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Home-owners...What are your current projects?


wilked

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So been tackling a few things around the house.  Decided the house needed to be painted - not much to see there as I'm doing the same colors.  Decks are done, most of the trim and windows are done.  Maybe 1/4 of the body of the house is done.  

Wanted to get some more done today, but with the heat warnings it wasn't really a good painting day..  Paint is drying in the pail it's so hot.  So I tackled the washer today - decent machine, but lately it sounds like an airplane during the spin cycle.   The way to fix it is to tear the whole thing down and replace the bearings.  So this is what I did.  The top bearing (closest to the tub and water) was completely toast.  After giving the sealant 6 hours to set I just ran a short cycle.  Damn thing is nearly silent.  :thumbup: $3-400 repair bill avoided for a $60 repair kit and 3 hours of futzing with the machine.  Pretty happy about that - it was easily the most annoying problem in the house.

Next up is replacing the railroad ties that were put in to support the semicircle island in the front with stone.  That's going to be a whopper of a job.  Contractor wants 7k.  I can get it done in 2.5.   I guess it'll give me the excuse to buy a pickaxe and a tamper.  After all, what household is complete without a tamper?

Edited by Sand
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On 8/9/2019 at 6:41 AM, Copeman said:

As long as the gravel is compacted tightly you should be fine.

It's pretty tight.  Had our first rain over the weekend.  Walked on it and it is like walking on a sidewalk.  Pretty solid.  We'll see how much it settles long term though.

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I came home late Saturday and our upstairs A/C wasn’t working.  I suffered thru the night and called my HVAC guy in the morning.  While I was waiting I opened up the unit and started to troubleshoot. 

With the help of youtube and my multimeter I figured out my capacitor was bad.  Problem is there  was no way to get that part on a Sunday.  I called my HVAC guy and asked if I could buy the part from him and save the service call.  He wouldnt sell it to me but said If my diagnosis was right he would replace it for free. 

Guess who got a free capacitor and a good nights sleep?  

TLDR: Berndog did some basic troubleshooting and is feeling pretty good 

Edited by berndog
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We had a big party this weekend and I had a few projects I did this week in advance.

One was a keezer build. I got a couple kegs for the party and this worked beautifully. Very happy with how it turned out. My girlfriend was initially skeptical of putting "the ugly freezer" on the patio for the party but ended up loving the finished product.

Other project was a coffee table for the patio. This was an effort to not have her spend $200 on a table. It didn't take a TON of time and I think it turned out pretty good.

 

Pics

http://imgur.com/a/LmS3kig

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59 minutes ago, berndog said:

I came home late Saturday and our upstairs A/C wasn’t working.  I suffered thru the night and called my HVAC guy in the morning.  While I was waiting I opened up the unit and started to troubleshoot. 

With the help of youtube and my multimeter I figured out my capacitor was bad.  Problem is there  was no way to get that part on a Sunday.  I called my HVAC guy and asked if I could buy the part from him and save the service call.  He wouldnt sell it to me but said If my diagnosis was right he would replace it for free. 

Guess who got a free capacitor and a good nights sleep?  

TLDR: Berndog did some basic troubleshooting and is feeling pretty good 

Last time that happened to me it was a $250 bill.  You got a deal there.

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1 hour ago, Worm said:

We just finished. Need to upload some pics. Turned out awesome and will spend so much time out there.

Can we post pics on here? My dad and I are building it over the course of a few weeks. Been taking pics of it along the way. 

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1 hour ago, Worm said:

We had a big party this weekend and I had a few projects I did this week in advance.

One was a keezer build. I got a couple kegs for the party and this worked beautifully. Very happy with how it turned out. My girlfriend was initially skeptical of putting "the ugly freezer" on the patio for the party but ended up loving the finished product.

Other project was a coffee table for the patio. This was an effort to not have her spend $200 on a table. It didn't take a TON of time and I think it turned out pretty good.

 

Pics

http://imgur.com/a/LmS3kig

Can you send plans on that table if you have them? 

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2 hours ago, wilked said:

Can you send plans on that table if you have them? 

I don't have any plans, mostly just winged it. But here's a from memory set of plans/instructions.

1. The top is a 16" x 36" pre-made spruce/pine plank from a big box store. Maybe $15. All I did was give it a good sanding.

2. Take a table saw to two 2x4's and rip off a 1/4" or so to get rid of the rounded corners. Then rip again at 1 1/2" to end up with 4 2x2's (1 1/2" x 1 1/2") that are 8' long.

3. Sand 2x2's.

4. Use miter saw and cut 2x2's into 12 pieces. I did approximately: 4x 17 1/2" legs, 4x 27" (long end pieces), and 4x 10" (short end pieces).

5. I stained everything before I put it together, just to make it easier. I used a Minwax grey stain I had on hand. Works well on the pine pieces to give it that rustic-ish look. Only did one coat. I can look up the exact stain if you'd like when I get home.

5. Put together two long ends of the base using pocket screws, joining the legs and long end pieces. Then join the two long end pieces together with the 10" short end pieces. This example (https://www.woodshopdiaries.com/diy-x-base-console-table-middle-shelf/) sort of shows how the long/short/legs go together. I used 2 1/2" pocket hole screws, just make sure you don't go to far or they will barely poke through. Only change is that i faced my pocket screw holes downwards since I wasn't doing a shelf. A couple 36" bar clamps worked great to help put it all together.

6. Once you have your base assembled, lay your table top with the top side facing down, lay your base on it, and attach your base to the top by putting wood screws straight through the base into the top. Make sure to pre-drill your holes and then use 1 5/8" wood screws, setting them into the base piece just a bit to make sure they grab.

That's pretty much it. I didn't use any wood glue but that's probably advisable. Probably took me a few hours total, and cost $15 in materials I didn't already have.

 

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Fixing water damage from a leak we had around our back patio door.  Ripped up the damaged hardwood yesterday and found that I needed to remove a section of subfloor as it had rotted (it was flaking away, but dry).  Cut the section out and removed.  This section went all the under the exterior wall's sill plate.  Not sure if this is even considered the sill plate as it doesn't sit directly on the foundation.  Didn't notice any obvious mold on the removed sub-floor, but I did notice a dark area on the bottom of about a 6 inch section of the "sill plate".  I'll need to investigate closer with a flashlight to confirm.  Praying that it is just paint/stamping, although I'm not optimistic.

If it is mold, what would you do here?  Cover it up with some Mold Killing Primer?  Remove/replace that section of sill plate?

I'm picking up a moisture meter this afternoon to test this area to ensure there is no longer a leak before continuing.

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39 minutes ago, Worm said:

I don't have any plans, mostly just winged it. But here's a from memory set of plans/instructions.

1. The top is a 16" x 36" pre-made spruce/pine plank from a big box store. Maybe $15. All I did was give it a good sanding.

2. Take a table saw to two 2x4's and rip off a 1/4" or so to get rid of the rounded corners. Then rip again at 1 1/2" to end up with 4 2x2's (1 1/2" x 1 1/2") that are 8' long.

3. Sand 2x2's.

4. Use miter saw and cut 2x2's into 12 pieces. I did approximately: 4x 17 1/2" legs, 4x 27" (long end pieces), and 4x 10" (short end pieces).

5. I stained everything before I put it together, just to make it easier. I used a Minwax grey stain I had on hand. Works well on the pine pieces to give it that rustic-ish look. Only did one coat. I can look up the exact stain if you'd like when I get home.

5. Put together two long ends of the base using pocket screws, joining the legs and long end pieces. Then join the two long end pieces together with the 10" short end pieces. This example (https://www.woodshopdiaries.com/diy-x-base-console-table-middle-shelf/) sort of shows how the long/short/legs go together. I used 2 1/2" pocket hole screws, just make sure you don't go to far or they will barely poke through. Only change is that i faced my pocket screw holes downwards since I wasn't doing a shelf. A couple 36" bar clamps worked great to help put it all together.

6. Once you have your base assembled, lay your table top with the top side facing down, lay your base on it, and attach your base to the top by putting wood screws straight through the base into the top. Make sure to pre-drill your holes and then use 1 5/8" wood screws, setting them into the base piece just a bit to make sure they grab.

That's pretty much it. I didn't use any wood glue but that's probably advisable. Probably took me a few hours total, and cost $15 in materials I didn't already have.

 

Poly? 3 coats? 

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Howdy all! The wife and I are buying our first home right now. We plan to have a pro move a gas line for a range and to add granite counter tops , as it is pink speckled tile. Besides that 95% of the changes will be done my yours truly. I have experience being a drywall taper specializing in finish and patch work. I have also done patio paver work and painting, but almost nothing involved with wood working, electrical, or plumbing. I will be redoing the drywall on the kitchen/dining ceiling, the entire unfinished garage, and one of the bathrooms for now.

So what are some of the favorite fixes or additions all of you have done that you feel really makes a difference? We are going to add a small home gym to the 1.5 car garage after I finish it and create outdoor spaces in the front 20'x10' concrete slab and 22'x18' concrete slab, with roofed cover in the side/back yard. Right now they are good spaces but filled with way to much clutter and junk to look nice. 

Any ideas, equipment, or items that people love, especially for the patios would be appreciated. Only thing I know is for certain is we are adding over head string lighting to the outside patios. 

 

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On 8/8/2019 at 2:17 PM, Bull Dozier said:

Shed is progressing.  We had 5 tons of gravel (recycled concrete) delivered Tuesday, as well as 8 yards of mulch for another part of the yard.  Yes, that is a lot of mulch.  Moved the entire pile of mulch Tuesday night.  Moved maybe half the gravel last night.  My lower back is killing me.  Will be stopping at the liquor store on the way home to self medicate once I finish the job.

2x4 frame for the shed foundation is constructed and waiting for the gravel to be in place.  This is the most highly technical engineering I have ever accomplished.  I followed the instructions to complete it (essentially, two 15 foot 2x4s along the side with 12 8 ft 2x4s running across).  I was mainly worried about it being square, but the diagonal measurements are withing 1/2 inch of each other.  The directions said to "square it up" when completed, but I have no idea how I could adjust that with 50+ nails in place. :shrug: 

Once the gravel is in place, the frame goes on the gravel and I play with that until it is level.  That might be the most challenging.  I have two layers of 4x4 surrounding the gravel, which are almost level.  The 4x4s should be higher than the gravel, slightly, so that shouldn't matter (I'm hoping).

Finished 99% of my shed this weekend.  What a PITA.  I worked on the foundation and pre-construction totally in an effort to ensure the shed was square, on a square foundation to ensure proper assembly, and to make sure the doors opened correctly and all that.  With a plastic shed, that is all for naught.  Once it is all together, it is a pretty decent shed, but the assembly process leaves a lot to be desired.  the injection molded plastic pieces aren't exactly...exact in the way they fit together.  The corners were an issue getting everything lined up, and getting slot a to fit into hole b correctly and all that.  (at one point, a piece of the wall was supposed to slid down into a slot in the floor.  Both my 17 year old son and I are litterally hanging from the top of the wall section giving all the force we can create to get it to "snap" into the slot to no avail).  I knew we were slightly off in various places and it made two impacts.  The roof sections didn't line up exactly, so I had to use some longer than provided screws to get them together.  We'll see how much of an issue this turns out to be.  But the bigger issue is the door.  It still shuts and all, but there are two deadbolt pieces that are supposed to line up to be able to lock the left hand door (double door opening) allowing the shed to be locked with a deadbolt.  Since the doors don't line up well, you essentially have to close them together, which means you can't have both deadbolts in place.  I won't be keeping my gold supply here, so I don't think it matters too much, but annoying.

Forget pictures of the completed shed, but have a few of my progress.  Will post once completed.

The guy removing my inground pool is slated to start the week of Labor Day, though that has been kicked back twice now.  Hopefully he starts and I can get working on that section of the back yard while I can still plant seed or sod.

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1 hour ago, madshot31 said:

Howdy all! The wife and I are buying our first home right now. We plan to have a pro move a gas line for a range and to add granite counter tops , as it is pink speckled tile. Besides that 95% of the changes will be done my yours truly. I have experience being a drywall taper specializing in finish and patch work. I have also done patio paver work and painting, but almost nothing involved with wood working, electrical, or plumbing. I will be redoing the drywall on the kitchen/dining ceiling, the entire unfinished garage, and one of the bathrooms for now.

So what are some of the favorite fixes or additions all of you have done that you feel really makes a difference? We are going to add a small home gym to the 1.5 car garage after I finish it and create outdoor spaces in the front 20'x10' concrete slab and 22'x18' concrete slab, with roofed cover in the side/back yard. Right now they are good spaces but filled with way to much clutter and junk to look nice. 

Any ideas, equipment, or items that people love, especially for the patios would be appreciated. Only thing I know is for certain is we are adding over head string lighting to the outside patios. 

 

I don't want to be captain obvious but I would paint ceilings, remove wallpaper, fix and paint walls, now before you move in.  I would replace any flooring now too.  It's so much easier to get all of that out of the way than later.  I installed a ring doorbell, love that thing and that's a simple improvement.  I would install a nest hvac controller too while you're working on the walls.  Ceiling fans/lighting fixtures now is easy too since you won't have to move furniture like you will after you move in.  I would get the door locks rekeyed now, change the codes on the garage door(s) now.  Another easy win is secure your door hinges for a couple bucks.  Zip tie fix your garage door emergency door releases.  Change your furnace filter, fridge water filter, whole house water filter (if any) and put a sticker label with the date on it or set up a calendar reminder in gmail.  Clean out your dryer vent before you move your dryer in, again, setup a reminder in gmail for once a year.  I would join nextdoor in your neighborhood, that's really nice.  Your neighbors make recommendations for electricians, painters, hvac guys, etc. plus you can keep up on what's going on in your neighborhood.

Whenever you get around to landscaping, I would highly recommend going to your local nursery (smaller nursery) and hiring a pro to design your landscape.  We did this on our first home and I think I paid the guy $500, sold that home, 10 years later I hired another guy.  This was probably 7 or 8 years ago but the 2nd guy drew up blueprints, made recommendations, etc. and I think that was $1,500 for a design.  The second time around we had a bigger area to landscape and we did all four sides of the home, the first time it was just the front and right side of the house plus the first guy hand sketched the design on scrap paper and listed plant ideas in the margins.  The second guy put a ton of time and effort into it, left us a book of plants that are native to our climate zone, gave all sorts of different ideas, I think he left 3 or 4 different designs for the front, etc.

 

Edited by Sullie
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Installed a Ring Doorbell Pro on both my front door and back door on Wednesday, then installed a new Chamberlain B970 belt drive Wi-Fi garage door opener yesterday to replace my old Liftmaster chain drive. The Rings were super easy but the Chamberlain took a while since I was doing it by myself and it was my first garage door opener install. I actually broke it down over a few days as I only had a certain amount of time each day to work on it. The online videos are MONEY for this and made it pretty easy. I almost got away with using my existing hanging brackets but the Chamberlain was slightly longer than the Liftmaster so I had to move the brackets back a few inches. This thing is SO quiet now, and the open and close settings (I think they're called Travel Limits) are now spot on.

 

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It not about the actual visitors.  It's the motion sensor so I know when packages are dropped off, if anyone is creeping, guys spraying my yard.   I'm surprised at the amount of people in my neighborhood during the day that I had no idea

It's basically just a security camera with a doorbell attached. :shrug:

If you don't want a security camera then you won't want a Ring

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Among other things, I plan on upgrading my kitchen this year. I'm curious if anyone might have thoughts on a floor discoloration / stain issue that I have.

I bought the house 25+ years ago. There was a rug in the kitchen that we didn't look under until after taking possession. Here we found a tan/brownish, perfectly rectangular discoloration that extended out about 3 feet from the dishwasher (about 2-3 feet wider than the dishwasher). The stain really is more of a 3 inch wide framing of the rectangle than than a filling in of the rectangle. 

A couple years later we had new linoleum installed and the contractor was to replace whatever it was that caused the stain. The stain gradually returned. It came back the same size and shape.

Before this next project. Anyone have any thoughts on how I approach this with the contractor to ensure this is truly fixed?

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9 minutes ago, brun said:

Among other things, I plan on upgrading my kitchen this year. I'm curious if anyone might have thoughts on a floor discoloration / stain issue that I have.

I bought the house 25+ years ago. There was a rug in the kitchen that we didn't look under until after taking possession. Here we found a tan/brownish, perfectly rectangular discoloration that extended out about 3 feet from the dishwasher (about 2-3 feet wider than the dishwasher). The stain really is more of a 3 inch wide framing of the rectangle than than a filling in of the rectangle. 

A couple years later we had new linoleum installed and the contractor was to replace whatever it was that caused the stain. The stain gradually returned. It came back the same size and shape.

Before this next project. Anyone have any thoughts on how I approach this with the contractor to ensure this is truly fixed?

Photo? 

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16 hours ago, offdee said:

What’s so great about having a Ring doorbell?  I get maybe one doorbell visitor every 2-3 wks....is it really worth the investment?  

A few of the situations I like about it :

1.) I'm at home, I sit down to eat and the doorbell rings.  If it's my neighbor, across the street (whom I am good friends with) I will put aside my dinner and go talk to him.  However, if it's someone pimping their crap (candy bars, someone wanting signatures, whatever the reason) I pull up the app on my tablet or phone and I talk to them without opening up the door.

2.) I'm not at home, the doorbell rings and I can answer it so that's handy too.

3.) Packages are delivered, I can verify they were delivered or prove they were stolen via video.

4.) Someone is creeping around the front yard, the motion sensor goes off and I have video evidence.  If I'm awake, I can call out to them "what do you need?" or something, again, without opening the front door.

You do have the option to connect to the ring community, people post of videos of things going on (people stealing things, free candy van roaming in the neighborhood, lost pets, etc.) so you have the option to connect to your neighborhood so you can see what's going on if you'd like.

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20 hours ago, Sullie said:

I don't want to be captain obvious but I would paint ceilings, remove wallpaper, fix and paint walls, now before you move in.  I would replace any flooring now too.  It's so much easier to get all of that out of the way than later.  I installed a ring doorbell, love that thing and that's a simple improvement.  I would install a nest hvac controller too while you're working on the walls.  Ceiling fans/lighting fixtures now is easy too since you won't have to move furniture like you will after you move in.  I would get the door locks rekeyed now, change the codes on the garage door(s) now.  Another easy win is secure your door hinges for a couple bucks.  Zip tie fix your garage door emergency door releases.  Change your furnace filter, fridge water filter, whole house water filter (if any) and put a sticker label with the date on it or set up a calendar reminder in gmail.  Clean out your dryer vent before you move your dryer in, again, setup a reminder in gmail for once a year.  I would join nextdoor in your neighborhood, that's really nice.  Your neighbors make recommendations for electricians, painters, hvac guys, etc. plus you can keep up on what's going on in your neighborhood.

Whenever you get around to landscaping, I would highly recommend going to your local nursery (smaller nursery) and hiring a pro to design your landscape.  We did this on our first home and I think I paid the guy $500, sold that home, 10 years later I hired another guy.  This was probably 7 or 8 years ago but the 2nd guy drew up blueprints, made recommendations, etc. and I think that was $1,500 for a design.  The second time around we had a bigger area to landscape and we did all four sides of the home, the first time it was just the front and right side of the house plus the first guy hand sketched the design on scrap paper and listed plant ideas in the margins.  The second guy put a ton of time and effort into it, left us a book of plants that are native to our climate zone, gave all sorts of different ideas, I think he left 3 or 4 different designs for the front, etc.

 

Thanks for the tips, I would have never thought of add longer screws to the door jams but that is a nice touch. And yes, we will be ripping out the old as hell carpets that are compacted and nasty for new flooring. A bright spot for us is the HVAC is only a year old and should be solid for long time to come, and in Norcal where it was 108 last week, that is important. 

 

Any recommendations on where to get solid fixtures and hardware for decent prices, as I have never looked into these things before.

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21 hours ago, madshot31 said:

Howdy all! The wife and I are buying our first home right now. We plan to have a pro move a gas line for a range and to add granite counter tops , as it is pink speckled tile. Besides that 95% of the changes will be done my yours truly. I have experience being a drywall taper specializing in finish and patch work. I have also done patio paver work and painting, but almost nothing involved with wood working, electrical, or plumbing. I will be redoing the drywall on the kitchen/dining ceiling, the entire unfinished garage, and one of the bathrooms for now.

So what are some of the favorite fixes or additions all of you have done that you feel really makes a difference? We are going to add a small home gym to the 1.5 car garage after I finish it and create outdoor spaces in the front 20'x10' concrete slab and 22'x18' concrete slab, with roofed cover in the side/back yard. Right now they are good spaces but filled with way to much clutter and junk to look nice. 

Any ideas, equipment, or items that people love, especially for the patios would be appreciated. Only thing I know is for certain is we are adding over head string lighting to the outside patios. 

 

First of all, congrats GB! Second, post some pics, especially of the outdoor areas to help with suggestions.

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3 minutes ago, Worm said:

First of all, congrats GB! Second, post some pics, especially of the outdoor areas to help with suggestions.

Thanks GB! I will do once it is confirmed. Today is the pest inspection and the past few days the loan got underwriting and we got fire insurance in our price range, which is a huge deal here because of the Camp Fire last year. 

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Question

 

My 'through the wall' air conditioner died.  Pulled the beast out (must have been 90 pounds), but a new one in.  The new one is smaller so reframed the opening, installed last night.  Pitched it to the back as you are supposed to.  Need some patching and trim work on the inside, but from the inside it's nearly there.  Nice install, gaps are only 1/8" or less

 

Now the outside.  Vinyl siding - I bought replacement vinyl and will be replacing a few sections.  I have never done j-channel but will learn and do it.  My plan is as follows:

 

-Add backer rod foam around the perimeter and a sealant behind the backer rod.  

-Then add a wpb (ie housewrap) around the new area, overlap with existing and use tyvek tape to seal.  

-Then add some flashing (peel and stick) 6" tape to the top and sides to help protect against water infiltration

-Install siding including j channel around A/C sleeve

 

Here's my questions:

-Anything I am missing?  Is order of operations correct?

-Went looking for housewrap, Depot sells Tvyek in rolls of 100 feet for $30-40, and the Tyvek tape for $15.  I don't need 100 feet, I need 10 feet.  Any better option?

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45 minutes ago, wilked said:

 

-Went looking for housewrap, Depot sells Tvyek in rolls of 100 feet for $30-40, and the Tyvek tape for $15.  I don't need 100 feet, I need 10 feet.  Any better option?

Know any contractors? They always have scraps around. Also my try roofing felt, if you can get a small amount, since you have such a small area to cover.

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In the process of converting one of my kitchen drawers into a paper towel holder/dispenser (so no longer sitting on countertop taking up space and being ugly). 

Almost complete and pretty sweet.  Bonus is that the depth of the drawer allows to store 4 rolls behind the active roll (so this one drawer holds 5 total thick rolls of paper towel). Looks cool, very functional and saves on lots of paper storage space normally in laundry closet. 

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49 minutes ago, offdee said:

In the process of converting one of my kitchen drawers into a paper towel holder/dispenser (so no longer sitting on countertop taking up space and being ugly). 

Almost complete and pretty sweet.  Bonus is that the depth of the drawer allows to store 4 rolls behind the active roll (so this one drawer holds 5 total thick rolls of paper towel). Looks cool, very functional and saves on lots of paper storage space normally in laundry closet. 

how many command hooks did this project use take that to the bank bromigo

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2 hours ago, offdee said:

In the process of converting one of my kitchen drawers into a paper towel holder/dispenser (so no longer sitting on countertop taking up space and being ugly). 

Almost complete and pretty sweet.  Bonus is that the depth of the drawer allows to store 4 rolls behind the active roll (so this one drawer holds 5 total thick rolls of paper towel). Looks cool, very functional and saves on lots of paper storage space normally in laundry closet. 

Bonus is that when someone visits and makes a spill they won’t use your paper towels and be forced to use their sleeve 

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After almost four years of planning, designing, dealing with ####### neighbor and building, we are finally scheduled to move into our new house this weekend. 

It's been a huge pain in the ###, but the equity that we are going to have being our own developer is going to be worth the pain that we have endured. 

Can't wait. 

Our house

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5 hours ago, wilked said:

Bonus is that when someone visits and makes a spill they won’t use your paper towels and be forced to use their sleeve 

Ah no, guess I didn’t explain all that well...the paper towel is still open and exposed.  A version of this....

https://makespace.com/blog/posts/kitchen-storage-hacks-solutions/paper-towel-dispenser-kitchen-drawer-hack/

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4 hours ago, McJose said:

Was that something that really needed to be "hacked"?

Yes.  I hate bulky crap on the countertop and ultimately this drawer is now a storage center for 5 total huge rolls of paper towel that normally took up the space of a full shelf in a pantry. I can find a different place for the 5 hand towels that used to be in this drawer. 

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2 hours ago, offdee said:

Yes.  I hate bulky crap on the countertop and ultimately this drawer is now a storage center for 5 total huge rolls of paper towel that normally took up the space of a full shelf in a pantry. I can find a different place for the 5 hand towels that used to be in this drawer. 

Nice.

I, too, hate things on the counter that I use multiple times a day.

Next week i’m cutting a hole in my splashboard to hide my kitchen faucet.  Should go well with the hinged section of countertop I handcarved to hide the sink itself.

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51 minutes ago, McJose said:

Nice.

I, too, hate things on the counter that I use multiple times a day.

Next week i’m cutting a hole in my splashboard to hide my kitchen faucet.  Should go well with the hinged section of countertop I handcarved to hide the sink itself.

Pics when done! 

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On 8/22/2019 at 10:24 AM, wilked said:

Question

 

My 'through the wall' air conditioner died.  Pulled the beast out (must have been 90 pounds), but a new one in.  The new one is smaller so reframed the opening, installed last night.  Pitched it to the back as you are supposed to.  Need some patching and trim work on the inside, but from the inside it's nearly there.  Nice install, gaps are only 1/8" or less

 

Now the outside.  Vinyl siding - I bought replacement vinyl and will be replacing a few sections.  I have never done j-channel but will learn and do it.  My plan is as follows:

 

-Add backer rod foam around the perimeter and a sealant behind the backer rod.  

-Then add a wpb (ie housewrap) around the new area, overlap with existing and use tyvek tape to seal.  

-Then add some flashing (peel and stick) 6" tape to the top and sides to help protect against water infiltration

-Install siding including j channel around A/C sleeve

 

Here's my questions:

-Anything I am missing?  Is order of operations correct?

-Went looking for housewrap, Depot sells Tvyek in rolls of 100 feet for $30-40, and the Tyvek tape for $15.  I don't need 100 feet, I need 10 feet.  Any better option?

Finished this project. Fairly proud of myself, was a lot of work and things I hadn’t done before. All that’s left is filling a few nail holes and touch up paint. 

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So next project...  when I converted my attic to living space I put in a new bathroom. Had the roofers put on a vent boot, plumber was finishing his work on a Thursday (including vent pipe) as I was getting the rafters spray framed on a Friday. 

 

Plumber calls me thurs eve (I got a hotel out of town to be away from the spray foaming) and says his vent pipe didn’t feel right going through, normally he feels some resistance from the boot (classic hot dog in a hallway syndrome). Says we will figure it out later. Like a dummy I left it at that. 

 

Put in solar over the summer and solar guys are like, you got a big gap around your vent pipe, likely rain coming in. Guy must have sent a 1.5 vent pipe up and roofers put in a 3” boot. 

 

So planning to go up on the roof and put a sleeve over it the correct size (basically this https://images.homedepot-static.com/productImages/626c2a14-8298-4cf9-9960-8dfda29beb58/svn/perma-boot-vent-pipe-flashing-pbr-312-2bk-64_1000.jpg )

 

where t gets fun is the roof edge is 20 feet up and the roof is nearly 45 (10/12). My buddy had a harness, gonna send a rope up and over the other side of roof and tie off to a radiator through a window. 

 

If you don’t hear from me again, you know why 

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16 hours ago, Senor Schmutzig said:

After almost four years of planning, designing, dealing with ####### neighbor and building, we are finally scheduled to move into our new house this weekend. 

It's been a huge pain in the ###, but the equity that we are going to have being our own developer is going to be worth the pain that we have endured. 

Can't wait. 

Our house

What an amazing looking place. Where are you guys? Any more detail on the process?

Really impressive.

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Demo guy stopped by last night to confirm he will start taking out my garage and pool next week.  :pickle:

Will take some before pictures this weekend.  It is disgusting right now with all the weed growing through the cracks around the pool  Will be SO nice to be gone.  Will have to start looking for a fire pit plan.

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