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Dynasty & Redraft: WR Breshad Perriman, Lions


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@PFF_Steve: Breshad Perriman by Route pic.twitter.com/Zj4uxXWeTt

https://twitter.com/PFF_Steve/status/580805576617246720

14% drop rate...

Rotoworld take:

UCF WR Breshad Perriman recorded a drop rate of 14 percent during the 2014 season, according to College Football Focus.

Drops are always subjective, but PFF sides on the receiver's side when charting NFL games. As does Rotoworld's Greg Peshek. To come up with the figure, CFF added catches (50) plus drops (8) to find the catchable passes number. Perriman posted a blazing forty time and did his best work on vertical routes. Poor dropped rates carried over from the 2013 season to rookie's first NFL seasons last year. Josh Norris recently mocked Perriman to the Browns at No. 19.

Source: Steve Palazzolo on Twitter

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No way I could put OBJ in my championship line up after the turd he’s been all year. I actually cut him two weeks ago to avoid this decision. I hope he works out for you if you start him, but Perriman

Where the heck was all this for the past 5 years when I drafted you in the 1st round of my rookie draft.  Do nothing for 4 and 3/4 years and then explode.

Yeesh. Who do you like in this draft at WR? 

Cooper and Parker are better off the line. White I'm not sure. I've seen him do it well but not enough.

I'd love to track down some footage of Perriman facing CBs with enough guts to stand in and actually challenge him at the LOS, but I haven't. Perriman has the speed and explosiveness that puts timid DBs on their heals. UCF threw a ton of 9 routes to him so it was a valid fear.

@PFF_Steve: Breshad Perriman by Route pic.twitter.com/Zj4uxXWeTthttps://twitter.com/PFF_Steve/status/580805576617246720

14% drop rate...

Rotoworld take:

UCF WR Breshad Perriman recorded a drop rate of 14 percent during the 2014 season, according to College Football Focus.Drops are always subjective, but PFF sides on the receiver's side when charting NFL games. As does Rotoworld's Greg Peshek. To come up with the figure, CFF added catches (50) plus drops (8) to find the catchable passes number. Perriman posted a blazing forty time and did his best work on vertical routes. Poor dropped rates carried over from the 2013 season to rookie's first NFL seasons last year. Josh Norris recently mocked Perriman to the Browns at No. 19.

Source: Steve Palazzolo on Twitter

So, 25% of his targets were on 9 routes. That's very high.
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Who thinks Coates is stiff? I don't. I think Coates and Perriman are similar prospects. Both raw but extremely athletic. Both sudden off the line and able to destroy a cushion. Both unreliable hands, but for different reasons. Both sloppy routes. Boom/bust guys IMO.

That's pretty much how I see the 2 as well. I currently have them ranked at #14 and #16 respectively. Coates has a higher ceiling to me. But this is the Perriman thread.

When I say stiff I mean it in regards to the way a player cuts. If the routes are rounded, that's either 1. They haven't learned the best technique to run that route. 2. They physically can't get to the top, sink, and move (ie. stiff)

What you're describing isn't called "stiff". It's just lack of suddenness.

White has a lower center of gravity, yet he doesn't cut that well in his routes either. So what is he? Stiff, too? White doesn't show the kind of hip/torso fluidity as Perriman, but Perriman is considered "stiff"? What does that make White? Sammie Coates cuts sharper than Perriman. Does that make Coates "not stiff"? Yet people refer to Coates as "stiff".

It's my description of stiff and that's how I view it... why are you trying to argue my point of view on a trait? You may be right with White not having the hip/torso "fluidity" as you call it (I honestly haven't noticed it), but that's not my interpretation of "stiff". It has nothing to do with White or Coates being called "stiff". I never said anything like that. Coates and White are 3x the athlete on the field than Perriman.

I do wish there was more videos I could see of Perriman. I think I have a pretty good grasp on what he is, but the more information the better obviously.

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Who thinks Coates is stiff? I don't. I think Coates and Perriman are similar prospects. Both raw but extremely athletic. Both sudden off the line and able to destroy a cushion. Both unreliable hands, but for different reasons. Both sloppy routes. Boom/bust guys IMO.

That's pretty much how I see the 2 as well. I currently have them ranked at #14 and #16 respectively. Coates has a higher ceiling to me. But this is the Perriman thread.

When I say stiff I mean it in regards to the way a player cuts. If the routes are rounded, that's either 1. They haven't learned the best technique to run that route. 2. They physically can't get to the top, sink, and move (ie. stiff)

What you're describing isn't called "stiff". It's just lack of suddenness.

White has a lower center of gravity, yet he doesn't cut that well in his routes either. So what is he? Stiff, too? White doesn't show the kind of hip/torso fluidity as Perriman, but Perriman is considered "stiff"? What does that make White? Sammie Coates cuts sharper than Perriman. Does that make Coates "not stiff"? Yet people refer to Coates as "stiff".

It's my description of stiff and that's how I view it... why are you trying to argue my point of view on a trait? You may be right with White not having the hip/torso "fluidity" as you call it (I honestly haven't noticed it), but that's not my interpretation of "stiff". It has nothing to do with White or Coates being called "stiff". I never said anything like that. Coates and White are 3x the athlete on the field than Perriman.

I do wish there was more videos I could see of Perriman. I think I have a pretty good grasp on what he is, but the more information the better obviously.

You're going to confuse a lot of people with your definition of "stiff". How can Perriman be your "stiff" and my "fluid" at the same time? A player can be stiff and show what you've described. They can also be fluid and show it.

How are Coates and White better athletes on the field?

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We could probably go back and forth using different words each time and still not be describing the same thing ha.

Anyways Coats and White, don't have an awkward look to them, while Perriman does. His game doesn't look natural to me. It's probably a variety of things, but what I notice the most is how he runs with the ball is incredibly wavy than jagged, and I do not like thatt. Both White and Coates seem to time their jumps better (along with high pointing it), and play in space much better than Perriman. More so White than Coates. I'm splitting hairs when it comes to Coates and Perriman though, but if I'm taking a deep threat I'd rather have Coates than Perriman.

Again it's just what I see when I watch their videos, I'm just giving my opinion and I doubt I'm going to change your mind. You seem to enjoy constantly questioning me with how I see things, but it's just how I see it... My eyes don't describe it, my words do and they fail half the time.

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We could probably go back and forth using different words each time and still not be describing the same thing ha.

Anyways Coats and White, don't have an awkward look to them, while Perriman does. His game doesn't look natural to me. It's probably a variety of things, but what I notice the most is how he runs with the ball is incredibly wavy than jagged, and I do not like thatt. Both White and Coates seem to time their jumps better (along with high pointing it), and play in space much better than Perriman. More so White than Coates. I'm splitting hairs when it comes to Coates and Perriman though, but if I'm taking a deep threat I'd rather have Coates than Perriman.

Again it's just what I see when I watch their videos, I'm just giving my opinion and I doubt I'm going to change your mind. You seem to enjoy constantly questioning me with how I see things, but it's just how I see it... My eyes don't describe it, my words do and they fail half the time.

I'm the opposite, actually--at least when it comes to Perriman/Coates. Coates looks awkward to me, while Perriman looks like better football player. I don't watch or know enough to comment on his routes, beyond what I've read, but from the clips--Perriman looks very fluid and natural.

Perriman plays like Dez and Coates plays like TO, to my eyes. Obviously, I am not projecting that either match the production--and TO could do a lot more than Coates has shown. But Bryant is fluid and natural and TO, while obviously very effective, had some awkwardness to his game. He always looked like a guy who got by on his freak physical gifts, rather than natural football ability.

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We could probably go back and forth using different words each time and still not be describing the same thing ha.

Anyways Coats and White, don't have an awkward look to them, while Perriman does. His game doesn't look natural to me. It's probably a variety of things, but what I notice the most is how he runs with the ball is incredibly wavy than jagged, and I do not like thatt. Both White and Coates seem to time their jumps better (along with high pointing it), and play in space much better than Perriman. More so White than Coates. I'm splitting hairs when it comes to Coates and Perriman though, but if I'm taking a deep threat I'd rather have Coates than Perriman.

Again it's just what I see when I watch their videos, I'm just giving my opinion and I doubt I'm going to change your mind. You seem to enjoy constantly questioning me with how I see things, but it's just how I see it... My eyes don't describe it, my words do and they fail half the time.

I'm the opposite, actually--at least when it comes to Perriman/Coates. Coates looks awkward to me, while Perriman looks like better football player. I don't watch or know enough to comment on his routes, beyond what I've read, but from the clips--Perriman looks very fluid and natural.

Perriman plays like Dez and Coates plays like TO, to my eyes. Obviously, I am not projecting that either match the production--and TO could do a lot more than Coates has shown. But Bryant is fluid and natural and TO, while obviously very effective, had some awkwardness to his game. He always looked like a guy who got by on his freak physical gifts, rather than natural football ability.

Not trying to nitpick, but I don't think Perriman plays like Dez at all. Dez most dominating trait is his "my ball" mentality and the way he attacks catching passes. Perriman is timid in this area IMO. He doesn't high point well, mistimes jumps. He also doesn't work back to the ball in his routes like I pointed out before. Dez is a great hands catcher, part of how he attacks the ball so well. Perriman lets the ball into his body and waits on a lot of passes causing double clutch catches, bobbles, ect.
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We could probably go back and forth using different words each time and still not be describing the same thing ha.

Anyways Coats and White, don't have an awkward look to them, while Perriman does. His game doesn't look natural to me. It's probably a variety of things, but what I notice the most is how he runs with the ball is incredibly wavy than jagged, and I do not like thatt. Both White and Coates seem to time their jumps better (along with high pointing it), and play in space much better than Perriman. More so White than Coates. I'm splitting hairs when it comes to Coates and Perriman though, but if I'm taking a deep threat I'd rather have Coates than Perriman.

Again it's just what I see when I watch their videos, I'm just giving my opinion and I doubt I'm going to change your mind. You seem to enjoy constantly questioning me with how I see things, but it's just how I see it... My eyes don't describe it, my words do and they fail half the time.

I'm the opposite, actually--at least when it comes to Perriman/Coates. Coates looks awkward to me, while Perriman looks like better football player. I don't watch or know enough to comment on his routes, beyond what I've read, but from the clips--Perriman looks very fluid and natural.

Perriman plays like Dez and Coates plays like TO, to my eyes. Obviously, I am not projecting that either match the production--and TO could do a lot more than Coates has shown. But Bryant is fluid and natural and TO, while obviously very effective, had some awkwardness to his game. He always looked like a guy who got by on his freak physical gifts, rather than natural football ability.

Not trying to nitpick, but I don't think Perriman plays like Dez at all. Dez most dominating trait is his "my ball" mentality and the way he attacks catching passes. Perriman is timid in this area IMO. He doesn't high point well, mistimes jumps. He also doesn't work back to the ball in his routes like I pointed out before. Dez is a great hands catcher, part of how he attacks the ball so well. Perriman lets the ball into his body and waits on a lot of passes causing double clutch catches, bobbles, ect.

My comp for Perriman is Alshon Jeffery, with some Roddy White.

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Rotoworld:

Breshad Perriman - WR - Knights

UCF WR Breshad Perriman ranked as the No. 3 receiver in the class according to Football Outsiders' Playmaker Score.

"Perriman was a consistently productive receiver for the Knights, including a stellar junior season despite a huge drop-off at quarterback from Blake Bortles to Justin Holman," wrote FO's Nathan Forster. "Perriman enters the draft as an underclassman, has an impressive 19.5 yards per catch average, and his other Playmaker numbers are solid. He put up 40-yard times of 4.24 and 4.27 at his pro day on Wednesday." The system offered Kenny Britt and Darrell Jackson as similar historical prospects to Perriman. College Football Focus recently passed along that Perriman recorded a drop rate of 14 percent during the 2014 season. Josh Norris mocks Perriman to the Browns at No. 19.

Source: ESPN Insider

Mar 29 - 8:42 PM

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SI 64: Nos. 64-60: Breshad Perriman, Cedric Ogbuehi, Ronald Darby, more

Excerpt:

62. Breshad Perriman, WR, UCF

Bio: The son of Brett Perriman, who caught 525 passes and gained over 6,500 yards for four different NFL teams, Breshad Perriman is a different player than his dad. He's bigger (6'2", 212 to 5'10", 180) and more of an outside receiver. The younger Perriman took a little while to get up to speed, catching 26 passes in 2012 and 39 in '13, but he really broke it open last season with 50 catches for 1,044 yards and nine touchdowns. There's work to be done before Perriman will be able to match UCF alum Brandon Marshall in overall productivity, but the potential is there.

Strengths: As his career 19.5 yards-per-catch average implies, Perriman is an outstanding deep threat. But he's also adept at using his size and cut ability to get under coverage on slants and drags. Has a long wingspan that he knows how to use to beat close coverage for contested catches. Can be really tough to beat on 50/50 balls. Runs out of the snap well and digs his foot in to start a route. Big and physical enough to deal with press coverage, able to gain consistent yards after the catch. Could be a huge upside player for a team patient enough to deal with the raw spots in his palette.

Weaknesses: High-waisted player who gets a bit sluggish in his breaks at times—is not a sudden mover except in a straight line. May not have the pure burst and acceleration needed to be a top-class receiver; could be better cast as a complementary threat in an NFL passing game, though this could be partially countered with technique fixes. Will need to round out his route knowledge in the NFL. Must gain a better sense of concentration in traffic, and he must use his body better to avoid being re-directed too often.

Conclusion: Perriman made his biggest splash in the court of public opinion when he ran a sub-4.3 40 at his pro day, but as they say, it's important to go back to the tape—and he doesn't always play to that speed. That said, there's enough on the tape to make one wonder if, in the right environment and given the proper tools, Perriman might not wind up as the best receiver in this draft class. It's a longshot, but he flashes that potential from time to time.

Pro Comparison: Sidney Rice, Vikings/Seahawks (2nd round, Vikings, 2007)

Edited by Faust
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Perriman debuts in Top 32 ranks

Excerpt:

Wide receiver is one of the strongest position groups in the 2015 draft class, and a sixth receiver makes our top 32 rankings this week: UCF's Breshad Perriman.

To be clear, I'm not moving up Perriman simply based off of his pro-day workout last week, which included 40-yard dash times of 4.24 and 4.27 -- faster than any prospect produced at this year's NFL combine -- although those times certainly verify the speed and explosiveness he has shown on the field. I also completed his tape evaluation, and he appeared to improve upon his biggest weakness -- his inconsistent ball skills -- as the season went on. He still needs to get better in this area, but he is a serious threat as a big-play receiver due to his size-speed combo and the ability to come down with difficult catches.

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Rotoworld:

UCF WR Breshad Perriman moved up in NFL Media analyst Mike Mayock's position rankings into a dead heat for the No. 4 receiver slot.

Perriman ran a ridiculous 4.25 40-yard dash at his pro day last week, pushing his value in Mayock's estimation into a tie with Louisville's DeVante Parker. Mayock believes White, Cooper and Perriman and Parker will go in the top 20 of the draft while Arizona State's Jaelen Strong will go at the bottom of the first round. Perriman ranked as the No. 3 receiver in the class according to Football Outsiders' Playmaker Score metric.
Source: NFL.com
Mar 31 - 7:09 PM
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Mel Kiper has Perriman ahead of Parker on his big board now. Does everybody still think it's an absolutely ridiculous claim that he could be a top 6 rookie pick this year in dynasty?

He's a better prospect than Jordan Matthews was, who went in the top 4-6.

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Mel Kiper has Perriman ahead of Parker on his big board now. Does everybody still think it's an absolutely ridiculous claim that he could be a top 6 rookie pick this year in dynasty?

There is a grumbling that Kiper is a mouthpiece for Rosenhaus clients. Dunno how much stock to put in it, but he's talking up Dorsett as well.

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Mel Kiper has Perriman ahead of Parker on his big board now. Does everybody still think it's an absolutely ridiculous claim that he could be a top 6 rookie pick this year in dynasty?

He's a better prospect than Jordan Matthews was, who went in the top 4-6.

I don't agree but even if he is we're talking about two different drafts so it's hard to judge value across drafts. I mean the 10th best prospect in one draft could be better than the 3rd best prospect in another. I do like Perriman though. Not as much as Parker but with his measurables he's ahead DGB for me as a prospect due to DGB's off the field red flags.

Edited by Milkman
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Mel Kiper has Perriman ahead of Parker on his big board now. Does everybody still think it's an absolutely ridiculous claim that he could be a top 6 rookie pick this year in dynasty?

There is a grumbling that Kiper is a mouthpiece for Rosenhaus clients. Dunno how much stock to put in it, but he's talking up Dorsett as well.

I think its ridiculous that Perriman would move to #9 on Kiper's board just because of his workout. Kiper's job 24/7/365 is college football, so how could one workout (not even a game) change his opinion so much on one player?? It's just a ridiculous reactionary ranking to me. If Perriman was that good, he should have been at 9 a LONG time ago.

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Mel Kiper has Perriman ahead of Parker on his big board now. Does everybody still think it's an absolutely ridiculous claim that he could be a top 6 rookie pick this year in dynasty?

Nope just me.

And me

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Mel Kiper has Perriman ahead of Parker on his big board now. Does everybody still think it's an absolutely ridiculous claim that he could be a top 6 rookie pick this year in dynasty?

There is a grumbling that Kiper is a mouthpiece for Rosenhaus clients. Dunno how much stock to put in it, but he's talking up Dorsett as well.

I think its ridiculous that Perriman would move to #9 on Kiper's board just because of his workout. Kiper's job 24/7/365 is college football, so how could one workout (not even a game) change his opinion so much on one player?? It's just a ridiculous reactionary ranking to me. If Perriman was that good, he should have been at 9 a LONG time ago.

In fairness to Kiper he has had Perriman a lot higher than most before he ran a 4.1-4.2 40. I hope you guys are right because I'm sitting at 1.09 and I won't pass him up. No chance he's there imo though.

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Rotoworld:

CBS Sports' Frank Cooney believes UCF WR Breshad Perriman is the best fit for the Ravens at No. 26 overall.

With Steve Smith and Marlon Brown sitting atop the depth chart, you know Baltimore is going to pop a receiver early. "Perriman might have put himself out of range for Baltimore after his 4.25 40-yard dash at his pro day, but his combination of size, speed and upside is an ideal fit in the Ravens' offense," Cooney wrote. Every CBS analyst has Baltimore taking a wide receiver at No. 26. Pete Prisco agrees on Perriman, Dane Brugler mocks Dorial Green-Beckham to Baltimore and Rob Rang currently sees the Ravens taking Jaelen Strong.
Source: CBS Sports
Apr 6 - 7:57 PM
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Rotoworld:

SI's Peter King says Central Florida WR Breshad Perriman has at least two teams in the teens "looking seriously at him."

Perriman's Pro Day times of 4.19 and 4.27 at 6'2/212 have his stock on the rise. Just about every team in the teens could use difference-making WR help, but the Dolphins (No. 14), 49ers (No. 15) and Browns (No. 19) stand out. Perriman is the son of ex-Lions WR Brett Perriman.
Source: SI.com
Apr 13 - 9:19 AM
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Rotoworld:

ESPN's Todd McShay writes that UCF WR Breshad Perriman's "ball skills concern me, specifically his high drop rate of 14 percent (anything above 8 percent worries me with prospects) and the fact that he doesn't appear to be a natural pass-catcher."

"The reason for his big-time elevation on our draft board is his ability to make plays down the field," McShay wrote. Perriman, who posted 40-yard dash times of 4.24 and 4.27 at his pro day, ranked as the No. 3 receiver in the class according to Football Outsiders' Playmaker Score metric.
Apr 14 - 7:58 PM
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Rotoworld:

Breshad Perriman - WR - Knights

UCF WR Breshad Perriman "is a big, fast, strong receiver with a great attitude who seems to be just getting the grasp of things, which should be a scary thought for all NFL defensive backs under 6-feet or slower than 4.25 seconds in 40 yards," according to NFLDraftScout.com's Frank Cooney.

"Perriman continues to show improvement as he learns to harness his rare combination of size and speed," Cooney wrote. "Excellent pick with upside." The 6-foot-2, 209-pounder Perriman, who posted 40-yard dash times of 4.24 and 4.27 at his pro day, is the son of 10-year NFL veteran wide receiver Brett Perriman. "As a big receiver you have to go up and get the ball at its highest point, you have to be able to wall off defenders, you have to be able to block and you have to be able to also kind of shrink your mentality as a smaller receiver as well," Perriman said at combine when asked how being a big receiver helps him.

Source: CBS Sports

Apr 17 - 7:04 PM

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Rotoworld:

An NFL analytics staffer said he wouldn't rank UCF WR Breshad Perriman as high as Mel Kiper [No. 9 overall] for three reasons.

Those reasons? The staffer said Perriman dropped too many balls, has a troublesome injury history and doesn't run as fast on the field as he does on the track. Perriman, who posted 40-yard dash times of 4.24 and 4.27 at his pro day, ranked as the No. 3 receiver in the class according to Football Outsiders' Playmaker Score metric, which compared him to Kenny Britt and Darrell Jackson. Perriman put up stats with and without Blake Bortles, it's important to note.
Apr 21 - 8:01 PM
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Boy, this guy is going to be a top 5-6 rookie dynasty pick in a month (maybe it's just me but seems like he came out of nowhere).

He really stands out, when looking at him on Draft Breakdown. 'Who's that big dude running away from everyone?'

Might not play to 4.2 fast, but he's fast.

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Boy, this guy is going to be a top 5-6 rookie dynasty pick in a month (maybe it's just me but seems like he came out of nowhere).

He really stands out, when looking at him on Draft Breakdown. 'Who's that big dude running away from everyone?'

Might not play to 4.2 fast, but he's fast.

I can see how the speed really reels people in. I understand it. I guess I was just commenting because I'm always fascinated by these guys that come out of the blue, seemingly. It's hard to know the difference between when someone uncovers a real nugget Vs. how we tend to get into this groove where everyone is tired of talking about the obvious talent and so we start pulling new names into the discussion.

If 80% of this draft is what its been built up to be, it might be one of the best, from top to bottom, I can recall.

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Boy, this guy is going to be a top 5-6 rookie dynasty pick in a month (maybe it's just me but seems like he came out of nowhere).

I don't understand this thinking. He was considered what a late 2nd-3rd round pick before his 40 time? How can you catapult someone up that up high just because he's "fast?" I won't touch him til the mid 2nd, so he can be someone else's problem.

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No mention of DHB in this thread?

He actually came to my mind but I admittedly don't know enough about Perriman to make that connection.

There's only two games on Draftbreakdown so it's difficult to get a true sense. He looks like he tracks the ball better than DHB but still has the same easy drops. Same limited route runner.

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My comp for Perriman is Alshon Jeffery, with some Roddy White.

Jeffery I don't agree with - he was a monster before he got lazy.

White I can see, but he was a disappointment his first couple of years in the NFL.

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We could probably go back and forth using different words each time and still not be describing the same thing ha.

Anyways Coats and White, don't have an awkward look to them, while Perriman does. His game doesn't look natural to me. It's probably a variety of things, but what I notice the most is how he runs with the ball is incredibly wavy than jagged, and I do not like thatt. Both White and Coates seem to time their jumps better (along with high pointing it), and play in space much better than Perriman. More so White than Coates. I'm splitting hairs when it comes to Coates and Perriman though, but if I'm taking a deep threat I'd rather have Coates than Perriman.

Again it's just what I see when I watch their videos, I'm just giving my opinion and I doubt I'm going to change your mind. You seem to enjoy constantly questioning me with how I see things, but it's just how I see it... My eyes don't describe it, my words do and they fail half the time.

One of the things that took me a long time to accept is that it's difficult to develop a guy in the NFL who is not a natural receiver. Some guys have 'it', others don't.

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Rotoworld:

Breshad Perriman - WR - Knights

NFL Media's Gil Brandt ranks UCF WR Breshad Perriman as the No. 10 overall prospect in this class, with Louisville WR DeVante Parker at No. 11.

The ranking is only one spot apart, but it is noteworthy to point out whenever Perriman is ranked before Parker as it breaks groupthink. Brandt lists Amari Cooper (3) as the top receiver and Kevin White second (4). Jaelen Strong rounds out the top five at No. 21 overall.

Source: NFL.com

Apr 23 - 2:03 PM

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  • Faust changed the title to Dynasty & Redraft: WR Breshad Perriman, Lions

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