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A little embarrassed to admit it. I'm hooked on a kids' series called Warriors. Probably read 8-10 so far. Started with a couple via Prime Reading. I would describe the series as GoT for kids, but with cats instead of people. Very quick reading.¬†ūüźą

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On 5/26/2020 at 6:35 PM, MindCrime said:

Just finished ‚ÄúStorm Front‚ÄĚ by Jim Butcher. Thought it was fun, looking forward to reading on in the Dresden series.

Stephen King‚Äôs ‚ÄúIf it Bleeds‚ÄĚ is next up.

Love the Dresden books. Love ‚Äėem.¬†

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5 hours ago, Don't Toews Me said:

Picked up a copy of "Tried by War: Abraham Lincoln as Commander in Chief" by James McPherson. About 50 pages in so far. I'm no Civil War historian, but I've enjoyed the author's writing thus far. 

I haven't read that one by McPherson, but his "Battle Cry of Freedom" is great.

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Finished "Tried By War" by McPherson. Very good. Good research into the political challenges Lincoln faced as well as the military challenges posed to him with regards to the difficulties with generals (McClellan, Buell, etc). Felt like I was there with Lincoln and his cabinet. 

Thinking I might give "In the Name of Rome: The Men Who Won the Roman Empire" by Adrian Goldsworthy a read next. 

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Just finished NYTimes best seller top 10 American Dirt.

Very enjoyable exciting read about a woman and her son trying to escape a cartel chase. Could have been a true story as I had no idea what is going on in Acapulco now with bodies being left out in public places as scare tactics. Plus the migrants riding Le Bestia (the beast) which is a freight train they ride dangerously on top by running alongside and hopping up a ladder. 

Next up Where the Crawdads Sing.

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Rereading The Killer Angels by Shaara. Basis of the Gettysburg movie. Enjoying it again.

Also mixing this with Day of Battle which is the second book of Atkinson's trilogy on the US Army in the Second World War. It's somewhat neglected that the US Army was fighting in Europe (Italy) a year before the Normandy landings.

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I just finished Until The End Of Time by Brian Greene. It was a true learning experience for me. I am not a physics or math guy and I ended up rereading some chapters two or three times. I still don't think I would jump into a conversation regarding any of this but I do think I would be able to better follow and comprehend this subject if others bring it up. 

I also did a reread of Revival by Stephen King. Seems like this book has been brought up a lot recently so I wanted to revisit it. Still a good book although one of the more pessimistic endings of any book I have read. I wonder if they will change the ending for a movie?

I just started Fortitude:American Resilience in the Era of Outrage by Dan Crenshaw.

I have a history of not watching the news or paying much attention to politics until it comes time to vote. That rule has been broken during the pandemic. As a result I have seen Dan Crenshaw speak a few times and I kind of liked what he had to say so I thought I would read his book. Historically I have always been and voted independent but I will see what this guy has to say. 

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Roughly a quarter of the way into "In the Name of Rome" 

Can't believe how much detail Goldsworthy can report on some of these battles over 2000 yrs ago. His descriptions of Scipio Africanus at the Battle of Cartagena (and overall in Spain) and Zama were fascinating. Macedonian Wars were also very interesting. 

Looking forward to exploring more by Goldsworthy as he has a number of books out on Rome. 

 

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Just finished Where Men Win Glory: The Odyssey of Pat Tillman by Jon Krakauer.  Really enjoyed learning more about Tillman.  Was shocked about the govt coverup of how he died due to friendly fire.

 

Now started Where the Crawdads Sing

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I know I'm missing some, but some of my recent reads are:

If It Bleeds - Stephen King. 4 stories in this one. I enjoyed them all, but the 2nd one felt like 3 different ideas he tried to wedge into one.

Wolf Hall - Hilary Mantel. The first of her Thomas Cromwell trilogy. It's really good and the style is unique (to me), though I found myself lost a few times by not knowing who was speaking. Plus, there are like 15 different characters named Thomas and another 10 or so Marys and Annes. I'll read the other other two but I needed a break.

The Splendid and the Vile - Eric Larsen. Awful title, good book - not Larsen's best, but close. It follows Churchill and those around him - family, politicians, his staff, as well as key Nazi members - in his first year as PM and the Bombing of London. If you're familiar with Larsen's style, you'll be in your element. It's non-fiction, but reads like a novel. All quotes are taken from diaries or published/broadcast reports. It leans heavy on the more private aspects of the main characters' lives, though it can't help but have a major throughline that includes the war and its effect on London.

I'm on to Max Brooks' Devolution: A Firsthand Account Of The Rainier Sasquatch Massacre . He wrote World War Z several years ago, which I loved. High hopes for this one.

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Back to The Expanse series.  Not sure why I keep straying - fun, quick read and I really like the characters and the world they built.   Plus, unlike Song of Ice and Fire  or The Kingkiller Chronicles, they seem to have a plan and the ability to finish this thing in a timely manner.  

The post a couple above mine reminds me that I want to get to Where the Crawdads Sings soon too.  

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On 6/17/2020 at 10:19 AM, Uruk-Hai said:

 

The Splendid and the Vile - Eric Larsen. Awful title, good book - not Larsen's best, but close. It follows Churchill and those around him - family, politicians, his staff, as well as key Nazi members - in his first year as PM and the Bombing of London. If you're familiar with Larsen's style, you'll be in your element. It's non-fiction, but reads like a novel. All quotes are taken from diaries or published/broadcast reports. It leans heavy on the more private aspects of the main characters' lives, though it can't help but have a major throughline that includes the war and its effect on London.

 

I downloaded both this and the one about the Lusitania recently, but started with the latter and am fascinated by it.  His books are only so-so in writing, but I always find his research so amazing that I enjoy them.

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5 hours ago, krista4 said:

I downloaded both this and the one about the Lusitania recently, but started with the latter and am fascinated by it.  His books are only so-so in writing, but I always find his research so amazing that I enjoy them.

I liked the Lusitania book a lot.

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Finished Where the Crawdads Sing - excellent.

Halfway through Let It Bleed, I liked the first two novellas.

Next up- Firing Point a Jack Ryan Jr. novel written by Mike Maden carrying the Tom Clancy torch. Maden's first JR. I like the new JR. Jr novels better than the JR. Sr (although he makes a great president). I believe this will be my 40th Tom Clancy (or successor) book.

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Just finished Where the Crawdads Sing too!  I really enjoyed it.  The only thing that bothered me was she had some of her NC geography wrong in the book.  She was talking about going to Asheville like it was a short drive from the coast.

 

Now reading The Yellow House by Sarah Broom

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https://www.amazon.com/September-1918-War-Plague-World/dp/1621576205#ace-1639449406

 

One hundred years ago, in September 1918, three things came to Boston: war, plague, and the World Series.

This is the unimaginable story of that late summer month, in which a division of Massachusetts militia volunteers led the first unified American fighting force into battle in France, turning the tide of World War I. Meanwhile the world‚Äôs deadliest pandemic‚ÄĒthe Spanish Flu‚ÄĒerupted in Boston and its suburbs, bringing death on a terrifying scale first to military facilities and then to the civilian population. At precisely the same time, in a baseball season cut short on the homefront and amidst the surrounding ravages of death, a young pitcher named Babe Ruth rallied the sport‚Äôs most dominant team, the Boston Red Sox, to a World Series victory‚ÄĒthe last World Series victory the Sox would see for 86 years.

In September 1918: War, Plague and the World Series, the riveting, intertwined stories of this remarkable month introduce readers to a richly diverse cast of characters: David Putnam, a Boston teenager and America’s World War I Flying Ace; a transcendent Babe Ruth and his teammates, battling greedy owners and a hostile public; entire families from all social strata, devastated by sudden and horrifying influenza death; unknown political functionary Calvin Coolidge, thrust into managing the country’s first great public health crisis by an absentee governor; and New England’s soldiers, enduring trench warfare and poisonous gas to drive back German forces.

At the same time, other stories were also unfolding: Cambridge high school football star Charlie Crowley, a college freshman teamed up with stars Curly Lambeau and George Gipp under a first-time coach named Knute Rockne; Boston suffrage leader Maud Wood Park was fighting for women’s right to vote, even as they flexed their developing political muscle; poet E.E. Cummings, an Army private found himself stationed at the center of a biological storm; and Massachusetts Senator Henry Cabot Lodge maneuvered as the constant rival of a sitting wartime president.

In the tradition of Erick Larsen's bestselling Devil in the White City, September 1918 is a haunting three-dimensional recreation of a moment in history almost too cinematic to be real.

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On 4/19/2020 at 1:55 PM, Barry said:
On 4/14/2020 at 3:48 PM, Don Quixote said:

Great book.

 

On 4/14/2020 at 3:55 PM, Ilov80s said:

Tremendous book- probably a top 10 all time for me. 

 

On 4/14/2020 at 4:34 PM, KarmaPolice said:

 

It really is - loving the idea of the book and the language/descriptions.   The quick chapters and switching back and forth between the characters is perfect for me too.  

halfway through, it's terrific. Thanks for the rec guys

about 2/3 through and I'm running out of steam a bit. perfect beach book with the narrative structure allowing for easy pop in and out without missing anything. I'll try to figure out and articulate what's not working for me... feel like it may be the short chapters and jumping around not allowing me to really dig in. prose doesnt knock me out, although it certainly maintains and easy-breezy style- again, good for the beach. also not loving the inclusion of the german gem expert nemesis, which seems forced for the sake of driving plot. but I'm open to seeing where it goes and will finish it out. these are the negatives... but it's been a nice beach book, so thanks for the recommendation, friends... especially considering I"ve been slogging through Absalom, Absalom for going on 3 or 4 years (not a good beach/vacation book).

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New Iberia Blues, second-to-most- recent Dave Robicheaux novel from James Lee Burke.  Excellent mystery/police procedural.  Burke is super lyric in his prose.  However, in this novel he reveals some age stuff, which :spoileralert:! reveals that Dave is in his early 80s and humping his new cop partner who is in her late 20s.  Even if if the super hot young babe "doesn't care about age", there's no way she's diddling Tommy Lee Jones.  C'mon.  Still, love his novels.

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Read Mycroft Holmes by Kareem Abdul ‚ÄĒJabbar, who knew he was an airline co pilot and author of Holmes literature?

felt like the style of sir Conan Doyle 

i didn’t love it, didn’t hate it. Glad I read it because i normally don’t read this kind of book so it was a change of pace for me and something different.

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85/832 issues down in my quest to read the Marvel Comics of the 1960s beginning with FF #1. Skipping a couple of non-core series. Onto the 70's after I finish the 60's. I'm a slow reader though, even with comics. 

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1 hour ago, cap'n grunge said:

85/832 issues down in my quest to read the Marvel Comics of the 1960s beginning with FF #1. Skipping a couple of non-core series. Onto the 70's after I finish the 60's. I'm a slow reader though, even with comics. 

Where you finding these? 

Please tell me it is not your personal collection.

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3 hours ago, Mr. Landry said:

Where you finding these? 

Please tell me it is not your personal collection.

https://www.marvel.com/comics/unlimited

Subscription to Marvel Unlimited

$69 a year for access to 27,000 issues. New issues are 6 months behind. Not every issue ever but a good majority of them. Great value for comic book nerds. DC has something similar, DC Universe, but that also has movies and animated series. Similar price.

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Just finished A Farewell to Arms, Legs and Jockstraps by Diane K. Shah. The first female sportswriter for a major newspaper and one of the first to be allowed into mens locker rooms. She went through a lot during her years. Discrimination, bullying, being propositioned and shares many great stories and interviews with many famous people. Mickey Mantle, Cary Grant,  Larry Bird, Kareem, Jim Brown, Steve Carlton and more. Also snuck into The White House.

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  • 2 weeks later...
On 6/19/2020 at 12:56 PM, SouthJersey said:

Now reading The Yellow House by Sarah Broom

I thought this books was meh.  Not sure why it was noted as one of the best memoirs by the NYT last year.  I kept waiting for it to get interesting but it never did.

 

Currently half way through Shantaram.  I really like the story, but thing the writing is mediocre at best.  To read an 1,000 page novel I'd prefer the author writes like Michael Chabon, Gregory David Roberts is nowhere close to that level.

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18 minutes ago, SouthJersey said:

Currently half way through Shantaram.  I really like the story, but thing the writing is mediocre at best.  To read an 1,000 page novel I'd prefer the author writes like Michael Chabon, Gregory David Roberts is nowhere close to that level.

Loved the setting in this one.  The writing tended toward pedantic and repetitive.  It was good enough for me to finish, though.

------

I'm currently reading schlock too embarrassing to mention here.  Thoroughly entertaining.

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2 hours ago, Sand said:

 

2 hours ago, SouthJersey said:

Currently half way through Shantaram.  I really like the story, but thing the writing is mediocre at best.  To read an 1,000 page novel I'd prefer the author writes like Michael Chabon, Gregory David Roberts is nowhere close to that level.

Loved the setting in this one.  The writing tended toward pedantic and repetitive.  It was good enough for me to finish, though.

------

I'm currently reading schlock too embarrassing to mention here.  Thoroughly entertaining.

 

Huh. The Shantaram schlock is in my all time top 10. I am dumber than I thought I guess.

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8 hours ago, facook said:

Huh. The Shantaram schlock is in my all time top 10. I am dumber than I thought I guess.

Not at all.  I just found a lot of his musings and wording to be very repetitive over time.  I still finished the book, which given my impatience with poor books says something.  Takes a lot for me to finish a book that long.

As far as schlock I'm reading something very different from that and about as far from "literature" as you can get (which Shantaram is).

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On 6/21/2020 at 2:11 PM, El Floppo said:
On 4/19/2020 at 1:55 PM, Barry said:
On 4/14/2020 at 3:48 PM, Don Quixote said:

Great book.

 

On 4/14/2020 at 3:55 PM, Ilov80s said:

Tremendous book- probably a top 10 all time for me. 

 

On 4/14/2020 at 4:34 PM, KarmaPolice said:

 

It really is - loving the idea of the book and the language/descriptions.   The quick chapters and switching back and forth between the characters is perfect for me too.  

halfway through, it's terrific. Thanks for the rec guys

about 2/3 through and I'm running out of steam a bit. perfect beach book with the narrative structure allowing for easy pop in and out without missing anything. I'll try to figure out and articulate what's not working for me... feel like it may be the short chapters and jumping around not allowing me to really dig in. prose doesnt knock me out, although it certainly maintains and easy-breezy style- again, good for the beach. also not loving the inclusion of the german gem expert nemesis, which seems forced for the sake of driving plot. but I'm open to seeing where it goes and will finish it out. these are the negatives... but it's been a nice beach book, so thanks for the recommendation, friends... especially considering I"ve been slogging through Absalom, Absalom for going on 3 or 4 years (not a good beach/vacation book).

I wrapped this up a while back.

Thanks for the recommendations- it was a perfect beach book. Easy to jump in and out of, and told an interesting story(ies) really well. In the credits and thanks at the end it shows how much research went into this- and it really showed on the writing- it felt true, and felt like I was seeing places, parts of, and people in the war I had never considered.

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31 minutes ago, El Floppo said:

I wrapped this up a while back.

Thanks for the recommendations- it was a perfect beach book. Easy to jump in and out of, and told an interesting story(ies) really well. In the credits and thanks at the end it shows how much research went into this- and it really showed on the writing- it felt true, and felt like I was seeing places, parts of, and people in the war I had never considered.

When I started it, I was apprehensive since WW2 stories are a bit like beating a dead horse at this point. I was impressed with how it was able to still be unique and find a corner of the war that I hadn't really seen before. 

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1 hour ago, Sand said:

Not at all.  I just found a lot of his musings and wording to be very repetitive over time.  I still finished the book, which given my impatience with poor books says something.  Takes a lot for me to finish a book that long.

As far as schlock I'm reading something very different from that and about as far from "literature" as you can get (which Shantaram is).

Definitely don't read the sequel. It is far more repetitive and annoying. 

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3rd son convinced me to read wings of fire book 1 (in exchange for him reading books 4-7 of Harry Potter). Wasn't horrible for a kids book. 

Now reading the golden albatross. A book about pensions ūü§ď

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On 6/17/2020 at 1:19 PM, Uruk-Hai said:

I know I'm missing some, but some of my recent reads are:

If It Bleeds - Stephen King. 4 stories in this one. I enjoyed them all, but the 2nd one felt like 3 different ideas he tried to wedge into one.

Wolf Hall - Hilary Mantel. The first of her Thomas Cromwell trilogy. It's really good and the style is unique (to me), though I found myself lost a few times by not knowing who was speaking. Plus, there are like 15 different characters named Thomas and another 10 or so Marys and Annes. I'll read the other other two but I needed a break.

The Splendid and the Vile - Eric Larsen. Awful title, good book - not Larsen's best, but close. It follows Churchill and those around him - family, politicians, his staff, as well as key Nazi members - in his first year as PM and the Bombing of London. If you're familiar with Larsen's style, you'll be in your element. It's non-fiction, but reads like a novel. All quotes are taken from diaries or published/broadcast reports. It leans heavy on the more private aspects of the main characters' lives, though it can't help but have a major throughline that includes the war and its effect on London.

I'm on to Max Brooks' Devolution: A Firsthand Account Of The Rainier Sasquatch Massacre . He wrote World War Z several years ago, which I loved. High hopes for this one.

Enjoyed Devolution. There are a couple of "wait, how could.....?" moments, but I'm pretty comfortable rolling my eyes and moving on. 

I then went to the book (sorry, forgot the title) someone here recommended about the events in Boston in 1918 - the Red Sox World Series, the first American troops in WW1, and the Influenza outbreak. It was a good read, though I thought it petered out about 2/3 if the way through.

Next, I ripped through Paul Tremblay's latest - Survivor's Song. Fantastic and really eerie - he had to have written this last year, but it deals with an infectious outbreak (N-95 masks are mentioned, among other things we're dealing with nowadays).

Now, I'm on The Vapors by David Hill. It's non-fiction about the rise & fall of Hot Springs Arkansas as a gambling mecca and all-around den of desire.

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On 7/11/2020 at 9:48 PM, SouthJersey said:

Currently half way through Shantaram.  I really like the story, but thing the writing is mediocre at best.  To read an 1,000 page novel I'd prefer the author writes like Michael Chabon, Gregory David Roberts is nowhere close to that level.

300 pages into Shantaram myself.  It's no Infinite Jest, but I'm enjoying it thus far.  Definitely worth a read for those interested at all.

Before that I read Catch-22 for the first time.  The story was much more compelling, and humorous, than I anticipated.  That said, it was a bit 'dusty' in some parts.  Nothing that took me out of the story, but it did read a bit dated.

Prior to that I flew through John Green's Looking for Alaska.  I enjoy his podcast Anthropocene Reviewed, and found this YA novel fantastic.  Something about his prose is compelling (the podcast as well) and I enjoyed this book more than Paper Towns and almost as much as Turtles All The Way Down.

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Reading the 3rd of a 3 book series (Jessica Blackwood series) by Andrew Mayne.

Main character is an FBI agent, but grew up in showbiz (magician family). I like the pace, the cases are interesting and some magic trick reveals get worked in as well. Enjoyable, quick reads. I think the 1st 2 of the 3 books can be had via Prime Reading. So, I like the price too.

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Started reading Black Autumn. I really like post apocalyptic books. Enjoy books like Alas Babylon One Second after Failsafe and On the beach. So I thought I would give this one a try. 55 pages in I notice that the authors are the main characters never read a book that that's happened. I'm going to keep reading for a bit but thinking this might be one I never finish.

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4 hours ago, rustycolts said:

Started reading Black Autumn. I really like post apocalyptic books. Enjoy books like Alas Babylon One Second after Failsafe and On the beach. So I thought I would give this one a try. 55 pages in I notice that the authors are the main characters never read a book that that's happened. I'm going to keep reading for a bit but thinking this might be one I never finish.

Are you ok?

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  • 2 weeks later...

Edgedancer was the first book from Sanderson I've been disappointed in. I thought it was pretty bad throughout. Lift is an interesting character, but her immaturity was too much for me to get past. I found it annoying and overall unenjoyable. At least it was short. 

Oathbringer is up next.

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