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The 100 Greatest Classic Rock Albums of All Time: #1. Sticky Fingers (5 Viewers)

OMG Rod Stewart over Van Halen, Are You Experienced, Wish You Were Here, Moving Pictures, etc. for "classic rock"... this is a joke, right?
Good thing Taylor Swift missed the date criteria.
Can’t wait for the Barry Manilow reveal.

:lmao:
yeah, this is indeed classic rock - can't believe this selection is getting grief

I love this album and have no issues with it being ranked this high - good job tim. :thumbup:
User name computes.
Ok, seriously - why do you people keep bringing up Van Halen? They are fine, good even but can we use a great band as an example?

Oh....you were being serious with that Barry comment.

ok - I laughed.

I get why Rod gets **** on with what he did to turn a buck after "Hot Legs, etc."

a lot of you guys are young enough that you don't remember how big and how influential he and Faces were back before he went so plastic.

so you also think Faces were lame? - this album is very close to their work and a clear classic

The 26th best "classic rock" album of all time? Not even close IMO. Barely in the top 100? Maybe.

Listen, that isn't major criticism. We are talking about the top 100 "classic rock" albums of all time up until whenever Tim's cutoff was. To be in the top 100 is high praise. To be #26 is just silly IMO. To rank it over so many of these other albums, I don't even know what more to say...

I was born in 1968 and grew up on the music Tim has defined as "classic rock" here. A lot of the music I would rank highly was released earlier than this RS album, so that is not it.

:shrug:
 
OMG Rod Stewart over Van Halen, Are You Experienced, Wish You Were Here, Moving Pictures, etc. for "classic rock"... this is a joke, right?
Good thing Taylor Swift missed the date criteria.
Can’t wait for the Barry Manilow reveal.

:lmao:
yeah, this is indeed classic rock - can't believe this selection is getting grief

I love this album and have no issues with it being ranked this high - good job tim. :thumbup:
User name computes.
Ok, seriously - why do you people keep bringing up Van Halen? They are fine, good even but can we use a great band as an example?

Oh....you were being serious with that Barry comment.

ok - I laughed.

I get why Rod gets **** on with what he did to turn a buck after "Hot Legs, etc."

a lot of you guys are young enough that you don't remember how big and how influential he and Faces were back before he went so plastic.

so you also think Faces were lame? - this album is very close to their work and a clear classic

The 26th best "classic rock" album of all time? Not even close IMO. Barely in the top 100? Maybe.

Listen, that isn't major criticism. We are talking about the top 100 "classic rock" albums of all time up until whenever Tim's cutoff was. To be in the top 100 is high praise. To be #26 is just silly IMO. To rank it over so many of these other albums, I don't even know what more to say...

I was born in 1968 and grew up on the music Tim has defined as "classic rock" here. A lot of the music I would rank highly was released earlier than this RS album, so that is not it.

:shrug:
I couldn’t quote you no Dickens, Shelly or Keats.
 
To each his/her own, I guess. No Quarter was my #1 song in the Zep song countdown poll we did awhile back.
You ranked it the highest and were one of 10 people to rank it in the Top 5. 33 people didn't rank it at all. IIRC, there were 62 people that participated. No Quarter ended up at 19th overall.
Just curious: did The Crunge get any votes?
Ballots had 25 spots. Two people voted for it . . . one at 23 and one at 25. It ended up ranked 76 out of 82 songs. Rumor has it that @Long Ball Larry and @Galileo may have been the ones that voted for it. But I don't keep meticulous records like that, so I would have no idea.
Looks like I had it at 23. Everyone else was completely wrong .
 
OMG Rod Stewart over Van Halen, Are You Experienced, Wish You Were Here, Moving Pictures, etc. for "classic rock"... this is a joke, right?
Good thing Taylor Swift missed the date criteria.
Can’t wait for the Barry Manilow reveal.

:lmao:
yeah, this is indeed classic rock - can't believe this selection is getting grief

I love this album and have no issues with it being ranked this high - good job tim. :thumbup:
User name computes.
Ok, seriously - why do you people keep bringing up Van Halen? They are fine, good even but can we use a great band as an example?

Oh....you were being serious with that Barry comment.

ok - I laughed.

I get why Rod gets **** on with what he did to turn a buck after "Hot Legs, etc."

a lot of you guys are young enough that you don't remember how big and how influential he and Faces were back before he went so plastic.

so you also think Faces were lame? - this album is very close to their work and a clear classic
I don't ever recall any of my buddies playing Faces or Rod Stewart on the cassettes, but do remember a lot of Van Halen, Hendrix, and LZ.

I do agree the Stewart belongs on this list, just not in front of 30-40 other albums posted.
 
23. Black Sabbath-Paranoid (1970)

Classic rock radio hits: Iron Man, Paranoid, War Pigs/Luke’s Wall


The greatest heavy metal album of all time is also the 23rd greatest classic rock album of all time. Because it is simply tremendous rock and roll, played with a blue collar edge by these four guys from Birmingham. Tony Iommi’s heavy guitar is what is most memorable, though the band’s rhythm section is also top notch. And Ozzy has never sung better in his life.

War Pigs/Luke’s Wall
Commenting on Geezer Butler’s very serious lyrics for this tune (along with the rest of the album) Ozzy said “this is why we don’t attract girls to our shows”. I doubt that sentiment held up over time, but this powerful song is the most savage attack against the war machine since Dylan’s “Masters of War”. So what if it’s a little showy and dramatic? Awesome in scope and power. But I’ve never loved the speeded up ending.

Paranoid
IMO the greatest heavy metal song of all time. Explodes for the listener. Awesome hard rock performed at the highest level.

Planet Caravan
Love this mysterious sounding ballad. Everything that doesn’t work for me in “No Quarter” somehow works here, though I can’t quite explain the difference. But I like everything about this.

Iron Man
Ozzy said the guitar sounded like an “iron bloke” walking around, and Geezer immediately wrote the Heinlienesque sci-fi lyrics. Obviously one of the most memorable guitar riffs of all time. Simplistic but a lot of fun. Bill Ward’s drumming here (and on the entire album) rival the best of John Bonham for greatness. The second half of this tune, featuring that guitar solo by Iommi, is incredible.

Electric Funeral
More awesome hard rock simplicity. Takes me back to high school when I knew guys who loved to sing along to this perhaps more than any other song I can think of. You can’t love rock and roll and not adore this stuff.

Hand of Doom
Understated opening compared to the rest of the record. But then Ozzy raises his voice and the instruments get loud. Then they get quiet again. And that’s just the first part. The second half of this tune is even better with yet another great guitar riff.

Rat Salad
Instrumental track. Featuring a pretty great drum solo and Ward would do really long ones in concerts back in the day. I’ve never been the biggest drum solo guy but this is very impressive.

Jack The Stripper/Fairies Wear Boots
One of my favorite song titles of all time. Great intro (that’s the Jack the Stripper part) then we get to the main tune which is all kinds of hard rock goodness. Ozzy is upset because some skinhead types supposedly called him a name for having long hair. Skinheads in 1970? Who knew? Anyhow this song finishes the record the way it began: awesome pulse pounding rock and roll.
 
Jack The Stripper/Fairies Wear Boots
One of my favorite song titles of all time. Great intro (that’s the Jack the Stripper part) then we get to the main tune which is all kinds of hard rock goodness. Ozzy is upset because some skinhead types supposedly called him a name for having long hair. Skinheads in 1970? Who knew? Anyhow this song finishes the record the way it began: awesome pulse pounding rock and roll.
That transition from Stripper to Boots here is so awesome.
 
Although there are some great and truly classic albums on the list, I looked through the list again. There are only about a dozen (for me) that scream "put the headphones on, crank it up, and blow up your eardrums." Paranoid is definitely high up on that list. That doesn't make it better or worse than other on the list, but I do think it gets lost some times. Rolling Stone has it as the overall number 139 of all time (2021), but I am not sure if a full generation missed this one. There is a great documentary that can be found on Prime about the making of the album if anyone is interested (YouTube usually has those too).
 
I didn’t expect to see Paranoid on this list. Tim is full of surprises.

Not sure why you think this. I’ve been showcasing pretty hard rock all along. Van Halen (though I know folks think I ranked it too low), two AC/DC albums, Aerosmith, Deep Purple, plenty of Led Zeppelin.

It’s not that I prefer “softer” rock to this stuff- I love it all. Classic rock is a mix of all of these elements.
 
I didn’t expect to see Paranoid on this list. Tim is full of surprises.

Not sure why you think this. I’ve been showcasing pretty hard rock all along. Van Halen (though I know folks think I ranked it too low), two AC/DC albums, Aerosmith, Deep Purple, plenty of Led Zeppelin.

It’s not that I prefer “softer” rock to this stuff- I love it all. Classic rock is a mix of all of these elements.
I think it depends where you listened to Classic Rock radio. Where I grew up the CR station(s) played hard rock like the bands you listed above rather than any softer rock. The softer rock like Rod Stewart, Billy Joel, etc. was played on the radio, but not on the stations playing Classic Rock.
 
I didn’t expect to see Paranoid on this list. Tim is full of surprises.

Not sure why you think this. I’ve been showcasing pretty hard rock all along. Van Halen (though I know folks think I ranked it too low), two AC/DC albums, Aerosmith, Deep Purple, plenty of Led Zeppelin.

It’s not that I prefer “softer” rock to this stuff- I love it all. Classic rock is a mix of all of these elements.
I think it depends where you listened to Classic Rock radio. Where I grew up the CR station(s) played hard rock like the bands you listed above rather than any softer rock. The softer rock like Rod Stewart, Billy Joel, etc. was played on the radio, but not on the stations playing Classic Rock.
You didn’t hear “Maggie May” or “Only the Good Die Young” on classic rock radio?
 
I didn’t expect to see Paranoid on this list. Tim is full of surprises.

Not sure why you think this. I’ve been showcasing pretty hard rock all along. Van Halen (though I know folks think I ranked it too low), two AC/DC albums, Aerosmith, Deep Purple, plenty of Led Zeppelin.

It’s not that I prefer “softer” rock to this stuff- I love it all. Classic rock is a mix of all of these elements.
I think it depends where you listened to Classic Rock radio. Where I grew up the CR station(s) played hard rock like the bands you listed above rather than any softer rock. The softer rock like Rod Stewart, Billy Joel, etc. was played on the radio, but not on the stations playing Classic Rock.
You didn’t hear “Maggie May” or “Only the Good Die Young” on classic rock radio?
Not on stations in the classic rock format.
 
I didn’t expect to see Paranoid on this list. Tim is full of surprises.

Not sure why you think this. I’ve been showcasing pretty hard rock all along. Van Halen (though I know folks think I ranked it too low), two AC/DC albums, Aerosmith, Deep Purple, plenty of Led Zeppelin.

It’s not that I prefer “softer” rock to this stuff- I love it all. Classic rock is a mix of all of these elements.
I think it depends where you listened to Classic Rock radio. Where I grew up the CR station(s) played hard rock like the bands you listed above rather than any softer rock. The softer rock like Rod Stewart, Billy Joel, etc. was played on the radio, but not on the stations playing Classic Rock.
You didn’t hear “Maggie May” or “Only the Good Die Young” on classic rock radio?
Not on stations in the classic rock format.
I have trouble believing this but OK.
 
22. Derek & The Dominos- Layla and Other Assorted Love Songs (1970)

Classic rock radio hits: Layla, Bell Bottom Blues, Little Wing


Eric Clapton’s finest album thanks to an excellent and steady diet of blues rock and the contributions of many great musicians, including Duane Allman and drummer Jim Gordon, who was sane at this time (later he would be shut away for the rest of his life after decapitating his mother.)

I Looked Away
Penned by Clapton and the legendary Bobby Whitlock, this is a terrific throwback to early 60s soul.

Bell Bottom Blues
My favorite song on the album and probably my favorite Clapton tune. Really soulful.

Keep On Growing
Is it just me but does this sound a lot like the Doobie Brothers? Anyhow, fine deep cut.

Nobody Knows When You’re Down and Out
Terrific standard blues ballad with a very memorable slide guitar performance by Allman.

I Am Yours
Acoustic goodness here.

Anyday
Really love this. A great blues rock song. Love Whitlock’s vocals and the chorus is gorgeous.

Key to the Highway
More standard blues. Formulaic but performed excellently due to the fine musicians involved.

Tell the Truth
The sound effects here are a little weird and unnecessary but nonetheless another really good blues rock song.

Why Does Love Got to Be So Sad
Pretty good rock played very fast. Band really goes to town here.

Have You Ever Loved a Woman
Eric doing a fine BB King imitation here. Since I adore the blues of course I love this.

Little Wing
I think this is better than the Hendrix original. For me this is the definitive version. Sublime slide guitars in harmony by Clapton and Allman.

It’s Too Late
50s throwback. Just OK IMO.

Layla
Obviously Clapton’s signature tune and one of the great classic rock songs. The gorgeous piano ending was written by the mysterious Gordon, and used to great effect in the film Goodfellas.

Thorn Tree In the Garden
Soft love song sung by Whitlock ends the record. Rather incongruous with the rest of the album, but nonetheless very pretty.
 
22. Derek & The Dominos- Layla and Other Assorted Love Songs (1970)

Classic rock radio hits: Layla, Bell Bottom Blues, Little Wing


Eric Clapton’s finest album thanks to an excellent and steady diet of blues rock and the contributions of many great musicians, including Duane Allman and drummer Jim Gordon, who was sane at this time (later he would be shut away for the rest of his life after decapitating his mother.)

I Looked Away
Penned by Clapton and the legendary Bobby Whitlock, this is a terrific throwback to early 60s soul.

Bell Bottom Blues
My favorite song on the album and probably my favorite Clapton tune. Really soulful.

Keep On Growing
Is it just me but does this sound a lot like the Doobie Brothers? Anyhow, fine deep cut.

Nobody Knows When You’re Down and Out
Terrific standard blues ballad with a very memorable slide guitar performance by Allman.

I Am Yours
Acoustic goodness here.

Anyday
Really love this. A great blues rock song. Love Whitlock’s vocals and the chorus is gorgeous.

Key to the Highway
More standard blues. Formulaic but performed excellently due to the fine musicians involved.

Tell the Truth
The sound effects here are a little weird and unnecessary but nonetheless another really good blues rock song.

Why Does Love Got to Be So Sad
Pretty good rock played very fast. Band really goes to town here.

Have You Ever Loved a Woman
Eric doing a fine BB King imitation here. Since I adore the blues of course I love this.

Little Wing
I think this is better than the Hendrix original. For me this is the definitive version. Sublime slide guitars in harmony by Clapton and Allman.

It’s Too Late
50s throwback. Just OK IMO.

Layla
Obviously Clapton’s signature tune and one of the great classic rock songs. The gorgeous piano ending was written by the mysterious Gordon, and used to great effect in the film Goodfellas.

Thorn Tree In the Garden
Soft love song sung by Whitlock ends the record. Rather incongruous with the rest of the album, but nonetheless very pretty.

I think you are underselling "Why Does Love Got to Be So Sad?" here. Duane's guitar on that song is one of my 10 favorite guitar performances ever. And while it is one of the few songs not to feature Allman, "Keep on Growing" is also a favorite.

For those who are a fan of the album, it's also worth checking out the Tedeschi Trucks Band doing Layla Revisited.
 
22. Derek & The Dominos- Layla and Other Assorted Love Songs (1970)

Classic rock radio hits: Layla, Bell Bottom Blues, Little Wing


Eric Clapton’s finest album thanks to an excellent and steady diet of blues rock and the contributions of many great musicians, including Duane Allman and drummer Jim Gordon, who was sane at this time (later he would be shut away for the rest of his life after decapitating his mother.)

I Looked Away
Penned by Clapton and the legendary Bobby Whitlock, this is a terrific throwback to early 60s soul.

Bell Bottom Blues
My favorite song on the album and probably my favorite Clapton tune. Really soulful.

Keep On Growing
Is it just me but does this sound a lot like the Doobie Brothers? Anyhow, fine deep cut.

Nobody Knows When You’re Down and Out
Terrific standard blues ballad with a very memorable slide guitar performance by Allman.

I Am Yours
Acoustic goodness here.

Anyday
Really love this. A great blues rock song. Love Whitlock’s vocals and the chorus is gorgeous.

Key to the Highway
More standard blues. Formulaic but performed excellently due to the fine musicians involved.

Tell the Truth
The sound effects here are a little weird and unnecessary but nonetheless another really good blues rock song.

Why Does Love Got to Be So Sad
Pretty good rock played very fast. Band really goes to town here.

Have You Ever Loved a Woman
Eric doing a fine BB King imitation here. Since I adore the blues of course I love this.

Little Wing
I think this is better than the Hendrix original. For me this is the definitive version. Sublime slide guitars in harmony by Clapton and Allman.

It’s Too Late
50s throwback. Just OK IMO.

Layla
Obviously Clapton’s signature tune and one of the great classic rock songs. The gorgeous piano ending was written by the mysterious Gordon, and used to great effect in the film Goodfellas.

Thorn Tree In the Garden
Soft love song sung by Whitlock ends the record. Rather incongruous with the rest of the album, but nonetheless very pretty.

I think you are underselling "Why Does Love Got to Be So Sad?" here. Duane's guitar on that song is one of my 10 favorite guitar performances ever. And while it is one of the few songs not to feature Allman, "Keep on Growing" is also a favorite.

For those who are a fan of the album, it's also worth checking out the Tedeschi Trucks Band doing Layla Revisited.
Thank you for bringing them up. I meant to a couple of times now and I forgot.

I cannot say enough good things about Susan Tedeschi, Derek Trucks, or their band. They are among the best blues rockers out today and continue the Allman Brothers tradition. Both artists have excellent solo albums as well.
 
I didn’t expect to see Paranoid on this list. Tim is full of surprises.

Not sure why you think this. I’ve been showcasing pretty hard rock all along. Van Halen (though I know folks think I ranked it too low), two AC/DC albums, Aerosmith, Deep Purple, plenty of Led Zeppelin.

It’s not that I prefer “softer” rock to this stuff- I love it all. Classic rock is a mix of all of these elements.
I think it depends where you listened to Classic Rock radio. Where I grew up the CR station(s) played hard rock like the bands you listed above rather than any softer rock. The softer rock like Rod Stewart, Billy Joel, etc. was played on the radio, but not on the stations playing Classic Rock.
You didn’t hear “Maggie May” or “Only the Good Die Young” on classic rock radio?
Not on stations in the classic rock format.
I have trouble believing this but OK.
??? I'm not sure why? My experience with Classic Rock radio was from growing up in Western Canada where Canadian content rules also influenced which artists and songs were played on radio.
My point is there were regional differences regarding what constituted Classic Rock. My experience is different than what you experienced. That doesn't make either of us wrong, we just have different perspectives.
 
21. Steely Dan- Aja (1977)

Classic rock radio hits: Deacon Blues, Josie, Peg, Aja


Aja is about as far removed from the raw heavy metal of Paranoid and the improvisational blues rock of Layla that I can think of. It’s probably the most polished record on this list, with every note on every song deliberate and rehearsed to the nth degree. Steely Dan gathered together some of the greatest jazz musicians of all time to assist them. The result is an audiophile’s dream and the greatest yacht rock album of all time.

This is complex jazz rock to a high degree and I almost don’t feel comfortable commenting on it. Not being a jazz expert by any means, how can I write anything informative about the brilliance of Wayne Shorter or Steve Gadd? So I won’t. As usual I’m simply going to tell you what I think of these songs at a very basic level. Apologies if, in this case in particular, that comes off as trite.

Black Cow
Pleasant soft jazz if you like this sort of thing. I didn’t used to but like most of the tunes on this album it’s grown on me over the years. Now, in my late 50s, I find it pretty relaxing. Go figure. I like the piano solo.

Aja
Like Black Cow, Aja is not very accessible the first time you hear it. Now it is but I already know every note. So it’s like coffee: you learn to love it over time (or maybe you never do). I’m well aware this song has some extraordinary musicians doing amazing things with their instruments.

Deacon Blues
I can’t really explain why this tune is so catchy, but it somehow is. It might be the lyrics that makes you want to sing along: “Drink scotch whisky all night long”, etc. But the lyrics are really depressing, aren’t they? He’s a loser who dies in a car crash. Not a happy ending.

Peg
My first real crush ever, at age 13: Debbie B. She was the cutest girl in 8th grade. I could barely muster two words to ever say to her. Debbie was in the school talent show and danced to her own choreography to this song. I will for the rest of my life associate this tune with her. Anyhow, this is great rock song.

Home At Last
I know this is one of those the audiophiles love because if you listen to it with headphones on the right equipment you can hear every instrument very distinctly, and it’s said to be brilliant jazz. My problem is I don’t really understand brilliant jazz. But I can appreciate it in theory.

I Got the News
I love the funky bass here by the great Chuck Rainey. And late in the song, the guitar solo by the incredible Lee Rittenaur. Other than that this is not something I would listen to regularly.

Josie
The only song on this records that sounds like other classic rock- well a little. It’s got a blues rock base to it though they still go off in unexpected directions as befits jazz. Anyhow I’ve always enjoyed listening to it.
 
I love Steely Dan, and even though Aja was their most popular album, the only two songs I really like are Peg and Josie. I never really ranked their albums, but I might have Aja in the 5 or 6 range. IMO, it's a little too mellow for me. Put another way, their other albums seemed to have a few more up-tempo songs.
 
21. Steely Dan- Aja (1977)

Classic rock radio hits: Deacon Blues, Josie, Peg, Aja


Aja is about as far removed from the raw heavy metal of Paranoid and the improvisational blues rock of Layla that I can think of with every note on every song deliberate and rehearsed to the nth degree. Steely Dan gathered together some of the greatest jazz musicians of all time to assist them. The result is an audiophile’s dream and the greatest yacht rock album of all time.

This is complex jazz rock to a high degree. Not being a jazz expert by any means.
Steely Dan has almost grown on me over the years. There is little doubt that they were a "polished group" as you mentioned, but as many of have critiqued along the way, I have a hard time getting behind this one and you helped illustrate why with the snippets above. That, along with there know detestation of touring (not that the Beatles were any different) kind of don't inspire me to put them here or in the annals of classic rock (but that's just me). I hear the songs about played on adult contemporary and during the summer on Yacht Rock Radio on Sirius as much or more than Classic Rock radio. But, it's your list and I'm sure plenty will disagree with me. On to the top 20!
 
21. Steely Dan- Aja (1977)

Classic rock radio hits: Deacon Blues, Josie, Peg, Aja


Aja is about as far removed from the raw heavy metal of Paranoid and the improvisational blues rock of Layla that I can think of with every note on every song deliberate and rehearsed to the nth degree. Steely Dan gathered together some of the greatest jazz musicians of all time to assist them. The result is an audiophile’s dream and the greatest yacht rock album of all time.

This is complex jazz rock to a high degree. Not being a jazz expert by any means.
Steely Dan has almost grown on me over the years. There is little doubt that they were a "polished group" as you mentioned, but as many of have critiqued along the way, I have a hard time getting behind this one and you helped illustrate why with the snippets above. That, along with there know detestation of touring (not that the Beatles were any different) kind of don't inspire me to put them here or in the annals of classic rock (but that's just me). I hear the songs about played on adult contemporary and during the summer on Yacht Rock Radio on Sirius as much or more than Classic Rock radio. But, it's your list and I'm sure plenty will disagree with me. On to the top 20!
Interesting point.

I would argue that yacht rock is as much a part of classic rock as hard rock or heavy metal or blues rock or early Rod Stewart or Billy Joel.

Aja is regarded as one of the greatest albums of all time. Is it my favorite? Clearly not; my personal preferences, as I have revealed many times in this thread, is the blues rock that has fairly dominated this list and will REALLY dominate the top 20 picks. But impossible for me not to have Aja on this list and not to give it a pretty high position due to all of its accolades.
 
the blues rock that has fairly dominated this list and will REALLY dominate the top 20 picks.
So we'll have a few Grand Funk albums coming!
I find it hard to comprehend that it took Grand Funk only 3 days to sell out Shea Stadium in 1971 while it took The Beatles several weeks to accomplish that feat in 1965 (the first major stadium concert in the U.S.). Oddly enough, this was well before the peak of GFR.
 
the blues rock that has fairly dominated this list and will REALLY dominate the top 20 picks.
So we'll have a few Grand Funk albums coming!
I find it hard to comprehend that it took Grand Funk only 3 days to sell out Shea Stadium in 1971 while it took The Beatles several weeks to accomplish that feat in 1965 (the first major stadium concert in the U.S.). Oddly enough, this was well before the peak of GFR.
I think it was Lester Bangs who called GFR "the first under-underground band" because all of the hip rocks critics (based mostly in SF) hated them - and all the while, they were selling LPs at a one-unit-per-three-second clip with no big radio hits. Their fans loved them and would represent big-time.
 
21. Steely Dan- Aja (1977)

Classic rock radio hits: Deacon Blues, Josie, Peg, Aja


Aja is about as far removed from the raw heavy metal of Paranoid and the improvisational blues rock of Layla that I can think of with every note on every song deliberate and rehearsed to the nth degree. Steely Dan gathered together some of the greatest jazz musicians of all time to assist them. The result is an audiophile’s dream and the greatest yacht rock album of all time.

This is complex jazz rock to a high degree. Not being a jazz expert by any means.
Steely Dan has almost grown on me over the years. There is little doubt that they were a "polished group" as you mentioned, but as many of have critiqued along the way, I have a hard time getting behind this one and you helped illustrate why with the snippets above. That, along with there know detestation of touring (not that the Beatles were any different) kind of don't inspire me to put them here or in the annals of classic rock (but that's just me). I hear the songs about played on adult contemporary and during the summer on Yacht Rock Radio on Sirius as much or more than Classic Rock radio. But, it's your list and I'm sure plenty will disagree with me. On to the top 20!
Interesting point.

I would argue that yacht rock is as much a part of classic rock as hard rock or heavy metal or blues rock or early Rod Stewart or Billy Joel.

Aja is regarded as one of the greatest albums of all time. Is it my favorite? Clearly not; my personal preferences, as I have revealed many times in this thread, is the blues rock that has fairly dominated this list and will REALLY dominate the top 20 picks. But impossible for me not to have Aja on this list and not to give it a pretty high position due to all of its accolades.

My classic rock stations all played certain songs from Billy Joel, Rod Stewart, Steely Dan, Doobie Brothers (inc. Michael McDonald era), etc.
 
Aja
Like Black Cow, Aja is not very accessible the first time you hear it. Now it is but I already know every note. So it’s like coffee: you learn to love it over time (or maybe you never do). I’m well aware this song has some extraordinary musicians doing amazing things with their instruments.

Aja is required listening when evaluating new speakers.
 
I don't revisit it much anymore, but I still remember my cousin Dan playing me Aja for the first time the summer I was 18/19. That was one of those HOLY CRAP moments as a music fan. Great album. Good band.
 
Would love to see what we did with the awesome Beatles countdown thread Krista4 conducted. No, not the post-Beatles Fab Four releases countdown, which was also awesome. The re-ordering of the 1-204 countdown based on FBGs submissions. We each put in a Top 25 and ended up with a new Beatles-world order of the top 1-172 as ranked by FBGs.

No offense to timmay, but in it's current form this one is pretty lame. Does not reflect the world I grew up in. Would love to hear others thoughts on this concept.
 
20. The Who- Tommy (1969)

Classic rock radio hits: Pinball Wizard, We’re Not Gonna Take It, I’m Free


Of the three “rock operas” that appear on this list (Quadrophenia, Tommy, and one yet forthcoming) this one is the most coherent, in that it tells a story you can at least understand from start to finish. That being said it’s a pretty bizarre story. Traumatized as a child by the murder of his mom’s lover, Tommy becomes deaf dumb and blind. In this state he is both abused by relatives and cruelly treated. As a teenager he excels at pinball, then the breaking of a mirror releases him and he becomes a rock star/cult leader until his followers finally reject him. Got it?
The music is beyond superb. This would be Pete Townshend’s finest effort (and in terms of composition it might well be) except that the sound and production is not up to the standards of their 70s work without the addition of synthesizers which gave the band, on their next stereo album which we will get to, a fuller richer sound. But that is not to take away from the band’s performance here. In particular Keith Moon is outstanding on this record.

Overture
As per traditional Broadway, an introduction to the dominant melodies on the record. However the story begins late into this song. As a side note the first several songs on this record feature Townshend’s vocals and while he has a good voice he lacks Roger Daltry’s commanding hard rock edge.

It’s A Boy
Short introduction of the baby. There are several of these short tunes, some lasting only a few seconds, but the melodies are really good.

1921
One of my favorite tunes by this band. Simple but delightful. The bridge contains the story line amd the reason for Tommy’s condition (though it’s a bit confusing.)

Amazing Journey
Fine rock song exploring Tommy’s descent into deaf dumb and blindness. It merges into the major instrumental theme, Sparks.

Sparks
I like Sparks, a rather simplistic instrumental theme (it’s basically only a few chords repeated over and over) and at two minutes it’s perfect. It is NOT perfect at 10 minutes which comes later. The band also performed a rousing live version on the Leeds record which was excellent.

Eyesight to the Blind (The Hawker)
A blues cover, originally performed by Blind Lemon Jefferson. Pretty incongruous here but what the hell? It’s a great performance.

Christmas
Continues the story and also a sharp commentary on Christianity and the question of eternal salvation.

Cousin Kevin
One of two songs about child abuse, both written by John Entwistle (which is interesting). Cousin Kevin seems to enjoy torture.

The Acid Queen
Great rock song immortalized by Tina Turner in the movie (practically the only performance in that film that is worth watching.) This version is fine but not as good.

Underture
Basically a repeat of Sparks except this is ten minutes which is way too long. My suspicion is that they simply ran out of music and wanted to finish out side two of the record. Unnecessary to listen to this whole thing, except that Moon’s drumming is memorable.

Do You Think It’s Alright?
Intro to the Uncle Ernie song.

Fiddle About
The Uncle Ernie song. Not sure there had been a song overtly about this subject before. Pretty serious theme.

Pinball Wizard
Given the terrific opening guitar this ought to be one of the great classic rock songs of all time but again it suffers from sound quality. Imagine if it been on Who’s Next with a Moog synthesizer. Even so it’s still great, and IMO superior to the Elton John cover which replaced the lead guitar with piano.

There’s A Doctor
My favorite of the short intros. I like this melody.

Go The Mirror!
Contains some of main themes of the album, including “See Me, Feel Me” which would later be repeated on We’re Not Gonna Take It. This is sublime rock and roll.

Tommy Can You Hear Me?
Nice rock song but really repetitive.

Smash the Mirror
Short great rock that is the pivotal moment in the story.

Sensation
Nice trippy song. A hippie psychedelic favorite.

Miracle Cure
Another throwaway short.

Sally Simpson
Along with 1921 my favorite song on the record. Again rather incongruous to the storyline but its description of a groupie is still relevant even today- Sally could just as easily be a Swiftie! Marvelous tune and story.

I’m Free
Like Sensation, except with a better guitar riff, this is more hippie trippy psychedelic goodness.

Welcome
My least favorite. I don’t like this melody. Important to the storyline of course as Tommy creates his cult.

Tommy’s Holidays Camp
The only song I know from this band composed by Keith Moon. Very weird and love the “Ha ha!”

We’re Not Gonna Take It
Epic fitting conclusion. Awesome lyrics and melody. Satisfying the whole way through.
 
I understand why Tommy is on the list, but I don't understand Tommy. Pink Floyd concept albums (including their opera, The Wall) "I get". I like other The Who albums better and I hope others might chime in and explain to me what I am missing here. Tim, I get your points, so thanks.
 
I understand why Tommy is on the list, but I don't understand Tommy. Pink Floyd concept albums (including their opera, The Wall) "I get". I like other The Who albums better and I hope others might chime in and explain to me what I am missing here. Tim, I get your points, so thanks.
It’s not on on this list because of its theme or understandability. It’s on this list because, IMO, it rocks.
 
I understand why Tommy is on the list, but I don't understand Tommy. Pink Floyd concept albums (including their opera, The Wall) "I get". I like other The Who albums better and I hope others might chime in and explain to me what I am missing here. Tim, I get your points, so thanks.
I'm firmly in this camp. I like other Who material way better. The only part about the "rock opera" that I see is some of the songs try to be operatic. IMO, this could have easily been pared down to a single album with all strong songs as opposed to a double album with a lot of filler to try to instill a concept that is hard for many listeners to identify with. I have an original pressing of the vinyl album sitting in my house somewhere, and I am not sure I have played it once in the past 40+ years.
 
I understand why Tommy is on the list, but I don't understand Tommy. Pink Floyd concept albums (including their opera, The Wall) "I get". I like other The Who albums better and I hope others might chime in and explain to me what I am missing here. Tim, I get your points, so thanks.
I'm firmly in this camp. I like other Who material way better. The only part about the "rock opera" that I see is some of the songs try to be operatic. IMO, this could have easily been pared down to a single album with all strong songs as opposed to a double album with a lot of filler to try to instill a concept that is hard for many listeners to identify with.

:goodposting:
 
I find the whole storyline to be a bit silly, but I feel that Tommy is the best Who album from start to finish. It's a musical masterpiece, and I like their raw sound from the 60s better than their more refined sound of the 70s (where Keith Moon was emasculated in the mixes).
 
20. The Who- Tommy (1969)

Classic rock radio hits: Pinball Wizard, We’re Not Gonna Take It, I’m Free


Of the three “rock operas” that appear on this list (Quadrophenia, Tommy, and one yet forthcoming) this one is the most coherent, in that it tells a story you can at least understand from start to finish. That being said it’s a pretty bizarre story. Traumatized as a child by the murder of his mom’s lover, Tommy becomes deaf dumb and blind. In this state he is both abused by relatives and cruelly treated. As a teenager he excels at pinball, then the breaking of a mirror releases him and he becomes a rock star/cult leader until his followers finally reject him. Got it?
The music is beyond superb. This would be Pete Townshend’s finest effort (and in terms of composition it might well be) except that the sound and production is not up to the standards of their 70s work without the addition of synthesizers which gave the band, on their next stereo album which we will get to, a fuller richer sound. But that is not to take away from the band’s performance here. In particular Keith Moon is outstanding on this record.

Overture
As per traditional Broadway, an introduction to the dominant melodies on the record. However the story begins late into this song. As a side note the first several songs on this record feature Townshend’s vocals and while he has a good voice he lacks Roger Daltry’s commanding hard rock edge.

It’s A Boy
Short introduction of the baby. There are several of these short tunes, some lasting only a few seconds, but the melodies are really good.

1921
One of my favorite tunes by this band. Simple but delightful. The bridge contains the story line amd the reason for Tommy’s condition (though it’s a bit confusing.)

Amazing Journey
Fine rock song exploring Tommy’s descent into deaf dumb and blindness. It merges into the major instrumental theme, Sparks.

Sparks
I like Sparks, a rather simplistic instrumental theme (it’s basically only a few chords repeated over and over) and at two minutes it’s perfect. It is NOT perfect at 10 minutes which comes later. The band also performed a rousing live version on the Leeds record which was excellent.

Eyesight to the Blind (The Hawker)
A blues cover, originally performed by Blind Lemon Jefferson. Pretty incongruous here but what the hell? It’s a great performance.

Christmas
Continues the story and also a sharp commentary on Christianity and the question of eternal salvation.

Cousin Kevin
One of two songs about child abuse, both written by John Entwistle (which is interesting). Cousin Kevin seems to enjoy torture.

The Acid Queen
Great rock song immortalized by Tina Turner in the movie (practically the only performance in that film that is worth watching.) This version is fine but not as good.

Underture
Basically a repeat of Sparks except this is ten minutes which is way too long. My suspicion is that they simply ran out of music and wanted to finish out side two of the record. Unnecessary to listen to this whole thing, except that Moon’s drumming is memorable.

Do You Think It’s Alright?
Intro to the Uncle Ernie song.

Fiddle About
The Uncle Ernie song. Not sure there had been a song overtly about this subject before. Pretty serious theme.

Pinball Wizard
Given the terrific opening guitar this ought to be one of the great classic rock songs of all time but again it suffers from sound quality. Imagine if it been on Who’s Next with a Moog synthesizer. Even so it’s still great, and IMO superior to the Elton John cover which replaced the lead guitar with piano.

There’s A Doctor
My favorite of the short intros. I like this melody.

Go The Mirror!
Contains some of main themes of the album, including “See Me, Feel Me” which would later be repeated on We’re Not Gonna Take It. This is sublime rock and roll.

Tommy Can You Hear Me?
Nice rock song but really repetitive.

Smash the Mirror
Short great rock that is the pivotal moment in the story.

Sensation
Nice trippy song. A hippie psychedelic favorite.

Miracle Cure
Another throwaway short.

Sally Simpson
Along with 1921 my favorite song on the record. Again rather incongruous to the storyline but its description of a groupie is still relevant even today- Sally could just as easily be a Swiftie! Marvelous tune and story.

I’m Free
Like Sensation, except with a better guitar riff, this is more hippie trippy psychedelic goodness.

Welcome
My least favorite. I don’t like this melody. Important to the storyline of course as Tommy creates his cult.

Tommy’s Holidays Camp
The only song I know from this band composed by Keith Moon. Very weird and love the “Ha ha!”

We’re Not Gonna Take It
Epic fitting conclusion. Awesome lyrics and melody. Satisfying the whole way through.
Only 19 albums left. Whatever your definition of classic rock is, one more Who album has to appear.
 
20. The Who- Tommy (1969)

Classic rock radio hits: Pinball Wizard, We’re Not Gonna Take It, I’m Free


Of the three “rock operas” that appear on this list (Quadrophenia, Tommy, and one yet forthcoming) this one is the most coherent, in that it tells a story you can at least understand from start to finish. That being said it’s a pretty bizarre story. Traumatized as a child by the murder of his mom’s lover, Tommy becomes deaf dumb and blind. In this state he is both abused by relatives and cruelly treated. As a teenager he excels at pinball, then the breaking of a mirror releases him and he becomes a rock star/cult leader until his followers finally reject him. Got it?
The music is beyond superb. This would be Pete Townshend’s finest effort (and in terms of composition it might well be) except that the sound and production is not up to the standards of their 70s work without the addition of synthesizers which gave the band, on their next stereo album which we will get to, a fuller richer sound. But that is not to take away from the band’s performance here. In particular Keith Moon is outstanding on this record.

Overture
As per traditional Broadway, an introduction to the dominant melodies on the record. However the story begins late into this song. As a side note the first several songs on this record feature Townshend’s vocals and while he has a good voice he lacks Roger Daltry’s commanding hard rock edge.

It’s A Boy
Short introduction of the baby. There are several of these short tunes, some lasting only a few seconds, but the melodies are really good.

1921
One of my favorite tunes by this band. Simple but delightful. The bridge contains the story line amd the reason for Tommy’s condition (though it’s a bit confusing.)

Amazing Journey
Fine rock song exploring Tommy’s descent into deaf dumb and blindness. It merges into the major instrumental theme, Sparks.

Sparks
I like Sparks, a rather simplistic instrumental theme (it’s basically only a few chords repeated over and over) and at two minutes it’s perfect. It is NOT perfect at 10 minutes which comes later. The band also performed a rousing live version on the Leeds record which was excellent.

Eyesight to the Blind (The Hawker)
A blues cover, originally performed by Blind Lemon Jefferson. Pretty incongruous here but what the hell? It’s a great performance.

Christmas
Continues the story and also a sharp commentary on Christianity and the question of eternal salvation.

Cousin Kevin
One of two songs about child abuse, both written by John Entwistle (which is interesting). Cousin Kevin seems to enjoy torture.

The Acid Queen
Great rock song immortalized by Tina Turner in the movie (practically the only performance in that film that is worth watching.) This version is fine but not as good.

Underture
Basically a repeat of Sparks except this is ten minutes which is way too long. My suspicion is that they simply ran out of music and wanted to finish out side two of the record. Unnecessary to listen to this whole thing, except that Moon’s drumming is memorable.

Do You Think It’s Alright?
Intro to the Uncle Ernie song.

Fiddle About
The Uncle Ernie song. Not sure there had been a song overtly about this subject before. Pretty serious theme.

Pinball Wizard
Given the terrific opening guitar this ought to be one of the great classic rock songs of all time but again it suffers from sound quality. Imagine if it been on Who’s Next with a Moog synthesizer. Even so it’s still great, and IMO superior to the Elton John cover which replaced the lead guitar with piano.

There’s A Doctor
My favorite of the short intros. I like this melody.

Go The Mirror!
Contains some of main themes of the album, including “See Me, Feel Me” which would later be repeated on We’re Not Gonna Take It. This is sublime rock and roll.

Tommy Can You Hear Me?
Nice rock song but really repetitive.

Smash the Mirror
Short great rock that is the pivotal moment in the story.

Sensation
Nice trippy song. A hippie psychedelic favorite.

Miracle Cure
Another throwaway short.

Sally Simpson
Along with 1921 my favorite song on the record. Again rather incongruous to the storyline but its description of a groupie is still relevant even today- Sally could just as easily be a Swiftie! Marvelous tune and story.

I’m Free
Like Sensation, except with a better guitar riff, this is more hippie trippy psychedelic goodness.

Welcome
My least favorite. I don’t like this melody. Important to the storyline of course as Tommy creates his cult.

Tommy’s Holidays Camp
The only song I know from this band composed by Keith Moon. Very weird and love the “Ha ha!”

We’re Not Gonna Take It
Epic fitting conclusion. Awesome lyrics and melody. Satisfying the whole way through.
Only 19 albums left. Whatever your definition of classic rock is, one more Who album has to appear.
Checking what has been listed, I think that is a safe assumption. Top 10 material.
 
20. The Who- Tommy (1969)

Classic rock radio hits: Pinball Wizard, We’re Not Gonna Take It, I’m Free


Of the three “rock operas” that appear on this list (Quadrophenia, Tommy, and one yet forthcoming) this one is the most coherent, in that it tells a story you can at least understand from start to finish. That being said it’s a pretty bizarre story. Traumatized as a child by the murder of his mom’s lover, Tommy becomes deaf dumb and blind. In this state he is both abused by relatives and cruelly treated. As a teenager he excels at pinball, then the breaking of a mirror releases him and he becomes a rock star/cult leader until his followers finally reject him. Got it?
The music is beyond superb. This would be Pete Townshend’s finest effort (and in terms of composition it might well be) except that the sound and production is not up to the standards of their 70s work without the addition of synthesizers which gave the band, on their next stereo album which we will get to, a fuller richer sound. But that is not to take away from the band’s performance here. In particular Keith Moon is outstanding on this record.

Overture
As per traditional Broadway, an introduction to the dominant melodies on the record. However the story begins late into this song. As a side note the first several songs on this record feature Townshend’s vocals and while he has a good voice he lacks Roger Daltry’s commanding hard rock edge.

It’s A Boy
Short introduction of the baby. There are several of these short tunes, some lasting only a few seconds, but the melodies are really good.

1921
One of my favorite tunes by this band. Simple but delightful. The bridge contains the story line amd the reason for Tommy’s condition (though it’s a bit confusing.)

Amazing Journey
Fine rock song exploring Tommy’s descent into deaf dumb and blindness. It merges into the major instrumental theme, Sparks.

Sparks
I like Sparks, a rather simplistic instrumental theme (it’s basically only a few chords repeated over and over) and at two minutes it’s perfect. It is NOT perfect at 10 minutes which comes later. The band also performed a rousing live version on the Leeds record which was excellent.

Eyesight to the Blind (The Hawker)
A blues cover, originally performed by Blind Lemon Jefferson. Pretty incongruous here but what the hell? It’s a great performance.

Christmas
Continues the story and also a sharp commentary on Christianity and the question of eternal salvation.

Cousin Kevin
One of two songs about child abuse, both written by John Entwistle (which is interesting). Cousin Kevin seems to enjoy torture.

The Acid Queen
Great rock song immortalized by Tina Turner in the movie (practically the only performance in that film that is worth watching.) This version is fine but not as good.

Underture
Basically a repeat of Sparks except this is ten minutes which is way too long. My suspicion is that they simply ran out of music and wanted to finish out side two of the record. Unnecessary to listen to this whole thing, except that Moon’s drumming is memorable.

Do You Think It’s Alright?
Intro to the Uncle Ernie song.

Fiddle About
The Uncle Ernie song. Not sure there had been a song overtly about this subject before. Pretty serious theme.

Pinball Wizard
Given the terrific opening guitar this ought to be one of the great classic rock songs of all time but again it suffers from sound quality. Imagine if it been on Who’s Next with a Moog synthesizer. Even so it’s still great, and IMO superior to the Elton John cover which replaced the lead guitar with piano.

There’s A Doctor
My favorite of the short intros. I like this melody.

Go The Mirror!
Contains some of main themes of the album, including “See Me, Feel Me” which would later be repeated on We’re Not Gonna Take It. This is sublime rock and roll.

Tommy Can You Hear Me?
Nice rock song but really repetitive.

Smash the Mirror
Short great rock that is the pivotal moment in the story.

Sensation
Nice trippy song. A hippie psychedelic favorite.

Miracle Cure
Another throwaway short.

Sally Simpson
Along with 1921 my favorite song on the record. Again rather incongruous to the storyline but its description of a groupie is still relevant even today- Sally could just as easily be a Swiftie! Marvelous tune and story.

I’m Free
Like Sensation, except with a better guitar riff, this is more hippie trippy psychedelic goodness.

Welcome
My least favorite. I don’t like this melody. Important to the storyline of course as Tommy creates his cult.

Tommy’s Holidays Camp
The only song I know from this band composed by Keith Moon. Very weird and love the “Ha ha!”

We’re Not Gonna Take It
Epic fitting conclusion. Awesome lyrics and melody. Satisfying the whole way through.
Only 19 albums left. Whatever your definition of classic rock is, one more Who album has to appear.
Leaving some wiggle room in that Tim has some interesting choices sometimes, I would guess the remaining albums are 4 from Zeppelin, 3 from the Stones, 3 from The Beatles, 2 from Floyd, 2 from Bruce, and single entries from FMac, Boston, The Who, Bowie, and Queen. But that's me thinking out loud.
 
I can't stand Tommy. I think it's a ridiculously dumb concept album. Maybe I gotta be on acid to understand it ... or whatever drug they said in Almost Famous.
 
I can't stand Tommy. I think it's a ridiculously dumb concept album. Maybe I gotta be on acid to understand it ... or whatever drug they said in Almost Famous.
The Who has always seemed overrated to me. They were a good but not great band and Tommy is an average album. There are a lot of songs that are not worth listening to ever again.
 
20. The Who- Tommy (1969)

Classic rock radio hits: Pinball Wizard, We’re Not Gonna Take It, I’m Free


Of the three “rock operas” that appear on this list (Quadrophenia, Tommy, and one yet forthcoming) this one is the most coherent, in that it tells a story you can at least understand from start to finish. That being said it’s a pretty bizarre story. Traumatized as a child by the murder of his mom’s lover, Tommy becomes deaf dumb and blind. In this state he is both abused by relatives and cruelly treated. As a teenager he excels at pinball, then the breaking of a mirror releases him and he becomes a rock star/cult leader until his followers finally reject him. Got it?
The music is beyond superb. This would be Pete Townshend’s finest effort (and in terms of composition it might well be) except that the sound and production is not up to the standards of their 70s work without the addition of synthesizers which gave the band, on their next stereo album which we will get to, a fuller richer sound. But that is not to take away from the band’s performance here. In particular Keith Moon is outstanding on this record.

Overture
As per traditional Broadway, an introduction to the dominant melodies on the record. However the story begins late into this song. As a side note the first several songs on this record feature Townshend’s vocals and while he has a good voice he lacks Roger Daltry’s commanding hard rock edge.

It’s A Boy
Short introduction of the baby. There are several of these short tunes, some lasting only a few seconds, but the melodies are really good.

1921
One of my favorite tunes by this band. Simple but delightful. The bridge contains the story line amd the reason for Tommy’s condition (though it’s a bit confusing.)

Amazing Journey
Fine rock song exploring Tommy’s descent into deaf dumb and blindness. It merges into the major instrumental theme, Sparks.

Sparks
I like Sparks, a rather simplistic instrumental theme (it’s basically only a few chords repeated over and over) and at two minutes it’s perfect. It is NOT perfect at 10 minutes which comes later. The band also performed a rousing live version on the Leeds record which was excellent.

Eyesight to the Blind (The Hawker)
A blues cover, originally performed by Blind Lemon Jefferson. Pretty incongruous here but what the hell? It’s a great performance.

Christmas
Continues the story and also a sharp commentary on Christianity and the question of eternal salvation.

Cousin Kevin
One of two songs about child abuse, both written by John Entwistle (which is interesting). Cousin Kevin seems to enjoy torture.

The Acid Queen
Great rock song immortalized by Tina Turner in the movie (practically the only performance in that film that is worth watching.) This version is fine but not as good.

Underture
Basically a repeat of Sparks except this is ten minutes which is way too long. My suspicion is that they simply ran out of music and wanted to finish out side two of the record. Unnecessary to listen to this whole thing, except that Moon’s drumming is memorable.

Do You Think It’s Alright?
Intro to the Uncle Ernie song.

Fiddle About
The Uncle Ernie song. Not sure there had been a song overtly about this subject before. Pretty serious theme.

Pinball Wizard
Given the terrific opening guitar this ought to be one of the great classic rock songs of all time but again it suffers from sound quality. Imagine if it been on Who’s Next with a Moog synthesizer. Even so it’s still great, and IMO superior to the Elton John cover which replaced the lead guitar with piano.

There’s A Doctor
My favorite of the short intros. I like this melody.

Go The Mirror!
Contains some of main themes of the album, including “See Me, Feel Me” which would later be repeated on We’re Not Gonna Take It. This is sublime rock and roll.

Tommy Can You Hear Me?
Nice rock song but really repetitive.

Smash the Mirror
Short great rock that is the pivotal moment in the story.

Sensation
Nice trippy song. A hippie psychedelic favorite.

Miracle Cure
Another throwaway short.

Sally Simpson
Along with 1921 my favorite song on the record. Again rather incongruous to the storyline but its description of a groupie is still relevant even today- Sally could just as easily be a Swiftie! Marvelous tune and story.

I’m Free
Like Sensation, except with a better guitar riff, this is more hippie trippy psychedelic goodness.

Welcome
My least favorite. I don’t like this melody. Important to the storyline of course as Tommy creates his cult.

Tommy’s Holidays Camp
The only song I know from this band composed by Keith Moon. Very weird and love the “Ha ha!”

We’re Not Gonna Take It
Epic fitting conclusion. Awesome lyrics and melody. Satisfying the whole way through.
Only 19 albums left. Whatever your definition of classic rock is, one more Who album has to appear.
Leaving some wiggle room in that Tim has some interesting choices sometimes, I would guess the remaining albums are 4 from Zeppelin, 3 from the Stones, 3 from The Beatles, 2 from Floyd, 2 from Bruce, and single entries from FMac, Boston, The Who, Bowie, and Queen. But that's me thinking out loud.
I wasn’t going to be that specific. I was only going to say I expect a British Invasion in the top 20.
 
Would love to see what we did with the awesome Beatles countdown thread Krista4 conducted. No, not the post-Beatles Fab Four releases countdown, which was also awesome. The re-ordering of the 1-204 countdown based on FBGs submissions. We each put in a Top 25 and ended up with a new Beatles-world order of the top 1-172 as ranked by FBGs.

No offense to timmay, but in it's current form this one is pretty lame. Does not reflect the world I grew up in. Would love to hear others thoughts on this concept.

OK good talk thnx guys
 

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