Jump to content
Fantasy Football - Footballguys Forums

Ran a 10k - Official Thread


Ned

Recommended Posts

I have a bunch of stuff in there that looks weird like a run that I started recording as a bike ride then discarded and then started over as a run mid-way through, and another that I did on the treadmill and logged as an outdoor run by accident and forgot to turn off the clock so it just says I ran 30 minute miles but hey I'm still figuring this stuff out

  • Thinking 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

19 minutes ago, bostonfred said:

I have a bunch of stuff in there that looks weird like a run that I started recording as a bike ride then discarded and then started over as a run mid-way through, and another that I did on the treadmill and logged as an outdoor run by accident and forgot to turn off the clock so it just says I ran 30 minute miles but hey I'm still figuring this stuff out

My stuff looks weird too - like you can't even see it.

  • Laughing 1
  • Thinking 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

23 hours ago, El Floppo said:

Scheduled recovery day today, and I'm still fried.

I think my Sunday run took a lot more out of me than I expected.

Or it's the ball aids.

Got back into a workout today- 1/4m intervals. Slower than it felt. Amazing how much last weekends run has taken out of me.

I want to do a long (15m +) run this weekend, but unless the legs recover feel like I'm going to have to slow the pace way down.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

13 floppinho's weekend schedule has finally opened up to allow him time to run with his dad. Will take him out for a couple on Saturday. Hoping to get him on the x-country team when he starts HS I'm the fall. After a year inside playing Jazz on Saturdays, nowhere to go but up for him

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

So I signed up for the Donut Challenge for this Saturday.

 

Essentially, they give you a dozen Krispy Kreme donuts.  After each mile, you need to eat a donut.  Goal is to get to 12 miles and 12 donuts) the fastest. 

 

No idea how I'll do.  A few friends are doing it, so I decided to join.  What could go wrong?

  • Like 4
  • Love 5
Link to comment
Share on other sites

9 minutes ago, SteelCurtain said:

So I signed up for the Donut Challenge for this Saturday.

 

Essentially, they give you a dozen Krispy Kreme donuts.  After each mile, you need to eat a donut.  Goal is to get to 12 miles and 12 donuts) the fastest. 

 

No idea how I'll do.  A few friends are doing it, so I decided to join.  What could go wrong?

You are gonna need this guy.

  • Laughing 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

10 minutes ago, SteelCurtain said:

So I signed up for the Donut Challenge for this Saturday.

 

Essentially, they give you a dozen Krispy Kreme donuts.  After each mile, you need to eat a donut.  Goal is to get to 12 miles and 12 donuts) the fastest. 

 

No idea how I'll do.  A few friends are doing it, so I decided to join.  What could go wrong?

So they're giving away a dozen Krispy Kremes? 

Sign me up

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

21 minutes ago, SteelCurtain said:

So I signed up for the Donut Challenge for this Saturday.

 

Essentially, they give you a dozen Krispy Kreme donuts.  After each mile, you need to eat a donut.  Goal is to get to 12 miles and 12 donuts) the fastest. 

 

No idea how I'll do.  A few friends are doing it, so I decided to join.  What could go wrong?

This would get me to return to racing

  • Laughing 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

35 minutes ago, SteelCurtain said:

So I signed up for the Donut Challenge for this Saturday.

 

Essentially, they give you a dozen Krispy Kreme donuts.  After each mile, you need to eat a donut.  Goal is to get to 12 miles and 12 donuts) the fastest. 

 

No idea how I'll do.  A few friends are doing it, so I decided to join.  What could go wrong?

I'd hate myself if I did this.

Signed,

@Juxtatarot

  • Laughing 4
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Working on our cottage yesterday, so didn't have a chance to jump into the @bostonfred discussion.  @gianmarco already noted my strong preference for a mid/forefoot strike.  As stated by a few of the guys, running hills is a way to get the feel of a forward lean and landing more on the front of the foot.  The challenge is that forefoot running calls for more active use of the big, upper leg muscles.  That's why the adjustment takes time - it's harder work at first (which is why most runners settle for heel striking).  As with swim technique, running technique can be modified and improved.  It just takes practice and focus, supported by some strength/flexibility work.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Posted (edited)
10 minutes ago, El Floppo said:

@gianmarco

What was your workout supposed to be? 4m tempo looked good...?

I didn't mention anything in here, but my back locked up last Tuesday and could barely move. Couldn't even turn in bed for the next 3 nights. I haven't had that happen in years.  Luckily, with some meds and lots of stretching I was able to get over it in about a week, but I lost all last week and now I'm behind (and was already behind). 

2 weeks ago I ran a 5 mile tempo even faster and felt great with much better HR. Today was supposed to be 10 miles with 8 @GMP. Between losing fitness and today being my first day out in heat, it was awful. Had to pull the plug or risk sabotaging the next few runs. The good news is the back hasn't given me any fits since getting back on Monday.

Playing catch-up during marathon training is a disaster and I know I'm likely going to pay for it, but I'm still charging full steam ahead as best as I can. 

FWIW, I would have hoped to run today with most of those miles in the upper 150s, maybe low 160s for the last couple. I was already over 170 by the 3rd one and knew I was cooked. By the end, arms were tingling a bit and I felt awful. Drove home and still took almost an hour before feeling back to normal. Bummer, but not surprising. 

Edited by gianmarco
  • Like 2
  • Thanks 1
  • Sad 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

17 hours ago, tri-man 47 said:

Working on our cottage yesterday, so didn't have a chance to jump into the @bostonfred discussion.  @gianmarco already noted my strong preference for a mid/forefoot strike.  As stated by a few of the guys, running hills is a way to get the feel of a forward lean and landing more on the front of the foot.  The challenge is that forefoot running calls for more active use of the big, upper leg muscles.  That's why the adjustment takes time - it's harder work at first (which is why most runners settle for heel striking).  As with swim technique, running technique can be modified and improved.  It just takes practice and focus, supported by some strength/flexibility work.

I honestly don't understand the debate about it.  It sounds like heel striking is natural and all of my muscles have developed around it and it hurts to change... but also the science is inconclusive?  Sign me up! 

But with all that, there are people like you who clearly prefer mid/forefoot strike, and I trust that because when smart people who have made the change clearly think it was worth it while and people who haven't, don't, it usually means the people who haven't are uninformed and/or justifying their decisions. I googled it and see that there's a debate about it but it's hard for me to really weigh in. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

9 minutes ago, bostonfred said:

I honestly don't understand the debate about it.  It sounds like heel striking is natural and all of my muscles have developed around it and it hurts to change... but also the science is inconclusive?  Sign me up! 

But with all that, there are people like you who clearly prefer mid/forefoot strike, and I trust that because when smart people who have made the change clearly think it was worth it while and people who haven't, don't, it usually means the people who haven't are uninformed and/or justifying their decisions. I googled it and see that there's a debate about it but it's hard for me to really weigh in. 

I'm a heel striker, and I just go with the flow.  Not going to invest the time and energy to try to change what's natural.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I changed my running technique once, back when I started doing tris.  It was about shortening the stride (IM Shuffle) not the foot fall, but it was still really tough to break out of a method that I was lifelong used to. Glad I did, as shorter stride, higher cadence worked great for tris and isn't bad in general.

I've been trying to play around with landing more midfoot during my recovery runs since we've been talking about this. Feels a little awkward- like I'm falling forward a bit- but not bad. I'll keep giving it a spin until it feels more comfortable and see if I can integrate it into a workout.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Posted (edited)

I think 7 of the top 10 marathoners are heel-strikers?  Something like that.

I have a short stride, reasonably high cadence (175ish on ERs), and my foot falls are almost always under my body.  Yet I'm a heel striker.  Any time I try to change that, it is crazy awkward -- feels like I'm trying to run on my toes.  

:shrug:

ETA:  Then again, I'm an injured POS so maybe I am doing it all wrong.

Edited by Zasada
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Interrsting.  I've never paid attention to cadence but on my last run when I really paid attention to keeping my front foot underneath me I think I shortened my stride and increased my cadence naturally which probably contributed to me going a little faster. I'd like to get out there and try my long run today but I don't think I have time. I need to figure out when I can squeeze something in. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

1 hour ago, bostonfred said:

I honestly don't understand the debate about it.  It sounds like heel striking is natural and all of my muscles have developed around it and it hurts to change... but also the science is inconclusive?  Sign me up! 

But with all that, there are people like you who clearly prefer mid/forefoot strike, and I trust that because when smart people who have made the change clearly think it was worth it while and people who haven't, don't, it usually means the people who haven't are uninformed and/or justifying their decisions. I googled it and see that there's a debate about it but it's hard for me to really weigh in. 

Generally speaking, your cadence is your cadence. I don't think messing with it should be a priority, especially early on, unless discomfort results. If that outcome occurs then I think it's worthwhile to start exploring adjustments. Big picture, you're probably going to apply adjustments anyway, but as long as you're not hurting yourself I think it's something better left for future Boston Fred. There's only so much new one can absorb and apply at one time, right? 

And just as an anecdotal example because it may help explain where I'm coming from, until recently my cadence was below 160. How much below 160? I couldn't tell you. I didn't get a watch until 15 months ago and didn't activate it on strava until shortly before then, so I have no limited data to reference. Apparently this is a crazy-low number, but it's how I ran my entire life from age teenager to early 30something. I made a concerted effort to increase mine between 2018 and 2020 and was still only to about 160 give or take. Through continued work I'm now consistently in the upper 160's, which is still significantly lower than 'normal' and at this point I'm skeptical a number any higher would provide any benefit. If anything, I may be slower now than I was a few years ago. This is certainly more efficient and increases my probability of sustaining health, but I'm considering adjustments within my next training cycle. An unusually low cadence may just be a better fit for me, so ultimately that's what you'll need to find out - what fits for you (and this goes for foot strike too).

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Posted (edited)
29 minutes ago, MAC_32 said:

Generally speaking, your cadence is your cadence. I don't think messing with it should be a priority, especially early on, unless discomfort results. If that outcome occurs then I think it's worthwhile to start exploring adjustments. Big picture, you're probably going to apply adjustments anyway, but as long as you're not hurting yourself I think it's something better left for future Boston Fred. There's only so much new one can absorb and apply at one time, right? 

And just as an anecdotal example because it may help explain where I'm coming from, until recently my cadence was below 160. How much below 160? I couldn't tell you. I didn't get a watch until 15 months ago and didn't activate it on strava until shortly before then, so I have no limited data to reference. Apparently this is a crazy-low number, but it's how I ran my entire life from age teenager to early 30something. I made a concerted effort to increase mine between 2018 and 2020 and was still only to about 160 give or take. Through continued work I'm now consistently in the upper 160's, which is still significantly lower than 'normal' and at this point I'm skeptical a number any higher would provide any benefit. If anything, I may be slower now than I was a few years ago. This is certainly more efficient and increases my probability of sustaining health, but I'm considering adjustments within my next training cycle. An unusually low cadence may just be a better fit for me, so ultimately that's what you'll need to find out - what fits for you (and this goes for foot strike too).

You obviously get much of your speed through powerful strides instead of turnover. That makes sense since you have a background in weight training. I don’t recall if you are a heel striker or not but even if you are I assume you’re not overstriding or you would have had more injury problems.

One thing I’ve wondered about is if your style gets you in trouble in longer distance races. From a McMillan calculator standpoint, you’re significantly better at shorter distance races than the longer ones. Although I know you haven’t run a lot of marathons so maybe it’s just a matter of time before that evens up. I don’t know.

 

Edited by Juxtatarot
  • Like 3
Link to comment
Share on other sites

3 hours ago, Juxtatarot said:

You obviously get much of your speed through powerful strides instead of turnover. That makes sense since you have a background in weight training. I don’t recall if you are a heel striker or not but even if you are I assume you’re not overstriding or you would have had more injury problems.

One thing I’ve wondered about is if your style gets you in trouble in longer distance races. From a McMillan calculator standpoint, you’re significantly better at shorter distance races than the longer ones. Although I know you haven’t run a lot of marathons so maybe it’s just a matter of time before that evens up. I don’t know.

 

I think you're right, which is why I have made such an effort to increase my cadence - as naturally as possible anyway. Obviously no way of knowing now, but I think everything was really coming together in those 4-6 months before covid - effectively mixing speed workouts and weekend longs with paces under 7 then having the fitness to do it again the week after. I've had to remind myself of that more than few times throughout 2021 and I'm sure that will continue through summer. We'll see where I am once on the other side...

  • Like 4
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Haven't had more than about an hour between things today so I snuck downstairs to the treadmill for a quick run.  Did a mile at 6mph, then did a 2.1 at 7mph to complete a 28 minute 5k, then did a slower cool down mile and sweating in a meeting right now.  Not a record but not a bad time, and made me realize that I like getting that first crappy mile out of the way before starting my "real" run.  I usually walk 5 or 10 minutes as a warmup and then get right into my run but this felt better.   Also made me realize how easy it is to do this on my shorter run days, and how much it helps to clear my head when my brain is cooked from three letter acronyms. 

  • Like 6
Link to comment
Share on other sites

11 minutes ago, bostonfred said:

Haven't had more than about an hour between things today so I snuck downstairs to the treadmill for a quick run.  Did a mile at 6mph, then did a 2.1 at 7mph to complete a 28 minute 5k, then did a slower cool down mile and sweating in a meeting right now.  Not a record but not a bad time, and made me realize that I like getting that first crappy mile out of the way before starting my "real" run.  I usually walk 5 or 10 minutes as a warmup and then get right into my run but this felt better.   Also made me realize how easy it is to do this on my shorter run days, and how much it helps to clear my head when my brain is cooked from three letter acronyms. 

I've realized how important that warmup is for me, about a mile before the legs and cardio start to loosen up. I never feel great if I try to push it, and it's always slow first mile

Link to comment
Share on other sites

5 hours ago, El Floppo said:

I've realized how important that warmup is for me, about a mile before the legs and cardio start to loosen up. I never feel great if I try to push it, and it's always slow first mile

I found a 10-min pre-run warmup on the Peloton app that I really like.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

48 minutes ago, gruecd said:

I found a 10-min pre-run warmup on the Peloton app that I really like.

Just because it involves Kendall in yoga pants and a sports bra, it doesn’t mean it’s helping your running at all.

  • Like 1
  • Laughing 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

35 minutes ago, SteelCurtain said:

Just because it involves Kendall in yoga pants and a sports bra, it doesn’t mean it’s helping your running at all.

Shhhh...he's got an advanced nap session going with Aditi

  • Laughing 3
Link to comment
Share on other sites

35 minutes ago, SteelCurtain said:

Just because it involves Kendall in yoga pants and a sports bra, it doesn’t mean it’s helping your running at all.

Helps “blood flow” (IYKWIM)

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

7 minutes ago, El Floppo said:

Ok...we've had this talk already- but what is everybody doing for hydration on long runs?

Yes yan...gunga din.

The rest of you guys?

They turned on the water fountains this year so I’m good.

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

41 minutes ago, El Floppo said:

Ok...we've had this talk already- but what is everybody doing for hydration on long runs?

Yes yan...gunga din.

The rest of you guys?

An older version of this. I fill it about 80-90% full after each use then put it in the freezer. I take it out before I start getting ready to run so it's not a solid block of ice when I start. It starts to thaw in the heat after about 20-30 mins, which is when I start getting thirsty and it doesn't start to get lukewarm until sometime over an hour. If I'm going more than 80-90 minutes I try to route myself near parks with water fountains towards the end, just in case.

  • Thanks 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

On 5/20/2021 at 12:33 PM, SteelCurtain said:

So I signed up for the Donut Challenge for this Saturday.

 

Essentially, they give you a dozen Krispy Kreme donuts.  After each mile, you need to eat a donut.  Goal is to get to 12 miles and 12 donuts) the fastest. 

 

No idea how I'll do.  A few friends are doing it, so I decided to join.  What could go wrong?

I did a similar race a few years ago with my then 10yo. Run 2 miles to Krispy Kreme, eat a dozen donuts, run 2 miles back. We both got a dozen, I finished mine, he ate like 5 of his. They give you a sticker if you finish your dozen. And let you carry the leftovers if you don't. So there I was running back with the sticker and carrying his remaining 8. :shrug:

Link to comment
Share on other sites

4 hours ago, El Floppo said:

Ok...we've had this talk already- but what is everybody doing for hydration on long runs?

Yes yan...gunga din.

The rest of you guys?

Not taking in any fluids. Probably not the best strategy but that’s what I do.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Posted (edited)
3 hours ago, JShare87 said:

Not taking in any fluids. Probably not the best strategy but that’s what I do.

I only start hydrating on runs when it's above 75F or so.  I'll drop an insulated bottle at the beginning of my loop, and then use it at the halfway point.  Filled with water, Dr Price's Electrolyte mix, and ice, it will still be quite cold/icy even after an hour.

For very long trail runs, I'll wear my Salomon ADV 12, with a soft flask or two.  Filled with the above, or Tailwind.

Edited by Zasada
  • Like 1
  • Thanks 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Posted (edited)
3 hours ago, JShare87 said:

Not taking in any fluids. Probably not the best strategy but that’s what I do.

It's what I do too. (Eta... nice run this am, gb!)

And same sentiment.

I still have my old fuel belt and 4x 7oz bottles, which would be more than enough. I used to freeze the bottles too. When I dusted it off from storage last summer, it felt bouncier than I remembered which I didn't like (either the elastic is loosened or Ive just gotten used to not using it). It also doesn't fit my phone. I bought a decent sized hand flask, but that also felt too sloshy/bouncy when I took it out for a spin, but does fit my phone.

Dropping bottles off in the middle of Brooklyn or elsewhere in the city isn't exactly an option.

With the suck coming back and my fitness a lot better than last summer allowing longer and faster runs, I'll want to figure something out pdq. Will pull one do them out to trial tomorrow for my recovery run.

Off to try to do 15...

 

Edited by El Floppo
  • Like 1
  • Thanks 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

On 5/20/2021 at 7:04 AM, El Floppo said:
On 5/19/2021 at 7:17 AM, El Floppo said:

Scheduled recovery day today, and I'm still fried.

I think my Sunday run took a lot more out of me than I expected.

Or it's the ball aids.

Got back into a workout today- 1/4m intervals. Slower than it felt. Amazing how much last weekends run has taken out of me.

I want to do a long (15m +) run this weekend, but unless the legs recover feel like I'm going to have to slow the pace way down.

 

Did my 15 o&b...wanted to do ladder blocks of 3m with wu/cd. I guess it worked, but really struggled holding a pace at any of the blocks and wasn't as distinct in the ladders as I had planned. Wanted to finish the last mile under 7 before the bridge home but the wheels kinda came off.

Not sure what's going on, but still fried. HR isn't going crazy at least, even though I feel crappy. Might be stress/lack of sleep.

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Restore formatting

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×
  • Create New...