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who here has had a startling 23andme discovery? (1 Viewer)

 I just mailed my sample in. The only thing I am slightly worried about is finding out that I have some half brothers or sisters because before my father married my mother he was definitely pretty promiscuous back in the late 60s early 70s. 

 He had terminal multiple sclerosis when I was young and died when I was seven so I really never knew him all that well. I honestly would not be surprised but I don’t know how I would react either.

 
So basically everyone is finding out who the relatives are that had to give up their children.    Sounds like fun. 

"Hey, this is Bill from Sacramento our DNA matches.  I think my Aunt ####ed around a lot and we could be related!" 

 
As Chris Rock once said: Men tell more lies, but women tell bigger ones (the baby's yours!)

These tests are showing how many men are paying and raising kids that they did not truly father out there.

 
Just looked at my results today.

I'm the youngest of 3 kids (32 years old). My middle brother got all 5 of us the kit. Turns out hes only my half brother. We arent sure if it's me or him that doesn't know their true dad, but breakdown of ancestry leans towards me not knowing my "true" dad and being lied to my whole life. Seems so surreal.

 
Just looked at my results today.

I'm the youngest of 3 kids (32 years old). My middle brother got all 5 of us the kit. Turns out hes only my half brother. We arent sure if it's me or him that doesn't know their true dad, but breakdown of ancestry leans towards me not knowing my "true" dad and being lied to my whole life. Seems so surreal.
Damn, dude. Is your mom still alive?

 
Just looked at my results today.

I'm the youngest of 3 kids (32 years old). My middle brother got all 5 of us the kit. Turns out hes only my half brother. We arent sure if it's me or him that doesn't know their true dad, but breakdown of ancestry leans towards me not knowing my "true" dad and being lied to my whole life. Seems so surreal.
So your whole family took the kit and they didn't tip you off thinking the test would not show it?  Or were they planning on burning down the test facility?

 
So your whole family took the kit and they didn't tip you off thinking the test would not show it?  Or were they planning on burning down the test facility?
Only my brother and I took it so far. My dad is in the hospital and doesnt have long to live due to  progression of a chronic lung disease. 

My mom is alive (they are still together) but my brother and I dont plan on bringing anything up until my dad passes. 

I'm also not planning on telling my oldest brother unless he figures it out with his own kit. He is really struggling with my dad's disease.

I'm fairly certain my mom will deny deny deny when it gets brought up even theres no way it's wrong.

Ultimately it changes nothing about how I feel about my dad and brothers, just adds another confusing layer to my life that I am still processing now.

Not sure of the next step to finding out my true father when the day comes. My next closest match is a 2nd cousin which wont be enough info I think to track down my father when my mom lies.

Or we could be wrong and my middle brother could have a different father.

Edit: My brother and I were completely surprised. No one in my family mentioned anything when we got the Kits. I'm assuming the most likely scenario is my mom cheated and was crossing her fingers that I was my dad's son all these years.

 
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Only my brother and I took it so far. My dad is in the hospital and doesnt have long to live due to  progression of a chronic lung disease. 

My mom is alive (they are still together) but my brother and I dont plan on bringing anything up until my dad passes. 

I'm also not planning on telling my oldest brother unless he figures it out with his own kit. He is really struggling with my dad's disease.

I'm fairly certain my mom will deny deny deny when it gets brought up even theres no way it's wrong.

Ultimately it changes nothing about how I feel about my dad and brothers, just adds another confusing layer to my life that I am still processing now.

Not sure of the next step to finding out my true father when the day comes. My next closest match is a 2nd cousin which wont be enough info I think to track down my father when my mom lies.

Or we could be wrong and my middle brother could have a different father.

Edit: My brother and I were completely surprised. No one in my family mentioned anything when we got the Kits. I'm assuming the most likely scenario is my mom cheated and was crossing her fingers that I was my dad's son all these years.
Thats mind blowing stuff.  GL to you as you work through your issues.

I agree that it shouldn't change the way you feel about your father.  Regardless of any DNA he may or may not have passed on to you, he raised you as a father would.  If I was in your shoes, I'm not sure what that would do to the way I looked at my mother though.

 
Not sure of the next step to finding out my true father when the day comes. My next closest match is a 2nd cousin which wont be enough info I think to track down my father when my mom lies.
If the match is a true 2nd cousin, then it would mean that you share one of 8 potential great-grandparents. If you contact the person and get a list of their grandparents (and great-grandparents if they know them), then it will take about an hour's worth of genealogical research to come up with a list potential matches for your father. (For comparison, I just checked my own tree and there are 22 males who descend from my 8 great-grandparents.)  You'll be able to narrow the list down by cross-checking where each person lived at the time you were conceived. If you can contact other matches on the website (even if they're distant cousins), then you might be able to zero in on which great-grandparent is the correct starting point.

Also, if you are seriously interested in finding the answer, then you should submit DNA tests to every available genealogical website (Ancestry, 23andme, etc.). You're likely to find more matches that way.

 
Also, if you are seriously interested in finding the answer, then you should submit DNA tests to every available genealogical website (Ancestry, 23andme, etc.). You're likely to find more matches that way.
This is a great point and something someone on Reddit used to get the final piece together

 
Btw, saw article that had sisters submit to multiple DNA testing sites and having different results returned, so maybe get second opinion before blowing up entire family, especially with the major family stuff going on right now.

 
Btw, saw article that had sisters submit to multiple DNA testing sites and having different results returned, so maybe get second opinion before blowing up entire family, especially with the major family stuff going on right now.
I spent the latter half of my day looking into if it could be wrong as I was in denial. It doesn't look like it could be wrong as I have a different paternal haplotype and share no identical segments of DNA like full brothers will.

My brother that gave us all the kits texted me this morning to say my oldest brother, mom, and dad all submitted their results so things might get a little chaotic when the results are in coming up.

I'm kind of wishing my dad didn't have to find out at the end of his life while in and out of the hospital. The wheels are in motion though so now it's a matter of how to soften the blow for my dad. It will be made more difficult too as my middle brother and I live in Arizona while my parents and oldest brother live near where I grew up on the opposite side of the country.

 
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I spent the latter half of my day looking into if it could be wrong as I was in denial. It doesn't look like it could be wrong as I have a different paternal haplotype and share no identical segments of DNA like full brothers will.

My brother that gave us all the kits texted me this morning to say my oldest brother, mom, and dad all submitted their results so things might get a little chaotic when the results are in coming up.

I'm kind of wishing my dad didn't have to find out at the end of his life while in and out of the hospital. The wheels are in motion though so now it's a matter of how to soften the blow for my dad. It will be made more difficult too as my middle brother and I live in Arizona while my parents and oldest brother live near where I grew up on the opposite side of the country.
I am just saying that maybe you and your brother do another test with a separate company to make sure before you drop the bombshell on the family, just to make sure. DNA doesn't lie, but companies make mistakes.

Also there were some weird things going on back in the day with fertility, so one never knows what happened at the time.

 
My father-in-law never knew his dad (interracial/affair situation in the early 1940's), only his name. My wife and I did some digging on Ancestry, were pretty sure we found his dad (now deceased) and submitted my father-in-law's DNA. Matched him to direct relatives of the guy we suspected and that put us in touch with a whole side of my wife's family tree they never knew. He was finally able to see pictures and home movies of his dad, and get some important family health history. 

 
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I spent the latter half of my day looking into if it could be wrong as I was in denial. It doesn't look like it could be wrong as I have a different paternal haplotype and share no identical segments of DNA like full brothers will.

My brother that gave us all the kits texted me this morning to say my oldest brother, mom, and dad all submitted their results so things might get a little chaotic when the results are in coming up.

I'm kind of wishing my dad didn't have to find out at the end of his life while in and out of the hospital. The wheels are in motion though so now it's a matter of how to soften the blow for my dad. It will be made more difficult too as my middle brother and I live in Arizona while my parents and oldest brother live near where I grew up on the opposite side of the country.
I just rushed popcorn in from Amazon. 

 
While there seem to be some good stories coming from these things, there seems to be a whole lot more with the potential to devastate families. They sound like an awful idea.

 
I didn't realize he was the guy they pulled over for the cat game in Supertroopers until I saw the sequel.
Finally watched the sequel over the weekend and realized the same thing (though he looks really odd in the sequel, at least.  didn't go back to check the original).

 
“Oh, I did one of those genetic tests. I was surprised to find out I’m all Asian. You do learn things from those genetic tests. Like I discovered I wasted 100 bucks. [laughter] They send you information. Mine just said, “Dude, you’re white.” In fact, you’re very white. “I hope you feel guilty.” They didn’t even break down my nationality. They just highlighted all the British Isles. They’re like, “You’re trash from here. Wherever people need sunscreen.” But what do we expect to learn from these genetic tests? Like, “Oh, my gosh! I’m related to my ancestors!” We’re only gonna find out bad news. You see it in the commercials. I thought I was Italian, but it ends up, my great-grandma was a whore. [laughter] So I guess I’m Eastern European. Sometimes people think I’m saying. Eastern Europeans are whores and… I am. No. My point is, only good family news is passed along. Like, if your great-grandfather was Abraham Lincoln, you’d already know that, but if your great-grandfather was the town drunk, your grandpa’s likely to go, “Uh, I don’t remember.” I think he worked in a bar. “Chief gutter inspector.” I do know I have some Irish ancestry, but, apparently, the Irish didn’t keep great records ’cause, well, draw your own conclusion. Something tells me they weren’t busy sunbathing. I’m Irish, but I have blonde hair. Supposedly, the only reason the Irish have blonde or red hair is ’cause the Vikings invaded, pillaged, and probably other stuff.
Those Vikings, the Scandinavians, I don’t know if you’ve been to Sweden, it’s like a whole country of Scarlett Johanssons. If I was in Ireland at that time, I would’ve been, “Oh, no, some Viking ladies coming to pillage me.” I guess I’ll hide on this bed covered in rose petals. Hopefully she can help me put together that table.”
So my wife got me a 23 and me test for father's day and I did it and honestly, this pretty much sums up my experience.

at least I know that I ca likely smell asparagus in my pee and likely have blue or green eyes.  I had no idea!

 
My father-in-law never knew his dad (interracial/affair situation in the early 1940's), only his name. My wife and I did some digging on Ancestry, were pretty sure we found his dad (now deceased) and submitted my father-in-law's DNA. Matched him to direct relatives of the guy we suspected and that put us in touch with a whole side of my wife's family tree they never knew. He was finally able to see pictures and home movies of his dad, and get some important family health history. 
Been researching my and my wife's family tree for about a year now and found out some very cool things about her:

  • William Clark (of Lewis & Clark), is her 7th great uncle (he is her 6th great grandfather's brother)
  • This dude is her 13th great grandfather (and one of his grandsons, a brother to my wife's 11th great grandfather, came over on the Mayflower) 
  • She's related to President Andrew Jackson, by marriage (her 4th cousin married Jackson's son and she served as de facto First Lady when Jackson's wife died.)
Specifically DNA related: we recently found out my wife and I are related.....by marriage. Someone from her mom's tree married someone from my dad's tree, years ago. So we have common DNA matches from the kids they had together, that have started popping up in our results.  

 
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My mom was adopted, so she did the 23 & me to find potential blood relatives..  

Because of that, she indeed found her birth mom (still alive) and birth dad (died 10 years ago).

I've always been a little dark complected and tanned easily, I guess the reason for that is my mom's dad is 100% hispanic.

She's reconnected with his family and they were very welcoming and excited to meet her (us)..  Her birth mom? not so much.  She's visited her and her family.. her family first off wanted to know, "What do you want?"..  The mom is in assisted living and has early stage Alzheimer's.. I think her son is afraid my mom reconnected to try and get some kind of inheritance.. My mom is much better off than her birth mom's family and wants nothing from her but to know her.

Her dad's family has already invited us to their side family reunion in San Antonio next Summer.  :tumbleweed:   

 
My sister did the '23 and me' thing last year.

Her and I have the same parents (?) and are just 16 months apart in age.

She came up as splash of just about every European ethnicity.

I assume that I'm the same.

I really don't care to test.

Zero interest.

 
I listen to a lot of the Freakanomics podcasts.  Was recently listening to the one they did about 23 and me while mowing.  They do indeed sell the information to pharmaceutical companies and colleges/universities, but that should come as no surprise.  You're paying $100 (or $200) to increase the size of their database for them, which is estimated to be worth in the billions. 

Anyway, I had a question after listening.  They say they don't have any personally identifiable information on hand for others - but then give stories about how someone found a long lost relative they never knew about.  Those two things don't go together.  If I submit my stuff (have thought about it), and I find out there is some relative out there that no one knew about - that's personally identifiable information they are willing to send to be about that person, right?  Is that person then notified about me?

 
I have never submitted a DNA test, but it is through DNA testing that I now know about a half-brother that I never knew of for the first 46 years of my life.  "Bob" was adopted as a child and never knew his biological mother or father.  At some point he got curious and searched as best he could.  This was long before these DNA test services were easily available.  He had a birth certificate from a hospital in Virginia, but with the names of the parents omitted.  He ran into nothing but dead ends and eventually gave up his search resigning himself to the fact that he would never know.  Fast forward several years and Bob's daughter picks up the torch partially wanting to know who her grandparents were, but was more so driven by a desire to figure it out for her father.  For the most part, she just kept running into dead ends.  At some point in her search she was contacted by a woman who was also looking for her birth parents.  This person was supposedly a twin who was adopted from the same orphanage about the same time as Bob.  Bob's daughter talked him into submitting a DNA sample to see if he matched this person.  He figured what the hell, nothing to lose.  I do not recall at the moment which service they used, but is was not 23andMe.  When the results were returned they discovered he had no connection whatsoever to that woman, but it happened to hit on someone else at the level of 1st cousin.  It turns out that my cousin and her husband had submitted their DNA just for the fun of it to explore their heritage a little more.  As luck would have it, they used the same service and landed in the same data bank.  Bob's daughter eventually contacted my cousin and started to put the puzzle pieces together.  My sister submitted a DNA sample just for confirmation although that really wasn't necessary.  The first picture I ever saw of Bob I said, "HOLY ####, that's dad!!!"  Sure enough my sister's sample came back as a match at the sibling level.  

My father was in the army stationed in the Virginia Beach area at the time of Bob's birth.  My father did not meet my eventual mother until after his time in the military.  Turns out pop's must have had a little fun with one of the locals.  It was very difficult to get any information out of my father.   This was something he did not want to acknowledge and refused to talk about.   Chiseling away at him we were able to pick up on a few more clues and pieces of info, but this was also around the time my father's Alzheimers started to rear its ugly head.  Apparently there was a paternity court case over the matter at the time with a decision that relieved my dad of any responsibility for the child.  They "proved" the baby could not be his based upon military records of when he was and wasn't in town.  The court records were then sealed.  So, essentially, the military (or his military buddies) covered for his ###.  I do not know if my dad truly believed he wasn't the father or if he just bailed on the situation.  Given other clues and a letter my uncle received from my dad while in the service, I suspect the latter which leaves an awful sour taste in my mouth, but I won't get into that here.  

Anyway, Bob managed to find his birth father thanks to the efforts of his daughter and DNA testing at the age of 57.  Along with dad, he found 5 half siblings he had no idea existed.   Now I have a brother (grew up with 4 sisters)...and two more nieces.  We found each other in time to catch one of the niece's weddings which was cool.  And I got to celebrate my brothers 60th birthday with him.  Through a little more detective work from me and Bob's daughter, we were eventually able to identify his biological mother as well.  Unfortunately, she had already passed, but my niece was able to make contact with and meet the woman's sister.  According to the sister, Bob's mom was a bit of a nut job.  Maybe that was my dad's motivation to run from the situation   :shrug:
Wow......

 
BIL did it... Ended up finding a half sister nobody ever knew about- from a relationship prior to their parents getting married. 

 
I listen to a lot of the Freakanomics podcasts.  Was recently listening to the one they did about 23 and me while mowing.  They do indeed sell the information to pharmaceutical companies and colleges/universities, but that should come as no surprise.  You're paying $100 (or $200) to increase the size of their database for them, which is estimated to be worth in the billions. 

Anyway, I had a question after listening.  They say they don't have any personally identifiable information on hand for others - but then give stories about how someone found a long lost relative they never knew about.  Those two things don't go together.  If I submit my stuff (have thought about it), and I find out there is some relative out there that no one knew about - that's personally identifiable information they are willing to send to be about that person, right?  Is that person then notified about me?
As far as I know, they aren't going to give any of your personal information to any other users. Just your username.

However, these services can also provide you with a list of your own ancestors. So, if you are adopted and you don't know anyone in your family, and you take a DNA test which gives you the names of your biological grandparents, you'll be able to use various public records to track down all the descendants of those grandparents.

 
BIL did it... Ended up finding a half sister nobody ever knew about- from a relationship prior to their parents getting married. 
and unlike galileo, at least up until now, only the BIL has talked to the half-sister via email. I don't even know if they've exchanged real names or emails yet. he told my wife (his sister) and one other brother... not sure the rest of the family knows yet. FIL (father of the 1/2 sister) passed away years ago and MIL doesn't have the emotional capability to handle the news, IMO.

 
and unlike galileo, at least up until now, only the BIL has talked to the half-sister via email. I don't even know if they've exchanged real names or emails yet. he told my wife (his sister) and one other brother... not sure the rest of the family knows yet. FIL (father of the 1/2 sister) passed away years ago and MIL doesn't have the emotional capability to handle the news, IMO.
The other crazy thing about my story was that at the time I had found out about my brother, I learned that he lived in Philadelphia.  Coincidentally, I happened to be scheduled to attend a conference in Philly 3 weeks later.  So I actually met him fairly quickly after the time I learned of his existence.

 

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