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Made a big push last week and watched the final 6 episodes.

Just one ending question

mytagid = Math.floor( Math.random() * 100 );document.write("

Are we to assume Michael killed his mom? It's fairly clear, but the nature of it makes you wonder a little bit.

*** SPOILER ALERT! Click this link to display the potential spoiler text in this box. ***");document.close();

So this series was supposed to have run out of money and that's why it was canceled. So what else was to be done? The only interview I ever heard was that they wanted to get more in depth with the paper more like the dock thing, but felt they had to wrap up the story and do the paper in season 5 together.

The Metro editor was easily my favorite new character of this series. His performance was extremely strong. The bumbling plagarist (tempelton?) didn't seem to have much range to me and detracted from that story line a bit. Most of those types are usually really slick talkers, slick actors, and go down in flames all at once. That storyline wasn't that strong and sucked at least 40-70 minutes too much play IMO.

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Made a big push last week and watched the final 6 episodes.

Just one ending question

mytagid = Math.floor( Math.random() * 100 );document.write("

Are we to assume Michael killed his mom? It's fairly clear, but the nature of it makes you wonder a little bit.

*** SPOILER ALERT! Click this link to display the potential spoiler text in this box. ***");document.close();

So this series was supposed to have run out of money and that's why it was canceled. So what else was to be done? The only interview I ever heard was that they wanted to get more in depth with the paper more like the dock thing, but felt they had to wrap up the story and do the paper in season 5 together.

The Metro editor was easily my favorite new character of this series. His performance was extremely strong. The bumbling plagarist (tempelton?) didn't seem to have much range to me and detracted from that story line a bit. Most of those types are usually really slick talkers, slick actors, and go down in flames all at once. That storyline wasn't that strong and sucked at least 40-70 minutes too much play IMO.

I don't think the bolded is true at all. Everything I've ever read was that it Simon was working towards wrapping things up in five seasons from Season 3 on. I think he said something about running out of stories to tell about the city. He expressed interest in the Latino population explosion as the big American urban story that they left untold, but as I recall he didn't think he and the other primaries on the show had the expertise necessary to do it justice. Edited by TobiasFunke
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Made a big push last week and watched the final 6 episodes.

Just one ending question

mytagid = Math.floor( Math.random() * 100 );document.write("

Are we to assume Michael killed his mom? It's fairly clear, but the nature of it makes you wonder a little bit.

*** SPOILER ALERT! Click this link to display the potential spoiler text in this box. ***");document.close();

So this series was supposed to have run out of money and that's why it was canceled. So what else was to be done? The only interview I ever heard was that they wanted to get more in depth with the paper more like the dock thing, but felt they had to wrap up the story and do the paper in season 5 together.

The Metro editor was easily my favorite new character of this series. His performance was extremely strong. The bumbling plagarist (tempelton?) didn't seem to have much range to me and detracted from that story line a bit. Most of those types are usually really slick talkers, slick actors, and go down in flames all at once. That storyline wasn't that strong and sucked at least 40-70 minutes too much play IMO.

I don't think the bolded is true at all. Everything I've ever read was that it Simon was working towards wrapping things up in five seasons from Season 3 on. I think he said something about running out of stories to tell about the city. He expressed interest in the Latino population explosion as the big American urban story that they left untold, but as I recall he didn't think he and the other primaries on the show had the expertise necessary to do it justice.
canceled was probably the wrong word. cut short perhaps.
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Made a big push last week and watched the final 6 episodes.

Just one ending question

mytagid = Math.floor( Math.random() * 100 );document.write("

Are we to assume Michael killed his mom? It's fairly clear, but the nature of it makes you wonder a little bit.

*** SPOILER ALERT! Click this link to display the potential spoiler text in this box. ***");document.close();

So this series was supposed to have run out of money and that's why it was canceled. So what else was to be done? The only interview I ever heard was that they wanted to get more in depth with the paper more like the dock thing, but felt they had to wrap up the story and do the paper in season 5 together.

The Metro editor was easily my favorite new character of this series. His performance was extremely strong. The bumbling plagarist (tempelton?) didn't seem to have much range to me and detracted from that story line a bit. Most of those types are usually really slick talkers, slick actors, and go down in flames all at once. That storyline wasn't that strong and sucked at least 40-70 minutes too much play IMO.

I don't think the bolded is true at all. Everything I've ever read was that it Simon was working towards wrapping things up in five seasons from Season 3 on. I think he said something about running out of stories to tell about the city. He expressed interest in the Latino population explosion as the big American urban story that they left untold, but as I recall he didn't think he and the other primaries on the show had the expertise necessary to do it justice.
canceled was probably the wrong word. cut short perhaps.
I don't think either is true. I think once they cleared Season 3, HBO was prepared to let them make as many shows as they wanted. I think at that point everyone had figured out that something amazing was being done. Presumably HBO knew that even if it wasn't drawing ratings on first broadcasts, The Wire was something that would pay huge dividends on DVD sales and indirectly through branding and so forth.

Curious as to where you heard the "running out of money" thing. It absolutely could be true, but I've never heard it, and I am a Wire junkie.

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Made a big push last week and watched the final 6 episodes.

Just one ending question

mytagid = Math.floor( Math.random() * 100 );document.write("

Are we to assume Michael killed his mom? It's fairly clear, but the nature of it makes you wonder a little bit.

*** SPOILER ALERT! Click this link to display the potential spoiler text in this box. ***");document.close();

So this series was supposed to have run out of money and that's why it was canceled. So what else was to be done? The only interview I ever heard was that they wanted to get more in depth with the paper more like the dock thing, but felt they had to wrap up the story and do the paper in season 5 together.

The Metro editor was easily my favorite new character of this series. His performance was extremely strong. The bumbling plagarist (tempelton?) didn't seem to have much range to me and detracted from that story line a bit. Most of those types are usually really slick talkers, slick actors, and go down in flames all at once. That storyline wasn't that strong and sucked at least 40-70 minutes too much play IMO.

I don't think the bolded is true at all. Everything I've ever read was that it Simon was working towards wrapping things up in five seasons from Season 3 on. I think he said something about running out of stories to tell about the city. He expressed interest in the Latino population explosion as the big American urban story that they left untold, but as I recall he didn't think he and the other primaries on the show had the expertise necessary to do it justice.
canceled was probably the wrong word. cut short perhaps.

I don't think either is true.

I think once they cleared Season 3, HBO was prepared to let them make as many shows as they wanted. I think at that point everyone had figured out that something amazing was being done. Presumably HBO knew that even if it wasn't drawing ratings on first broadcasts, The Wire was something that would pay huge dividends on DVD sales and indirectly through branding and so forth.

Curious as to where you heard the "running out of money" thing. It absolutely could be true, but I've never heard it, and I am a Wire junkie.

:cry:
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Made a big push last week and watched the final 6 episodes.

Just one ending question

mytagid = Math.floor( Math.random() * 100 );document.write("

Are we to assume Michael killed his mom? It's fairly clear, but the nature of it makes you wonder a little bit.

*** SPOILER ALERT! Click this link to display the potential spoiler text in this box. ***");document.close();

So this series was supposed to have run out of money and that's why it was canceled. So what else was to be done? The only interview I ever heard was that they wanted to get more in depth with the paper more like the dock thing, but felt they had to wrap up the story and do the paper in season 5 together.

The Metro editor was easily my favorite new character of this series. His performance was extremely strong. The bumbling plagarist (tempelton?) didn't seem to have much range to me and detracted from that story line a bit. Most of those types are usually really slick talkers, slick actors, and go down in flames all at once. That storyline wasn't that strong and sucked at least 40-70 minutes too much play IMO.

I don't think the bolded is true at all. Everything I've ever read was that it Simon was working towards wrapping things up in five seasons from Season 3 on. I think he said something about running out of stories to tell about the city. He expressed interest in the Latino population explosion as the big American urban story that they left untold, but as I recall he didn't think he and the other primaries on the show had the expertise necessary to do it justice.
canceled was probably the wrong word. cut short perhaps.

I don't think either is true.

I think once they cleared Season 3, HBO was prepared to let them make as many shows as they wanted. I think at that point everyone had figured out that something amazing was being done. Presumably HBO knew that even if it wasn't drawing ratings on first broadcasts, The Wire was something that would pay huge dividends on DVD sales and indirectly through branding and so forth.

Curious as to where you heard the "running out of money" thing. It absolutely could be true, but I've never heard it, and I am a Wire junkie.

:goodposting:
This was before I ever saw a single episode. I think Simon came on Fresh Air or some NPR program and they discussed the end of the series and how he thought he had another 10-12 episodes total when he started with HBO. I think there were 60? finally and he thought he'd get something north of 70. Then at some point they said you've got X many hours to work with and wrap it up.
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I think the 5th season was always going to be the last. Here was an old article from the Baltimore Sun that mentions they would have written the 5th and last season as a novel if HBO didn't renew it.

Its 4th season just begun, 'The Wire' gets OK for 5th

Latest rave reviews delight HBO brass

By David Zurawik

sun television critic

Originally published September 13, 2006

In a surprise move that will guarantee 125 jobs and pump at least $17.5 million into the local economy next year, HBO will announce today that it is renewing its Peabody Award-winning drama, The Wire, for a fifth season.

The Baltimore-based series about urban America began its fourth season Sunday night, greeted by a crush of critical acclaim, including an "appreciation" on The New York Times' editorial page calling the series "the closest that moving pictures have come so far to the depth and nuance of the novel."

"We are delighted - though not surprised - at the initial critical response to the new season of The Wire," Carolyn Strauss, president of HBO Entertainment, said in a statement. "David Simon and his remarkable creative team have a riveting and thought-provoking series that's unlike anything else on TV."

In a statement, HBO confirmed reports in Sunday's Sun that the fifth season would look at the role of mass media in contributing to cities' dysfunction.

"For four seasons, we have depicted that part of urban America which has been left behind by the economy and by the greater society, and chronicled entrenched problems that have gone without solution for generations now," Simon, the 46-year-old creator of the series, says in the statement.

According to Simon, the fifth season will focus on the economy in answering the questions: "Why? What is it that we see and sense about these problems? To what are we giving attention, and what is it that we consistently ignore? How do we actually see ourselves?"

At the end of Season 3, in December 2004, it seemed as if HBO was about to cancel the series. But, not ready to abandon his vision, Simon wrote story arcs and scripts for another season that were so compelling that HBO gave him another year.

The expectation by Simon himself was that HBO would see how ratings went this season before committing to a fifth season. In an interview in Sunday's Sun, Simon vowed to write a fifth and final season as a novel if HBO did not renew the series.

The ratings Sunday for the Season 4 premiere - 1.53 million - were only slightly better than those of Season 3, when cancellation seemed imminent - an average of 1.49 million. But looking at The Wire's critical acclaim and at technology that allows the series to be marketed in new ways, HBO sees a series worth renewing.

A final audience measurement for Sunday's screening won't be available for weeks - the time it will take for an independent ratings service to canvass cable systems across the country for the number of viewers who saw the episode On Demand. In addition, Nielsen Media Research this week will be measuring the number of viewers for nine additional replays of The Wire's premiere on various HBO channels.

"All of these - plus people recording the show on DVRs for later viewing - are ways that we hope more people will be accessing The Wire," said David Baldwin, executive vice president for program planning at HBO. "We've made a concerted effort to put it on in as many places as we possibly can."

By way of comparison, other Sunday-night viewing included 20.7 million people watching NFL football on NBC, while 13.0 million tuned in for Part 1 of ABC's controversial docudrama The Path to 9/11.

Since season 5 was the weakest, I think they probably made the right decision to end when they did.
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Made a big push last week and watched the final 6 episodes.

Just one ending question

mytagid = Math.floor( Math.random() * 100 );document.write("

Are we to assume Michael killed his mom? It's fairly clear, but the nature of it makes you wonder a little bit.

*** SPOILER ALERT! Click this link to display the potential spoiler text in this box. ***");document.close();

I don't remember this being suggested.
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My five favorite Wire characters...

1. Omar - every man has to have a code

2. Bubs - Lovable loser with a heart of gold

3. Bunk - his stand against McNulty and Freeman has made him more likable

4. Slim - dude deserves better

5. Colvin - Hamsterdam was genius, plus he's a big softie

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Made a big push last week and watched the final 6 episodes.

Just one ending question

mytagid = Math.floor( Math.random() * 100 );document.write("

Are we to assume Michael killed his mom? It's fairly clear, but the nature of it makes you wonder a little bit.

*** SPOILER ALERT! Click this link to display the potential spoiler text in this box. ***");document.close();

I don't remember this being suggested.
Really she was the one to get the whole ball rolling. Without her conversation with Bunk nothing would have played out quite like it did. This also implicated Michael as a snitch at the worst possible time, and was the basis for the way he played out his string as a player and not a kingpin.

If he didn't do her in then is this chalked up to being just a random killing?

And why is it that spoiler tags are so screwed up in this thread? Is it because this one spans the quote limit timeframe?

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Made a big push last week and watched the final 6 episodes.

Just one ending question

mytagid = Math.floor( Math.random() * 100 );document.write("

Are we to assume Michael killed his mom? It's fairly clear, but the nature of it makes you wonder a little bit.

*** SPOILER ALERT! Click this link to display the potential spoiler text in this box. ***");document.close();

I don't remember this being suggested.
Really she was the one to get the whole ball rolling. Without her conversation with Bunk nothing would have played out quite like it did. This also implicated Michael as a snitch at the worst possible time, and was the basis for the way he played out his string as a player and not a kingpin.

If he didn't do her in then is this chalked up to being just a random killing?

And why is it that spoiler tags are so screwed up in this thread? Is it because this one spans the quote limit timeframe?

It's been a while since I watched it, but I don't recall it ever being mentioned that she'd been killed. I'm pretty sure that once Michael started running with Marlo's crew and getting money, he moved his brother (and Dukie) into a new place to keep him away from his mom. She's a junkie and had no actual interest in either of her kids, except for Michael's ability to support her financially. If you remember when she signed Michael out of jail after he'd been picked up for questioning in the triple murder at that one stash house, she made a quick show of telling Michael that he should let her see Bug more often, and then quickly changes the subject to getting him to give her money. I think the implication is that he's simply done with her.
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The fourth season should have been the last.

I agree.
Yeah, but imagine how miserable we'd all be if we were left wanting more after Season Four. This way we know the show peaked and was starting to come down a bit, and they closed it out before they tainted the legacy.
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Did anyone see the No Reservations where Anthony Bourdain went to Baltimore (& Buffalo & Detroit), and met Snoop? She really talks like that.

Yeah, she was not acting at all in the show. That's really her.
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Did anyone see the No Reservations where Anthony Bourdain went to Baltimore (& Buffalo & Detroit), and met Snoop? She really talks like that.

actress' name is felicia pearson and sounds like she's pretty genuine. snoop is actually a real nickname. from her wiki:

Instead of attending school, Pearson worked as a drug dealer. At the age of 14, she was convicted of second-degree murder in the shooting death of a girl named Okia Toomer and sentenced to eight years at the Maryland Correctional Institution for Women in Jessup, Maryland.[1] Pearson said her life turned around at the age of 18 when Arnold Loney, a local drug dealer who looked out for her and sent her money in prison, was shot and killed. It was he who had given her the nickname "Snoop" because she reminded him of Charlie Brown's beagle Snoopy in the comic strip Peanuts. While in prison, she earned her GED and was released in 2000. She landed a local job fabricating car bumpers, she says, but was fired after only two weeks when her employer learned she had a prison record.

Pearson met Michael K. Williams, who plays Omar Little on The Wire, in a Baltimore club. He invited her to come to the set one day. He introduced her to the writers and the producers, and after a subsequent audition, she was offered a role in the series.

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Did anyone see the No Reservations where Anthony Bourdain went to Baltimore (& Buffalo & Detroit), and met Snoop? She really talks like that.

Yeah, she was not acting at all in the show. That's really her.
He also talked to a few other of the bit players that were not actors, but real people.
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Did anyone see the No Reservations where Anthony Bourdain went to Baltimore (& Buffalo & Detroit), and met Snoop? She really talks like that.

Yeah, she was not acting at all in the show. That's really her.
He also talked to a few other of the bit players that were not actors, but real people.
It was Jay Landsman, a Baltimore Homicide detective. The show Homicide was based on him, and he also played a recurring role in The Wire as the guy under Major Bunny Colvin. He also had a character named after him...the big fat guy in Homicide.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jay_Landsman

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jay_Landsman_%28The_Wire%29

Also, Snoop wrote a book

http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/044619519...;pf_rd_i=507846

Editorial Reviews

From Publishers Weekly

Pearson, who stars in HBO's The Wire, was born ill and underweight from her mother's drug habits, and later worked for a crack dealer in East Baltimore. At age 15 she killed a woman in self-defense and wound up in the Jessup State Penitentiary. She got a wakeup call when the notorious dealers she called Uncle and Father wound up respectively dead and imprisoned for life. Once out on parole, Pearson took an assembly-line job and didn't give [her neighborhood dope dealers] a second glance, but after repeatedly getting fired because of her rap sheet, she returned to dealing before a chance meeting gave her a way off the street for good. This isn't a light celebrity bio, but a powerful story of someone trying to find her way in a dark world, realizing she can still choose her life's direction even in tremendously difficult circumstances. Pearson's narrative is spare, even poetic, rendering traumatic moments all the more powerful. (Nov.)

Copyright © Reed Business Information, a division of Reed Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved. --This text refers to the Hardcover edition.

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It was Jay Landsman, a Baltimore Homicide detective. The show Homicide was based on him, and he also played a recurring role in The Wire as the guy under Major Bunny Colvin. He also had a character named after him...the big fat guy in Homicide.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jay_Landsman

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jay_Landsman_%28The_Wire%29

That's confusing. The character Jay Landsman, who is based on the actual Jay Landsman, worked under Rawls. The actor Jay Landsman, who really is the actual Jay Landsman, plays a character who works under Colvin.
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It was Jay Landsman, a Baltimore Homicide detective. The show Homicide was based on him, and he also played a recurring role in The Wire as the guy under Major Bunny Colvin. He also had a character named after him...the big fat guy in Homicide.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jay_Landsman

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jay_Landsman_%28The_Wire%29

That's confusing. The character Jay Landsman, who is based on the actual Jay Landsman, worked under Rawls. The actor Jay Landsman, who really is the actual Jay Landsman, plays a character who works under Colvin.
it's like a new version of Who's on First?
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Also, Snoop wrote a book

http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/044619519...;pf_rd_i=507846

Editorial Reviews

From Publishers Weekly

Pearson, who stars in HBO's The Wire, was born ill and underweight from her mother's drug habits, and later worked for a crack dealer in East Baltimore. At age 15 she killed a woman in self-defense and wound up in the Jessup State Penitentiary. She got a wakeup call when the notorious dealers she called Uncle and Father wound up respectively dead and imprisoned for life. Once out on parole, Pearson took an assembly-line job and didn't give [her neighborhood dope dealers] a second glance, but after repeatedly getting fired because of her rap sheet, she returned to dealing before a chance meeting gave her a way off the street for good. This isn't a light celebrity bio, but a powerful story of someone trying to find her way in a dark world, realizing she can still choose her life's direction even in tremendously difficult circumstances. Pearson's narrative is spare, even poetic, rendering traumatic moments all the more powerful. (Nov.)

Copyright © Reed Business Information, a division of Reed Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved. --This text refers to the Hardcover edition.

Imagine trying to get through this as an author narrated audiobook.
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Shivam Amin (North Royalton, OH): In honor of Boner Stabone, who would be your all-time top 3 favorite tv best friends?? (i.e. Boner Stabone to Mike Seaver, Shawn Hunter to Cory Matthews)

Bill Simmons (1:05 PM): 1. George Kostanza; 2. Steve Sanders; 3. Cliff Klaven; 4. Shawn Hunter; 5. Snoop.

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the deacon is a real person not actor. he actually created the phone code they used on the show.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Street_level_...Wire#The_Deacon

In his youth Melvin Williams, the actor who plays the Deacon, was a real-life drug kingpin who was arrested by series writer Ed Burns in 1984 when he was a Baltimore city police officer.[6] Creator David Simon was responsible for covering the arrest for The Baltimore Sun at the time.[7] Williams received a 34-year sentence for his crimes and much of the evidence against him came from a wiretap investigation like the one featured in the first season of the show.[7]

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It was Jay Landsman, a Baltimore Homicide detective. The show Homicide was based on him, and he also played a recurring role in The Wire as the guy under Major Bunny Colvin. He also had a character named after him...the big fat guy in Homicide.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jay_Landsman

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jay_Landsman_%28The_Wire%29

That's confusing. The character Jay Landsman, who is based on the actual Jay Landsman, worked under Rawls. The actor Jay Landsman, who really is the actual Jay Landsman, plays a character who works under Colvin.
And just to add to that, I either read somewhere or saw on the DVD commentary that the real Jay Landsman auditioned for the part of Jay Landsman on the show. The actor who actually got the part said something like, "I guess they thought I made for a more convincing Jay Landsman."
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Near the end of Season 5, the reporter guy goes into the cop bar for some inside info on the police. In the background, Det. John Munch, from Homicide, can be seen in a quick cameo mentioning that he owns a similar cop bar with his partner. His partner was played by the same actor that plays the reporter here. Det. John Munch was based on the real Jay Landsman. The cop that the reporter goes to for info is played by Jay Landsman. The guy the reporter wants the inside info on, IIRC, is the character "Jay Landsman".

In other words, this scene has a reporter asking Jay Landsman about one fake-Jay Landsman while the other fake-Jay Landsman is in the background talking about another character played by the actor who's playing the reporter.

Edited by Philo
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These may have been posted already, but for those who recently completed the series, or missed these the first time around, here are some good links I've come across since finishing the series last month:

Great series finale review

Long interview with David Simon, after the series finale

Interview with the real Omar, Donnie Andrews

Podcast with Bill Simmons and Jason Whitlock on the eve of the series finale

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5. Colvin - Hamsterdam was genius

I hated the Hamsterdam plan from Day 1. It was such an unrealistic plan that it's the main reason why Season 3 ranks only ahead of Season 5 in my rankings. (41235)
Hell no... Hamsterdam was a great plan.
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5. Colvin - Hamsterdam was genius

I hated the Hamsterdam plan from Day 1. It was such an unrealistic plan that it's the main reason why Season 3 ranks only ahead of Season 5 in my rankings. (41235)
different strokes, for me it was season 2
Didn't a mayor of Baltimore actually try to legalize drugs?
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5. Colvin - Hamsterdam was genius

I hated the Hamsterdam plan from Day 1. It was such an unrealistic plan that it's the main reason why Season 3 ranks only ahead of Season 5 in my rankings. (41235)
different strokes, for me it was season 2
Didn't a mayor of Baltimore actually try to legalize drugs?
Yes, Hamsterdam was based on fact, taken a bit more extreme for dramatic purposes.

http://www.thenation.com/doc/19990920/shenk

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