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The Top 155 Songs by American Artists According to 5 Middle-Aged Idiots (1 Viewer)

MAC_32

Footballguy
Lean on me in a landslide and that has much more to do with it than the others. Except Van Halen anyway. Otherwise, great round.
 

Dr. Octopus

Footballguy
27


Dr. Octopus:


I Saw the Light – Todd Rundgren


"I Saw the Light" is a song written and performed by American musician Todd Rundgren that was released as the opening track from his 1972 album Something/Anything?. In the album's liner notes, Rundgren states that he intended the song to be the hit of the album, and copied the Motown tradition of putting hit songs at the beginning of albums


Jeb:

Fortunate Son – Creedance Clearwater Revival


The song, released during the peak period of the U.S. involvement in the Vietnam War, is not explicit in its criticism of that war in particular, rather, it "speaks more to the unfairness of class than war itself," according to its author, John Fogerty. "It's the old saying about rich men making war and poor men having to fight them."] In 2015, while on the television show The Voice, he also said:

The thoughts behind this song - it was a lot of anger. So it was the Vietnam War going on... Now I was drafted and they're making me fight, and no one has actually defined why. So this was all boiling inside of me and I sat down on the edge of my bed and out came "It ain't me, it ain't me, I ain't no senator's son!" You know, it took about 20 minutes to write the song.


Scooter:


Dream On - Aerosmith


In 2004, Rolling Stone magazine ranked the song at number 172 on its list of the 500 Greatest Songs of All Time. It was moved to number 173 in 2010, and re-ranked at number 199 in 2021.


Doug:

Under the Bridge – Red Hot Chili Peppers


"Under the Bridge" is a song by the American rock band Red Hot Chili Peppers and the eleventh track on their fifth studio album, Blood Sugar Sex Magik (1991). Vocalist Anthony Kiedis wrote the lyrics while reflecting on loneliness and the struggles of being clean from drugs, and almost didn't share it with the band. Released in March 1992, "Under the Bridge" was praised by critics and fans for its emotional weight. The song was a commercial success and the band's highest-charting single, peaking at number 2 on the Billboard Hot 100 and certified platinum. It was also a success in other countries, mostly charting in the Top 10.


Chap:

I Want You Back – The Jackson 5


"I Want You Back" is the first national single by the Jackson 5. It was released by Motown on October 6, 1969, and became the first number-one hit for the band on January 31, 1970
 

DocHolliday

Footballguy
Jeb wins this round again. Fortunate Son is one of my favore classic rock songs. I Saw the Light is second. I am a big fan of early Aerosmith but Dream On is worn way out. RHCP can just go away.
 

Dr. Octopus

Footballguy
Chap is redeeming himself a bit - still sticking with his "schtick" but going to more heavy hitters in the "genre".
 

Pip's Invitation

Footballguy
I am almost as big a Todd fan as Binky, so I give this round to Doc Oc. ISTL is one of his best songs in addition to being one of his most popular.

The CCR, Aerosmith and J5 songs are UGE as well. I'm OK with Under the Bridge but I don't consider it one of the greatest songs of its time.
 

Uruk-Hai

Footballguy
27


Dr. Octopus:


I Saw the Light – Todd Rundgren


"I Saw the Light" is a song written and performed by American musician Todd Rundgren that was released as the opening track from his 1972 album Something/Anything?. In the album's liner notes, Rundgren states that he intended the song to be the hit of the album, and copied the Motown tradition of putting hit songs at the beginning of albums


Jeb:

Fortunate Son – Creedance Clearwater Revival


The song, released during the peak period of the U.S. involvement in the Vietnam War, is not explicit in its criticism of that war in particular, rather, it "speaks more to the unfairness of class than war itself," according to its author, John Fogerty. "It's the old saying about rich men making war and poor men having to fight them."] In 2015, while on the television show The Voice, he also said:

The thoughts behind this song - it was a lot of anger. So it was the Vietnam War going on... Now I was drafted and they're making me fight, and no one has actually defined why. So this was all boiling inside of me and I sat down on the edge of my bed and out came "It ain't me, it ain't me, I ain't no senator's son!" You know, it took about 20 minutes to write the song.


Scooter:


Dream On - Aerosmith


In 2004, Rolling Stone magazine ranked the song at number 172 on its list of the 500 Greatest Songs of All Time. It was moved to number 173 in 2010, and re-ranked at number 199 in 2021.


Doug:

Under the Bridge – Red Hot Chili Peppers


"Under the Bridge" is a song by the American rock band Red Hot Chili Peppers and the eleventh track on their fifth studio album, Blood Sugar Sex Magik (1991). Vocalist Anthony Kiedis wrote the lyrics while reflecting on loneliness and the struggles of being clean from drugs, and almost didn't share it with the band. Released in March 1992, "Under the Bridge" was praised by critics and fans for its emotional weight. The song was a commercial success and the band's highest-charting single, peaking at number 2 on the Billboard Hot 100 and certified platinum. It was also a success in other countries, mostly charting in the Top 10.


Chap:

I Want You Back – The Jackson 5


"I Want You Back" is the first national single by the Jackson 5. It was released by Motown on October 6, 1969, and became the first number-one hit for the band on January 31, 1970
1. "I Want You Back". I traded a comic book for this in '69 or '70. The original vinyl 7" is the way to go here (as with most Motown singles up until about 1971). This record JUMPS off of the turntable it's so hot. The band just slays it and Michael gives an unbelievable performance.

2. "I Saw The Light". Love Runt. He's a melodic genius and this is one of his best melodies.

3. "Fortunate Son". Is there a law that this record has to be on the soundtrack of every film/show set in the late '60s? Anyway, it's a great blast of class rage on a par with anything the punks did. It's not the song's fault it's so overplayed.

4. "Dream On". Probably Tyler's best vocal. Nice atmosphere in the production.

5. "Under The Bridge". I don't know much about RHCP, but I'm not sure what they were going for here. My initial thought was that they were going for an anthem - sort of a cross between "What's Going On" & "Stairway To Heaven" - but it's not anthemic. I dunno. I wasn't in their demographic, so I may be missing something.
 

Binky The Doormat

Footballguy
27


Dr. Octopus:


I Saw the Light – Todd Rundgren


"I Saw the Light" is a song written and performed by American musician Todd Rundgren that was released as the opening track from his 1972 album Something/Anything?. In the album's liner notes, Rundgren states that he intended the song to be the hit of the album, and copied the Motown tradition of putting hit songs at the beginning of albums


Jeb:

Fortunate Son – Creedance Clearwater Revival


The song, released during the peak period of the U.S. involvement in the Vietnam War, is not explicit in its criticism of that war in particular, rather, it "speaks more to the unfairness of class than war itself," according to its author, John Fogerty. "It's the old saying about rich men making war and poor men having to fight them."] In 2015, while on the television show The Voice, he also said:

The thoughts behind this song - it was a lot of anger. So it was the Vietnam War going on... Now I was drafted and they're making me fight, and no one has actually defined why. So this was all boiling inside of me and I sat down on the edge of my bed and out came "It ain't me, it ain't me, I ain't no senator's son!" You know, it took about 20 minutes to write the song.


Scooter:


Dream On - Aerosmith


In 2004, Rolling Stone magazine ranked the song at number 172 on its list of the 500 Greatest Songs of All Time. It was moved to number 173 in 2010, and re-ranked at number 199 in 2021.


Doug:

Under the Bridge – Red Hot Chili Peppers


"Under the Bridge" is a song by the American rock band Red Hot Chili Peppers and the eleventh track on their fifth studio album, Blood Sugar Sex Magik (1991). Vocalist Anthony Kiedis wrote the lyrics while reflecting on loneliness and the struggles of being clean from drugs, and almost didn't share it with the band. Released in March 1992, "Under the Bridge" was praised by critics and fans for its emotional weight. The song was a commercial success and the band's highest-charting single, peaking at number 2 on the Billboard Hot 100 and certified platinum. It was also a success in other countries, mostly charting in the Top 10.


Chap:

I Want You Back – The Jackson 5


"I Want You Back" is the first national single by the Jackson 5. It was released by Motown on October 6, 1969, and became the first number-one hit for the band on January 31, 1970

killer rd - best so far

you guys know where I'm at 🥰
 

Dr. Octopus

Footballguy
26


Dr. Octopus:


Romeo’s Tune – Steve Forbert


The distinctive piano lick on "Romeo's Tune" was done by former Elvis Presley pianist Bobby Ogdin, a well-known Nashville session piano player. In live performances, Forbert plays the lick on a neck-mounted harmonica.


Jeb:

Outshined - Soundgarden


"Outshined" became an instant hit and a fan favorite, and gained considerable airtime on alternative rock radio stations. "Outshined" features one of the most memorable Soundgarden lyrics, "I'm looking California, and feeling Minnesota". The lyric inspired the title for the 1996 film, Feeling Minnesota, although Soundgarden is not featured on the soundtrack. The lyric "feeling Minnesota" has also been used by ESPN anchor Stuart Scott in reference to Kevin Garnett, who spent the first 11 years of his career as a player for the Minnesota Timberwolves.


Scooter:


Stay (I Missed You) – Lisa Loeb


Stay (I Missed You)" is a song by American singer-songwriter Lisa Loeb. It was released in May 1994 as the lead single from the original movie soundtrack to Reality Bites (1994). The song was written and composed by Loeb herself, while production was handled by Juan Patiño. "Stay" was originally conceived in 1990, at one point with the intent of selling it to Daryl Hall for a project he was seeking music for.


Doug:

Fire and Rain – James Taylor


On the VH1 series Storytellers, Taylor said the song was about several incidents during his early recording career. The second line "Suzanne, the plans they made put an end to you" refers to Suzanne Schnerr, a childhood friend of his who died by suicide while he was in London, England, recording his first album.[3] In that same account, Taylor said he had been in a deep depression after the failure of his new band the Flying Machine to coalesce (the lyric "Sweet dreams and Flying Machines in pieces on the ground"; the reference is to the name of the band rather than a fatal plane crash, as was long rumored). Taylor completed writing the song while in rehab.


Chap:

Billy Don’t Be a Hero – Bo Donaldson and the Heywoods

"Billy Don't Be a Hero" is a 1974 pop song that was first a UK hit for Paper Lace and then, some months later, a US hit for Bo Donaldson and The Heywoods. The song was written and composed by two British songwriters, Mitch Murray and Peter Callander.
 

Dr. Octopus

Footballguy
I actually saw Steve Forbert in August at the smaller music venue in my town. Great night. Of course he waited for the second encore to break out "Romeo's Tune" but it was well worth it.
 

Dr. Octopus

Footballguy
"Outshined" features one of the most memorable Soundgarden lyrics, "I'm looking California, and feeling Minnesota". The lyric inspired the title for the 1996 film, Feeling Minnesota, although Soundgarden is not featured on the soundtrack.

Me, Chap, and Jeb used to meet up at our friend Melvin's apartment (with a few others and wives/gfs etc.) in Hoboken every Monday Night for "Beverly Hills 90210" and "Melrose Place" back to back - we sort of watched to make fun of it but, admittedly, were also kind of into it.

So to us this line was the "Brandon and Brenda Walsh line", as they were, of course, Minnesota teens that moved to Beverly Hills, California.
 

Dr. Octopus

Footballguy
I anticipate Lisa Loeb getting some hate here, but it's actually a very pretty song. It wouldn't come close to being a favorite or a song I'd seek out, but I don't mind it at all.
 

AAABatteries

Footballguy
Fortunate Son is just a fantastic song and would be my pick from yesterday.

Fire and Rain today - I'm not typically in to easy listening but James Taylor is just incredible. There's actually a couple of songs from today's list that I'm not familiar with so excited to listen to them.
 

Uruk-Hai

Footballguy
26


Dr. Octopus:


Romeo’s Tune – Steve Forbert


The distinctive piano lick on "Romeo's Tune" was done by former Elvis Presley pianist Bobby Ogdin, a well-known Nashville session piano player. In live performances, Forbert plays the lick on a neck-mounted harmonica.


Jeb:

Outshined - Soundgarden


"Outshined" became an instant hit and a fan favorite, and gained considerable airtime on alternative rock radio stations. "Outshined" features one of the most memorable Soundgarden lyrics, "I'm looking California, and feeling Minnesota". The lyric inspired the title for the 1996 film, Feeling Minnesota, although Soundgarden is not featured on the soundtrack. The lyric "feeling Minnesota" has also been used by ESPN anchor Stuart Scott in reference to Kevin Garnett, who spent the first 11 years of his career as a player for the Minnesota Timberwolves.


Scooter:


Stay (I Missed You) – Lisa Loeb


Stay (I Missed You)" is a song by American singer-songwriter Lisa Loeb. It was released in May 1994 as the lead single from the original movie soundtrack to Reality Bites (1994). The song was written and composed by Loeb herself, while production was handled by Juan Patiño. "Stay" was originally conceived in 1990, at one point with the intent of selling it to Daryl Hall for a project he was seeking music for.


Doug:

Fire and Rain – James Taylor


On the VH1 series Storytellers, Taylor said the song was about several incidents during his early recording career. The second line "Suzanne, the plans they made put an end to you" refers to Suzanne Schnerr, a childhood friend of his who died by suicide while he was in London, England, recording his first album.[3] In that same account, Taylor said he had been in a deep depression after the failure of his new band the Flying Machine to coalesce (the lyric "Sweet dreams and Flying Machines in pieces on the ground"; the reference is to the name of the band rather than a fatal plane crash, as was long rumored). Taylor completed writing the song while in rehab.


Chap:

Billy Don’t Be a Hero – Bo Donaldson and the Heywoods

"Billy Don't Be a Hero" is a 1974 pop song that was first a UK hit for Paper Lace and then, some months later, a US hit for Bo Donaldson and The Heywoods. The song was written and composed by two British songwriters, Mitch Murray and Peter Callander.

1. "Stay". I'm a melody guy and I adore it in this song, especially the vocal.

2. "Romeo's Tune". I can think of no other song that this one sounds like. I can usually find (or make up) connections between records. Can't do it for this one. It's awesomely all by itself.

3. "Fire And Rain". James and I have a complicated relationship. Some his more personal stuff just doesn't resonate with me, which is why I like most of his covers (except "Mockingbird w/Carly - it's horrible) better than his originals. Don't have that problem with this one, though.

4. "Outshined". I probably liked Soundgarden the best out of that early 90s invasion, but I still wouldn't go much out of my way to listen to them. This one, which I haven't heard in a million years, sounds about how I remember it. Good band, not my style.

5. "Billy Don't Be A Hero". When your name is used in a song title and you're 11-12 years old, you're wonderful classmates will sing that song to you every time you cross paths with them. I actually bought this 45 before it became a big hit. I destroyed it afterwards.
 

Dr. Octopus

Footballguy
5. "Billy Don't Be A Hero". When your name is used in a song title and you're 11-12 years old, you're wonderful classmates will sing that song to you every time you cross paths with them. I actually bought this 45 before it became a big hit. I destroyed it afterwards.

Try being a boy in elementary school with the same first name as the female mule in “Eerie Canal” - and having everyone singing it in music class. That was not so fun.
 

Uruk-Hai

Footballguy
5. "Billy Don't Be A Hero". When your name is used in a song title and you're 11-12 years old, you're wonderful classmates will sing that song to you every time you cross paths with them. I actually bought this 45 before it became a big hit. I destroyed it afterwards.

Try being a boy in elementary school with the same first name as the female mule in “Eerie Canal” - and having everyone singing it in music class. That was not so fun.
I think I had every song with Bill, Billy, William, Willy (shoutout to Sweet!), and Will in it sung to me - most of the time in extremely mocking form.
 

Dr. Octopus

Footballguy
5. "Billy Don't Be A Hero". When your name is used in a song title and you're 11-12 years old, you're wonderful classmates will sing that song to you every time you cross paths with them. I actually bought this 45 before it became a big hit. I destroyed it afterwards.

Try being a boy in elementary school with the same first name as the female mule in “Eerie Canal” - and having everyone singing it in music class. That was not so fun.
I think I had every song with Bill, Billy, William, Willy (shoutout to Sweet!), and Will in it sung to me - most of the time in extremely mocking form.
I’d guess this one was the worst for you.
 

Leroy Hoard

Footballguy
5. "Billy Don't Be A Hero". When your name is used in a song title and you're 11-12 years old, you're wonderful classmates will sing that song to you every time you cross paths with them. I actually bought this 45 before it became a big hit. I destroyed it afterwards.

Try being a boy in elementary school with the same first name as the female mule in “Eerie Canal” - and having everyone singing it in music class. That was not so fun.
I think I had every song with Bill, Billy, William, Willy (shoutout to Sweet!), and Will in it sung to me - most of the time in extremely mocking form.
Oddly enough I still like Jim Croce.
 

zamboni

Footballguy
5. "Billy Don't Be A Hero". When your name is used in a song title and you're 11-12 years old, you're wonderful classmates will sing that song to you every time you cross paths with them. I actually bought this 45 before it became a big hit. I destroyed it afterwards.

Try being a boy in elementary school with the same first name as the female mule in “Eerie Canal” - and having everyone singing it in music class. That was not so fun.
I think I had every song with Bill, Billy, William, Willy (shoutout to Sweet!), and Will in it sung to me - most of the time in extremely mocking form.
I’d guess this one was the worst for you.
Alan Alda's finest moment and it's not even close.
 

scorchy

Footballguy
The only ones I know from the last group are Soundgarden and Lisa Loeb. :bag: I really like both songs and can see an argument for Outshined being Top 30. As for Stay, only if we are limiting it to 1994.

Not trying to pull a Don't Noonan here - I don't think I've ever listened to a James Taylor song from start to finish, and literally have never heard of Steve Forbert or Bo Donaldson. Will have to check out the links when I get home.
 

Dr. Octopus

Footballguy
and literally have never heard of Steve Forbert or Bo Donaldson. Will have to check out the links when I get home.
Depending on how old you are I’d guess you’ve heard both and just aren’t familiar with the artists - but it wouldn’t be shocking at all if you haven’t.
 

simey

Footballguy
Depending on how old you are I’d guess you’ve heard both and just aren’t familiar with the artists - but it wouldn’t be shocking at all if you haven’t.
It's my #2 in the 26 round batch. I love the piano in it, and it's just one of those feel good tunes.
 

zamboni

Footballguy

Dr. Octopus

Footballguy

Pip's Invitation

Footballguy
Unlike yesterday I’m not feeling this round much. It’s either Taylor or Soundgarden. I’ll cast a provisional ballot for Cornell and co because I remember when that song came out. I’d have opted for Jesus Christ Pose or Slaves and Bulldozers but almost every track on Badmotorfinger is great.

I appreciate Chap’s taste in kitsch, but Billy Don’t Be a Hero is a bridge too far.
 

Pip's Invitation

Footballguy
I anticipate Lisa Loeb getting some hate here, but it's actually a very pretty song. It wouldn't come close to being a favorite or a song I'd seek out, but I don't mind it at all.
It’s fine. Not one of the best songs by an American, though.

However, I have some friends who were all about it. If my group of 5 idiots did this, I would not be surprised to see that song show up.
 

Dr. Octopus

Footballguy
I anticipate Lisa Loeb getting some hate here, but it's actually a very pretty song. It wouldn't come close to being a favorite or a song I'd seek out, but I don't mind it at all.
It’s fine. Not one of the best songs by an American, though.

However, I have some friends who were all about it. If my group of 5 idiots did this, I would not be surprised to see that song show up.
Just want to point out - although I call this “best” it’s really “favorites”, but yeah.
 

Dr. Octopus

Footballguy
25


Dr. Octopus:


New York Groove – Ace Frehley

Ace Frehley, best known as the lead guitarist of Kiss, recorded "New York Groove" for his first solo album, Ace Frehley, released in 1978; the album was released concurrently with solo albums from the other three Kiss members: Peter Criss, Gene Simmons and Paul Stanley. Frehley originally "scoffed" at the idea of the remake, but co-producer Eddie Kramer persisted. It was released as a single and the song made it to No. 13 on the Billboard Hot 100, by far the highest-charting single from any of the four solo albums. Frehley once told Rolling Stone magazine that his unique take on the song was inspired by his experience with hookers in New York City's Times Square in the 1970s.


Jeb:

One – Metallica

"One" is a song by American heavy metal band Metallica,] released as the third and final single from the band's fourth studio album, ...And Justice for All (1988). Written by band members Lars Ulrich and James Hetfield, the song portrays a World War I soldier who is severely wounded—arms, legs and jaw blown off by a landmine, blind and unable to speak or move—begging God to take his life.


Scooter:

Your Mamma Don’t Dance – Loggins & Messina

This song, whose refrain and first verse is done in a blues format, deals with the 1950s and 1960s lifestyle concerning the generation gap, where the parents oppose the Rock and Roll Revolution of the younger generation, which includes the rebelliousness against the old society that monitors curfews on dating; as well as being arrested for making love with a girl in the back seat of a car during a drive-in movie, which happens during the bridge section of the song.


Doug:

What’s Going OnMarvin Gaye

"What's Going On" is a song by American singer-songwriter Marvin Gaye, released in 1971 on the Motown subsidiary Tamla. Originally inspired by a police brutality incident witnessed by Renaldo "Obie" Benson, the song was composed by Benson, Al Cleveland, and Gaye and produced by Gaye himself. The song marked Gaye's departure from the Motown Sound towards more personal material.


Chap:

La Freak - Chic

This song commemorates Studio 54 in New York City for its notoriously long customer waiting lines, exclusive clientele, and discourteous doormen. According to guitarist Nile Rodgers, the song was devised during New Year's Eve 1977, as a result of his and bassist Bernard Edwards' being refused entrance to Studio 54, where they had been invited by Grace Jones, due to her failure to notify the nightclub's staff. He said the lyrics of the refrain were originally "**** off!" rather than "Freak out!"
 
Last edited:

Dr. Octopus

Footballguy
The KISS solo albums were trash, with the exception of Ace's which is a garage rock masterpiece (yeah, I said it). New York Groove doesn't fit the mold of the rest of the album but was the breakout hit and is still ubiquitous today as heard in commercials, movies, television shows and sports outro bumpers. Ace is not a great vocalist but really sells this song - it's just so very cool.
 

Dr. Octopus

Footballguy
I'm starting to feel like Jeb & I aren't quite on the same wavelength :lol:

He kind of prides himself on being a bit different.

When we went to see Neil Young & Crazy Horse, Soundgarden and Blind Melon (how crazy is it that Neil is the only lead singer still alive from that group) together for whatever reason he wore a full length skirt to the show and just ran around dancing and twirling all over the Garden State Arts Center lawn - he was a big hit.
 

Hawks64

Footballguy
I'm starting to feel like Jeb & I aren't quite on the same wavelength :lol:

He kind of prides himself on being a bit different.

When we went to see Neil Young & Crazy Horse, Soundgarden and Blind Melon (how crazy is it that Neil is the only lead singer still alive from that group) together for whatever reason he wore a full length skirt to the show and just ran around dancing and twirling all over the Garden State Arts Center lawn - he was a big hit.
I like the cut of Jeb's jib!
 

Uruk-Hai

Footballguy
25


Dr. Octopus:


New York Groove – Ace Frehley

Ace Frehley, best known as the lead guitarist of Kiss, recorded "New York Groove" for his first solo album, Ace Frehley, released in 1978; the album was released concurrently with solo albums from the other three Kiss members: Peter Criss, Gene Simmons and Paul Stanley. Frehley originally "scoffed" at the idea of the remake, but co-producer Eddie Kramer persisted. It was released as a single and the song made it to No. 13 on the Billboard Hot 100, by far the highest-charting single from any of the four solo albums. Frehley once told Rolling Stone magazine that his unique take on the song was inspired by his experience with hookers in New York City's Times Square in the 1970s.


Jeb:

One – Metallica

"One" is a song by American heavy metal band Metallica,] released as the third and final single from the band's fourth studio album, ...And Justice for All (1988). Written by band members Lars Ulrich and James Hetfield, the song portrays a World War I soldier who is severely wounded—arms, legs and jaw blown off by a landmine, blind and unable to speak or move—begging God to take his life.


Scooter:

Your Mamma Don’t Dance – Loggins & Messina

This song, whose refrain and first verse is done in a blues format, deals with the 1950s and 1960s lifestyle concerning the generation gap, where the parents oppose the Rock and Roll Revolution of the younger generation, which includes the rebelliousness against the old society that monitors curfews on dating; as well as being arrested for making love with a girl in the back seat of a car during a drive-in movie, which happens during the bridge section of the song.


Doug:

What’s Going OnMarvin Gaye

"What's Going On" is a song by American singer-songwriter Marvin Gaye, released in 1971 on the Motown subsidiary Tamla. Originally inspired by a police brutality incident witnessed by Renaldo "Obie" Benson, the song was composed by Benson, Al Cleveland, and Gaye and produced by Gaye himself. The song marked Gaye's departure from the Motown Sound towards more personal material.


Chap:

La Feak - Chic

This song commemorates Studio 54 in New York City for its notoriously long customer waiting lines, exclusive clientele, and discourteous doormen. According to guitarist Nile Rodgers, the song was devised during New Year's Eve 1977, as a result of his and bassist Bernard Edwards' being refused entrance to Studio 54, where they had been invited by Grace Jones, due to her failure to notify the nightclub's staff. He said the lyrics of the refrain were originally "**** off!" rather than "Freak out!"
This is a strong rack for me. Sorry, Jeb!

1. "What's Going On". This is one of those songs that was beloved when it was released (except by Berry Gordy) and it's rep keeps growing. It's is one of the finest pieces of music ever recorded, by anyone anywhere anytime.

2. "New York Groove". Agree with Doc's post on the KISS solo albums. I was never the biggest KISS fan, but my younger-by-two-years brother was. He bought all of them, but Ace's is the only only I can remember that he played a lot. I don't know that there's ever been a more aptly-titled song.

3. "La Freak". As much bandwidth as I've burned on this site extolling the virtues of Chic and the criminal underrating of them by most historians, you'd think I'd have this higher. It's my least-favorite of Chic's big hits. But.....it's still pretty damned great. They were running like a fine-tuned Jag at this point. This record was a massive hit (I think it was #1 for several weeks) and an even bigger influence on '80s music. I just like "New York Groove" better.

4. "You're Momma Don't Dance". It's a fine, fun record. No complaints ever when it comes on the radio.

5. "One". I'm no Metallica super-fan. I like them. If I were to rank my Top 5 Metallica songs, this would be in it. I know that's anathema to True Believers, but there ya have it. A good record that would rank higher in a different group.
 

Dr. Octopus

Footballguy
New York Groove". Agree with Doc's post on the KISS solo albums. I was never the biggest KISS fan, but my younger-by-two-years brother was. He bought all of them, but Ace's is the only only I can remember that he played a lot. I don't know that there's ever been a more aptly-titled song.
Good point. I think one of the reasons why it resonates so much with me, is I was born in NYC (Queens), worked there for many years and have never really lived more than 33 miles away and spent many years right across the Hudson River.
 

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