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timschochet

100 Greatest Bob Dylan Songs- 1. Like a Rolling Stone 2. Tangled Up in Blue, Congratulations to Bonzai, winner of the contest

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24 minutes ago, timschochet said:

Marvin was the Man. Not gonna mess with Marvin. 

Against a backdrop of seeming label indifference -- I mean, he did have nearly a whole studio at his behest, so let's not exaggerate, but he certainly was catching vapors from his headwind into label headwinds -- also. 

Edited by rockaction

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23 minutes ago, rockaction said:

Mercy, mercy me who was that protest singer?

Edie Brickell

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12 minutes ago, Uruk-Hai said:

Then he bailed. He got smoked by his fans for doing so.

That's not Dylan's fault - it's all of his fans who try to square his circle.

 

It's a choice we're making

We're saving our own liiiiives

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10 minutes ago, Eephus said:

Edie Brickell

To bring it on back home, that cover helped me get into Dylan as a youth otherwise completely absorbed by his generaltion. I love that cover by her. 

Eta* and now that I listen to it from thirty years ago, the production kills me. And I suppose that's good eighties production. Woof.

Edited by rockaction
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36 minutes ago, Uruk-Hai said:

Splain, Lucy

I'm fairly certain that the burden of proof is on your end. 

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3 minutes ago, Bonzai said:

I'm fairly certain that the burden of proof is on your end. 

Fine.

Can we start with the fact that Wonder is a better singer than Dylan? And, can we also also go with the given that Stevie's records sound better?

If we can't agree on both of those, then there's no use going forward.

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2 minutes ago, Uruk-Hai said:

Fine.

Can we start with the fact that Wonder is a better singer than Dylan? And, can we also also go with the given that Stevie's records sound better?

If we can't agree on both of those, then there's no use going forward.

You're both pretty

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1 minute ago, Eephus said:

You're both pretty

I hear ya, and thanks. I'm out. Sorry if I messed up your thread, @timschochet

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3 minutes ago, Uruk-Hai said:

I hear ya, and thanks. I'm out. Sorry if I messed up your thread, @timschochet

No mention of Stevie Wonder can ever mess up a thread. 

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6 minutes ago, timschochet said:

No mention of Stevie Wonder can ever mess up a thread. 

Very superstitious.

Did I ever talk about how I messed up the punk draft with a huge non-shtick fight? This pales in comparison. Okay Stevie's records sound better and he has a better voice, but how about lyrics and historical movements? I'd like a rebuttal to that. Dylan's height is '63-'65, in my estimation. Wonder's has to be much later, post-VIetnam, post race riots of '68. What is it about time and place that could possibly jettison Wonder in favor of Dylan as primo protest writer of the land? 

eta* I should also add that I always find Uruk's comments, even if I might not be initially amenable, to be so rich with historical knowledge that I simply defer, listen, and see where my previous thoughts might be edified, even if I still disagree.

Edited by rockaction

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“Well now, what can a poor boy do
Except to sing for a rock n' roll band?
'Cause in sleepy London town
There's just no place for a street fighting man”

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20 minutes ago, Dr. Octopus said:

“Well now, what can a poor boy do
Except to sing for a rock n' roll band?
'Cause in sleepy London town
There's just no place for a street fighting man”

Hmm. Somehow those don’t sound like Dylan lyrics.

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14. “Love Minus Zero/No Limit” (1965, from Bringing It All Back Home

https://youtu.be/7ZzyRcySgK8

Another song about Sara, this one positive and cheerful from the days when he first met her. It’s got one of Dylan’s most upbeat and classic melodies, and it’s the personification of the phrase “folk rock.” Plus some of the most classic lyrics ever, such as 

She knows there’s no success like failure 

And that failure’s no success at all

and

Statues made of matchsticks crumble into one another 

My love she does not bother, she knows too much to argue or to judge 

and 

The bridge at midnight trembles

the country doctor rambles 

Now I need to hear it again. So good. 

Covers Texas folk singer Eliza Gilkyson, who’s done a lot of Dylan, really does this song justice: 

https://youtu.be/bTN8e4juAtk

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13. “It’s All Over Now, Baby Blue” (1965, from Bringing It All Back Home

https://youtu.be/L4HW33SgZlM

In the second most famous scene from the film Don’t Look Back, (the first being the card sequence at the beginning), Dylan, who is touring England, is introduced to Donavan, who rather smugly plays a wispy folk tune he composed on guitar (it may have been “Catch the Wind”; I cant remember now.) Dylan asks to borrow the guitar and proceeds to perform a blistering version of “Baby Blue.” Donavan watches, smoking a cigarette, and his face is stony and blank; he has been bested by a superior artist and he knows it...

...or so the legend goes. Both Dylan and Donavan have argued ever since that it wasn’t like that, there was no attempt to show up each other, just a friendly exchange between two artists. Who knows? The legend is more fun to believe. 

Covers There are quite a few versions of this song by famous artists, including Van Morrison (with Them) all the usual subjects (the Byrds, Baez, the Grateful Dead, etc.) I like most of these, but none particularly stick out in my mind. 

But then yesterday I heard for the first time a Brazilian version, in Portuguese, called “Negro Amor”. The singer is the legendary Gal Costa, very famous there, barely known over here. It was recorded in 1977 and it’s a little bit dated but I still found myself really liking it: 

https://youtu.be/TKdd3rMP5Ek

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35 minutes ago, timschochet said:

13. “It’s All Over Now, Baby Blue” (1965, from Bringing It All Back Home

https://youtu.be/L4HW33SgZlM

In the second most famous scene from the film Don’t Look Back, (the first being the card sequence at the beginning), Dylan, who is touring England, is introduced to Donavan, who rather smugly plays a wispy folk tune he composed on guitar (it may have been “Catch the Wind”; I cant remember now.) Dylan asks to borrow the guitar and proceeds to perform a blistering version of “Baby Blue.” Donavan watches, smoking a cigarette, and his face is stony and blank; he has been bested by a superior artist and he knows it...

...or so the legend goes. Both Dylan and Donavan have argued ever since that it wasn’t like that, there was no attempt to show up each other, just a friendly exchange between two artists. Who knows? The legend is more fun to believe. 

Covers There are quite a few versions of this song by famous artists, including Van Morrison (with Them) all the usual subjects (the Byrds, Baez, the Grateful Dead, etc.) I like most of these, but none particularly stick out in my mind. 

But then yesterday I heard for the first time a Brazilian version, in Portuguese, called “Negro Amor”. The singer is the legendary Gal Costa, very famous there, barely known over here. It was recorded in 1977 and it’s a little bit dated but I still found myself really liking it: 

https://youtu.be/TKdd3rMP5Ek

To Sing for You. That exchange is one of the great moments in cinema history, afaic. An incredible display of how Dylan's greatness at the time dwarfed his peers. Donavan's song was nice (and no doubt one he chose to impress). Dylan made it sound like a kindergarten nursery rhyme and you can practically see the blood rushing from Donavan's face.

Jerry sang it best, but the Them version is iconic for among other reasons, the sample used by Beck in Jackass.

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On 1/16/2020 at 6:20 AM, timschochet said:

22. “Lay Lady Lay” (1969, from Nashville Skyline)

https://youtu.be/LhzEsb2tNbI

Another of Dylan’s most iconic love songs, this one sung in the crooning style that so differentiates Nashville Skyline from his previous albums. I’ve always loved this tune, especially that marvelous chord progression at the very end. 

Covers I’ve spent the last day or so listening to a lot of pretty good covers of this song. I’m sure I haven’t heard them all. One of them that really stood out for me was jazz singer Cassandra Wilson from 2003. I’m going to have to listen to more from this woman; I like nearly every thing I hear from her. Lots of percussion in this used very nicely: 

https://youtu.be/dlVAfvZo1LY

 

This one would be #1 for me.

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8 hours ago, timschochet said:

13. “It’s All Over Now, Baby Blue” (1965, from Bringing It All Back Home

https://youtu.be/L4HW33SgZlM

In the second most famous scene from the film Don’t Look Back, (the first being the card sequence at the beginning), Dylan, who is touring England, is introduced to Donavan, who rather smugly plays a wispy folk tune he composed on guitar (it may have been “Catch the Wind”; I cant remember now.) Dylan asks to borrow the guitar and proceeds to perform a blistering version of “Baby Blue.” Donavan watches, smoking a cigarette, and his face is stony and blank; he has been bested by a superior artist and he knows it...

...or so the legend goes. Both Dylan and Donavan have argued ever since that it wasn’t like that, there was no attempt to show up each other, just a friendly exchange between two artists. Who knows? The legend is more fun to believe. 

Covers There are quite a few versions of this song by famous artists, including Van Morrison (with Them) all the usual subjects (the Byrds, Baez, the Grateful Dead, etc.) I like most of these, but none particularly stick out in my mind. 

But then yesterday I heard for the first time a Brazilian version, in Portuguese, called “Negro Amor”. The singer is the legendary Gal Costa, very famous there, barely known over here. It was recorded in 1977 and it’s a little bit dated but I still found myself really liking it: 

https://youtu.be/TKdd3rMP5Ek

Gorgeous song and deserving of a high rank. The Van Morrison cover is my favorite version. I have tried not think about what songs are left to go so it's still fun to see great songs like this pop up. 

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12. “Mr. Tambourine Man” (1965, from Bringing It All Back Home

https://youtu.be/OeP4FFr88SQ

The link is to a live version, also from 1965, featuring Dylan with a single acoustic guitar. The recorded version from the album actually has two guitars, the second an electric, though played softly in the background. 

Obviously one of Dylan’s most famous and iconic tunes. The lyrics are joyous, poetic, and whimsical. I have compared lyrics from other songs on  this same album to Dylan’s contemporary Lou Reed. But this one, less gloomy and more cheerful, sounds like another of his contemporaries of the time, Paul Simon. “Jingle jangle morning” fits right in with “I’m dappled and drowsy and ready for sleep.” 

Covers The Byrds’ version of this song was the breakthrough hit for them; it was the title of their debut album which became a bestseller, and in June of 1965 the Byrds’ “Mr. Tambourine Man” reached #1 on Billboard, the only Dylan song ever to do so. Because of this, because it introduced folk rock to millions of people and vastly widened Dylan’s audience, it is an incredibly important cover. It’s also great to listen to, McGuinn’s lead guitar hook is one of his very best, the harmonies are awesome, just a tremendous performance. 

But I couldn’t select it. 

No I couldn’t take the Byrds, because a few years later there was another cover version of this tune which would turn out to be the most amazing cover version of a Dylan song ever made, perhaps the most amazing cover version of any song ever made (with the possible exception of when, several years later, this very same artist performed a live cover version of Elton John’s “Rocket Man”). You may have guessed who I am referring to by now, but in case you haven’t, here is the unbelievable, astonishing, awe inducing cover version of “Mr. Tambourine Man” by the one and only Captain Kirk himself, William Shatner from his album, The Transformed Man

https://youtu.be/_0hTtsqiFCc

If you are listening to this for the first time (and oh how I envy you that experience if you are) I urge you to get through the entire song if possible. You see long before there was “Khaaaaaaaaaaannmnn!!!”, there was “Mr. Tambourine Maaaaaaannn!!!”. And you don’t want to miss out on that. 

 

Edited by timschochet

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The YouTube  video to the link I provided was beautifully assembled; some genius out there has real talent. 

The comments section also is quite brilliant, my favorite being 

“Where is Shatner’s Nobel Prize?” Where indeed? 

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14 minutes ago, timschochet said:

12. “Mr. Tambourine Man” (1965, from Bringing It All Back Home

https://youtu.be/PYF8Y47qZQY

The link is to a live version, also from 1965, featuring Dylan with a single acoustic guitar. The recorded version from the album actually has two guitars, the second an electric, though played softly in the background.

While it's uncanny how much this guy's voice sounds like Bob's in the nuances, it's not him. That's the Helio Sequence. Here's Bob:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OeP4FFr88SQ

And take me disappearing
Through the smoke rings of my mind
Down the foggy ruins of time
Far past the frozen leaves
The haunted frightened trees
Out to the windy beach
Far from the twisted reach of crazy sorrow

Yes, to dance beneath the diamond sky
With one hand waving free
Silhouetted by the sea
Circled by the circus sands
With all memory and fate
Driven deep beneath the waves
Let me forget about today until tomorrow

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33 minutes ago, timschochet said:

12. “Mr. Tambourine Man” (1965, from Bringing It All Back Home

https://youtu.be/PYF8Y47qZQY

The link is to a live version, also from 1965, featuring Dylan with a single acoustic guitar. The recorded version from the album actually has two guitars, the second an electric, though played softly in the background. 

Obviously one of Dylan’s most famous and iconic tunes. The lyrics are joyous, poetic, and whimsical. I have compared lyrics from other songs on  this same album to Dylan’s contemporary Lou Reed. But this one, less gloomy and more cheerful, sounds like another of his contemporaries of the time, Paul Simon. “Jingle jangle morning” fits right in with “I’m dappled and drowsy and ready for sleep.” 

Covers The Byrds’ version of this song was the breakthrough hit for them; it was the title of their debut album which became a bestseller, and in June of 1965 the Byrds’ “Mr. Tambourine Man” reached #1 on Billboard, the only Dylan song ever to do so. Because of this, because it introduced folk rock to millions of people and vastly widened Dylan’s audience, it is an incredibly important cover. It’s also great to listen to, McGuinn’s lead guitar hook is one of his very best, the harmonies are awesome, just a tremendous performance. 

But I couldn’t select it. 

No I couldn’t take the Byrds, because a few years later there was another cover version of this tune which would turn out to be the most amazing cover version of a Dylan song ever made, perhaps the most amazing cover version of any song ever made (with the possible exception of when, several years later, this very same artist performed a live cover version of Elton John’s “Rocket Man”). You may have guessed who I am referring to by now, but in case you haven’t, here is the unbelievable, astonishing, awe inducing cover version of “Mr. Tambourine Man” by the one and only Captain Kirk himself, William Shatner from his album, The Transformed Man

https://youtu.be/_0hTtsqiFCc

If you are listening to this for the first time (and oh how I envy you that experience if you are) I urge you to get through the entire song if possible. You see long before there was “Khaaaaaaaaaaannmnn!!!”, there was “Mr. Tambourine Maaaaaaannn!!!”. And you don’t want to miss out on that. 

 

Interesting 

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38 minutes ago, Apple Jack said:

While it's uncanny how much this guy's voice sounds like Bob's in the nuances, it's not him. That's the Helio Sequence. Here's Bob:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OeP4FFr88SQ

And take me disappearing
Through the smoke rings of my mind
Down the foggy ruins of time
Far past the frozen leaves
The haunted frightened trees
Out to the windy beach
Far from the twisted reach of crazy sorrow

Yes, to dance beneath the diamond sky
With one hand waving free
Silhouetted by the sea
Circled by the circus sands
With all memory and fate
Driven deep beneath the waves
Let me forget about today until tomorrow

Oops. Thank you. False advertising! 

(Well, at least the Shatner one is the genuine McCoy- err I mean Kirk!) 

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11. “Blowin’ in the Wind” (1962, from The Freewheelin’ Bob Dylan

https://youtu.be/MMFj8uDubsE

This is the 2nd of the 3 Dylan songs which I argue are the greatest “protest songs” ever written- it is by far the most famous, perhaps Bob Dylan’s most famous song as well. It’s lyrics are known to millions of Americans and for years, especially during the early 60s, it was sung earnestly at every civil rights rally and anti-war march, so much so that it inevitably became a parody of itself. It’s only rivals in terms of this sort of fame was Pete Seeger’s “We Shall Overcome” and Woody Guthrie’s “This Land is Your Land” (which amazingly and ironically has been transformed into a patriotic song which every American child learns, the first  verse and chorus only, the remaining bitter socialist, anarchist and anti-patriotic verses having been excised.) 

A word about the use of apostrophes and folk phrases in Dylan’s early work: (Blowin’, freewheelin’, a-gonna, a-changin’, etc): Dylan rather slavishly copied Woody Guthrie in this sort of “American language”, and my theory is that Guthrie, rejecting the precise language of other folk singers like Seeger and Burl Ives, was heavily influenced by the works of John Steinbeck, whose novels are full of this sort of language which he heard used by the “Okies” who worked the fields in central California. In fact both Guthrie and Dylan in his early folk persona thought of themselves as Tom Joad. 

Covers Peter, Paul and Mary were essentially created by their manager, Albert Grossman, who also happened to be Dylan’s early manager. Dylan and some of the other folkies were considered too raw and shady for the general public; a smooth more clean cut interpreter was needed and so this trio of Jewish singers with the ironic Christian sounding title. But for all that they were pretty good. For “Blowin’ In the Wind” their arrangement  expanded on Dylan‘s more basic melody and added a much needed harmony. Their version was a huge hit (#2 on the charts) and helped greatly to push Bob Dylan to stardom: 

https://youtu.be/Ld6fAO4idaI

Edited by timschochet
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7 minutes ago, timschochet said:

A word about the use of apostrophes and folk phrases in Dylan’s early work: (Blowin’, freewheelin’, a-gonna, a-changin’, etc): Dylan rather slavishly copied Woody Guthrie in this sort of “American language”, and my theory is that Guthrie, rejecting the precise language of other folk singers like Seeger and Burl Ives, was heavily influenced by the works of John Steinbeck, whose novels are full of this sort of language which he heard used by the “Okies” who worked the fields in central California. In fact both Guthrie and Dylan in his early folk persona thought of themselves as Tom Joad. 

Wow. Indispensable stuff. Thanks for that. I never would have known that or cut my teeth on that distinction. 

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To the top ten we go!!

10. "The Times They Are A-Changin'" (1964, from The Times They Are A-Changin')

https://youtu.be/90WD_ats6eE

I rank this slightly above "Blowin' In the Wind" and "A Hard Rain's A-Gonna Fall" as the greatest protest song ever written. This is purely subjective of course, but in this song Dylan casts his protest in terms of the younger generation vs. the older, and rather than address specific issues of war or race, he is making the claim that EVERYTHING is going to change. If Bob Dylan had lived and written this song in the 30s, 40s, 50s, 70s, 80s, 90s, etc., the impact would have been minimal and its greatness far less. But it was written in the early 60s and that made all the difference. It was "The Times They Are A-Changin'" that truly made Bob Dylan, already a famous figure thanks to "Blowin' In the Wind", the "Voice of His Generation", a title he did not want and very quickly discarded.

Come senators, Congressmen
Please heed the call
Don't stand in the doorway
Don't block up the hall
For he that gets hurt
Will be he who has stalled
There's a battle outside
And it is ragin'.
It'll soon shake your windows
And rattle your walls
For the times they are a-changin'.

Covers Me First and the Gimme Gimmes are a hilarious punk rock "supergroup" (made up of former members of NOFX, Foo Fighters, Bad Religion, and others) devoted to recording and performing punk rock versions of pop hits from the 60s, 70s, and 80s. They're very straight forward and very funny.  Their version of "The Times They Are A-Changin'" is representative of their sound in general:

https://youtu.be/F-D_HH38J0Y

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Finally we're down to the meat of it.  Wonder where in the top 10 Hurricane will fall.  Because that's a Tim kinda song.  

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3 minutes ago, johnnycakes said:

Finally we're down to the meat of it.  Wonder where in the top 10 Hurricane will fall.  Because that's a Tim kinda song.  

It will fall to #46.

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9. “Desolation Row” (1965, from Highway 61 Revisited

https://youtu.be/hUvcWXTIjcU

I’ve adored this song my entire life. But until I watched Ken Burn’s Country Music, I had no idea how it was made. I was unaware that Dylan invited a well known session guitarist from Nashville named Charlie McCoy to play with him, and that it’s McCoy who added all those guitar fills that you hear on the album version (and not on the bootleg). It’s those fills that make the song so much better, enhance the melody. 

As for the lyrics...:don’t bother. This is a ten minute song with meaning as obscure as any Dylan has ever written. It’s filled with mysterious characters and maybe they’re made up people and maybe they’re real, I doubt we will ever really know. What’s important is how the words go together- as poetic as anything he’s ever written: 

All these people that you mention, yes I know them they’re quite lame 

I had to rearrange their faces and give them all another name 

Mix those poetic lyrics in with the haunting folk melody, McCoy’s fills, and Dylan’s singing (IMO as good on the album version as anything he’s ever sung) and you have a masterpiece for the ages. 

Covers There’s a few out there. Forget them. None do it justice. 

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3 hours ago, timschochet said:

9. “Desolation Row” (1965, from Highway 61 Revisited

https://youtu.be/hUvcWXTIjcU

I’ve adored this song my entire life. But until I watched Ken Burn’s Country Music, I had no idea how it was made. I was unaware that Dylan invited a well known session guitarist from Nashville named Charlie McCoy to play with him, and that it’s McCoy who added all those guitar fills that you hear on the album version (and not on the bootleg). It’s those fills that make the song so much better, enhance the melody. 

As for the lyrics...:don’t bother. This is a ten minute song with meaning as obscure as any Dylan has ever written. It’s filled with mysterious characters and maybe they’re made up people and maybe they’re real, I doubt we will ever really know. What’s important is how the words go together- as poetic as anything he’s ever written: 

All these people that you mention, yes I know them they’re quite lame 

I had to rearrange their faces and give them all another name 

Mix those poetic lyrics in with the haunting folk melody, McCoy’s fills, and Dylan’s singing (IMO as good on the album version as anything he’s ever sung) and you have a masterpiece for the ages. 

Covers There’s a few out there. Forget them. None do it justice. 

Au contraire

Love Jerry's backing vocals on a couple last lines of verses...they all play on the pennywhistle, you can hear them blow...

Einstein disguised as Robin Hood
With his memories in a trunk
Passed this way an hour ago
With his friend a jealous monk
And he looked so immaculately frightful
As he bummed a cigarette
And went off sniffing drainpipes
And reciting the alphabet
You wouldn't think to look at him
But he was famous long ago
For playing electric violin on Desolation Row

Edited by Apple Jack
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51 minutes ago, Apple Jack said:

Au contraire

Love Jerry's backing vocals on a couple last lines of verses...they all play on the pennywhistle, you can hear them blow...

Einstein disguised as Robin Hood
With his memories in a trunk
Passed this way an hour ago
With his friend a jealous monk
And he looked so immaculately frightful
As he bummed a cigarette
And went off sniffing drainpipes
And reciting the alphabet
You wouldn't think to look at him
But he was famous long ago
For playing electric violin on Desolation Row

Yeah I like Jerry (always do) and especially like how he imitates McCoy on his electric. But for some reason Weir’s vocals bug me a little here- they don’t normally but here it sounds like he’s forcing it somehow. This is certainly the best cover of this song but I can’t say I love it. 

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Speaking of those lyrics, I’ve always wondered if Bruce Springsteen’s “Blinded by the Light” was influenced by this song. It’s an unusual tune for Springsteen who is usually less subtle in his lyrics. But in “Blinded By the Light” he creates all these characters with nicknames (maybe?) just like “Desolation Row” and you have no idea what the #### he’s talking about. 

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8. “Make You Feel My Love” (1997, from Time Out of Mind

https://youtu.be/fdWto-AUM3Q

It’s simply amazing that, nearly five decades after he started, Bob Dylan could still write a song this lovely, arguably the most beautiful love song of his long career. 

The 90s didn’t begin well for Bob Dylan. He appeared on the Grammys and performed a disastrous, terrible version of “Masters of War”, probably the nadir of his life as an artist, worse than Self Portrait, worse than Live at Budokan. He was laughed at, mocked on late night TV. Critics demanded he retire as his voice was gone. Dylan then released two albums of folk and blues standards, sparsely recorded, which a few critics liked but nobody paid much attention to. He was no longer relevant, he appeared to be done. 

And then...Time Out of Mind. Talk about redemption! Out of nowhere comes this album of new, great songs. It won the Grammys’ album of the year. And other artists began to record “Make You Feel My Love” beginning with Billy Joel, which started to make it known to the public even if most people weren’t aware of who wrote it. Then in the 2000s, it took off thanks to...

Covers ...Adele. She made the song famous, and made it her own. Millions of her fans, including my daughters, simply assumed that she wrote it. And indeed she does make it her own with that amazing voice- it’s one of the best recordings IMO of the 21st century. 

https://youtu.be/0put0_a--Ng

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11 minutes ago, timschochet said:

8. “Make You Feel My Love” (1997, from Time Out of Mind

https://youtu.be/fdWto-AUM3Q

It’s simply amazing that, nearly five decades after he started, Bob Dylan could still write a song this lovely, arguably the most beautiful love song of his long career. 

The 90s didn’t begin well for Bob Dylan. He appeared on the Grammys and performed a disastrous, terrible version of “Masters of War”, probably the nadir of his life as an artist, worse than Self Portrait, worse than Live at Budokan. He was laughed at, mocked on late night TV. Critics demanded he retire as his voice was gone. Dylan then released two albums of folk and blues standards, sparsely recorded, which a few critics liked but nobody paid much attention to. He was no longer relevant, he appeared to be done. 

And then...Time Out of Mind. Talk about redemption! Out of nowhere comes this album of new, great songs. It won the Grammys’ album of the year. And other artists began to record “Make You Feel My Love” beginning with Billy Joel, which started to make it known to the public even if most people weren’t aware of who wrote it. Then in the 2000s, it took off thanks to...

Covers ...Adele. She made the song famous, and made it her own. Millions of her fans, including my daughters, simply assumed that she wrote it. And indeed she does make it her own with that amazing voice- it’s one of the best recordings IMO of the 21st century. 

https://youtu.be/0put0_a--Ng

I love this song and I'm glad it gets it's due, although I couldn't place it in the Top 10.

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9 hours ago, timschochet said:

Speaking of those lyrics, I’ve always wondered if Bruce Springsteen’s “Blinded by the Light” was influenced by this song. It’s an unusual tune for Springsteen who is usually less subtle in his lyrics. But in “Blinded By the Light” he creates all these characters with nicknames (maybe?) just like “Desolation Row” and you have no idea what the #### he’s talking about. 

Early Bruce was surely influenced by Dylan - in fact the record label was looking for the "next Dylan" when they signed Springsteen - but he's created characters in a numerous amount of his songs.

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6 minutes ago, Dr. Octopus said:

I love this song and I'm glad it gets it's due, although I couldn't place it in the Top 10.

I knew going in that this might be my most controversial ranking in terms of the top 10. But maybe not if we do this again in 20 or 30 years from now. That’s mainly because of Adele. 

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I love Time Out of Mind for many reasons, one of which is that the title comes from Warren Zevon's "Accidentally Like a Martyr."  Zevon is my favorite artist of all time and Dylan and Zevon were fans of each other. Dylan played harmonica on Zevon's "The Factory" in 1987.  

When Zevon was diagnosed with terminal cancer in 2002, Dylan began covering several of his songs in concert, "Mutineer," "Lawyers, Guns and Money," and "Accidentally Like a Martyr." Zevon, noted for his dark humor, said that having Dylan cover his songs made cancer almost worth it.

 

 

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Just now, timschochet said:

I knew going in that this might be my most controversial ranking in terms of the top 10. But maybe not if we do this again in 20 or 30 years from now. That’s mainly because of Adele. 

Yeah, no.

I like Adele (and her version) but I actually like Dylan's version better and before Adele it was covered by both Billy Joel and Garth Brooks (among others) so it was already well known (albeit not necessarily as a Dylan song).

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2 minutes ago, Dr. Octopus said:

Yeah, no.

I like Adele (and her version) but I actually like Dylan's version better and before Adele it was covered by both Billy Joel and Garth Brooks (among others) so it was already well known (albeit not necessarily as a Dylan song).

That’s true but it’s Adele that brought it to a whole new generation. As I pointed out, my daughters, now 19 and 17, know this song and love it. That’s the only Dylan song I can say this about. 

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Just now, timschochet said:

That’s true but it’s Adele that brought it to a whole new generation. As I pointed out, my daughters, now 19 and 17, know this song and love it. That’s the only Dylan song I can say this about. 

I had the same experience with my niece (my son likes rap so would not listen to Adele) who was listening to it. I told her it was a Dylan song and played his version, which she hated of course. So I don't think the song has necessarily created a new legion of Dylan fans. Young people don't care about songwriting (or albums for that matter), just songs.

If this song becomes known as one of his classics it will be on his own merits - I'm sure this song will be covered for the next 100 years since it's such a tremendous love song.

Time Out of Mind as you said became his big comeback record and that album will become a classic Dylan album over time - personally for me it's one of his Top 10, maybe Top 5 at times. That is pretty telling about his greatness. I'm a huge Rolling Stones fan but any of their records after 1990 are mostly garbage with, at best, a few hidden gems - Dylan's output post 2000 is arguably better than his stuff in the late 70s through the 80s in contrast. Only Dylan and Bowie have really managed that feat in my opinion.  

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I never got my act together to send a Top 10 in, but did anyone have it there?

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1 hour ago, Don Quixote said:

I never got my act together to send a Top 10 in, but did anyone have it there?

Make You Feel My Love? No. 

I can reveal now that the winner of the top 10 contest had 6 songs. 

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7. “Stuck Inside of Mobile with the Memphis Blues Again” (1966, from Blonde on Blonde

https://youtu.be/3kh6K_-a0c4

Another incredible melody. More great singing (though again this is an acquired taste but I love it.) And some of the most phenomenal lyrics of all time: 

And he just smoked my eyelids and punched my cigarette

Now the rainman gave me two cures, then he said “jump right in”, One was Texas medicine, the other was just railroad gin, and like a fool I mixed them, and it strangled up my mind, and now people just get uglier, I have no sense of time 

Who else writes like this? Who else ever has? ####### amazing. 

Covers Seems like deja vu all over again, but here’s the Grateful Dead. As usual Jerry has composed his own impressive guitar lead: 

https://youtu.be/bwsjQbf0czc

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6. “Idiot Wind” (1975, from Blood On the Tracks

https://youtu.be/Ex05XUddWMk

The meanest, nastiest  song ever written? For my money it’s only close competitor is Queen’s “Death on Two Legs” (which ironically was written the same year.) But on “Idiot Wind” Dylan doesn’t hold back: 

You hurt the ones that I love best and cover up the truth with lies, one day you’ll be in the ditch, Flies buzzin’ around your eyes 

Damn. Or how about 

You’ll never know the the hurt I suffered, nor the pain I rise above. 

And most of all the last line of the chorus: 

You’re an idiot babe, it’s a wonder that you still know how to breathe. 

This is Bob Dylan using his lyrics as a sharp knife, stabbing someone in the heart. 

Covers Mary Lee’s Corvette, whom I mentioned earlier in the thread, continues to perform Blood On the Tracks in concert. Her vocals are perfect for this song: 

https://youtu.be/2goaEofDrWM

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6 minutes ago, timschochet said:

6. “Idiot Wind” (1975, from Blood On the Tracks

https://youtu.be/Ex05XUddWMk

The meanest, nastiest  song ever written? For my money it’s only close competitor is Queen’s “Death on Two Legs” (which ironically was written the same year.) But on “Idiot Wind” Dylan doesn’t hold back: 

You hurt the ones that I love best and cover up the truth with lies, one day you’ll be in the ditch, Flies buzzin’ around your eyes 

Damn. Or how about 

You’ll never know the the hurt I suffered, nor the pain I rise above. 

And most of all the last line of the chorus: 

You’re an idiot babe, it’s a wonder that you still know how to breathe. 

This is Bob Dylan using his lyrics as a sharp knife, stabbing someone in the heart. 

Covers Mary Lee’s Corvette, whom I mentioned earlier in the thread, continues to perform Blood On the Tracks in concert. Her vocals are perfect for this song: 

https://youtu.be/2goaEofDrWM

Wow. Is this Dylan's most polarizing song? I have a buddy that also loves it.  I don't get it. Would not make my top 100.

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14 hours ago, Dr. Octopus said:

Yeah, no.

I like Adele (and her version) but I actually like Dylan's version better and before Adele it was covered by both Billy Joel and Garth Brooks (among others) so it was already well known (albeit not necessarily as a Dylan song).

Garth got a Grammy nomination for it.

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14 hours ago, timschochet said:

6. “Idiot Wind” (1975, from Blood On the Tracks

https://youtu.be/Ex05XUddWMk

The meanest, nastiest  song ever written? For my money it’s only close competitor is Queen’s “Death on Two Legs” (which ironically was written the same year.) But on “Idiot Wind” Dylan doesn’t hold back: 

You hurt the ones that I love best and cover up the truth with lies, one day you’ll be in the ditch, Flies buzzin’ around your eyes 

Damn. Or how about 

You’ll never know the the hurt I suffered, nor the pain I rise above. 

And most of all the last line of the chorus: 

You’re an idiot babe, it’s a wonder that you still know how to breathe. 

This is Bob Dylan using his lyrics as a sharp knife, stabbing someone in the heart. 

Covers Mary Lee’s Corvette, whom I mentioned earlier in the thread, continues to perform Blood On the Tracks in concert. Her vocals are perfect for this song: 

https://youtu.be/2goaEofDrWM

It's vicious. And he indicts himself, "we are idiots babe, it's a wonder we can even feed ourselves."

Edited by Apple Jack

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5 hours ago, Bonzai said:

Wow. Is this Dylan's most polarizing song? I have a buddy that also loves it.  I don't get it. Would not make my top 100.

That's surprising. Not sure it's in my top 10, but it's close. It's as personally raw and seething as he ever released.

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5. “Don’t Think Twice, It’s All Right” (1962, from The Freewheelin’ Bob Dylan

https://youtu.be/1iHhWh9FtsQ

Only the lyrics are by Dylan; the melody is traditional. But this is by far his best performance on his early albums, the most listenable song, the closest thing to a pop hit. He uses a finger picking style which is delightful. And those lyrics, especially at the end: 

I ain’t saying you treated me unkind, you could have done better but I don’t mind, you just kinda wasted my precious time, but don’t think twice it’s all right. 

Over the years Bob Dylan has recorded several live versions of this song; my favorite is from his live album with the Band, Before the Flood, in which he hoarsely sings in a style he’s never used before or since and plays an incredible harmonica solo, his best ever. 

Covers I haven’t checked officially, but I am almost positive that this is by far the most covered Bob Dylan song. There are dozens and dozens of versions of it and I haven’t nearly heard them all. My favorite is by blues singer Susan Tedeschi, now of the Tedeschi Trucks Band. She has such an outstanding voice and it enhances an already great tune: 

https://youtu.be/TFrFHKgWacA

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