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President Obama Addresses Muslim World in Cairo


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The point I see some folks upset about:

Around the world, the Jewish people were persecuted for centuries, and anti-Semitism in Europe culminated in an unprecedented Holocaust. Tomorrow, I will visit Buchenwald, which was part of a network of camps where Jews were enslaved, tortured, shot and gassed to death by the Third Reich. Six million Jews were killed - more than the entire Jewish population of Israel today. Denying that fact is baseless, ignorant, and hateful. Threatening Israel with destruction - or repeating vile stereotypes about Jews - is deeply wrong, and only serves to evoke in the minds of Israelis this most painful of memories while preventing the peace that the people of this region deserve.

On the other hand, it is also undeniable that the Palestinian people - Muslims and Christians - have suffered in pursuit of a homeland. For more than sixty years they have endured the pain of dislocation. Many wait in refugee camps in the West Bank, Gaza, and neighboring lands for a life of peace and security that they have never been able to lead. They endure the daily humiliations - large and small - that come with occupation. So let there be no doubt: the situation for the Palestinian people is intolerable. America will not turn our backs on the legitimate Palestinian aspiration for dignity, opportunity, and a state of their own.

Maybe it was just not a good choice of words but it seems that "on the other hand" puts the Holocaust and what's happening in Palestine on relatively equal footing. I'm not saying that. I'm saying that's what I hear people saying.

J

Rush was making this point earlier on his show, and I don't really see it that way, but he could have been more artful there.
I think it was well written. He had to point out the history of violence on both sides. I thought the speech did a good job of not elevating either side while stopping short of equating the Holocaust to the plight of modern Palestinians.

And lets face it, Rush and the people Joe are referring to would have complained either way.

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The speech is going to save lives. It's going to save lives because at least a few young Arab men are going to have more hope and more liking for the United States, and these emotions are going to produce one or two less terrorists. There is no higher praise I can give the speech, honestly.

I hope you're right, but you might be going a tad overboard
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I don't see how any American citizen can say anything bad about the speech Obama gave. Hopefully it opens doors around the world instead of slamming them shut like in our recent past. Again, I do not see how anyone can say anything bad about the words and ideals Obama appears to be presenting.

:shrug: Was just about to say the same thing.
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The speech is going to save lives. It's going to save lives because at least a few young Arab men are going to have more hope and more liking for the United States, and these emotions are going to produce one or two less terrorists. There is no higher praise I can give the speech, honestly.

I hope you're right, but you might be going a tad overboard
I think his post is an understatement. A US President making that speech in Cairo is a huge step forward. Whether it provides enough momentum to eventually lead to a long term peaceful resolution is still up in the air, but I have absolutely no doubt that there are thousands of young folks in the middle east whose opinion/impression of America was altered today.
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Several of the replies in this thread make me sad :thumbdown:

You know what makes me sad? That people think that the POTUS should be on a Muslim goodwill tour.

Leaders of Muslim nations should be coming to us. Let me say that again.

Leaders of Muslim nations should be coming to us!!!

They should be coming to us and explaining what they are doing and what they will be doing to get a hold on radical Muslims in their country.

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The speech is going to save lives. It's going to save lives because at least a few young Arab men are going to have more hope and more liking for the United States, and these emotions are going to produce one or two less terrorists. There is no higher praise I can give the speech, honestly.

I hope you're right, but you might be going a tad overboard
I think his post is an understatement. A US President making that speech in Cairo is a huge step forward. Whether it provides enough momentum to eventually lead to a long term peaceful resolution is still up in the air, but I have absolutely no doubt that there are thousands of young folks in the middle east whose opinion/impression of America was altered today.
Oh please. Bush gave quite a few speeches where he said essentially the same things. Anyone that thinks that just because Obama said it will make a difference to would be terrorists is delusional.
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Several of the replies in this thread make me sad :)

You know what makes me sad? That people think that the POTUS should be on a Muslim goodwill tour.

Leaders of Muslim nations should be coming to us. Let me say that again.

Leaders of Muslim nations should be coming to us!!!

They should be coming to us and explaining what they are doing and what they will be doing to get a hold on radical Muslims in their country.

A lot of people have forgotten 9/11. Not everyone wants to be chummy with these guys :thumbdown:
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The speech is going to save lives. It's going to save lives because at least a few young Arab men are going to have more hope and more liking for the United States, and these emotions are going to produce one or two less terrorists. There is no higher praise I can give the speech, honestly.

I hope you're right, but you might be going a tad overboard
I think his post is an understatement. A US President making that speech in Cairo is a huge step forward. Whether it provides enough momentum to eventually lead to a long term peaceful resolution is still up in the air, but I have absolutely no doubt that there are thousands of young folks in the middle east whose opinion/impression of America was altered today.
Oh please. Bush gave quite a few speeches where he said essentially the same things. Anyone that thinks that just because Obama said it will make a difference to would be terrorists is delusional.
:thumbdown: Unreal how many libs on Obama's jock in here.
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Several of the replies in this thread make me sad :thumbdown:

You know what makes me sad? That people think that the POTUS should be on a Muslim goodwill tour.

Leaders of Muslim nations should be coming to us. Let me say that again.

Leaders of Muslim nations should be coming to us!!!

They should be coming to us and explaining what they are doing and what they will be doing to get a hold on radical Muslims in their country.

The leaders of Muslim nations are caught in the middle, and none of the ideological battleground is theirs to defend.

To radical Muslims, we are the enemy. And to us, those radical Muslims who happen to be bent on our destruction are the enemy. It is a bold step for the leader of one side's enemy to go into the heart of their territory and speak so eloquently on behalf of peace. For the reverse to be true, we'd need radical clerics and known terrorists to be coming here on a goodwill tour; not national leaders.

Because...here it comes...Muslim countries aren't our enemies. You DO remember that, right? To have Muslim national leaders come here would only serve our sense of superiority, without actually achieving anything.

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The speech is going to save lives. It's going to save lives because at least a few young Arab men are going to have more hope and more liking for the United States, and these emotions are going to produce one or two less terrorists. There is no higher praise I can give the speech, honestly.

I hope you're right, but you might be going a tad overboard
I think his post is an understatement. A US President making that speech in Cairo is a huge step forward. Whether it provides enough momentum to eventually lead to a long term peaceful resolution is still up in the air, but I have absolutely no doubt that there are thousands of young folks in the middle east whose opinion/impression of America was altered today.
Oh please. Bush gave quite a few speeches where he said essentially the same things. Anyone that thinks that just because Obama said it will make a difference to would be terrorists is delusional.
I don't necessarily believe that just because Obama said it, it will make a huge difference. However, the ideas that he outlined, if implemented successfully in a revision of previous Middle East policy, have the potential to make a great difference in the region.
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The speech is going to save lives. It's going to save lives because at least a few young Arab men are going to have more hope and more liking for the United States, and these emotions are going to produce one or two less terrorists. There is no higher praise I can give the speech, honestly.

I hope you're right, but you might be going a tad overboard
I think his post is an understatement. A US President making that speech in Cairo is a huge step forward. Whether it provides enough momentum to eventually lead to a long term peaceful resolution is still up in the air, but I have absolutely no doubt that there are thousands of young folks in the middle east whose opinion/impression of America was altered today.
Oh please. Bush gave quite a few speeches where he said essentially the same things. Anyone that thinks that just because Obama said it will make a difference to would be terrorists is delusional.
Really? Bush went to Cairo and demanded a two state solution while quoting the Koran?
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He gave a great speech.. YAAAAAYYYY..

No policy changes, all rhetoric.. basicially following the Bush administrations policies, only "friendlier"..

Arabs will love us now..

Tomorrow, when we are still in Iraq and Afghanistan, and giving Israel billions of dollars, they will realize that it was in fact, just a speech, and will hate us again.. repeat....

sorry to send ants to the Obamites picnic, but unless we renounce Israel, pull troops out of the middle east, and give $$ to Palistine, they will ALWAYS hate us.. that's just the way it is.. :lmao:

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The speech is going to save lives. It's going to save lives because at least a few young Arab men are going to have more hope and more liking for the United States, and these emotions are going to produce one or two less terrorists. There is no higher praise I can give the speech, honestly.

I hope you're right, but you might be going a tad overboard
I think his post is an understatement. A US President making that speech in Cairo is a huge step forward. Whether it provides enough momentum to eventually lead to a long term peaceful resolution is still up in the air, but I have absolutely no doubt that there are thousands of young folks in the middle east whose opinion/impression of America was altered today.
Oh please. Bush gave quite a few speeches where he said essentially the same things. Anyone that thinks that just because Obama said it will make a difference to would be terrorists is delusional.
Anyone who thinks the world abroad views Bush and Obama (and what they say) as the same is delusional.
:lmao:

The European lefties may like Obama more, but the world's tyrants see them as essentially the same. Although my guess is that they view Obama as more of a pushover. Bin Laden has already released a statement admonishing his followers not to cooperate. What do you think the reaction will be when we pull out of Iraq and move those soldiers to Afghanistan. Carter was the last President to attempt to sweet talk the radical Arabs. We saw how well that worked out.

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I thought this article was interesting about some of the Mulsim reaction to the speech. Overall, I think it supports my argument I've made thus far. The sources quoted are not static minds who are intent on anti-American views. The general Muslim population has had vast disagreements with U.S. policy in the Middle East in the past, but have generally expressed hope that Obama will carry through with his rhetoric. I believe that this was an epic speech in history and that if Obama can follow through and aggressive pursue a two-state solution with Israel and Palestine, then this could be a game-changing moment in history. Obama recognized that nothing can be resolved through words, so hopefully he can put to rest some lingering doubts with his actions. If he carries through with some of his statements, I think that could really change Muslim sentiment towards the United States.

Muslims Like Obama Tone, Want Action to Back it Up

CAIRO — Muslim shopkeepers, students and even radical groups such as Hamas praised President Barack Obama's address Thursday as a positive shift in U.S. attitude and tone. But Arabs and Muslims of all political stripes said they want him to turn his words into action _ particularly in standing up to Israel.

Obama impressed Muslims with his humility and respect and they were thrilled by his citing of Quranic verses. Aiming to repair ties with the Muslim world that had been strained under his predecessor George W. Bush, he opened with the traditional Arabic greeting "Assalamu Aleikum," which drew enthusiastic applause from his audience at Cairo University.

Even some extremist Web sites, which have carried statements from al-Qaida in the past, gave rare praise for Obama by calling him a "wise enemy." One posting on a chat room expressed admiration for Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton "wearing a head scarf ... and she and Obama taking off their shoes" during a visit to Cairo's Sultan Hassan mosque.

Mohammed Zakarneh, a 33-year-old former fugitive militant in the West Bank town of Jenin, said Obama's speech "planted seeds of hope in our hearts, as Arabs and Muslims."

Obama's address touched on many themes Muslims wanted to hear. He insisted Palestinians must have a state and said continued Israeli settlement in the West Bank is not legitimate. He assured them the U.S. would pull all it troops out of Iraq by 2012 and promised no permanent U.S. presence in Afghanistan.

But at the top of his priorities, he put the battle against violent extremism. And he was faulted for not apologizing for U.S. wars in Muslim countries.

The Iranian government, which Obama is trying to draw into a dialogue, was silent. But state television described the speech as: "Too many words. Attractive but unbelievable."

Fawzi Barhoum, a Hamas spokesman in Gaza, said there was change in tone. But he complained that Obama did not specifically mention the suffering in Gaza following the Israeli incursion this year that killed more than 1,000 Palestinians.

"There is a change between the language of President Obama and previous speeches made by George Bush," he said. "So all we can say is that there is a difference in the statements, and the statements of today did not include a mechanism that can translate his wishes and views into actions," said Barhoum, whose group the U.S. considers a terrorist organization.

But Palestinian President Mahmoud Abbas, a moderate who rivals Hamas for leadership of the Palestinians, welcomed Obama's words.

"The part of Obama's speech regarding the Palestinian issue is an important step under new beginnings," his spokesman Nabil Abu Rdeneh said. "It shows there is a new and different American policy toward the Palestinian issue."

In Gaza, a Palestinian living with his wife and nine children in two tents after their home was razed in the Israeli offensive this year, cringed at Obama's demand that Palestinians recognize Israel's right to exist.

"For a man like me, who has been terrorized by Israel, who has lost his home because of Israel ... he ignored my suffering, and he started talking about their (Israelis') rights and that Hamas and the Palestinians should recognize Israel," said Mohammed Khader, 47, after watching Obama on a generator-powered TV set. "Unbelievable."

In a traditional Ramallah coffee shop, middle-aged men watched the speech on TV while they puffed on cigarettes or water pipes. Some even put their card and backgammon games on hold to follow along.

Customer Basel Abul Abed said it was a turning point.

"His real problem will be with Israel, not with Arabs and not with Muslims," he said. "We are waiting for Mr. Obama's real work. Next time we see him, we want him to congratulate us for our Palestinian state."

Another customer, 56-year-old Mohammed Sbeih, said: "His point in the speech of recognizing the Palestinians suffering is a positive point. But if the Palestinians have to abandon violence, Israel will have to as well. "

A joint statement by eight Syrian-based radical Palestinian factions, including Hamas, was harsher.

"Obama's speech is an attempt to mislead people and create more illusions to improve America's aggressive image in the Arab and Islamic world," it said.

The message for Israel was mixed. Obama strongly endorsed the U.S. alliance with the Jewish state but harshly criticized its West Bank settlement policy. The director of Israel's government press office, Danny Seaman, said the speech was "not bad."

Before the address, many Muslims said one of the things they wanted to hear most from Obama was respect for Islam. And many said he delivered.

"It was very good of him to address Muslims by quoting from holy Quran, something I did not expect in his speech," said Osama Ahmed Sameh, a 45-year-old Iraqi government employee at the Ministry of Higher Education.

In Egypt, Shahinda al-Bahgouri, a 20-year-old student at Cairo University where Obama spoke, was also impressed.

"All we want as Muslims is for there to be a partnership," she said. "And he was seriously humble. Humility is important for us."

In Syria, political analyst Imad Shouaibi said: "It is a speech with a different language from what we used to hear. This is a positive thing."

Sheik Muhammad al-Nujaimi, member of the committee in charge of rehabilitating Saudi militants, said he is going to tell the militants Muslims should offer help to the new American administration and reciprocate its overtures.

"Americans are a civilized people. The previous president didn't represent them. Today, there's a new president who's using a new language and wants a new world in place. We should give him a chance and not open up a new front that will lead to the failure of his plan."

Zahid Husain Gardezi, a 50-year-old landowner in the Pakistani city of Multan, was pleased by Obama's warmth.

"It is the first time I have ever heard such affectionate words from an American for Muslims," he said."

Arab satellite stations Al-Arabiya and Al-Jazeera, as well as Egyptian TV broadcast the speech live, with a voice-over Arabic translation.

Lebanese Hezbollah officials said they didn't watch Obama's speech although the group's Al-Manar TV carried it live. The station's newscast described it as "historic" _ a rare acknowledgment from a mouthpiece of the militant Shiite group. But the approval was tinged with criticism, saying Obama spoke to the Muslim world more like a "preacher" and did not distance himself from the pro-Israeli lobbyists.

Syrian state TV did not air the speech but the mobile text messaging service of the official Syrian news agency SANA sent four urgent headlines on it as Obama spoke.

Afghanistan's state television broadcast the speech live, but without translation so few could understand it.

At a Kabul restaurant, diner Ahmad Khalid watched the speech on TV and said Obama's words should turn into action. The Americans "should not do what they are doing in Muslim countries," he said.

Iranian television did not air Obama and most Iranians who own satellite dishes could not watch it as their reception was jammed.

In Iran, Mohammad Ali Abtahi, a cleric who was vice president under reformist President Mohammad Khatami, called the speech "compensation for a hostile environment which was created during President Bush."

Political commentator Ali Reza Khamesian said Obama's acknowledgment of Iran's right to produce nuclear energy for peaceful purposes was "a step forward for better ties with the United States."

Before the speech, Iran's Supreme Leader Ayatollah Ali Khamenei said any statements by Obama were just "words, speech and slogan" without specific measures by Washington, such as lifting sanctions on Iran.

In Iraq, the anti-U.S. Shiite cleric Muqtada al-Sadr _ whose militia fighters waged fierce battles with the Americans before a cease-fire in 2007 _ was skeptical U.S. policy would change.

"The honeyed and flowery speeches express only one thing _ that America wants to adopt a different attitude in subduing the world and putting it under its control and globalization," al-Sadr said in a statement.

Some Iraqis were disappointed that Obama did not express remorse for his predecessor's war on Iraq.

"I think there should have been apologies from him for the deaths and misery caused by wrong American policies against Muslims, whether it be in our region or in other places," said Baghdad engineer Muhsin Karim, 45.

Mohammed Ali, 40, a Shiite cleric from Najaf, was reassured by Obama that the U.S. is committed to getting out of Iraq.

"Listening to Obama's speech, I became more assured that the withdrawal of the U.S. troops from Iraq will be implemented and that the new U.S. administration is committed to help Iraq," he said.

Others were critical.

Wahyudin, the 57-year-old director of a hard-line Islamic boarding school in Jakarta, Indonesia, said "I don't trust him."

"He's just trying to apologize to Muslims because of what America _ or really Bush _ has done in the past," said Wahyudin, who goes by one name. "He's promising to be different. But that's all it is, a promise. We want action. We want to see an end to all intervention in Muslim countries. That's what we're fighting for."

In Pakistan, where the U.S. believes many top al-Qaida leaders including Osama bin Laden may be hiding, citizens were generally skeptical that American deeds would match Obama's soaring words.

"Whatever wounds America has inflicted on the world, they are very deep and they cannot be erased away by only one speech," political analyst Siraj Wahab told Aaj TV.

Hamayon Raza, a pharmacy owner in Multan, pointed to a Pakistani army offensive against the Taliban in the northwest Swat Valley that has displaced up to 3 million people and blamed it on Obama.

"The American president has fooled Muslims," Raza said. "Whatever has happened in Iraq, Afghanistan and now in Pakistan, who would believe Obama's words?"

http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20090604/ap_on_...bama_muslims_10
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:thumbup:The European lefties may like Obama more, but the world's tyrants see them as essentially the same. Although my guess is that they view Obama as more of a pushover. Bin Laden has already released a statement admonishing his followers not to cooperate. What do you think the reaction will be when we pull out of Iraq and move those soldiers to Afghanistan.

Exactly. Thats why we try and influence those who are the "undecideds" in the middle east.He wasnt there to make friends with Laden and those who follow him. Not sure how you cant see this. Not sure how you cant see Bush had almost zero diplomatic influence in the area, even worse when compared to Obama.
Only time will tell. I hope that his words are successful. I'm not sure why Obama's sweet talking will be any more successful than Carter's. Unless he's willing to completely throw Israel under the bus, I just don't see anything truly changing.
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:thumbup:The European lefties may like Obama more, but the world's tyrants see them as essentially the same. Although my guess is that they view Obama as more of a pushover. Bin Laden has already released a statement admonishing his followers not to cooperate. What do you think the reaction will be when we pull out of Iraq and move those soldiers to Afghanistan.

Exactly. Thats why we try and influence those who are the "undecideds" in the middle east.He wasnt there to make friends with Laden and those who follow him. Not sure how you cant see this. Not sure how you cant see Bush had almost zero diplomatic influence in the area, even worse when compared to Obama.
Only time will tell. I hope that his words are successful. I'm not sure why Obama's sweet talking will be any more successful than Carter's. Unless he's willing to completely throw Israel under the bus, I just don't see anything truly changing.
You just need more kool aid is all
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Oh please. Bush gave quite a few speeches where he said essentially the same things. Anyone that thinks that just because Obama said it will make a difference to would be terrorists is delusional.

Can you post a video/youtube or two of a Bush Speech in Egypt, Iraq, Saudi Arabia?
why does it matter where the speech was given?

If a cop gives a speech in the ghetto denouncing gang violence will it change anything?

nope.

Neither will this speech, as long as Obama continues the Bush policies in the ME..

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A lot of people have forgotten 9/11. Not everyone wants to be chummy with these guys :hot:

You and AE should go on a US tour espousing your wisdom. Perhaps you could travel in one of these.
Not sure why you quoted my post?? Does that strike you as odd that not everyone wants to be pals with the freaks in the ME?? Is it really that hard to understand. :thumbup:
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A lot of people have forgotten 9/11. Not everyone wants to be chummy with these guys :thumbup:

You and AE should go on a US tour espousing your wisdom. Perhaps you could travel in one of these.
Where did you find that?

Some kid back in town. Traded the van for it straight up. I can get 70 mpg on this hog.

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Oh please. Bush gave quite a few speeches where he said essentially the same things. Anyone that thinks that just because Obama said it will make a difference to would be terrorists is delusional.

Can you post a video/youtube or two of a Bush Speech in Egypt, Iraq, Saudi Arabia?
why does it matter where the speech was given?

If a cop gives a speech in the ghetto denouncing gang violence will it change anything?

nope.

Neither will this speech, as long as Obama continues the Bush policies in the ME..

When you're trying to influence hearts and minds, going to someone's turf and showing respect for their culture and religion goes a long way.

And Obama isn't continuing Bush ME policies. If you read/watched the speech today, he did everything but come out and apologize for that idiocy.

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Oh please. Bush gave quite a few speeches where he said essentially the same things. Anyone that thinks that just because Obama said it will make a difference to would be terrorists is delusional.

Can you post a video/youtube or two of a Bush Speech in Egypt, Iraq, Saudi Arabia?
3 seconds of google gives this one. http://www.america.gov/st/washfile-english...t0.3204004.html Wasn't in Egypt, was in the Islamic Center of Washington which I assume is a mosque from the article:

Washington – American appreciation for Islam was the theme of President Bush’s speech at the Islamic Center of Washington on the mosque’s 50th anniversary June 27.

The president also announced he will appoint a U.S. envoy to the Organization of the Islamic Conference (OIC) to “listen and learn” and share U.S. views with delegates from Muslim nations.

The appointment is intended “to demonstrate to Muslim communities our interest in respectful dialogue and continued friendship,” he said. It will be the first time an American president has appointed an envoy to the OIC.

Bush reaffirmed U.S. commitment to the Middle East peace process. “We will work toward a day when a democratic Palestine lives side by side with Israel in peace,” he said.

Calling the mosque’s anniversary a “celebration of America’s diversity of faith and our unity as free people,” Bush quoted the poet Rumi: “The lamps are different, but the light is the same.”

He said the location of the Islamic center, on the same street as Christian churches, a Jewish synagogue and a Buddhist temple, is evidence of a society where “people can live and worship as they choose without intimidation.”

The long-time imam of the Islamic Center, Abdullah M. Khouj, introduced the president, remarking on the tolerance and freedom of religion in the United States and recalling the speech of another U.S. president.

When the Islamic center was dedicated in 1957, then-President Dwight D. Eisenhower called it one of “the most beautiful buildings in Washington,” and said “America would fight with her whole strength for your right to have here your own church and worship according to your own conscience.” Fifty years later, Bush echoed his sentiments.

“The freedom to worship is so central to America’s character that we tend to take it personally when that freedom is denied to others,” he said.

Adding that “the greatest challenge” is to “help the forces of moderation win the great struggle against extremism,” Bush condemned extremists and the way they misrepresent Islam and the American perspective. “This enemy falsely claims that America is at war with Muslims and the Muslim faith, when in fact it is these radicals who are Islam’s true enemy,” he said.

Bush paid a visit to the Islamic center days after the September 11, 2001, attacks, when he also spoke of the importance of the Muslim community in America.

The generous outpouring of assistance to Muslim countries in times of disaster is a sign of American friendship toward Muslims, he said, citing relief sent after earthquakes in Iran and Pakistan, and the tsunami in Indonesia and Malaysia.

“Our country defended Muslims in Bosnia and Kosovo after the breakup of Yugoslavia. Today we’re rallying the world to confront genocide in Sudan,” he said.

Bush reiterated U.S. commitment to young democracies in the Muslim world, saying, “A democratic future is not a plan imposed by Western nations; it is a future that the people of the region will seize for themselves.”

“America offers its hand in friendship,” Bush concluded.

For additional details, see the full text of Eisenhower’s speech and a transcript of Bush’s speech.

(USINFO is produced by the Bureau of International Information Programs, U.S. Department of State. Web site: http://usinfo.state.gov)

Read more: http://www.america.gov/st/washfile-english...0HVbRlSkv&C

There will be people that are criticizing President Obama for his speech today that were mum when President Bush said the same things here. There will be people that are pleased with President Obama today that didn't say anything positive when President Bush said some of the same things here.

J

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Oh please. Bush gave quite a few speeches where he said essentially the same things. Anyone that thinks that just because Obama said it will make a difference to would be terrorists is delusional.

Can you post a video/youtube or two of a Bush Speech in Egypt, Iraq, Saudi Arabia?
3 seconds of google gives this one. http://www.america.gov/st/washfile-english...t0.3204004.html Wasn't in Egypt, was in the Islamic Center of Washington which I assume is a mosque from the article:

Washington – American appreciation for Islam was the theme of President Bush’s speech at the Islamic Center of Washington on the mosque’s 50th anniversary June 27.

The president also announced he will appoint a U.S. envoy to the Organization of the Islamic Conference (OIC) to “listen and learn” and share U.S. views with delegates from Muslim nations.

The appointment is intended “to demonstrate to Muslim communities our interest in respectful dialogue and continued friendship,” he said. It will be the first time an American president has appointed an envoy to the OIC.

Bush reaffirmed U.S. commitment to the Middle East peace process. “We will work toward a day when a democratic Palestine lives side by side with Israel in peace,” he said.

Calling the mosque’s anniversary a “celebration of America’s diversity of faith and our unity as free people,” Bush quoted the poet Rumi: “The lamps are different, but the light is the same.”

He said the location of the Islamic center, on the same street as Christian churches, a Jewish synagogue and a Buddhist temple, is evidence of a society where “people can live and worship as they choose without intimidation.”

The long-time imam of the Islamic Center, Abdullah M. Khouj, introduced the president, remarking on the tolerance and freedom of religion in the United States and recalling the speech of another U.S. president.

When the Islamic center was dedicated in 1957, then-President Dwight D. Eisenhower called it one of “the most beautiful buildings in Washington,” and said “America would fight with her whole strength for your right to have here your own church and worship according to your own conscience.” Fifty years later, Bush echoed his sentiments.

“The freedom to worship is so central to America’s character that we tend to take it personally when that freedom is denied to others,” he said.

Adding that “the greatest challenge” is to “help the forces of moderation win the great struggle against extremism,” Bush condemned extremists and the way they misrepresent Islam and the American perspective. “This enemy falsely claims that America is at war with Muslims and the Muslim faith, when in fact it is these radicals who are Islam’s true enemy,” he said.

Bush paid a visit to the Islamic center days after the September 11, 2001, attacks, when he also spoke of the importance of the Muslim community in America.

The generous outpouring of assistance to Muslim countries in times of disaster is a sign of American friendship toward Muslims, he said, citing relief sent after earthquakes in Iran and Pakistan, and the tsunami in Indonesia and Malaysia.

“Our country defended Muslims in Bosnia and Kosovo after the breakup of Yugoslavia. Today we’re rallying the world to confront genocide in Sudan,” he said.

Bush reiterated U.S. commitment to young democracies in the Muslim world, saying, “A democratic future is not a plan imposed by Western nations; it is a future that the people of the region will seize for themselves.”

“America offers its hand in friendship,” Bush concluded.

For additional details, see the full text of Eisenhower’s speech and a transcript of Bush’s speech.

(USINFO is produced by the Bureau of International Information Programs, U.S. Department of State. Web site: http://usinfo.state.gov)

Read more: http://www.america.gov/st/washfile-english...0HVbRlSkv&C

There will be people that are criticizing President Obama for his speech today that were mum when President Bush said the same things here. There will be people that are pleased with President Obama today that didn't say anything positive when President Bush said some of the same things here.

J

That's not even in the same universe as what happened today.
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There will be people that are criticizing President Obama for his speech today that were mum when President Bush said the same things here. There will be people that are pleased with President Obama today that didn't say anything positive when President Bush said some of the same things here.J

The COLLOSSAL difference of course is context...both in terms of who gave the speech as well as the time and place when the speech was given.
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Does that strike you as odd that not everyone wants to be pals with the freaks in the ME?? Is it really that hard to understand. :hifive:

Gross simplifications and generalizations are a specialty of yours. You don't seem to understand that there are millions and millions of muslims that wish no harm on us. Thus, we have to resort to dumb and dumber jokes. :fishing:
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Several of the replies in this thread make me sad :fishing:

You know what makes me sad? That people think that the POTUS should be on a Muslim goodwill tour.

Leaders of Muslim nations should be coming to us. Let me say that again.

Leaders of Muslim nations should be coming to us!!!

They should be coming to us and explaining what they are doing and what they will be doing to get a hold on radical Muslims in their country.

A lot of people have forgotten 9/11. Not everyone wants to be chummy with these guys :hifive:
What's wrong with the president actively pursuing relationships we need from both a political and intelligence perspective rather than passively sitting back after the trainwreck we helped create and having "them come to us"? Who are "these guys"? This exactly the type of thinking and lack of distinction that helped create the colossal problems his speech was intended to address.
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Oh please. Bush gave quite a few speeches where he said essentially the same things. Anyone that thinks that just because Obama said it will make a difference to would be terrorists is delusional.

Can you post a video/youtube or two of a Bush Speech in Egypt, Iraq, Saudi Arabia?
why does it matter where the speech was given?

If a cop gives a speech in the ghetto denouncing gang violence will it change anything?

nope.

Neither will this speech, as long as Obama continues the Bush policies in the ME..

BTW: If Obama went down to the GHETTO and talked with the Blood & Crips he would have FAR FAR FAR more influence on those people, especially the undecideds and moderates then he would from addressing them from a Podium in Washington D.C. Heck, from the east coast 90% wouldnt even know he was talking to them. Take a trip to their turf? Damn near every single person knows about it and is interested.

Even as slow as your are... you understand that.

:hifive: whatever..

Bottom line, it was a speech.. unless you can link me to some new policy initiatives in the ME, it will only be a speech, and will be forgotten after the next suicide boming in Afghanistan, Iraq, Pakistan, etc.. keep living in your utopian world though!!!

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Oh please. Bush gave quite a few speeches where he said essentially the same things. Anyone that thinks that just because Obama said it will make a difference to would be terrorists is delusional.

Can you post a video/youtube or two of a Bush Speech in Egypt, Iraq, Saudi Arabia?
3 seconds of google gives this one. http://www.america.gov/st/washfile-english...t0.3204004.html Wasn't in Egypt, was in the Islamic Center of Washington which I assume is a mosque from the article:

Washington – American appreciation for Islam was the theme of President Bush’s speech at the Islamic Center of Washington on the mosque’s 50th anniversary June 27.

The president also announced he will appoint a U.S. envoy to the Organization of the Islamic Conference (OIC) to “listen and learn” and share U.S. views with delegates from Muslim nations.

The appointment is intended “to demonstrate to Muslim communities our interest in respectful dialogue and continued friendship,” he said. It will be the first time an American president has appointed an envoy to the OIC.

Bush reaffirmed U.S. commitment to the Middle East peace process. “We will work toward a day when a democratic Palestine lives side by side with Israel in peace,” he said.

Calling the mosque’s anniversary a “celebration of America’s diversity of faith and our unity as free people,” Bush quoted the poet Rumi: “The lamps are different, but the light is the same.”

He said the location of the Islamic center, on the same street as Christian churches, a Jewish synagogue and a Buddhist temple, is evidence of a society where “people can live and worship as they choose without intimidation.”

The long-time imam of the Islamic Center, Abdullah M. Khouj, introduced the president, remarking on the tolerance and freedom of religion in the United States and recalling the speech of another U.S. president.

When the Islamic center was dedicated in 1957, then-President Dwight D. Eisenhower called it one of “the most beautiful buildings in Washington,” and said “America would fight with her whole strength for your right to have here your own church and worship according to your own conscience.” Fifty years later, Bush echoed his sentiments.

“The freedom to worship is so central to America’s character that we tend to take it personally when that freedom is denied to others,” he said.

Adding that “the greatest challenge” is to “help the forces of moderation win the great struggle against extremism,” Bush condemned extremists and the way they misrepresent Islam and the American perspective. “This enemy falsely claims that America is at war with Muslims and the Muslim faith, when in fact it is these radicals who are Islam’s true enemy,” he said.

Bush paid a visit to the Islamic center days after the September 11, 2001, attacks, when he also spoke of the importance of the Muslim community in America.

The generous outpouring of assistance to Muslim countries in times of disaster is a sign of American friendship toward Muslims, he said, citing relief sent after earthquakes in Iran and Pakistan, and the tsunami in Indonesia and Malaysia.

“Our country defended Muslims in Bosnia and Kosovo after the breakup of Yugoslavia. Today we’re rallying the world to confront genocide in Sudan,” he said.

Bush reiterated U.S. commitment to young democracies in the Muslim world, saying, “A democratic future is not a plan imposed by Western nations; it is a future that the people of the region will seize for themselves.”

“America offers its hand in friendship,” Bush concluded.

For additional details, see the full text of Eisenhower’s speech and a transcript of Bush’s speech.

(USINFO is produced by the Bureau of International Information Programs, U.S. Department of State. Web site: http://usinfo.state.gov)

Read more: http://www.america.gov/st/washfile-english...0HVbRlSkv&C

There will be people that are criticizing President Obama for his speech today that were mum when President Bush said the same things here. There will be people that are pleased with President Obama today that didn't say anything positive when President Bush said some of the same things here.

J

That's not even in the same universe as what happened today.
Please elaborate. People were commenting about these new words. I didn't hear either speech and was just reading and comparing the transcripts.

J

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Does that strike you as odd that not everyone wants to be pals with the freaks in the ME?? Is it really that hard to understand. :hifive:

Gross simplifications and generalizations are a specialty of yours. You don't seem to understand that there are millions and millions of muslims that wish no harm on us.
And milions and millions of muslims that do.
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Oh please. Bush gave quite a few speeches where he said essentially the same things. Anyone that thinks that just because Obama said it will make a difference to would be terrorists is delusional.

Can you post a video/youtube or two of a Bush Speech in Egypt, Iraq, Saudi Arabia?
why does it matter where the speech was given?

If a cop gives a speech in the ghetto denouncing gang violence will it change anything?

nope.

Neither will this speech, as long as Obama continues the Bush policies in the ME..

When you're trying to influence hearts and minds, going to someone's turf and showing respect for their culture and religion goes a long way.

And Obama isn't continuing Bush ME policies. If you read/watched the speech today, he did everything but come out and apologize for that idiocy.

:hifive:

Unless we denounce Israel and give them a Palistinian state, we will never "influence their hearts and minds".. :fishing:

I hated Bush, and he said the same damn stuff... :popcorn:

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Does that strike you as odd that not everyone wants to be pals with the freaks in the ME?? Is it really that hard to understand. :hifive:

Gross simplifications and generalizations are a specialty of yours. You don't seem to understand that there are millions and millions of muslims that wish no harm on us.
And milions and millions of muslims that do.
Please elaborate on exactly what you mean there. Who are these millions and millions?J
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why does it matter where the speech was given?

If a cop gives a speech in the ghetto denouncing gang violence will it change anything?

nope.

Neither will this speech, as long as Obama continues the Bush policies in the ME..

BTW: If Obama went down to the GHETTO and talked with the Blood & Crips he would have FAR FAR FAR more influence on those people, especially the undecideds and moderates then he would from addressing them from a Podium in Washington D.C. Heck, from the east coast 90% wouldnt even know he was talking to them. Take a trip to their turf? Damn near every single person knows about it and is interested.

Even as slow as your are... you understand that.

:hifive: whatever..

Bottom line, it was a speech.. unless you can link me to some new policy initiatives in the ME, it will only be a speech, and will be forgotten after the next suicide boming in Afghanistan, Iraq, Pakistan, etc.. keep living in your utopian world though!!!

whatever? because you know his speech in the ghetto would have a million time more impact then his speech from DC.

and you know it.

Probably would have more effect than his speech in Egypt will have..

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Rhetoric won't win the hearts and minds of the Arab street. What actions are we going to see here?

Why won't it? Are arabs incapable of diplomatic influence?
The kind every American President since Carter has tried? Yes, they are largely incapable of being influenced by empty rhetoric.
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Rhetoric won't win the hearts and minds of the Arab street. What actions are we going to see here?

Why won't it? Are arabs incapable of diplomatic influence?
The kind every American President since Carter has tried? Yes, they are largely incapable of being influenced by empty rhetoric.
:goodposting: but.. Obama MEANS it this time!!! :excited::lmao: Unless some major policy changes are made, NOTHING will change..
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Rhetoric won't win the hearts and minds of the Arab street. What actions are we going to see here?

Action #1 (that Arctic was against)... he went to the middle east and spoke directly to them.He made a first step. Considering all the serious business he has at hand in his homeland, 5 months is pretty good.Im sure what he said about Iraq is huge for the people in that region. He will certainly need to make some of it happen.
Muhammad went to the mountain too. The mountain didn't move.
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Bushs speech was to Americans, with Americans.

Obamas speach was to the middle easterners, with middle easterners.

Who are they tring to reach and influence?

From the onset its a massive difference. An easy to follow example.

So unless you're actually wherever the group you're talking about is, what you say doesn't matter? I'm sorry but that just doesn't wash.

J

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Here's how the speech played in places outside the U.S. (and yes - some of us actually think that's important :goodposting: )From Radio France:

Positive reaction to Obama's speechArticle published on the 2009-06-04 Latest update 2009-06-04 15:06 TUAs Barack Obama arrived in Egypt, Iran's supreme leader, Ayatollah Ali Khamenei said that the US is still "deeply hated" in the Middle East. However, that was a rare negative tone struck by the world's leaders reacting to his keynote speech to the Muslim world in Cairo. "The nations in the region hate the United States from the bottom of their hearts because they have seen violence, military intervention and discrimination," Khamenei said. "The new US government seeks to transform this image. I say firmly that this will not be achieved by talking, speech and slogans." He was speaking on the occasion of the 20th anniversary of the death of the Islamic republic's revolutionary leader Ayatollah Ruhollah Khomeini.On the contrary, the Palestinian authority hailed Obama's speech as a "good start.” Nabil Abou Rudeina, spokesperson for the Palestinian leader Mahmud Abbas, described it as " clear and frank... an innovative political step." Rudeina considered that the US president's support for a Palestinian state cannot be ignored by Israel.Radical Palestinian militants Hamas, who are in power in Gaza, gave Obama’s speech a qualified welcome. "It had many contradictions, all the while reflecting tangible change," Hamas spokesman Fawzi Barhum said. "It is a speech that plays on sentiment and is filled with civilities, which leads us to believe that he aimed to embellish America's image in the world."In his address, Obama had called on Hamas to recognise Israel’s right to exist and renounce violence. Speaking from Brussels, European Union foreign policy chief Javier Solana was effusive in his praise. "It was a remarkable speech, a speech that without any doubt is going to open a new page in the relation with the Arab-Muslim world and I hope in the problems we have in so many theatres in the region," he said.

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Rhetoric won't win the hearts and minds of the Arab street. What actions are we going to see here?

Why won't it? Are arabs incapable of diplomatic influence?
The kind every American President since Carter has tried? Yes, they are largely incapable of being influenced by empty rhetoric.
Obama doesn't look or sound like Carter...which may seem shallow, but it makes a huge difference to this region of the world....remember the context...they've been at war with Judeo Christians for thousands of years...white = badThis is why Obama has such a tremendous opportunity to change the world for the better.
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Rhetoric won't win the hearts and minds of the Arab street. What actions are we going to see here?

Why won't it? Are arabs incapable of diplomatic influence?
The kind every American President since Carter has tried? Yes, they are largely incapable of being influenced by empty rhetoric.
:goodposting: but.. Obama MEANS it this time!!! :excited::lmao: Unless some major policy changes are made, NOTHING will change..
My point exactly.
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Rhetoric won't win the hearts and minds of the Arab street. What actions are we going to see here?

Why won't it? Are arabs incapable of diplomatic influence?
The kind every American President since Carter has tried? Yes, they are largely incapable of being influenced by empty rhetoric.
Obama doesn't look or sound like Carter
:goodposting: What does that have to do with anything?J
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Bushs speech was to Americans, with Americans.

Obamas speach was to the middle easterners, with middle easterners.

Who are they tring to reach and influence?

From the onset its a massive difference. An easy to follow example.

So unless you're actually wherever the group you're talking about is, what you say doesn't matter? I'm sorry but that just doesn't wash.

J

:goodposting:

exactly, ESPECIALLY when you continue to follow the same policies that the 'evil one' did..

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Rhetoric won't win the hearts and minds of the Arab street. What actions are we going to see here?

Why won't it? Are arabs incapable of diplomatic influence?
The kind every American President since Carter has tried? Yes, they are largely incapable of being influenced by empty rhetoric.
Obama doesn't look or sound like Carter
:goodposting: What does that have to do with anything?J
Obama doesn't look or sound like Carter...which may seem shallow, but it makes a huge difference to this region of the world....remember the context...they've been at war with Judeo Christians/Whites for thousands of years...white = badThis is why Obama has such a tremendous opportunity to change the world for the better.
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