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Football Menace

Must haves for a new puppy (Doberman)

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Going pick up our pup this Saturday. I haven't had a dog in 20 years. We have all the basics food, crate, food and water bowls, etc. What I'm looking for is the less obvious, cool things that the more experienced dog owner can tell me about. I'm in Pet Smart right now. Help a FBG out.

Edited by Football Menace

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Natures Miracle TONS of toys to chew on. Every time he/she goes to chew on something it shouldn't, you must replace it with a toy"potty pads" for the crateLong training leash (something about 10-20ft)Dog Training Clickersmall training treats

Edited by Buddy Ball 2K3

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1) Clicker2) Harness / Leash3) Tug toys4) Antlers5) Bells

Edited by Cliff Clavin

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kong or somehting similarId tag (may be obvious)carpet cleaner water "bowl" that attaches to crate

Edited by JoeSteeler

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Natures Miracle TONS of toys to chew on. Every time he/she goes to chew on something it shouldn't, you must replace it with a toy"potty pads" for the crateLong training leash (something about 10-20ft)Dog Training Clickersmall training treats

Potty pads in the crate are a very bad idea... Edited by Cliff Clavin

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Natures Miracle TONS of toys to chew on. Every time he/she goes to chew on something it shouldn't, you must replace it with a toy"potty pads" for the crateLong training leash (something about 10-20ft)Dog Training Clickersmall training treats

What are "potty pads" for the crate? Are these pads to help teach the dog to go to the bathroom in their crate? Why would you want to teach a dog to go to the bathroom inside?

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I assume the clicker is for clicker training, right? Is this something that's easier to do versus regular training. Could you go into more detail. Chew toys and treats are a must. Thanks.

Edited by Football Menace

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shampoo brush

Edited by JoeSteeler

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Everybody's got this covered, I'll just say, if you want rawhides (and I'd suggest it), they end up being much cheaper at Sam's (probably Costco too, but I've never been there).But yeah, if you've got a crate, food, and a bowl, then a leash, collar, ID tag, clicker and a bunch of stuff to chew would be the basics. I've got a Dobie mix. If your fella ends up anything like mine, you'll have to be pretty particular about chew toys. Anything with stuffing is a waste of money. Ropes won't survive either (chews in half and dismantles them down to the individual fibers). He doesn't destroy tennis balls very quickly though. Maybe he loves them too much. Eh, just buy a boatload of different toys and you'll figure out what he's into and will/won't destroy soon enough.And if you don't get his tail docked, go ahead and get a cup for yourself and any other men in the house.

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shampoo brush

He's getting a Doberman, those aren't mandatory. Might end up needing them, but there's a decent chance he won't.

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I assume the clicker is for clicker training, right? Is this something that's easier to do versus regular training. Could you go into more detail. Chew toys and treats are a must. Thanks.

Yes, it is an aid in training. It is, IMO, the easiest way to train. Not sure what you mean by regular training. Clicker training is pretty simple. When you get the action you want, you click immediately, then reward. The clicker is a marker/replacement for your voice. Its a quick, consistent sound compared to your voice. Google clicker training and check out some videos on youtube; a lot better articles out there than me trying to explain it. You don't need to buy the overpriced garbage treats from Pet Smart. Cheerios, cheese and/or hot dogs are much cheaper and healthier for your dog.

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Natures Miracle TONS of toys to chew on. Every time he/she goes to chew on something it shouldn't, you must replace it with a toy"potty pads" for the crateLong training leash (something about 10-20ft)Dog Training Clickersmall training treats

What are "potty pads" for the crate? Are these pads to help teach the dog to go to the bathroom in their crate? Why would you want to teach a dog to go to the bathroom inside?
The potty pads in the crate are for when he sleeps at night (unless you are not going to keep him in there at night) and when you go to work. We have 3 dogs and used potty pads in their crate every single time. We had to crate the dogs during the day and they learned to go on the pad and not anywhere else in the crate. Can't imagine not doing it. The dogs now have full run of the house during the day with zero issues. Edited by Buddy Ball 2K3

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shampoo brush

He's getting a Doberman, those aren't mandatory. Might end up needing them, but there's a decent chance he won't.
cool. have two labs so that is what i know.

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Stop by Costco and pick up a case of paper towels on the way home.

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Natures Miracle TONS of toys to chew on. Every time he/she goes to chew on something it shouldn't, you must replace it with a toy"potty pads" for the crateLong training leash (something about 10-20ft)Dog Training Clickersmall training treats

What are "potty pads" for the crate? Are these pads to help teach the dog to go to the bathroom in their crate? Why would you want to teach a dog to go to the bathroom inside?
The potty pads in the crate are for when he sleeps at night (unless you are not going to keep him in there at night) and when you go to work. We have 3 dogs and used potty pads in their crate every single time. We had to crate the dogs during the day and they learned to go on the pad and not anywhere else in the crate. Can't imagine not doing it. The dogs now have full run of the house during the day with zero issues.
I was always told that dogs do not go to the bathroom where they sleep, so we always got a crate that fit the current size of the dog and gave her enough room to stand up and move around, but if she laid down she had enough room to stretch out and that was about it. Never had a problem either. Putting a "potty pad" in the crate seems to defeat this purpose.I guess whatever method works, works. Edited by collective

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Natures Miracle TONS of toys to chew on. Every time he/she goes to chew on something it shouldn't, you must replace it with a toy"potty pads" for the crateLong training leash (something about 10-20ft)Dog Training Clickersmall training treats

What are "potty pads" for the crate? Are these pads to help teach the dog to go to the bathroom in their crate? Why would you want to teach a dog to go to the bathroom inside?
The potty pads in the crate are for when he sleeps at night (unless you are not going to keep him in there at night) and when you go to work. We have 3 dogs and used potty pads in their crate every single time. We had to crate the dogs during the day and they learned to go on the pad and not anywhere else in the crate. Can't imagine not doing it. The dogs now have full run of the house during the day with zero issues.
I was always told that dogs do not go to the bathroom where they sleep, so we always got a crate that fit the current size of the dog and gave her enough room to stand up and move around, but if she laid down she had enough room to stretch out and that was about it. Never had a problem either. Putting a "potty pad" in the crate seems to defeat this purpose.I guess whatever method works, works.
I am guessing its the size of the crate. We have very large crates so that the dogs can get up and walk around a bit in the crate. They had food, water, toys and an area to go. Were you able to stay at home all day with the puppy? I know when they are that young they need to go every couple of hours or so.

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Very jealous. I've been looking to get a doberman for like a year now but just can't justify it. My place is too small (condo) and nobody is home during the day. I know that dogs eventually get used to our schedule (our family golden had an iron bladder) but I would hate leaving him at home at the start. I'd probably have to run home at lunch every day which would be brutal

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Natures Miracle TONS of toys to chew on. Every time he/she goes to chew on something it shouldn't, you must replace it with a toy"potty pads" for the crateLong training leash (something about 10-20ft)Dog Training Clickersmall training treats

What are "potty pads" for the crate? Are these pads to help teach the dog to go to the bathroom in their crate? Why would you want to teach a dog to go to the bathroom inside?
The potty pads in the crate are for when he sleeps at night (unless you are not going to keep him in there at night) and when you go to work. We have 3 dogs and used potty pads in their crate every single time. We had to crate the dogs during the day and they learned to go on the pad and not anywhere else in the crate. Can't imagine not doing it. The dogs now have full run of the house during the day with zero issues.
I was always told that dogs do not go to the bathroom where they sleep, so we always got a crate that fit the current size of the dog and gave her enough room to stand up and move around, but if she laid down she had enough room to stretch out and that was about it. Never had a problem either. Putting a "potty pad" in the crate seems to defeat this purpose.I guess whatever method works, works.
I am guessing its the size of the crate. We have very large crates so that the dogs can get up and walk around a bit in the crate. They had food, water, toys and an area to go. Were you able to stay at home all day with the puppy? I know when they are that young they need to go every couple of hours or so.
Luckily I worked really close to home, so I was able to go home every three or four hours to let the dog out.

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shampoo brush

He's getting a Doberman, those aren't mandatory. Might end up needing them, but there's a decent chance he won't.
cool. have two labs so that is what i know.
I agree that he should probably still get them. If he ever needs to or wants to, it's a good idea for his dog to be used to being bathed and brushed. I haven't bathed or brushed mine in over 2 years though. I know and hate the smell of stinky dog. He just doesn't need it. We take him to a small lake where he loves to roll in the mud. 15 minutes later, the mud's dry and just wipes right off like it never happened. I love short-haired dogs.

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2 beds-- on for the crate, and one for your living/family room.. this way dog can hang with you and not on your lap..

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Conrats on the Dobie. We have 2 Doberman puppies. One is 9 months and the other is 1 year. They are a handful, but a joy at the same time.Whoever said the Kong is right on. Put some treats in there and a little of the spray peanut butter and your puppy will be occupied for quite some time.As to the ropes and soft toys... Whoever said they are a waste is absolutley correct. Our floors were covered in fibers and filling constantly.You will want to teach it to not play-bite as soon as you get it home. Their baby teeth are razor sharp and will slice your arm or anything else before you know it.I was against clicker training at first, but it does seem to be a better way to train. We take our to the local AKC for training.Most of all, enjoy the hell out of it!! They are the best dogs we've ever owned. They are naturally protective, though, and you'll want to begin socializing it immediately. Let it meet all the neighbors so it knows they aren't a threat and they know your puppy isn't a threat. People still have a stigma against Dobermans, even though most of the bad stuff has been bred out of them.Again, congratulations on a great choice.

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Conrats on the Dobie. We have 2 Doberman puppies. One is 9 months and the other is 1 year. They are a handful, but a joy at the same time.Whoever said the Kong is right on. Put some treats in there and a little of the spray peanut butter and your puppy will be occupied for quite some time.As to the ropes and soft toys... Whoever said they are a waste is absolutley correct. Our floors were covered in fibers and filling constantly.You will want to teach it to not play-bite as soon as you get it home. Their baby teeth are razor sharp and will slice your arm or anything else before you know it.I was against clicker training at first, but it does seem to be a better way to train. We take our to the local AKC for training.Most of all, enjoy the hell out of it!! They are the best dogs we've ever owned. They are naturally protective, though, and you'll want to begin socializing it immediately. Let it meet all the neighbors so it knows they aren't a threat and they know your puppy isn't a threat. People still have a stigma against Dobermans, even though most of the bad stuff has been bred out of them.Again, congratulations on a great choice.

We have a 11 year old dobie and got her as a puppy incredible dogs, smart, sweet and athletic. Very active, so make sure you are take her/him on lots of walks etc. Make sure you have a few fleece blankets, my dog is constantly sucking on them. Also, might want to get some binacca as I remember the days of teething and it helped slow down the biting.Also, they rip into stuff animals very quickly, so watch out for that. Get a dremil and get him or her used to doing nails early.I would also get a short lead, so he/she gets used to being with you.Do you have any kids? We have four, so might want to get some with some scent. Are you cropping ear? Edited by schlesinj

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2 beds-- on for the crate, and one for your living/family room.. this way dog can hang with you and not on your lap..

Forgot about the beds, thanks.

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If you're getting a puppy, you need a good carpet cleaner. http://www.petsmart.com/product/index.jsp?productId=13137149&f=PAD%2FpsNotAvailInUS%2FNoDon't know if it's the enzymes or whatever, but this stuff is like magic. You spray this directly on a pee stain, come back in a half hour and you won't even be able to find the original spot. No color, no smell. :thumbup:

Have you tried this on non-pet stains? Like if you spilled tea or soda or a beer?

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If you're getting a puppy, you need a good carpet cleaner. http://www.petsmart.com/product/index.jsp?productId=13137149&f=PAD%2FpsNotAvailInUS%2FNoDon't know if it's the enzymes or whatever, but this stuff is like magic. You spray this directly on a pee stain, come back in a half hour and you won't even be able to find the original spot. No color, no smell. :thumbup:

I built my house with the dog in mind, no carpet, all ceramic and hardwood.

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Natures Miracle TONS of toys to chew on. Every time he/she goes to chew on something it shouldn't, you must replace it with a toy"potty pads" for the crateLong training leash (something about 10-20ft)Dog Training Clickersmall training treats

Potty pads in the crate are a very bad idea...
:goodposting: We rescued a puppy that was being fostered and they put potty pads in the crate. Made it absolutely impossible to crate train.

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Conrats on the Dobie. We have 2 Doberman puppies. One is 9 months and the other is 1 year. They are a handful, but a joy at the same time.Whoever said the Kong is right on. Put some treats in there and a little of the spray peanut butter and your puppy will be occupied for quite some time.As to the ropes and soft toys... Whoever said they are a waste is absolutley correct. Our floors were covered in fibers and filling constantly.You will want to teach it to not play-bite as soon as you get it home. Their baby teeth are razor sharp and will slice your arm or anything else before you know it.I was against clicker training at first, but it does seem to be a better way to train. We take our to the local AKC for training.Most of all, enjoy the hell out of it!! They are the best dogs we've ever owned. They are naturally protective, though, and you'll want to begin socializing it immediately. Let it meet all the neighbors so it knows they aren't a threat and they know your puppy isn't a threat. People still have a stigma against Dobermans, even though most of the bad stuff has been bred out of them.Again, congratulations on a great choice.

:goodposting:We have owned Dobermans for the past 15 years, and they are awesome. Our current dog destroys soft toys and rope toys quickly, as others have said. But unlike our previous dog, she isn't very interested in rawhides or Kongs.Be careful in your choice of food. Whatever you do, do not choose Beneful. I recommend you check out the brands you are considering at www.dogfoodadvisor.com.Good luck and enjoy.ETA: More good advice above on starting early with the dremil (sp?). Also, I recommend joining a local Doberman club if available; that was invaluable to us while we were taping her ears early on.Also, it has been mentioned how much exercise they need. We take ours to doggie day care every week day so she can run and play all day. This also helps with socialization. It is expensive but worth it for us. Edited by Just Win Baby

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Cat.Provides excercise and an excellent chew toy.

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Conrats on the Dobie. We have 2 Doberman puppies. One is 9 months and the other is 1 year. They are a handful, but a joy at the same time.Whoever said the Kong is right on. Put some treats in there and a little of the spray peanut butter and your puppy will be occupied for quite some time.As to the ropes and soft toys... Whoever said they are a waste is absolutley correct. Our floors were covered in fibers and filling constantly.You will want to teach it to not play-bite as soon as you get it home. Their baby teeth are razor sharp and will slice your arm or anything else before you know it.I was against clicker training at first, but it does seem to be a better way to train. We take our to the local AKC for training.Most of all, enjoy the hell out of it!! They are the best dogs we've ever owned. They are naturally protective, though, and you'll want to begin socializing it immediately. Let it meet all the neighbors so it knows they aren't a threat and they know your puppy isn't a threat. People still have a stigma against Dobermans, even though most of the bad stuff has been bred out of them.Again, congratulations on a great choice.

:goodposting:We have owned Dobermans for the past 15 years, and they are awesome. Our current dog destroys soft toys and rope toys quickly, as others have said. But unlike our previous dog, she isn't very interested in rawhides or Kongs.Be careful in your choice of food. Whatever you do, do not choose Beneful. I recommend you check out the brands you are considering at www.dogfoodadvisor.com.Good luck and enjoy.ETA: More good advice above on starting early with the dremil (sp?). Also, I recommend joining a local Doberman club if available; that was invaluable to us while we were taping her ears early on.Also, it has been mentioned how much exercise they need. We take ours to doggie day care every week day so she can run and play all day. This also helps with socialization. It is expensive but worth it for us.
I've been doing a lot of research on foods, and the Diamond Naturals Large Breed Puppy is what we'll start off with. It gets high marks on dogfoodadvisor.com (No corn or BS fillers) and less expensive than some of the higher end brands.

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Taste of the Wild dog food Pronged collar when bigger Congrats!

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Our Dobies love the Chef Michaels...

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1) Clicker

2) Harness / Leash

3) Tug toys

4) Antlers

5) Bells

I'm certainly not a professional, but our Vet is... We got Elk antlers after reading another FFA thread. Once we told him what we had done he scolded us and told us not to let our girls have them, especially since they were so young, but also in general. Dobies have such strong bites their teeth are prone to breaking on those things. Rawhides are the best bet for teething and such. Again, I have no veterinary training, but our Vet is a Doberman expert.

Also, make sure you take your new puppy to the vet and check for Von Willebrand Disease. It's a bleeding disease that Dobies can be predisposed for. Reputable breeders will warranty and already have checked for this. Just because their parents don't have it doesn't mean yours doesn't. It can skip generations.

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1) Clicker

2) Harness / Leash

3) Tug toys

4) Antlers

5) Bells

I'm certainly not a professional, but our Vet is... We got Elk antlers after reading another FFA thread. Once we told him what we had done he scolded us and told us not to let our girls have them, especially since they were so young, but also in general. Dobies have such strong bites their teeth are prone to breaking on those things. Rawhides are the best bet for teething and such. Again, I have no veterinary training, but our Vet is a Doberman expert.

Also, make sure you take your new puppy to the vet and check for Von Willebrand Disease. It's a bleeding disease that Dobies can be predisposed for. Reputable breeders will warranty and already have checked for this. Just because their parents don't have it doesn't mean yours doesn't. It can skip generations.

First bad thing I've ever heard about them. Our vet and trainer says they are great. From other dog training messages boards (specifically, German Shepherds who have the 2nd strongest bite behind Rotties) they get great reviews.

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