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Ive called another 4 places today and no one has the point, let alone the packers cut

Culdeus, My wife wants me to try with just the flat. Any recommendations so I dont dry it out

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Ive called another 4 places today and no one has the point, let alone the packers cutCuldeus, My wife wants me to try with just the flat. Any recommendations so I dont dry it out

What makes this cut so hard to find? Is it so large that few people order it to cook?

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Ive called another 4 places today and no one has the point, let alone the packers cutCuldeus, My wife wants me to try with just the flat. Any recommendations so I dont dry it out

Nobody sells just the point. You won't find that. Maybe it is a texas thing to find packers in cryo-bags. Basically 100% of grocery stores here carry them and most of the time there are at least 6-12 of them on hand. It is actually more rare to see a flat being sold in all but the jewish areas around here.

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Ive called another 4 places today and no one has the point, let alone the packers cutCuldeus, My wife wants me to try with just the flat. Any recommendations so I dont dry it out

I've been wanting to try this method. It's more of a mashup and on a green egg it's probably ok.Injecting with beef broth is probably a good idea.Let it go at 225 until it hits about 150F or so. Double wrap it in foil. When it starts moving past 165 I would consider removing it from the foil though this isn't necessarily required and introduces some risk.Use whatever fluid collected in the foil and a decent sauce and mop it every 30 minutes. It's not super important the egg temp once you are past the stall. Before you want to keep it as smooth as possible up to the point where you hit about 100F internal. Depending on when you want to serve you can wrap it up again or let it rest once it is passing the fork test.

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Glad I saw this thread today.

Wanted to tell you all thanks for all the assistance last month -- finally got my heat control figured out and my thanksgiving bird was amazing. Easily the best I've ever made. My fiancée said "make sure you tell your message board nerd friends thanks for the help."

Soooooooooooo.....prime rib tips? :D

Edited by Premier

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Man I am so addicted to cooking on this thing. Firing it up already today. :towelwave:

What brand charcoal do you guys use? Went to my "authorized retailer" last night to get more, and they wanted 30 dollars a bag. :shock:

Wicked Good Charcoal

They sell it at my local Ace Hardware. Or you can order it off of Ace's corporate site and have it delivered to your store.

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I have a shop vac that I use to clean out the thing pretty well between cooks. A lot of crap can pile up in the 12 o clock position behind the fire box. They don't like you to take the fire box out too often, but i don't see how it is avoidable at least monthly.

I use my leaf blower. Just pull out all the big chunks of lump, open up the vents and dome, cover my eyes with my elbow/forearm and have at it.

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I have a shop vac that I use to clean out the thing pretty well between cooks. A lot of crap can pile up in the 12 o clock position behind the fire box. They don't like you to take the fire box out too often, but i don't see how it is avoidable at least monthly.

I use my leaf blower. Just pull out all the big chunks of lump, open up the vents and dome, cover my eyes with my elbow/forearm and have at it.
lol, seriously? video this sometime. Edited by culdeus

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Glad I saw this thread today. Wanted to tell you all thanks for all the assistance last month -- finally got my heat control figured out and my thanksgiving bird was amazing. Easily the best I've ever made. My fiancée said "make sure you tell your message board nerd friends thanks for the help."

:thumbup:

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Glad I saw this thread today. Wanted to tell you all thanks for all the assistance last month -- finally got my heat control figured out and my thanksgiving bird was amazing. Easily the best I've ever made. My fiancée said "make sure you tell your message board nerd friends thanks for the help."

:thumbup:
Premier, what turned out to be the main issue with the heat control?

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Just picked one up for my mother as a gift. Can't wait to try it out.

Sweet! What size did you get her?
While it's just her by herself, I still ended up getting the large based on recs in here and other places I read. I saw the medium today in the store and agree that it's not just about how many you're cooking for but makes doing a slab of ribs difficult with the medium. Gonna try it out for the first time tomorrow in the cold weather...looking forward to it.

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Just picked one up for my mother as a gift. Can't wait to try it out.

Sweet! What size did you get her?
While it's just her by herself, I still ended up getting the large based on recs in here and other places I read. I saw the medium today in the store and agree that it's not just about how many you're cooking for but makes doing a slab of ribs difficult with the medium. Gonna try it out for the first time tomorrow in the cold weather...looking forward to it.
Sounds good. The large is a nice size. Hope she has great luck with it.

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Gonna try it out for the first time tomorrow in the cold weather...looking forward to it.

This is a good topic. How many winter warriors are out there with their eggs?Here in Boston I definitely cook outside less in the cold but I still try and use it time to time. Instead of multiple times a week from spring to fall, I use it more like a couple of times a month in winter.

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Glad I saw this thread today. Wanted to tell you all thanks for all the assistance last month -- finally got my heat control figured out and my thanksgiving bird was amazing. Easily the best I've ever made. My fiancée said "make sure you tell your message board nerd friends thanks for the help."

:thumbup:
Premier, what turned out to be the main issue with the heat control?
Definitely lack of charcoal. Wasn't filling it up to the correct level.

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Glad I saw this thread today. Wanted to tell you all thanks for all the assistance last month -- finally got my heat control figured out and my thanksgiving bird was amazing. Easily the best I've ever made. My fiancée said "make sure you tell your message board nerd friends thanks for the help."

:thumbup:
Premier, what turned out to be the main issue with the heat control?
Definitely lack of charcoal. Wasn't filling it up to the correct level.
Great! That was probably the best and easiest problem to fix. Good job getting the pic for people, it really helped showcase a possible problem. Edited by NewlyRetired

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Gonna try it out for the first time tomorrow in the cold weather...looking forward to it.

This is a good topic. How many winter warriors are out there with their eggs?Here in Boston I definitely cook outside less in the cold but I still try and use it time to time. Instead of multiple times a week from spring to fall, I use it more like a couple of times a month in winter.
NYC and have cooked more in this first winter with my Egg than any year previously with a gas grill. I need some kind on clip-on light because it gets dark too early. Once a weekend and once or twice a week. But it has been insanely warm so far this winter. I have it in the back of my yard (think Rodneys yard during Easy Money)Not sure if I'll trudge through snow to get to it. Maybe if it was just on a deck by the house.

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Only time I've ever seen a M deployed was next to a L.

I actually see a lot of dual setups on golf course homes and stuff :stalker:

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Gonna try it out for the first time tomorrow in the cold weather...looking forward to it.

This is a good topic. How many winter warriors are out there with their eggs?Here in Boston I definitely cook outside less in the cold but I still try and use it time to time. Instead of multiple times a week from spring to fall, I use it more like a couple of times a month in winter.
NYC and have cooked more in this first winter with my Egg than any year previously with a gas grill. I need some kind on clip-on light because it gets dark too early. Once a weekend and once or twice a week. But it has been insanely warm so far this winter. I have it in the back of my yard (think Rodneys yard during Easy Money)Not sure if I'll trudge through snow to get to it. Maybe if it was just on a deck by the house.
I grill all winter long - running in and out with the headlight on over my winter hat so I can see what's going on out there. By mid-winter, I'll have a path carved through the back yard leading to my grill.

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I havent read the entire thread so forgive a couple of questions:

#1- How easy to clean?

#2 - Where does the ash go? I use a webber kettle to smoke and it has a sweet ash pot in the bottom that is easily removed

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Xmas present from the GF:

- L BGE

- L place setter

- electric Looftlighter

So pumped!!!! First cook coming Sunday. Has anyone done chicken breasts over spatchcock chicken? Dunno if we'll get the bone in chicken before first cook tomorrow

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I havent read the entire thread so forgive a couple of questions:#1- How easy to clean?#2 - Where does the ash go? I use a webber kettle to smoke and it has a sweet ash pot in the bottom that is easily removed

It acts as a self cleaning oven. You perform what is called a clean burn, which is simply a high temp cook with no food. All ash settles to bottom of Egg. There is a vent that can be fully open to clean out ash. Edited by NewlyRetired

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Really happy with the first use the other day. Will be using on New Year's to do some grilling for guests. It was actually nice grilling out in the cold in this thing.

Issue I ran into with the first cook was going from indirect to direct heat. I did some pork steaks at 300 on indirect heat with the plate setter for about an hour and a half. I then added some sauce and wanted to do a final sear along with cooking a couple steaks and realized it wasn't going to be easy to get the platesetter out. I ended up just putting it along the edges and it worked well but I will try to remove it next time with some oven mitts. Not sure how that will go.

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Really happy with the first use the other day. Will be using on New Year's to do some grilling for guests. It was actually nice grilling out in the cold in this thing.Issue I ran into with the first cook was going from indirect to direct heat. I did some pork steaks at 300 on indirect heat with the plate setter for about an hour and a half. I then added some sauce and wanted to do a final sear along with cooking a couple steaks and realized it wasn't going to be easy to get the platesetter out. I ended up just putting it along the edges and it worked well but I will try to remove it next time with some oven mitts. Not sure how that will go.

Wifey bought me some welding gloves. They work great for quickly moving the plate setter. Just make sure you have some place non burn able to put it. I move mine to ceramic tiles when hot.

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Really happy with the first use the other day. Will be using on New Year's to do some grilling for guests. It was actually nice grilling out in the cold in this thing.Issue I ran into with the first cook was going from indirect to direct heat. I did some pork steaks at 300 on indirect heat with the plate setter for about an hour and a half. I then added some sauce and wanted to do a final sear along with cooking a couple steaks and realized it wasn't going to be easy to get the platesetter out. I ended up just putting it along the edges and it worked well but I will try to remove it next time with some oven mitts. Not sure how that will go.

Yeah, you gotta get in there with flame proof gloves to get the setter out, then turn all vents wide open and take the daisy off.Or just lick your fingers and grab it. :banned:

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Really happy with the first use the other day. Will be using on New Year's to do some grilling for guests. It was actually nice grilling out in the cold in this thing.Issue I ran into with the first cook was going from indirect to direct heat. I did some pork steaks at 300 on indirect heat with the plate setter for about an hour and a half. I then added some sauce and wanted to do a final sear along with cooking a couple steaks and realized it wasn't going to be easy to get the platesetter out. I ended up just putting it along the edges and it worked well but I will try to remove it next time with some oven mitts. Not sure how that will go.

Yeah, you gotta get in there with flame proof gloves to get the setter out, then turn all vents wide open and take the daisy off.Or just lick your fingers and grab it. :banned:
Serious question, if I'm doing a slow cook at 300 degrees or so, I should be able to grab it with some oven mitts, right? Or am I going to burn my hand and drop and break my stone for a lovely and costly story?

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Really happy with the first use the other day. Will be using on New Year's to do some grilling for guests. It was actually nice grilling out in the cold in this thing.Issue I ran into with the first cook was going from indirect to direct heat. I did some pork steaks at 300 on indirect heat with the plate setter for about an hour and a half. I then added some sauce and wanted to do a final sear along with cooking a couple steaks and realized it wasn't going to be easy to get the platesetter out. I ended up just putting it along the edges and it worked well but I will try to remove it next time with some oven mitts. Not sure how that will go.

Yeah, you gotta get in there with flame proof gloves to get the setter out, then turn all vents wide open and take the daisy off.Or just lick your fingers and grab it. :banned:
Serious question, if I'm doing a slow cook at 300 degrees or so, I should be able to grab it with some oven mitts, right? Or am I going to burn my hand and drop and break my stone for a lovely and costly story?
It works fine if you can set it down ASAP. Also keep in mind how the sides of the inside of the thing are hot too so don't chicken wing on the way out. I graduated to the spider so it's a lIttle more tricky for me now.

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Got the large BGE for Christmas and very excited. Planning to use it for the first time today. A little nervous about using it the first time though! I think I am going to go with spatchcock chicken as I believe I read to keep the temps around 350 or so for the first few cooks. Might throw a fattie on there too.

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Got the large BGE for Christmas and very excited. Planning to use it for the first time today. A little nervous about using it the first time though! I think I am going to go with spatchcock chicken as I believe I read to keep the temps around 350 or so for the first few cooks. Might throw a fattie on there too.

which gasket did yours come with? Some are starting with nomex now so it is not so important to temper it in.

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Ive called another 4 places today and no one has the point, let alone the packers cut

Culdeus, My wife wants me to try with just the flat. Any recommendations so I dont dry it out

I've spent the better part of today doing research on what kind of smoker to buy. Found this earlier, seems like it could be a good resource
thanks. Culdeus actually posted this earlier. I appreciate it.

I won't tell you my story. It's a little embarrassing. :bag:

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Got the large BGE for Christmas and very excited. Planning to use it for the first time today. A little nervous about using it the first time though! I think I am going to go with spatchcock chicken as I believe I read to keep the temps around 350 or so for the first few cooks. Might throw a fattie on there too.

The spatchcock is a fantastic first cook for the Egg! Congrats on your gift. Note that some people benefit from using a raised grill when spatchcocking a chicken. I tend to always use one, I like keeping it a few inches higher above the flame so that flare ups won't burn the skin.

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Ive called another 4 places today and no one has the point, let alone the packers cut

Culdeus, My wife wants me to try with just the flat. Any recommendations so I dont dry it out

I've spent the better part of today doing research on what kind of smoker to buy. Found this earlier, seems like it could be a good resource
Let us know what smoker you end up buying.

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Got the large BGE for Christmas and very excited. Planning to use it for the first time today. A little nervous about using it the first time though! I think I am going to go with spatchcock chicken as I believe I read to keep the temps around 350 or so for the first few cooks. Might throw a fattie on there too.

which gasket did yours come with? Some are starting with nomex now so it is not so important to temper it in.
Mine has what looks to be felt around the rim. She got me the large BGE, plate setter, cast iron grate, a bag of lump charcoal, BGE cookbook, grill cover and the fire strarters. Awesome gift to get me started on this thing.I am looking at getting the raised grill and pizza stone next. I assume you can used the raised grill with the cast iron grate?

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Gameplan tonight

-Spatched lemon chicken

-1/2" above feltline direct

-On at 450 set Q to 375 once on

-Off at 155 White Meat

Pull grid

Place spider

Shoulder on at 200 over 1.5# of post oak on the coals at feltline

Shoulder off at 195 sometime tomorrow for a NYE thing.

Will track all on the igrill

Photos of my setup flickr stream. I still haven't settled on the long term location for the thing. You can sort of see what I'm working with space wise here.

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Got the large BGE for Christmas and very excited. Planning to use it for the first time today. A little nervous about using it the first time though! I think I am going to go with spatchcock chicken as I believe I read to keep the temps around 350 or so for the first few cooks. Might throw a fattie on there too.

which gasket did yours come with? Some are starting with nomex now so it is not so important to temper it in.

Mine has what looks to be felt around the rim. She got me the large BGE, plate setter, cast iron grate, a bag of lump charcoal, BGE cookbook, grill cover and the fire strarters. Awesome gift to get me started on this thing.

I am looking at getting the raised grill and pizza stone next. I assume you can used the raised grill with the cast iron grate?

Probably. I opted for the oval grate with the raised grid (see photos). I can't really see a reason to run a raised CI grid though. People are usually coming up with ways to get CI closer to the coals.

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Got the large BGE for Christmas and very excited. Planning to use it for the first time today. A little nervous about using it the first time though! I think I am going to go with spatchcock chicken as I believe I read to keep the temps around 350 or so for the first few cooks. Might throw a fattie on there too.

which gasket did yours come with? Some are starting with nomex now so it is not so important to temper it in.

Mine has what looks to be felt around the rim. She got me the large BGE, plate setter, cast iron grate, a bag of lump charcoal, BGE cookbook, grill cover and the fire strarters. Awesome gift to get me started on this thing.

I am looking at getting the raised grill and pizza stone next. I assume you can used the raised grill with the cast iron grate?

Probably. I opted for the oval grate with the raised grid (see photos). I can't really see a reason to run a raised CI grid though. People are usually coming up with ways to get CI closer to the coals.

the cast iron grate is the only one I got. My wife told me the salesperson upgraded me to that one..not sure on that. I don't have a problem keeping that one on the bottom, I would just like to get the option to raise the surface up for more cooking space when needed.

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Got the large BGE for Christmas and very excited. Planning to use it for the first time today. A little nervous about using it the first time though! I think I am going to go with spatchcock chicken as I believe I read to keep the temps around 350 or so for the first few cooks. Might throw a fattie on there too.

which gasket did yours come with? Some are starting with nomex now so it is not so important to temper it in.

Mine has what looks to be felt around the rim. She got me the large BGE, plate setter, cast iron grate, a bag of lump charcoal, BGE cookbook, grill cover and the fire strarters. Awesome gift to get me started on this thing.

I am looking at getting the raised grill and pizza stone next. I assume you can used the raised grill with the cast iron grate?

Probably. I opted for the oval grate with the raised grid (see photos). I can't really see a reason to run a raised CI grid though. People are usually coming up with ways to get CI closer to the coals.

the cast iron grate is the only one I got. My wife told me the salesperson upgraded me to that one..not sure on that. I don't have a problem keeping that one on the bottom, I would just like to get the option to raise the surface up for more cooking space when needed.

I purchased a second grate and then simply added some bolts to it. When ever I want a raised surface I just add the second shelf. Looks like this, it just sits on top of the grill that would normally be on the egg.

http://winnipeggheads.files.wordpress.com/2012/09/img_0557.jpg

Edited by NewlyRetired

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Anybody have a kamado joe? There's one on sale from a local dealer, comes with accessories and whatnot too.

My link

There's also a Primo XL for a grand from another dealer.

Well, this is a thorough review, for anyone else who may have the same question
KJ seems to have a better gasket system straight out of the box. Also about 200 bucks cheaper on MSRP.

Effectively the same product more or less. I am not so sure about how they implement the top vent. the gasket seal may have some unintended consequences, however I'd have to mess with it some to see.

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So this is a more general grilling question, but here goes:

I was making some pork steaks again yesterday. My wife marinated most of them in a soy sauce mixture and I did a couple with another dry rub with the plan on doing BBQ sauce at the end again. The last set I did on 300 degrees for 1 1/2 hours were perfect so I did the same. Since it was snowing yesterday while I was grilling, I didn't want to open up the grill throughout. So I checked in after an hour and the marinated steaks were way too done already. The 2 dry rub steaks were fine.

Are "wet" marinated meats going to cook that much faster than dry rubs? If so, is it the temperature or the cooking time I should adjust?

Also, do you guys put in a lot of charcoal to start and then add little by little or do you add an amount you think you'll need for a particular grilling session?

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So this is a more general grilling question, but here goes:I was making some pork steaks again yesterday. My wife marinated most of them in a soy sauce mixture and I did a couple with another dry rub with the plan on doing BBQ sauce at the end again. The last set I did on 300 degrees for 1 1/2 hours were perfect so I did the same. Since it was snowing yesterday while I was grilling, I didn't want to open up the grill throughout. So I checked in after an hour and the marinated steaks were way too done already. The 2 dry rub steaks were fine.Are "wet" marinated meats going to cook that much faster than dry rubs? If so, is it the temperature or the cooking time I should adjust?Also, do you guys put in a lot of charcoal to start and then add little by little or do you add an amount you think you'll need for a particular grilling session?

By what method did you determine they were way too done? A wet marinade will caramelize in a more apparent manner if it has sugar than a dry rub. I can't imagine a pork steak taking 90 minutes to cook at 300. I would think more like 20-30. Thermometers are your friend.

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So this is a more general grilling question, but here goes:I was making some pork steaks again yesterday. My wife marinated most of them in a soy sauce mixture and I did a couple with another dry rub with the plan on doing BBQ sauce at the end again. The last set I did on 300 degrees for 1 1/2 hours were perfect so I did the same. Since it was snowing yesterday while I was grilling, I didn't want to open up the grill throughout. So I checked in after an hour and the marinated steaks were way too done already. The 2 dry rub steaks were fine.

how thick were the steaks?I am shocked about the 90 minutes at 300 like Culdeus was, that seems way too long unless these were extraordinarily thick steaks.In the end though, try to only use the clock to gauge a rough time to cook. Always probe your meat with a thermometer to determine the inside temperature of the meat.

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Also, do you guys put in a lot of charcoal to start and then add little by little or do you add an amount you think you'll need for a particular grilling session?

I always fill it to the fire ring. You can always use the leftover for next time

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Anybody have a kamado joe? There's one on sale from a local dealer, comes with accessories and whatnot too.

My link

There's also a Primo XL for a grand from another dealer.

Well, this is a thorough review, for anyone else who may have the same question
I've had a KJ for a couple of years now. I love it. I think the Naked whiz review is spot on. No disadvantages that I can see, and you'll save a few bucks.

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So this is a more general grilling question, but here goes:I was making some pork steaks again yesterday. My wife marinated most of them in a soy sauce mixture and I did a couple with another dry rub with the plan on doing BBQ sauce at the end again. The last set I did on 300 degrees for 1 1/2 hours were perfect so I did the same. Since it was snowing yesterday while I was grilling, I didn't want to open up the grill throughout. So I checked in after an hour and the marinated steaks were way too done already. The 2 dry rub steaks were fine.

how thick were the steaks?I am shocked about the 90 minutes at 300 like Culdeus was, that seems way too long unless these were extraordinarily thick steaks.In the end though, try to only use the clock to gauge a rough time to cook. Always probe your meat with a thermometer to determine the inside temperature of the meat.
They were pretty thick (over an inch) although I didn't take into account that the 2nd set of steaks I made weren't as thick. When I looked it up online, I saw anywhere from 250-300 for 1 to 1 1/2 hours (and some even longer). I'll play around with it and try much less next time. But back to the original question, will these meats cook faster being marinated vs. just having a rub? I know the outside will char more, but these were still done on indirect heat and I didn't realize there might be a difference.

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But back to the original question, will these meats cook faster being marinated vs. just having a rub? I know the outside will char more, but these were still done on indirect heat and I didn't realize there might be a difference.

I think it may depend on the marinade. I looked it up and found the following blurb.

The acid, alcohol and salt rule:Any marinade that contains acid, alcohol, or salt should not be used for very long, because it will chemically "cook" or denature the food in it. Marinate food in these marinades for less than 4 hours. Foods left too long in these blends can instantly change color and texture.

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So this is a more general grilling question, but here goes:I was making some pork steaks again yesterday. My wife marinated most of them in a soy sauce mixture and I did a couple with another dry rub with the plan on doing BBQ sauce at the end again. The last set I did on 300 degrees for 1 1/2 hours were perfect so I did the same. Since it was snowing yesterday while I was grilling, I didn't want to open up the grill throughout. So I checked in after an hour and the marinated steaks were way too done already. The 2 dry rub steaks were fine.

how thick were the steaks?I am shocked about the 90 minutes at 300 like Culdeus was, that seems way too long unless these were extraordinarily thick steaks.In the end though, try to only use the clock to gauge a rough time to cook. Always probe your meat with a thermometer to determine the inside temperature of the meat.
They were pretty thick (over an inch) although I didn't take into account that the 2nd set of steaks I made weren't as thick. When I looked it up online, I saw anywhere from 250-300 for 1 to 1 1/2 hours (and some even longer). I'll play around with it and try much less next time. But back to the original question, will these meats cook faster being marinated vs. just having a rub? I know the outside will char more, but these were still done on indirect heat and I didn't realize there might be a difference.
You really need a thermometer. A 1 inch chop should take you no more than about 20 minutes. Maybe even down to 15 if you have everything set right. Seriously.When i do beef steaks about 1.5" it is usually 4 minutes. 2 on each side at 650 and spending most of my time trying not to end up in the hospita. I realize pork can't take such high heat, but still you really need to re-calibrate your cooking time needs by at least 2-4 orders of magnitude. Rubs do not affect anything except perhaps the crust formation and some of the flavor of the perimeter of the meat. Cooking time is not affected.

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Having a small problem on my last couple of cooks. I have noticed that my meat has not been getting too much of the smoke. Obviously, I can tell by the small smoke ring. I have not been doing much different in terms of the lump and wood. I usually throw 2-3 big chunks of wood on top of the fire. Of course, it is difficult because I have to get the plate setter and grill on before the wood to get the temps right. So I just kind of throw them on top of the lump by lifting the plate setter a little.Should I be adding more wood. i dont want to over smoke it. Where do you guys place your wood. Do I have to take the plate setter off and look for a sweet spot to put the woodThanks

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Having a small problem on my last couple of cooks. I have noticed that my meat has not been getting too much of the smoke. Obviously, I can tell by the small smoke ring. I have not been doing much different in terms of the lump and wood. I usually throw 2-3 big chunks of wood on top of the fire. Of course, it is difficult because I have to get the plate setter and grill on before the wood to get the temps right. So I just kind of throw them on top of the lump by lifting the plate setter a little.Should I be adding more wood. i dont want to over smoke it. Where do you guys place your wood. Do I have to take the plate setter off and look for a sweet spot to put the woodThanks

I tend to be very gentle with my smoking so I only use one chunk and do not like too much smoke so I always lean towards the less smoke side of scale if need be. I make sure the fire is well established and no longer giving flames (just the bright coals showing), and then I place the chunk under some coals and then let it burn for a while (it is suppose to change from a blue to a white smoke look but my eyes can't see the difference so I just chose an arbitrary time).Note that the smoke ring is only for looks, it does not change the flavor of the meat at all. Also note that you do not need wood specifically to create the smoke ring. Using the lump charcoal alone should get you a ring. Smoke rings are created by the chemical reaction caused by nitrogen dioxide. Nitrogen dioxide is a byproduct of burning fuels such as wood, charcoal, gas etc. Edited by NewlyRetired

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