What's new
Fantasy Football - Footballguys Forums

Welcome to Our Forums. Once you've registered and logged in, you're primed to talk football, among other topics, with the sharpest and most experienced fantasy players on the internet.

So I am an NFL Veteran.... (1 Viewer)

Jeff Pasquino

Footballguy
Exactly what is Gene Upshaw doing for me?

Let's see....

Projected increase of each team's cap for 2006 was to be about $10M. That's $320M more for salaries for myself and my fellow players.

In addition, many of my fellow players are now about to be hitting the streets, hoping to land somewhere for probably less money this year and who knows what happens next. With veteran minimums and 2/3 of the teams now in dire straits with the cap, that means less of the vets and more jobs for the rooks.

Not to mention league competitiveness, team cohesiveness, general upheaval league-wide.....

Why exactly am I not pressing Upshaw to get this deal done?

 
M

MLBrandow

Guest
Because one year of suffering (2006) is worth a future without a salary cap.
And that's why we'll all be watching hockey in three years.
 
C

CrossEyed

Guest
Elimination of the cap will ruin what the NFL has become.

 

Jeff Pasquino

Footballguy
Wellington Mara is apparently both gone AND forgotten now.....

But I go back to the point - the vets are losing their jobs and money now. This "brave new world" without a cap - will it be any better? What league that is uncapped is better at this point?

 

Jeff Pasquino

Footballguy
What league that is uncapped is better at this point?
it was better for the dallas cowboys..... :thumbup: :unsure: :yes:
And the Steelers, which were a small market (relatively, but certainly not Green Bay).Another point missing is that the uncapped year (and years) will not have a MINIMUM salary either. That's another issue in baseball that may seep in to the NFL should they not be more careful.

I hope for everyone's sake they sort this out and quickly.

 

Frenchy Fuqua

Footballguy
Interesting pieces from PFT on this topic:

POSTED 5:00 p.m. EST; UPDATED 5:12 p.m. EST, March 1, 2006

UPSHAW FACES UPRISING

With roughly eight hours of windshield time on Wednesday to work the phone lines, a clear theme is emerging from our discussions with league insiders.

The NFLPA has left the players in the dark regarding the status of the discussions regarding a CBA extension, and the players are getting pissed.

Very pissed.

We're told that there has been little or no communication from NFLPA executive director Gene Upshaw and/or NFLPA president Troy Vincent to the rank-and-file regarding the status of the discussions.  With rampant media reports of a looming massacre of veteran players (and the blood already is flowing), guys are getting nervous.

But yet the players are getting no information.

So while Upshaw is being praised by some in the media for digging in his heels against the NFL, many of his constituents would like to dig their toes into his ###.

With that said, we continue to believe that this whole exercise in high drama is a well-orchestrated act between Upshaw and Commissioner Paul Tagliabue to get a deal done at the eleventh hour.

If it isn't -- and if free agency launches without a new CBA in place -- we predict that there will be open calls at the annual meeting of player representatives for Upshaw to be fired. 

Why?  Because guys who are in line for decent money will end up, absent an extension, with low-money deals.  Take Steelers running back Verron Haynes, for example.  With a new CBA, he'd likely get a deal averaging $1.5 million or so a year.  Without a new CBA, he's looking at the one-year minimum, at best.

But we shouldn't feel bad for him because he'll be a free agent in 2007, when there's no salary cap, right?

Wrong.  Too many players and media types simply don't realize that, in the uncapped year, only guys with six years of credited service will be eligible for unrestricted free agency.  Guys with three to five years will be subject to the restricted free agency rules.  So if Haynes rips it up in 2006, his reward will be one of the three levels of RFA tenders.

Bottom line -- Upshaw is taking a hell of a gamble.  If a deal gets done, the players quickly will forgive and forget.  If it doesn't, Upshaw might want to take out a lease on Saddam Hussein's spider hole.
UNCAPPED YEAR 101

Assuming that the powers-that-be can't get a new CBA hammered out by Friday, and assuming that NFLPA executive director Gene Upshaw intends to force an uncapped year, it's critical for everyone -- including most importantly the players -- to understand what a year without a salary cap really means.

Here are the key points.

1. There will be no limit on what teams can spend on players, but there also will be no minimum, either. Currently, teams are required annually to spend at least 54 percent of the projected Defined Gross Revenues on player costs. In an uncapped year, teams can spend as little as they choose.

2. Only players with six or more accrued seasons will be eligible for unrestricted free agency. Players with three, four, or five accrued seasons will be restricted free agents. In other words, Bucs quarterback Chris Simms (who signed a one-year restricted free agent tender on Wednesday), will be a restricted free agent again in 2007. Under normal circumstances, he would be eligible for unrestricted free agency in 2007.

3. All teams will have an extra transition tag in 2007. Currently, teams can use either a franchise tag or a transition tag. So next year the teams will be able to restrict two otherwise unrestricted free agents.

4. The final four playoff teams from 2006 will be permitted to sign only their own unrestricted free agents. For each of their unrestricted free agents signed by someone else, they can replace them with an unrestricted free agent signed from another team.

5. The next four playoff teams will be subject to the same rules as the final four. They also will be able to sign one unrestricted free agent at a first-year salary of $1.5 million or more, and one at a first-year salary of less than $1 million (not including signing bonus), with increases of no more than 30 percent of the player's first-year salary.

The message here is that there are some significant limits to the cash bonanza that the players are expecting in 2007. It's another reason, in our opinion, for both sides to get the deal done.
 
Last edited by a moderator:

TheRingLeader$

Footballguy
Interesting piece from PFT on this topic:

POSTED 5:00 p.m. EST; UPDATED 5:12 p.m. EST, March 1, 2006

UPSHAW FACES UPRISING

The NFLPA has left the players in the dark regarding the status of the discussions regarding a CBA extension, and the players are getting pissed.

Very pissed.
what professional reporter uses the word "pissed" in his work? :o

i would like to hear dan patrick say that tomorrow on ESPiN.....

:thumbup:

 

Spartans Rule

Footballguy
Guaranteed money - so NFL teams actually have to honor the contracts they sign.
:goodposting: That's where NFL players are getting screwed relative to the other sports.

Chan Ho Park made 15 million dollars last year. Jalen Rose is making 15.7 million dollars this year.

Both those guys had one good year, turned it in to a huge guaranteed contract and then proceeded to suck as they laughed their way to the bank.

NFL teams have to be a lot more careful with their money because of the cap. And when they do make a horrible mistake, the contract finds its way to the paper shredder pretty quickly.

 
Last edited by a moderator:

Spiderman

Footballguy
This is going to be interesting....

With the players already scheduled to be free agents, and now a ton of veteran players now on the list as well AND teams with limited cap space, the price on all these players are going to be driven way down.

 

Jeff Pasquino

Footballguy
Exactly what is Gene Upshaw doing for me?
retirement $
Tell that to the guys who played before the Super Bowl....
I believe stuff like that is why there's a system in place now
Wouldn't take much to compensate the "old guys" at this point.Before it is too late - see the "we honored the Negro Leagues" HOF with MLB right now. All 37 members going in are deceased.

Two are alive that were considered - not getting in.

 

Jeff Pasquino

Footballguy
Interesting piece from PFT on this topic:

POSTED 5:00 p.m. EST; UPDATED 5:12 p.m. EST, March 1, 2006

UPSHAW FACES UPRISING

The NFLPA has left the players in the dark regarding the status of the discussions regarding a CBA extension, and the players are getting pissed.

Very pissed.
what professional reporter uses the word "pissed" in his work? :o

i would like to hear dan patrick say that tomorrow on ESPiN.....

:thumbup:
Dan might not, but Keith O. would.
 

Jeff Pasquino

Footballguy
Guaranteed money - so NFL teams actually have to honor the contracts they sign.
:goodposting: That's where NFL players are getting screwed relative to the other sports.

Chan Ho Park made 15 million dollars last year. Jalen Rose is making 15.7 million dollars this year.

Both those guys had one good year, turned it in to a huge guaranteed contract and then proceeded to suck as they laughed their way to the bank.

NFL teams have to be a lot more careful with their money because of the cap. And when they do make a horrible mistake, the contract finds its way to the paper shredder pretty quickly.
Robert Smith (former RB - Minnesota) spoke on this at length on ESPN GameNight. He stated that it isn't a fair comparison. NFL players' career duration expectancy is far less than that of NBA players or MLB players. History also played a part - baseball and basketball have been guaranteed for years.

The NFL owners would give guaranteed contracts - but only for a year at a time. Hardly worth it.

The upper tier player gets 30-50% of his salary via a signing bonus, so that up front money is his "guarantee". Works well for the capologists too - spreading out the $$ across multiple years.

 

Jeff Pasquino

Footballguy
Interesting pieces from PFT on this topic:

POSTED 5:00 p.m. EST; UPDATED 5:12 p.m. EST, March 1, 2006

UPSHAW FACES UPRISING

With roughly eight hours of windshield time on Wednesday to work the phone lines, a clear theme is emerging from our discussions with league insiders.

The NFLPA has left the players in the dark regarding the status of the discussions regarding a CBA extension, and the players are getting pissed.

Very pissed.

We're told that there has been little or no communication from NFLPA executive director Gene Upshaw and/or NFLPA president Troy Vincent to the rank-and-file regarding the status of the discussions. With rampant media reports of a looming massacre of veteran players (and the blood already is flowing), guys are getting nervous.

But yet the players are getting no information.

So while Upshaw is being praised by some in the media for digging in his heels against the NFL, many of his constituents would like to dig their toes into his ###.

With that said, we continue to believe that this whole exercise in high drama is a well-orchestrated act between Upshaw and Commissioner Paul Tagliabue to get a deal done at the eleventh hour.

If it isn't -- and if free agency launches without a new CBA in place -- we predict that there will be open calls at the annual meeting of player representatives for Upshaw to be fired.

Why? Because guys who are in line for decent money will end up, absent an extension, with low-money deals. Take Steelers running back Verron Haynes, for example. With a new CBA, he'd likely get a deal averaging $1.5 million or so a year. Without a new CBA, he's looking at the one-year minimum, at best.

But we shouldn't feel bad for him because he'll be a free agent in 2007, when there's no salary cap, right?

Wrong. Too many players and media types simply don't realize that, in the uncapped year, only guys with six years of credited service will be eligible for unrestricted free agency. Guys with three to five years will be subject to the restricted free agency rules. So if Haynes rips it up in 2006, his reward will be one of the three levels of RFA tenders.

Bottom line -- Upshaw is taking a hell of a gamble. If a deal gets done, the players quickly will forgive and forget. If it doesn't, Upshaw might want to take out a lease on Saddam Hussein's spider hole.
UNCAPPED YEAR 101

Assuming that the powers-that-be can't get a new CBA hammered out by Friday, and assuming that NFLPA executive director Gene Upshaw intends to force an uncapped year, it's critical for everyone -- including most importantly the players -- to understand what a year without a salary cap really means.

Here are the key points.

1. There will be no limit on what teams can spend on players, but there also will be no minimum, either. Currently, teams are required annually to spend at least 54 percent of the projected Defined Gross Revenues on player costs. In an uncapped year, teams can spend as little as they choose.

2. Only players with six or more accrued seasons will be eligible for unrestricted free agency. Players with three, four, or five accrued seasons will be restricted free agents. In other words, Bucs quarterback Chris Simms (who signed a one-year restricted free agent tender on Wednesday), will be a restricted free agent again in 2007. Under normal circumstances, he would be eligible for unrestricted free agency in 2007.

3. All teams will have an extra transition tag in 2007. Currently, teams can use either a franchise tag or a transition tag. So next year the teams will be able to restrict two otherwise unrestricted free agents.

4. The final four playoff teams from 2006 will be permitted to sign only their own unrestricted free agents. For each of their unrestricted free agents signed by someone else, they can replace them with an unrestricted free agent signed from another team.

5. The next four playoff teams will be subject to the same rules as the final four. They also will be able to sign one unrestricted free agent at a first-year salary of $1.5 million or more, and one at a first-year salary of less than $1 million (not including signing bonus), with increases of no more than 30 percent of the player's first-year salary.

The message here is that there are some significant limits to the cash bonanza that the players are expecting in 2007. It's another reason, in our opinion, for both sides to get the deal done.
Nice two stories there, Frenchy.Seems to back my original opinion.

 

5Rings

Lurker
That's where NFL players are getting screwed relative to the other sports.
i think non-guaranteed contracts has been a major factor in the rise of the NFL as America's game. Pay for play, something us fans can identy with. None--well, significantly less-- of the NBA or MLB prima donnas getting paid then resting on their laurels.To answer the initial post:

How is Upshaw to negotiate a deal when the owners still can't figure out how they want to share revenue?

You are asking Upshaw to divide by zero.

 

Bri

Footballguy
Exactly what is Gene Upshaw doing for me?
retirement $
Tell that to the guys who played before the Super Bowl....
I believe stuff like that is why there's a system in place now
Wouldn't take much to compensate the "old guys" at this point.Before it is too late - see the "we honored the Negro Leagues" HOF with MLB right now. All 37 members going in are deceased.

Two are alive that were considered - not getting in.
I see that as "saving face" moreso than honorring them but another time, another threadI think there are applications at NFLPA.org for old guys to file for assistance/retriement $

 

Bri

Footballguy
Because of the non-guaranteed contracts player would seek higher signing bonuses. IMO The public often forgets about the 15mil they got upfront and think 4mil each year makes them "underpaid".

Baseball and hoops have given huge signing bonuses too and it's the norm now but originally one compensated the other

 

Riffraff

Footballguy
1. There will be no limit on what teams can spend on players, but there also will be no minimum, either.
Think that alot of non-stars that can end up getting the 30-40k a year deals?
4. The final four playoff teams from 2006 will be permitted to sign only their own unrestricted free agents. For each of their unrestricted free agents signed by someone else, they can replace them with an unrestricted free agent signed from another team.
Gotta suck to be in the final four teams... can only do one-for-one swaps essentially.
 

Jeff Pasquino

Footballguy
That's where NFL players are getting screwed relative to the other sports.
i think non-guaranteed contracts has been a major factor in the rise of the NFL as America's game. Pay for play, something us fans can identy with. None--well, significantly less-- of the NBA or MLB prima donnas getting paid then resting on their laurels.To answer the initial post:

How is Upshaw to negotiate a deal when the owners still can't figure out how they want to share revenue?

You are asking Upshaw to divide by zero.
That's a good point. But Upshaw's comments certainly didn't pertain to the owners not being ready to negotiate. If he felt that something could come soon, an extension could have been negotated (temporary - to avoid "Bloody Thursday").

I believe at this point Upshaw has painted himself into a corner, and now there's 10 or so owners who want to try without a cap and are willing to cut lots of vets to make that happen.

The players losing their jobs for the sake of "future player generations" have got to be hurting.

This will be an historical offseason, for certain.

 

Jeff Pasquino

Footballguy
1. There will be no limit on what teams can spend on players, but there also will be no minimum, either.
Think that alot of non-stars that can end up getting the 30-40k a year deals?
I interpret that statement to be to the TOTAL spent, not to the INDIVIDUAL player.Under current CBA salary cap, there is a team minimum salary for the Top 51 players.So now you could have a team pull a "Florida Marlins" with everyone at the league minimum salary.I do not know if the individual, rookie or veteran minimum salaries are also gone.
 

Bri

Footballguy
oh and kudos to you and Bloom for joining what seems like an awesome staff here at FBGs.

(sorry for the hijack)

 

Jeff Pasquino

Footballguy
but there's a jeff eaglez and a jeff pasquino...oh well OK sorry guess I'm overtired
LOL I thought you were joking, Bri.Yes, I was jeff_eaglz.

Now my whole name is out there, as both myself and Bloom were hired this week.

 

Bri

Footballguy
as both myself and Bloom were hired this week.
Did you get a big signing bonus? Any plans to holdout this summer? (see it's not a hijack:D)
 
Last edited by a moderator:

Users who are viewing this thread

Top