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The Third 100 from 1969. #1: Everyday People (1 Viewer)

Pip's Invitation

Footballguy
11. Stone Free -- The Jimi Hendrix Experience (released as a single)

One of Hendrix' best rockers has a strange release history. It first appeared in the UK in 1966 as the B-side to Hey Joe. (The US single had a different B-side.) When the decision was made to put together the Smash Hits compilation, Hendrix attempted to record a new version of this song to be the single from it. That didn't go well, so the original version ended up being put out as a single and included on Smash Hits -- which means its first official release in the US wasn't until '69. Many Hendrix devotees on our side of the pond were already familiar with it because it had been part of his live sets from the beginning. The link is from Spotify because the Hendrix estate doesn't like Youtube for whatever reason. 

I love how the chugging momentum is cut by flangs from Hendrix' guitar. The chorus is extremely memorable and very symbolic of its time. 

 

wikkidpissah

Footballguy
16. Darkness, Darkness -- The Youngbloods (from Elephant Mountain)

In 1969, the rock scene was evolving, adding more country and folk elements to the psychedelic sounds developed a few years earlier. The Youngbloods' album of that year is a good time capsule of that. And the best example on it is its opening track and first single, which starts out sounding like a traditional song and ends up going out in a blaze of fuzzed-out glory, remaining haunting the whole time. The emotion seethes in every second. Why this doesn't get more attention in the rock canon, I have no idea. 

I also enjoy the covers by Screaming Trees https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fg7EVvgXxJM and Robert Plant https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3qd_rEYSyWY.

Now we head into the top 15. With one exception (two if you're not too familiar with jazz), these are all songs you know well. 
JCY was one of the great talents of that era of American music, but was just one of the most irritating people of all time. he played the same circuit as the people i worked for and i would marvel at the synthesis at work until, about 40 minutes into his shows, a migraine based in a cloud of undefinable karmic vibe panic would rise up and turn my cranium into a throbbing gonad. and then i met him - a case of hippie bliss ego so bad that some kind of Van Helsing formula like beating him to death with the severed head of Jackson Browne seemed the only solution. hella songwriter, tho.

 

wikkidpissah

Footballguy
Pip's Invitation said:
14. Live with Me -- The Rolling Stones (from Let It Bleed)

This is it from the Stones; Tim and Bracie plundered the rest of their 1969 work worth plundering. 

This is a textbook late-60s Stones rocker with exciting work being done on the bass (Bill Wyman) and piano (Nicky Hopkins and Leon Russell) while Keef and Charlie bash away like they do; it's also the first Stones track Bobby Keys ever played sax on and Mick Taylor ever played guitar on (though in the latter case, his first released track was the "electric" Honky Tonk Women). But what really stands out about it is the lyrics. They are decadent as hell and downright scandalous for 1969, and Mick Jagger really sells them as such. And I love how the first sin depicted is "I take tea at 3." 
syllables were never so delicious as those couplefew years when Jagger was spittin' em at the top of his game...

 

Pip's Invitation

Footballguy
Top 10, baby!

10. Soul Sacrifice -- Santana (from Santana)

The Woodstock version gets most of the attention these days, but that wasn't released until 1970. The studio version has all the elements that made the Woodstock performance a star-making one. The thunderous drums and percussion displayed here became the band's calling card, and the track shows that Carlos Santana had a distinctive and influential guitar style from the very beginning. It's really hard to convey such fierce emotion without vocals, but the band pulls it off here. 

 

Pip's Invitation

Footballguy
9. Had to Cry Today -- Blind Faith (from Blind Faith)

Steve Winwood and Eric Clapton are at their peak here. The song is almost 9 minutes long but doesn't feel like it; every note does exactly what it needs to do. The arrangement represents a vibrant update of the blues, the guitar riffage is heavy but not overwhelming, Clapton's solos are hefty but graceful, and Winwood's vocal grits and soars as needed. The coda starting at 6:50 is pure guitar bliss. 

One of my favorite concert moments -- and there have been many -- was when I saw Clapton and Winwood take the stage together at MSG and open with this. 

 

zamboni

Footballguy
9. Had to Cry Today -- Blind Faith (from Blind Faith)

Steve Winwood and Eric Clapton are at their peak here. The song is almost 9 minutes long but doesn't feel like it; every note does exactly what it needs to do. The arrangement represents a vibrant update of the blues, the guitar riffage is heavy but not overwhelming, Clapton's solos are hefty but graceful, and Winwood's vocal grits and soars as needed. The coda starting at 6:50 is pure guitar bliss. 

One of my favorite concert moments -- and there have been many -- was when I saw Clapton and Winwood take the stage together at MSG and open with this. 
Still no “Sea of Joy” though. 😉

(j/k - it’s great, too)

 
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Pip's Invitation

Footballguy
8. Dreams -- The Allman Brothers Band (from The Allman Brothers Band)

Like the first Santana album, the first Allmans album unleashed a highly creative band who blended sounds in a way we hadn't really heard before. The album is considered to be the birth of Southern Rock, a blend of blues, rock and country, but this jaw-dropping track is notable for incorporating jazz into the mix; a lot of it is modal. Drummer Jaimoe described it as "Coltrane's My Favorite Things with lyrics." Those lyrics are full of despair and Gregg Allman sings them with anguish. 

Fun fact: I saw this performed live twice in the same week in 1992. First by the Black Crowes, then by the Allmans themselves. When introducing the Crowes' version, Chris Robinson mentioned the Allmans were coming to town in a few days and everyone should go see them (I already had tickets). 

 

Pip's Invitation

Footballguy
Depending on how much you know about jazz, this is the last song on the countdown that most of you probably haven't heard before. 

7. I Am Not Willing -- Moby Grape (from Moby Grape '69)

1968 was totally chaotic for Moby Grape, as I described in entry #51. In addition to the financial, commercial and mental-illness-related drama described there, Peter Lewis had a whole 'nother layer to deal with. His marriage had fallen apart and apparently the divorce process was prolonged and insane, to the extent that he had to spend a lot of time away from the band in '68. He only contributed one song to their second album, Wow, and does not appear at all on the bonus album packaged with Wow, Grape Jam. 

When it came time to put together Moby Grape '69, Lewis brought a song into which he had poured out all his feelings about his ex's betrayal. Set to a stately, sympathetic country rock backing, I Am Not Willing is one of the great singer/songwriter confessional songs, which happened to appear on a poor-selling album by a band with four other songwriters. The lyrics are just heart wrenching:

Said she loves me
She won't forget me
Then she's gone


She thinks that later
We could pick up the pieces
And carry on

&

This has always been a very significant song for me because it echoes what I went through in my first marriage. To this day, I have a hard time listening to it without getting emotional. 

I also enjoy Wilco's version, recorded during the Yankee Hotel Foxtrot sessions with Syd Straw on harmony vocals: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JhpHACOAVI8

 
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rockaction

Footballguy
Somehow I'm remembering that we discussed this in shuke's 10,000 songs thread, IIRC. Great song.

And I'm so grateful I'm no longer willing to have her home.

Yow. I think a lot of us have been there at one point or another, regardless of the reason.

Took a moment to listen to this, as I'd never really sat down with early Allmans. Very cool, very jazzy indeed. I enjoyed it a bunch.

 

wikkidpissah

Footballguy
Top 10, baby!

10. Soul Sacrifice -- Santana (from Santana)

The Woodstock version gets most of the attention these days, but that wasn't released until 1970. The studio version has all the elements that made the Woodstock performance a star-making one. The thunderous drums and percussion displayed here became the band's calling card, and the track shows that Carlos Santana had a distinctive and influential guitar style from the very beginning. It's really hard to convey such fierce emotion without vocals, but the band pulls it off here. 
the biggest band in our high school jumped all over this. turns out the singer had played non-stop on bongos since he was like two and this gave him a reason to get congas and, while their drummer was good - the guitarist got into Berklee, he didnt - he was the showiest mofo you ever wanna see. and Sacrifice turned him into the idol of the girls the li'l #### had dreamed of becoming. he beat them skins like they was fireworks and the hippiechix swooned. first time i circled back home after running away, he had my girl on his arm. drummers.......

 

Pip's Invitation

Footballguy
the biggest band in our high school jumped all over this. turns out the singer had played non-stop on bongos since he was like two and this gave him a reason to get congas and, while their drummer was good - the guitarist got into Berklee, he didnt - he was the showiest mofo you ever wanna see. and Sacrifice turned him into the idol of the girls the li'l #### had dreamed of becoming. he beat them skins like they was fireworks and the hippiechix swooned. first time i circled back home after running away, he had my girl on his arm. drummers.......
  I was wondering what the "sad" reaction was about. 

 

Pip's Invitation

Footballguy
21. King Harvest (Has Surely Come) -- The Band (from The Band)

The final track on the second Band album leaves us in awe. Incorporating elements of soul and even funk into the group's meld of sounds. The music has a certain anguish to it, reflective of the narrator, a down-on-his-luck sharecropper who decides to join a union in hopes of improving his lot. Unusually, the verses are loud and brash and the choruses and hushed and slow; we see the reverse often, but rarely this. Excellent performances by Robbie Robertson on guitar and Garth Hudson on organ. 
Lukas Nelson and Promise of the Real did a nice cover of this at virtual Farm Aid 2020. 

 

Pip's Invitation

Footballguy
6. It's All Too Much -- The Beatles (from Yellow Submarine)

This George Harrison song is about LSD and certainly sounds like it. He wrote it in 1967, at the peak of his obsession with Indian music, and employed the Hammond organ to replicate the drone-like sounds of the harmonium. "The love that's shining all around here" is both a reference to the headiness of the Summer of Love that was happening at the time, and to George's budding religious awareness. Obviously, the Beatles sat on it for a while before using it on the Yellow Submarine soundtrack, released in January '69. 

It is one of the most psychedelic and adventurous Beatles songs, yet doesn't get the props that Tomorrow Never Knows and Rain do. The chaotic coda is not for everyone, but I love it. @krista4, remember how I mentioned when I received the Beatles catalog on CD as a birthday present when I was in college, I made a 90-minute cassette of my favorites? This was on it. 

 

Pip's Invitation

Footballguy
5. Volunteers -- Jefferson Airplane (from Volunteers)

This was one of the year's anthems thanks to a rousing vocal from Marty Balin and hard-charging guitars from Jorma Kaukonen and Paul Kantner. It's all about the new generation taking over from the old one via revolution, in keeping with the spirit of the era's counterculture. It's probably my favorite Airplane song.

The big statements of the lyrics belie the origin of the song. Balin was woken up one morning by a truck with "Volunteers of America" painted on the side. He liked the phrase so much that he started writing lyrics based on that. 

Our final four selections are tomorrow. One of them should be obvious if you know my predilections and have kept track of what has and has not been taken on all three lists so far. I've already given away that one is jazz. What else is in store? Tune in then. 

 

Pip's Invitation

Footballguy
4. It's About That Time -- Miles Davis (from In a Silent Way)

As I said, there was going to be a jazz song that majorly influenced my musical sensibilities. This is it. Miles' #####es Brew, from the following year, is considered the cornerstone of jazz-rock fusion, but Miles' efforts started the year before with this album. Its magnum opus is It's About That Time, which brings funk grooves and rock pacing (if not yet intensity; that would come later) to jazz structures. The interplay between Miles and keyboardist Joe Zawinul is divine. More than any other, this album, especially this song, served as a bridge for me to learn more about jazz, funk, jazz-rock fusion and the other more complex shades of rock. 

The successful new direction of this album spurred Miles to be embraced by certain segments of the rock community, and shortly after its release, he started playing in bills with rock bands. A legendary stand occurred at the Fillmore East in early 1970, where Miles played on a bill with Neil Young and Crazy Horse and The Steve Miller Band. Selections from those sets have been officially released; the two versions of It's About That Time on those discs are completely different from the studio take, and from each other. 

 

wikkidpissah

Footballguy
4. It's About That Time -- Miles Davis (from In a Silent Way)

As I said, there was going to be a jazz song that majorly influenced my musical sensibilities. This is it. Miles' #####es Brew, from the following year, is considered the cornerstone of jazz-rock fusion, but Miles' efforts started the year before with this album. Its magnum opus is It's About That Time, which brings funk grooves and rock pacing (if not yet intensity; that would come later) to jazz structures. The interplay between Miles and keyboardist Joe Zawinul is divine. More than any other, this album, especially this song, served as a bridge for me to learn more about jazz, funk, jazz-rock fusion and the other more complex shades of rock. 

The successful new direction of this album spurred Miles to be embraced by certain segments of the rock community, and shortly after its release, he started playing in bills with rock bands. A legendary stand occurred at the Fillmore East in early 1970, where Miles played on a bill with Neil Young and Crazy Horse and The Steve Miller Band. Selections from those sets have been officially released; the two versions of It's About That Time on those discs are completely different from the studio take, and from each other. 
Herbie Hancock AND Chick Corea (RIP), John McLaughlin. Weather Report guys Shorter & Zawinul. Dave Holland and probably the best drummer ever, Tony Williams. Aint nobody formed The Beatles twice like Miles did w the Kind of Blue guys and then again here. Not the greatest music ever - Zawinul's changes never did click w me - but immense playing. And the space.....lord, the space.

 

Pip's Invitation

Footballguy
3. The Loner -- Neil Young (from Neil Young)

This was #25 in my Neil countdown and it wasn't taken by Tim or Bracie, so you had to know it was coming. The hardest-rocking and best song from his debut solo album, it was also his first solo single. The loner described in the lyrics has been speculated to be Stephen Stills or Neil himself; Neil has never clarified it. The distinctive fuzz guitar blasts were produced by putting Neil's guitar through a Leslie speaker. 

It is the one track from the debut that informed the sound Neil developed with Crazy Horse later in the year, and the one track that has made somewhat regular appearances in Neil 's live sets. In case you're wondering why I had nothing from Everybody Knows This Is Nowhere, I consider that to be a "stars and scrubs" album and Tim took all the stars. 

The orchestral backing adds a nice touch to the creeping isolation the titular character feels. If you don't care for it, a definitive live version without it appeared on Live Rust: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nBjr89p8khQ

 
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Leroy Hoard

Footballguy
5. Volunteers -- Jefferson Airplane (from Volunteers)

This was one of the year's anthems thanks to a rousing vocal from Marty Balin and hard-charging guitars from Jorma Kaukonen and Paul Kantner. It's all about the new generation taking over from the old one via revolution, in keeping with the spirit of the era's counterculture. It's probably my favorite Airplane song.

The big statements of the lyrics belie the origin of the song. Balin was woken up one morning by a truck with "Volunteers of America" painted on the side. He liked the phrase so much that he started writing lyrics based on that. 

Our final four selections are tomorrow. One of them should be obvious if you know my predilections and have kept track of what has and has not been taken on all three lists so far. I've already given away that one is jazz. What else is in store? Tune in then. 
Good song, but it's no We Built This City.

 

zamboni

Footballguy
3. The Loner -- Neil Young (from Neil Young)

This was #26 in my Neil countdown and it wasn't taken by Tim or Bracie, so you had to know it was coming. The hardest-rocking and best song from his debut solo album, it was also his first solo single. The loner described in the lyrics has been speculated to be Stephen Stills or Neil himself; Neil has never clarified it. The distinctive fuzz guitar blasts were produced by putting Neil's guitar through a Leslie speaker. 

It is the one track from the debut that informed the sound Neil developed with Crazy Horse later in the year, and the one track that has made somewhat regular appearances in Neil 's live sets. In case you're wondering why I had nothing from Everybody Knows This Is Nowhere, I consider that to be a "stars and scrubs" album and Tim took all the stars. 

The orchestral backing adds a nice touch to the creeping isolation the titular character feels. If you don't care for it, a definitive live version without it appeared on Live Rust: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nBjr89p8khQ
Love it -probably a top 5 Neil song for me. Glad to see it appear here.

 

Pip's Invitation

Footballguy
2. Long Time Gone -- Crosby, Stills and Nash (from Crosby, Stills and Nash)

This was another of the big anthems from '69. It was written by David Crosby in 1968 after the assassination of Robert F. Kennedy and was one of the first songs he worked on when he teamed up with Stephen Stills -- they had started collaborating before Graham Nash teamed up with them. The lyrics are full of memorable phrases that were often-quoted by the hippies and the music displays urgency but also has a radio-friendly sheen (as with the rest of the record). Crosby delivers a passionate vocal that really sells the message.

The live version from Four Way Street drops the sheen and is all passion: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XLdYJ9wmbaU

 
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zamboni

Footballguy
2. Long Time Gone -- Crosby, Stills and Nash (from Crosby, Stills and Nash)

This another of the big anthems from '69. It was written by David Crosby in 1968 after the assassination of Robert F. Kennedy and was one of the first songs he worked on when he teamed up with Stephen Stills -- they had started collaborating before Graham Nash teamed up with them. The lyrics are full of memorable phrases that were often-quoted by the hippies and the music displays urgency but also has a radio-friendly sheen (as with the rest of the record). Crosby delivers a passionate vocal that really sells the message.
I like the way it opens the Woodstock documentary/movie.

 

Bracie Smathers

Footballguy
It's About That Time -- Miles Davis
Took a history of jazz class and one of the assignments was to interview a jazz musician.  I tracked down Spike Robinson who knew Miles.  Spike gave a lecture to our class.  Dished on the hate Miles had for Caucasians.  Refused to face white audiences, raw racism goes across every color.  Its not limited.

Miles started was so accomplished, well beyond what most realize.  The most 'impressive' work he did isn't accessible to main stream because of the intensely complex structure, its basically unlistenable because of the timing.  Uber complex and elitist things he did with Bird and Dizz.  So far above anyone else that he looked down on basically everyone.  Hated Brubeck and the WC cool jazz scene but he wasn't the only one who resented all of the attention that Brubeck got.  

I just recall the hurt in Spike's voice when talking about how much Miles hated white people.  Also if you studied Davis' work and understand how he took jazz to a mathematical musical height that left everyone so far in the distance that he isolated himself.  Admirable and certainly not all he did but I love his more mainstream things.  Birth of the Cool is classic.  Fusion is eh... Jazz has got so many schools proceeding fusion.  Its criminal that most people have never been exposed.    

 

Pip's Invitation

Footballguy
1. Everyday People -- Sly and the Family Stone (from Stand!)

I had to quadruple-check to make sure this song didn't appear on either of the previous lists. It topped the R&B and Hot 100 charts in Feb/March '69 (the first Sly song to achieve the latter), was named by Billboard as the #5 song of 1969, was ranked #145 on Rolling Stone's list of the greatest songs of all time, and is one of the most memorable '60s hits by anyone. It was released as a single in late '68 but appeared on the Stand! album released in May '69, so it meets my inclusion criteria (and probably didn't meet Tim's due to the '68 angle). 

The song has remained in popular consciousness ever since its release because of its message of racial harmony and its infectious melody and rhythm. It coined the phrase "diff'rent strokes for diff'rent folks," which became so commonly used that it inspired the name of a sitcom launched a few years later. 

Larry Graham used the slap bass technique on this song and has claimed it was the first use of it anywhere. The rest of the arrangement is bright and sunny, reflecting the hope of the lyrics. 

"We got to live together" is a sentiment that means more than ever today.

Thanks for going on this journey with me. Since wikkid has Mandela Effect'd himself into thinking I did a 1971 countdown, I might as well do one for real. I was thinking about doing it anyway during the process of this project and I already have a #1 picked out. Work is busy the next few weeks but maybe I'll have something ready in early March. 

 

rockaction

Footballguy
 Since wikkid has Mandela Effect'd himself into thinking I did a 1971 countdown, I might as well do one for real.
You didn't?

Huh. I could have sworn you did, too. Learn something new every day and all...

Good work on this one, per usual. These years aren't my wheelhouse years, so it was good to get to listen to some big hits and unheralded tracks.

 

Pip's Invitation

Footballguy
Songs I considered that didn't make the cut:

Amon Duul II:

Kanaan: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=S2Nbud4CGHo

The Beach Boys:

Break Away: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cZ46rLgBXKk

I Can Hear Music: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EqhVI1lz3ng

Bee Gees:

Tomorrow Tomorrow: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NvzeG-5cP3U

David Bowie:

Cygnet Committee: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZZ2VMPPyyck

Tim Buckley:

Dream Letter: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HC58d3wQGw0

The Paul Butterfield Blues Band:

Love March: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8Hp3gSKD23A

The Byrds:

Bad Night at the Whiskey: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8bi62a4LEb4

Drug Store Truck Driving Man: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IBzyosxDKzY

Oil in My Lamp: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qc0ZZYiBHhU

This Wheel's on Fire: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PZGngEqg0Qg

Glen Campbell:

Galveston: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HhKZLhxFFUY 

Can:

Mary, Mary So Contrary: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fBRtK9tNjOs

Chicago:

Introduction: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=19gCLq-Zmnw

The Chi-Lites:

Give It Away: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2bZbhG06pYI

Jimmy Cliff:

Many Rivers to Cross: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=doWWHQDWe2k

Joe Cocker:

Delta Lady: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0CKlyE21Wmk

Cream:

What a Bringdown: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IKAmznY8NZs

Creedence Clearwater Revival:

It Came Out of the Sky: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zwAcvIZzuM0

Keep on Chooglin': https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iyI9r0CCu74

Wrote a Song for Everyone: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KvfS1oFfhZ0

Deep Purple:

Bird Has Flown: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=s8oFB7mHM40

Delaney & Bonnie:

Hard to Say Goodbye: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JlCglH1V_Mw

Nick Drake:

Cello Song: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MhSVh75lKiE

Man in a Shed: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RPETztdS7Fk

Bob Dylan ft. Johnny Cash:

Girl from the North Country: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Je4Eg77YSSA

Fairport Convention:

Matty Groves: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dtVkYMFueWs

Meet on the Ledge: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=K3uBlSnp-TI

She Moves Through the Fair: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hTb0_TfUnEk

Si Tu Dois Partir: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YWI29hIqIxY

Tam Lin: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=47z5n7p9B3I

Fleetwood Mac:

Rattlesnake Shake: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ob5Q_daCOB8

The Flying Burrito Brothers:

Hippie Boy: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-qvIjaqFCwg

Aretha Franklin:

I Can't See Myself Leaving You: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8kjx8nVlUGo

Free:

I'm a Mover: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bqJQHZu1Dg0

Woman: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xyffOHvjh3c

Marvin Gaye:

That's the Way Love Is: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6C5f2GMUWqs

Marvin Gaye and Tammi Terrell:

What You Gave Me: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0Ux24mWFgcg

The Grateful Dead:

China Cat Sunflower: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NTb000uPo6E

Humble Pie:

Natural Born Bugie: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kahiCYLbFhk

The Impressions:

Choice of Colors: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kX8iJ5pvsBQ

The James Gang:

Funk #48: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=G_UtzgOITzY (not #49, that was '70)

Tommy James and the Shondells:

Sweet Cherry Wine: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tlDML68sxv4

Waylon Jennings:

Just to Satisfy You: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DwsxrASoOOw

Jefferson Airplane:

Good Shepherd: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XtrYVj5e3cs  

Turn My Life Down: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=13Di9Uld7jw 

Jethro Tull:

A New Day Yesterday: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=R9JF7lUMH1U

Back to the Family: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=a3uqdoJxJ50

We Used to Know: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oGvux7w1Ea4

Elton John:

Skyline Pigeon: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iRFGgr4XIos

Janis Joplin:

Maybe: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zad3bDnjsII

To Love Somebody: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IYdIeorcwbc 

Work Me, Lord: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_b8C0Skuc-Y

King Crimson:

Epitaph: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vXrpFxHfppI

Jackie Lomax:

New Day: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TSYv_OhY52I

Love:

Always See Your Face: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=a19QBz7HEWY

Good Times: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yThpBvd09ts

Stand Out: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pYT-QEbPa8w

MC5:

Motor City Is Burning: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_Ly5pYEww9A

Steve Miller Band:

Brave New World: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IOf4i-Ymxho

Joni Mitchell:

The Gallery: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Qvm-WH8PN_s

Roses Blue: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KPqxi6-L52w

That Song About the Midway: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=O9R82TThjdw

Moby Grape:

It's a Beautiful Day Today: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=t_U3zy40xs0

Trucking Man: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hZzY-i41KUU

The Monkees:

Listen to the Band: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Paw1ZMsIM14

The Moody Blues:

So Deep Within You: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xA3JIqucvrU

Mountain:

Blood of the Sun: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nubjH8Tsyqk

Nazz: 

Not Wrong Long: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZUk4wCZ3Vq0

Pentangle:

Light Flight: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VVpS44LGqTk

Pink Floyd: 

Cymbaline: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ietkuUZwjpU

The Nile Song: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MduQlWUoyhI

Poco:

Pickin' up the Pieces: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dJ4B09BWNGY

Elvis Presley:

In the Ghetto: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FJ-r0bilzhU

Lou Rawls:

Your Good Thing (Is About to End): https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4tFh4lkiCaU

Diana Ross and the Supremes:

I'm Livin' in Shame: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fqXss1V6pdc

Santana:

Jingo: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DgGHeT9U9g0

The Bob Seger System:

2 + 2 = ?: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8vkap4GvyG4

Sly and the Family Stone:

You Can Make It If You Try: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=v-5F8-rm8cY

Spirit:

I'm Truckin': https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NifKMiezEjc 

New Dope in Town: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TzEyU17x78I

Spooky Tooth:

Evil Woman: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gJIBTgpD6pM

Hangman Hang My Shell on a Tree: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3byo0XnCCns

Candi Staton:

I'd Rather Be an Old Man's Sweetheart (Than a Young Man's Fool): https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GNVnzUqpH0A

Rod Stewart:

An Old Raincoat Won't Ever Let You Down: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0MU_w-HMGD0

Cindy's Lament: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aiBI3ssWnMw

The Stooges:

No Fun: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HXIw1BvfEQ8

The Temptations:

Message from a Black Man: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WvkQicMlm0Y

Ike & Tina Turner:

Honest I Do: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rSSUrzQ8y94

The Hunter: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fO1zyj96q0M

The Who:

Go to the Mirror!: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pFBt8DDbBT4

The Tony Williams Lifetime:

Emergency: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bmMHckNkJP8

Johnny Winter:

Highway 61 Revisited: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vUXhoIf1eQU

Yes:

Looking Around: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=saFVrWBPl_0

Survival: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UwfVMAh-9Bw

Frank Zappa:

The Gumbo Variations: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fLp5HoNaxKg

 

Pip's Invitation

Footballguy
You didn't?

Huh. I could have sworn you did, too. Learn something new every day and all...

Good work on this one, per usual. These years aren't my wheelhouse years, so it was good to get to listen to some big hits and unheralded tracks.
I wasn't coming into the FFA regularly when the 1971 lists were happening. My countdowns have been Neil Young, 1975 (second 100) and 1969 (third 100). 

 

wikkidpissah

Footballguy
Thanks for going on this journey with me. Since wikkid has Mandela Effect'd himself into thinking I did a 1971 countdown, I might as well do one for real. I was thinking about doing it anyway during the process of this project and I already have a #1 picked out. Work is busy the next few weeks but maybe I'll have something ready in early March. 
sometimes i forget things before they occur...

 

wikkidpissah

Footballguy
this was the 69est of the 69s. i am moist, have a stiff neck and am not sure if i was more or less excited by it than i thought i'd be...

 
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Doug B

Footballguy

rockaction

Footballguy
Some really good songs that missed the cut. "Break Away" by the Beach Boys and "Many Rivers To Cross" by Jimmy Cliff, as well as the Stooges' "No Fun," stand out to me as certain admissions to any hundred list from '69 that I'd do. Can and the Chi-Lites, too.

 

zamboni

Footballguy
Some really good songs that missed the cut. "Break Away" by the Beach Boys and "Many Rivers To Cross" by Jimmy Cliff, as well as the Stooges' "No Fun," stand out to me as certain admissions to any hundred list from '69 that I'd do. Can and the Chi-Lites, too.
Was thinking the same on Many Rivers To Cross. It’s all subjective of course, but really a shame that it missed three different lists. Seger’s 2+2=? also seems to be a glaring omission.

But again, shows how incredibly deep the year was.

 
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Bracie Smathers

Footballguy
Everyday People -- Sly and the Family Stone (from Stand!)

I had to quadruple-check to make sure this song didn't appear on either of the previous lists.
I definitely missed this one and the last Beatle tune but Yellow Submarine is one of the few Beatle albums I never got into.

Per Sly, I must have had it on my list but figured Tim would get it and put it off to the side.  I could have sworn it made it on another list for a different year.  I'm sure I looked it up more than once.

Any love for Tull’s “Bouree”?
:thumbup:

I skipped over jazz or I would have had THIS one.

 

Pip's Invitation

Footballguy
I definitely missed this one and the last Beatle tune but Yellow Submarine is one of the few Beatle albums I never got into.

Per Sly, I must have had it on my list but figured Tim would get it and put it off to the side.  I could have sworn it made it on another list for a different year.  I'm sure I looked it up more than once.

:thumbup:

I skipped over jazz or I would have had THIS one.
If a 1968 countdown ever happens, Everyday People would qualify for your list and Tim's based on the criteria you each use. 

 

rockaction

Footballguy
Some really good songs that missed the cut. "Break Away" by the Beach Boys and "Many Rivers To Cross" by Jimmy Cliff, as well as the Stooges' "No Fun," stand out to me as certain admissions to any hundred list from '69 that I'd do. Can and the Chi-Lites, too.
By the way, this wasn't a criticism, it was just spitballing. It is indeed subjective. I wrote especially since Pip is the one who considered the songs mentioned. More affirmation than disagreement, really.

 

zamboni

Footballguy
So.....does anyone have plans for a fourth countdown of 100 songs from 1969?

If not.....I might know of a guy who might be interested. The countdown couldn't start for about two weeks, though.
Always room for one more if they don’t include Pip’s just-missed ones, but personally I’d rather see someone start up a different year.

 

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