating through the eastern part of [Pennsylvania] was tremendous,” Gattis said.

That fall, Penn State finished 11-2 and won the Big Ten and the Fiesta Bowl behind running back Saquon Barkley, who once starred at a high school not far from Dotson’s in the Lehigh Valley. Those factors — the program’s renaissance and a local hero’s rise, as well as the departures of three top wideouts — made it easy for Dotson to flip his commitment to Penn State after UCLA fired coach Jim Mora.

In State College, Dotson ascended each season despite having three receivers coaches in four years. After his junior year, when he had 52 catches for 884 yards and eight touchdowns in nine games of the pandemic-shortened season, he could have left for the NFL. But he said he was too young, he wasn’t ready and it “wasn’t a very hard decision” to stay in school.

In 2021, Dotson worked with the same position coach in consecutive seasons for the first time in at least seven years. Taylor Stubblefield, that receivers coach, believed Dotson could make another leap because of his competitive streak. Once, while hosting a dinner at his house, Stubblefield saw it distilled as Dotson and Stubblefield’s son, Jagger, invented a game in which they threw balls at the family dog bed in the distance. (Jagger won two of three, Stubblefield said.)

In the team facility, Dotson asked for hard coaching. In Dotson’s senior year, Stubblefield focused on his footwork, his ability to disguise routes and his versatility. The coach delved into the nuances of looking for clues to the defense’s plan through the “DED” of a defensive back — depth, eyes, demeanor — and reminded Dotson of what it meant to be a professional by repeating the expression, “Don’t leave your paycheck on the table.”

“If you have an opportunity to make a play, that’s your opportunity to get paid,” he said. “Whether it’s working to an area that the defense isn’t there or whether it’s that hard, dirty, grinding route where the [defensive back] plays it perfectly and you got to make a great play — no matter what the situation is, be able to get paid.”

By the end of the year, Dotson had compiled one of the best seasons in Penn State history with 91 catches for 1,182 yards and 12 touchdowns. The Nittany Lions also used him out of the backfield and on passing trick plays, where he completed both attempts for a total of 43 yards.

Before the draft, Dotson focused on honing his speed and adding strength. Hill, the Exos trainer, said the company’s analysis recommended he play at about 183 pounds. And when Dotson arrived at the Commanders’ facility for the first time in late April, he arrived holding a football.

In his few Washington news conferences so far, Dotson has seemed businesslike. He compared learning the playbook — familiar concepts with new verbiage — to English and Spanish, that it’ll just take a little time. But one of the few subjects to prompt a more emotional response is his family.

“Having my parents there by my side, that was big to me,” he said during his introductory news conference in front of Al and Robin. “Reflecting on my young childhood days, there was a lot of sacrifice that led to this moment and a lot of hard work — just thinking about all those times where things weren’t always so pretty. But at the end of the day, we made it happen, and we got to this moment.”

And now, Dotson said, he’s intent on making the most of it.

 
I've really come around on the kid.  I think he's going to be a fantasy contributor, consistent WR2 occasionally flirting with the WR1 line.  I think he's somewhat underrated/undervalued falling into the 2nd round of rookie drafts.  

He's fast enough.  Ran a 4.43.  

Runs great routes.  

Combine the 2--and you get huge separation.  When I watch some people's highlights--I see the crazy contested catches, the huge run after the catch and broken tackles.  And that's awesome in it's own right.  Dotson certainly has some of that.  But what sticks out when I watch Dotson's tape--I think my god he's wide open a lot.  And it's not "blew by a slower DB and" caught it behind him.  He's consistently finding gaps in coverage.  Huge gaps.  And he's doing it against the Big 10.  He's doing it against Ohio State and Michigan.  He's doing it vs Iowa.  He did it against Auburn in the SEC.  

That always sticks out to me.  I'm very much not skilled at breaking down tape.  But when I see a guy consistently creating HUGE separation via route running that runs in the 4.4 range--I think that guy can get open in the NFL.  Can he convert it into catches?

By all accounts, Dotson has tremendous hands.  

I think the knocks on him:  #1:  Washington.  They've struggled to support 1 fantasy relevant WR.  Well, having the talent at the position goes a long way.  Also, Wentz is probably an upgrade over what they've had in the past--even if it's not the level of upgrade we'd like to have seen for McLaurin.  I also think there's a great chance Washington sucks this year.  They were 7-10 last year.  It's not that big of a leap to wind up 3-14 or 4-13.  They could definitely be looking at one of the Elite QB prospects this time next year.  And suddenly we're talking about how nasty this WAS offense can be with Bryce Young, McLaurin, Dotson.  

I appreciate the late breakout age.  But McLaurin never broke out in college and still found NFL success with Washington.  

I'm picking at 1.12 in a couple of leagues, hoping he falls there. 

 
I've really come around on the kid.  I think he's going to be a fantasy contributor, consistent WR2 occasionally flirting with the WR1 line.  I think he's somewhat underrated/undervalued falling into the 2nd round of rookie drafts.  

He's fast enough.  Ran a 4.43.  

Runs great routes.  

Combine the 2--and you get huge separation.  When I watch some people's highlights--I see the crazy contested catches, the huge run after the catch and broken tackles.  And that's awesome in it's own right.  Dotson certainly has some of that.  But what sticks out when I watch Dotson's tape--I think my god he's wide open a lot.  And it's not "blew by a slower DB and" caught it behind him.  He's consistently finding gaps in coverage.  Huge gaps.  And he's doing it against the Big 10.  He's doing it against Ohio State and Michigan.  He's doing it vs Iowa.  He did it against Auburn in the SEC.  

That always sticks out to me.  I'm very much not skilled at breaking down tape.  But when I see a guy consistently creating HUGE separation via route running that runs in the 4.4 range--I think that guy can get open in the NFL.  Can he convert it into catches?

By all accounts, Dotson has tremendous hands.  

I think the knocks on him:  #1:  Washington.  They've struggled to support 1 fantasy relevant WR.  Well, having the talent at the position goes a long way.  Also, Wentz is probably an upgrade over what they've had in the past--even if it's not the level of upgrade we'd like to have seen for McLaurin.  I also think there's a great chance Washington sucks this year.  They were 7-10 last year.  It's not that big of a leap to wind up 3-14 or 4-13.  They could definitely be looking at one of the Elite QB prospects this time next year.  And suddenly we're talking about how nasty this WAS offense can be with Bryce Young, McLaurin, Dotson.  

I appreciate the late breakout age.  But McLaurin never broke out in college and still found NFL success with Washington.  

I'm picking at 1.12 in a couple of leagues, hoping he falls there. 
Really.  Over 20% of his yards were against MD.    42% of his yards were against MD, VIL, and MSU.  He had an excellent game vs OSU.  But I don't see the separation.  Only the great hands.  In fact, he always played good against OSU.  But he's had a ton of clunkers like 3 and 5 catches vs Ball State and Rutgers for example. 

 
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I think he sucks and you'd be crazy to take him before the 3rd round in dynasty drafts  :grad: (to all the people who play in my dynasty leagues on FBG) 

 
Really.  Over 20% of his yards were against MD.    42% of his yards were against MD, VIL, and MSU.  He had an excellent game vs OSU.  But I don't see the separation.  Only the great hands.  In fact, he always played good against OSU.  But he's had a ton of clunkers like 3 and 5 catches vs Ball State and Rutgers for example. 
I think this is an example of the stats can say whatever you want them to say depending on how you present them.

47% of his yards came against top 25 competition.  
 

Sure he did a lot of damage versus Maryland and Villanova. Not sure why you’d lump the OSU game in with that.  
 

He averaged 110 yards per game against top 25 teams.

He had 4 TD’s in 5 games vs top 25 teams.

Sure, he had some clunkers.  But his game log suggests he played well vs elite competition.

 
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The ONLY thing that gives me pause if people seem to have buried Curtis Samuel, and by all reports he's healthy and flying around. There may be a 3 headed monster at WR in DC. 
My standard operating procedure when it comes to rookie draft valuation - don't account for year 1 production. It isn't a hard rule, but I use it as a guardrail as I think it increases the likelihood of building a team more likely to sustain success.

 
Really.  Over 20% of his yards were against MD.    42% of his yards were against MD, VIL, and MSU.  He had an excellent game vs OSU.  But I don't see the separation.  Only the great hands.  In fact, he always played good against OSU.  But he's had a ton of clunkers like 3 and 5 catches vs Ball State and Rutgers for example
In 2021, Dotson had 3 rec./52 yards and a TD against Rutgers in a 28-0 blowout.  Earlier in the season, he posted 5/65 and 1 TD against Ball State in another lopsided 44-13 game.  Clunkers?  I wouldn't say that.

 
Washington WR Jahan Dotson has been Carson Wentz’s top target at minicamp.

Terry McLaurin’s OTA absence has allowed Dotson to build up reps with Wentz. Washington expects McLaurin back for next week's mandatory camp, but the early returns have been good on Dotson, who looks to already be ahead of veteran Curtis Samuel. Dotson projects to start opposite McLaurin as a rookie and his long-term outlook is pointing up with McLaurin yet to be extended in a contract year.

SOURCE: NBC Sports Washington

Jun 10, 2022, 6:25 PM ET

 

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