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2020 Democratic Presidential Straw Poll


Juxtatarot

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49 minutes ago, Gopher State said:

Recent poll by Des Moines Register of primary dem voters/support shows 32 percent support Biden and 3 percent support Kloubachar.  The poll claims Iowa voters want experience.  To lazy to post a link, but feel free to google it.  I use to live in MN, and don’t understand the love for Kloubachar.

I understand why you don’t understand

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29 minutes ago, Juxtatarot said:

It might not be a good idea to announce running for President weeks after being sworn in.

are the poll entries are all announced candidates?

don't that much care - i dont see anything in this list but hasbeens & neverwases whose names are only known because of the scramble for power over an already rotted-out fed govt. there are no reform candidates, Bernie is still the only Bernhead. just thought that a participant in and dauphin of the Cali turnaround might have some heft in this bunch.

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56 minutes ago, Gopher State said:

Recent poll by Des Moines Register of primary dem voters/support shows 32 percent support Biden and 3 percent support Kloubachar.  The poll claims Iowa voters want experience.  To lazy to post a link, but feel free to google it.  I use to live in MN, and don’t understand the love for Kloubachar.

Odd...this is a 180 from November from you.

https://forums.footballguys.com/forum/topic/772212-amy-klobuchar-for-president-2020/?do=findComment&comment=21495896

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7 hours ago, Juxtatarot said:

The surprises for me in the results are:

1.  Klobuchar.  I knew she'd do well but I didn't think she'd win.

2. The lack of support to those candidates on the far left.  I thought Sanders would do much better and Warren currently has zero votes!  I'm not sure if this means the board is closer to the center left than I thought or if the majority is being pragmatic.

 

This boards day to day crowd is DINO heavy, my guess 70%.

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3 hours ago, the moops said:

She has bipartisan appeal and has won her senate seats going away. Even people who voted for her opponent have nice things to say about her. You are in a huge minority here

Ok, maybe more people love her in MN then I think, but the early polls show she is a Huge minority in the first primary, I don’t think she has the appeal outside of MN.  I yet to see a poll with more then 5 percent support for her.  Biden has been the favorite on every poll that I seen.  Of course it’s early, and maybe Joe doesn’t run.  I wish her well and peace to you.

 

 

 

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3 hours ago, the moops said:

She has bipartisan appeal and has won her senate seats going away. Even people who voted for her opponent have nice things to say about her. You are in a huge minority here

They said similar things about Walter Mondale. But in his landslide defeat he only carried his homestate of MN and DC.

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8 hours ago, elkurzhal said:

Current mayor of South Bend, Pete Buttigieg (Boot - a - judge) will probably be making an announcement any day that he is running.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pete_Buttigieg

Short version...
- 36 year old
- Harvard Grad
- Veteran of 7 month tour in Afghanistan in 2013,  remains a lieutenant in the Naval Reserve.
- Openly Gay

Edit to add - Currently 200-1 at Landbrokes. 

At least Trump won't be able to come up with some childish nickname. 

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1 hour ago, Gopher State said:

Ok, maybe more people love her in MN then I think, but the early polls show she is a Huge minority in the first primary, I don’t think she has the appeal outside of MN.  I yet to see a poll with more then 5 percent support for her.  Biden has been the favorite on every poll that I seen.  Of course it’s early, and maybe Joe doesn’t run.  I wish her well and peace to you.

 

 

 

I have no idea if she has a chance, but the early polls are meaningless. They’re basically name recognition only. In late 2006 Hillary Clinton had a 50 point lead over Barack Obama. In late 2014, Jeb Bush led all Republicans by double digits; Trump wasn’t in any polls. 

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1 minute ago, timschochet said:

Mondale ran against one of the most popular, charismatic Presidents ever. Klobuchar, if she gets the nomination, won’t have that problem. 

Mondale was as bland as Klobuchar. No matter who he ran against he wouldn't have generated much more enthusiasm or excitement among Democrats.

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Just now, squistion said:

Mondale was as bland as Klobuchar. No matter who he ran against he wouldn't have generated much more enthusiasm or excitement among Democrats.

All I’m saying is that no Democrat beats Reagan in 1984. Mondale was a sacrificial lamb. He’s not the example you want of a lost opportunity. 

Better examples are McGovern in 1972, Dukakis in 1988, Kerry in 2004, and, I must regretfully admit, Hillary in 2016. In all 4 of those instances, the Democratic Party might have won with a better candidate. 

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7 hours ago, timschochet said:

There was no work Bernie could have done in the South. 

IMO, the southern primaries for the Democratic Party are the least democratic aspect of our Presidential politics, period. There are 3 reasons for this: the first is that most of them are caucuses. The second is that, over the past 40 years, southern whites have largely abandoned the Democratic Party, making it dominated by African-Americans. The 3rd reason is that African-American voting in the South is led by churches more than it is anywhere else in the nation: the ministers endorse a candidate and that is who gets voted for. 

So what you have in these states is a very small group of people deciding who the winner is going to be. In 2008, that was Barack Obama. In 2016, that was Hillary Clinton. It’s not the single deciding factor for the entire Democratic Party, but it is extremely significant and usually decisive. 

 

Um. What?  I can't think of a single southern state outside of Kentucky maybe that does caucus for primaries. :confused:

i have no idea how you came up with the rest

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6 hours ago, Gopher State said:

Recent poll by Des Moines Register of primary dem voters/support shows 32 percent support Biden and 3 percent support Kloubachar.  The poll claims Iowa voters want experience.  To lazy to post a link, but feel free to google it.  I use to live in MN, and don’t understand the love for Kloubachar.

This makes even more sense now.  

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1 hour ago, squistion said:

Mondale was as bland as Klobuchar. No matter who he ran against he wouldn't have generated much more enthusiasm or excitement among Democrats.

I’m really not looking forward to you trotting out this “bland” argument for the next 16 months.  Just sayin.

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14 hours ago, timschochet said:

Mondale ran against one of the most popular, charismatic Presidents ever. Klobuchar, if she gets the nomination, won’t have that problem. 

Um, I don't know if you've heard this, but Trump is the greetest most awesomest President ever who won in a landslide and is loved by real Americans.

He said so.

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13 hours ago, The Commish said:

Um. What?  I can't think of a single southern state outside of Kentucky maybe that does caucus for primaries. :confused:

i have no idea how you came up with the rest

You’re correct. My info was off on that. Florida did have a Caucus but not anymore. 

The rest of what I wrote though is valid, based on some articles I read a few years ago- opinion, but I found it compelling. 

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21 minutes ago, timschochet said:

You’re correct. My info was off on that. Florida did have a Caucus but not anymore. 

The rest of what I wrote though is valid, based on some articles I read a few years ago- opinion, but I found it compelling. 

I'll give you my :2cents: from living here my whole life.  Keep in mind I dont have the articles in front of me that you've read, but when you say "African-American voting in the South is led by churches more than it is anywhere else in the nation" this may be true, but it does NOT mean they mindlessly vote for whoever their minister says.  African Americans here in the south seem to always feel they are picking from a group of people who are going to screw them least.  Oddly enough, that sentiment still applied to Obama even though it was less pervasive.  That sentiment will always be around.  That's the damage done to this group of citizens and its quite sad.

I don't disagree that white people have left the party.  I don't think that's a large number outside of white females though.  If we're being honest, they were an ignored group outside of abortion.  They followed their husbands as a "good woman should".  That social dynamic is changing quickly it seems and with the flat out verbalization of misogyny, they are being pushed back towards the Democrats.  

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11 hours ago, timschochet said:

You’re correct. My info was off on that. Florida did have a Caucus but not anymore. 

The rest of what I wrote though is valid, based on some articles I read a few years ago- opinion, but I found it compelling. 

It might be true in MS and AL, but that’s decidedly not true in VA, NC, GA, and FL. 

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11 hours ago, The Dude said:

I think if they can pair a strong 1 with Beto at vice, we got a winner.

Unless Kasich is the republican nominee

I prefer a ticket with the younger candidate at the top and a more experienced person at VP.

When was the last time somebody won the White House without the more experienced person being the VP? The formula, for a long time, seems to be to put the more exciting candidate that will drive votes at the top, and give them a VP to fill the experience gap (or win them a few key states). I'd even say a good VP candidate might be a little boring (seemingly level-headed to make voters feel like they can help guide the wet behind the ears Presidential candidate). 

I say, let Beto/Kamala/Booker/Klobuchar fight it out for the nomination, then go with Warren or somebody as VP. 11 years in the Senate probably makes Klobuchar a good candidate for the "experienced VP" role. A likable Midwesterner at VP to help ground a ticket that might be led by a more progressive candidate from a coast or a young buck like Beto could the be the right answer.

 

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My two biggest areas of concern heading into this election are climate change and healthcare - we need to drastically reduce emissions and adopt single payer healthcare ASAP. To that end, I think Bernie would be the best person for the job. He's never been worried about pushing the envelope on policy, and that's the attitude we need in the climate debate especially. He's not perfect, and I could certainly be convinced to change sides once other candidates' policy proposals roll out, but I feel like most of the democratic field is going to take a softer stance on those critical issues.

 

 

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23 minutes ago, caustic said:

My two biggest areas of concern heading into this election are climate change and healthcare - we need to drastically reduce emissions and adopt single payer healthcare ASAP. To that end, I think Bernie would be the best person for the job. He's never been worried about pushing the envelope on policy, and that's the attitude we need in the climate debate especially. He's not perfect, and I could certainly be convinced to change sides once other candidates' policy proposals roll out, but I feel like most of the democratic field is going to take a softer stance on those critical issues.

 

 

I agree but people, especially on this board care about the person and not policy.

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27 minutes ago, caustic said:

My two biggest areas of concern heading into this election are climate change and healthcare - we need to drastically reduce emissions and adopt single payer healthcare ASAP. To that end, I think Bernie would be the best person for the job. He's never been worried about pushing the envelope on policy, and that's the attitude we need in the climate debate especially. He's not perfect, and I could certainly be convinced to change sides once other candidates' policy proposals roll out, but I feel like most of the democratic field is going to take a softer stance on those critical issues.

 

 

I will give you the rebuttal.  Bernie is too old.  Policy will never pass.  How will we pay for it? War is ok.  Climate change policy is better when letting lobbyist make policy, medicare for all can't happen because it would cost the healthcare sector too much.  Saved 70% of the board much time.  All bs btw.

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On 12/27/2018 at 9:57 AM, Maurile Tremblay said:

Just because I don’t know where else to put this ... some data re populist leaders:

https://twitter.com/yascha_mounk/status/1077997504573177858

Populist is one of those terms for political leaders that tends to confuse me.  If I go off the dictionary definition then almost every politician I can remember tries to act like they are a populist. So, can you tell me what your definition of a populism/populist is and what you see as the key problems with it?

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1 hour ago, AAABatteries said:

Populist is one of those terms for political leaders that tends to confuse me.  If I go off the dictionary definition then almost every politician I can remember tries to act like they are a populist. So, can you tell me what your definition of a populism/populist is and what you see as the key problems with it?

Make sure you look into the comprehensive global dataset.  WTF.

But, please don't use real data.

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6 hours ago, AAABatteries said:

Populist is one of those terms for political leaders that tends to confuse me.  If I go off the dictionary definition then almost every politician I can remember tries to act like they are a populist. So, can you tell me what your definition of a populism/populist is and what you see as the key problems with it?

Good question because the dictionary definition doesn't really capture how the term is used.

A shortcut to thinking about populism is that it's a rebellion against elitism (also pretty vaguely defined). You know how people complain about "the elites" such as globalist free-traders, deep-state public servants, out-of-touch journalists, ivory-tower professors, self-serving institutional leaders, and know-it-all scientists with all of their technocratic, evidence-based solutions published in fancy-sounding journals and whatnot? Populists are the ones attacking all that stuff whether from the left ("we need protectionist tariffs to protect the common folk in this country") or from the right ("we need a border wall to protect the common folk in this country").

Populists distrust professional expertise, preferring simple, common-sense slogans filled with typos. A populist politician focuses on issues where a man on the street would most sharply disagree with a university professor in his chosen field -- about trade policy, immigration, whatever -- and sides with the man on the street.

Populism is correlated with authoritarianism because it takes a strong leader, who must be given extraordinary powers, to stand up to all of the various institutions run by elites -- i.e., to drain the swamp.

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7 minutes ago, Maurile Tremblay said:

Good question because the dictionary definition doesn't really capture how the term is used.

A shortcut to thinking about populism is that it's a rebellion against elitism (also pretty vaguely defined). You know how people complain about "the elites" such as globalist free-traders, deep-state public servants, out-of-touch journalists, ivory-tower professors, self-serving institutional leaders, and know-it-all scientists with all of their technocratic, evidence-based solutions published in fancy-sounding journals and whatnot? Populists are the ones attacking all that stuff whether from the left ("we need protectionist tariffs to protect the common folk in this country") or from the right ("we need a border wall to protect the common folk in this country").

Populists distrust professional expertise, preferring simple, common-sense slogans filled with typos. A populist politician focuses on issues where a man on the street would most sharply with a university professor in his chosen field -- about trade policy, immigration, whatever -- and sides with the man on the street.

Populism is correlated with authoritarianism because it takes a strong leader, who must be given extraordinary power, to stand up to all of the various institutions run by elites -- i.e., to drain the swamp.

Macron a populist?

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I grew up believing that populism was a Democratic domain. At 13yo i canvassed for Sen Eugene McCarthy because so many local kids were dying overseas and he was considered, with Sens Harold Hughes of IA & George McGovern of SD, part of a populist triangle. While probably three of the most liberal Senators ever, 'twas the common, decent (with tolerance a lynchpin of decency) person of peace and reverence they sought to represent. I became friendly with Sen Fred Harris of OK when i covered his Presidential campaign in '76 and then when he moved to Albq to teach history @ UNM and he would wax majestic for hours (had the great pleasure of watching him bat it around w Teddy Kennedy over lunch @ La Placita once) on the concept. I wish they made more citizens like that now...

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7 minutes ago, wikkidpissah said:

I grew up believing that populism was a Democratic domain. At 13yo i canvassed for Sen Eugene McCarthy because so many local kids were dying overseas and he was considered, with Sens Harold Hughes of IA & George McGovern of SD, part of a populist triangle. While probably three of the most liberal Senators ever, 'twas the common, decent (with tolerance a lynchpin of decency) person of peace and reverence they sought to represent. I became friendly with Sen Fred Harris of OK when i covered his Presidential campaign in '76 and then when he moved to Albq to teach history @ UNM and he would wax majestic for hours (had the great pleasure of watching him bat it around w Teddy Kennedy over lunch @ La Placita once) on the concept. I wish they made more citizens like that now...

Who are the 3 most liberal Senators now?  IYO.

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8 minutes ago, IC FBGCav said:

Who are the 3 most liberal Senators now?  IYO.

I stopped following such things when i gave up on our Fed Govt in June of '09. I won't return until i see a genuine reform movement, including a constitutional amendment reversing Citizens United, which basically means i wont return. Y'all are rearranging deck chairs on the Titanic til that happens.

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Just now, wikkidpissah said:

I stopped following such things when i gave up on our Fed Govt in June of '09. I won't return until i see a genuine reform movement, including a constitutional amendment reversing Citizens United, which basically means i wont return. Y'all are rearranging chairs on the Titanic til that happens.

Thank you brother, I can not disagree.

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10 hours ago, caustic said:

My two biggest areas of concern heading into this election are climate change and healthcare - we need to drastically reduce emissions and adopt single payer healthcare ASAP. To that end, I think Bernie would be the best person for the job. He's never been worried about pushing the envelope on policy, and that's the attitude we need in the climate debate especially. He's not perfect, and I could certainly be convinced to change sides once other candidates' policy proposals roll out, but I feel like most of the democratic field is going to take a softer stance on those critical issues.

 

 

I really like Bernie. My only knock is his age.

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Thank you to 

E Street Brat, WilliamBonney, cubd8, rustycolts, Don't Noonan, ManOfSteelhead, jonrolly, butcher boy for being real. A big anti-thank you to the <Trump Supporters> or "Gary Johnson voters" or burn it all down progressives who decided to poop on the poll because we all know you aren't going to vote D anyway.

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