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2019 NFL Combine News (1 Viewer)

Gandalf

Footballguy
Didn’t see a thread yet. Any news yet??? Schedule below:

Time, TV, and streaming info

Date: Feb. 26 - March 4

Time: 9 a.m. - 7 p.m. (March 1st, 3rd, and 4th) 10 a.m. - 7 p.m. (March 2)

Location: Lucas Oil Stadium, Indianapolis, Ind.

TV: NFL Network

Streaming: FuboTV, NFL

Groups 1 (PK, ST, OL), 2 (OL), and 3 (RB)

Tuesday, Feb. 26: Registration, hospital pre-exams, X-rays, overflow testing, orientation, interviews

Wednesday, Feb. 27: Measurements, medical examinations, overflow testing, interviews

Thursday, Feb. 28: Psychological testing, NFLPA meeting, media availability, bench press, interviews

Friday, March 1: On-field workouts (timing, stations, and drills) and departure from Indianapolis

Groups 4 (QB, WR), 5 (QB, WR), and 6 (TE)

Wednesday, Feb. 27: Registration, hospital pre-exams, X-rays, overflow testing, orientation, interviews

Thursday, Feb. 28:Measurements, medical examinations, overflow testing, interviews

Friday, March 1: Psychological testing, NFLPA meeting, media availability, bench press, interviews

Saturday, March 2: On-field workouts (timing, stations, and drills) and departure from Indianapolis

Groups 7 (DL), 8 (DL), and 9 (LB)

Thursday, Feb. 28: Registration, hospital pre-exams, X-rays, overflow testing, orientation, interviews

Friday, March 1: Measurements, medical examinations, overflow testing, interviews

Saturday, March 2: Psychological testing, NFLPA meeting, media availability, bench press, interviews

Sunday, March 3: On-field workouts (timing, stations, and drills) and departure from Indianapolis

Groups 10 (DB) and 11 (DB)

Friday, March 1: Registration, hospital pre-exams, X-rays, overflow testing, orientation, interviews

Saturday, March 2: Measurements, medical examinations, overflow testing, interviews

Sunday, March 3: Psychological testing, NFLPA meeting, media availability, bench press, interviews

Monday, March 4: On-field workouts (timing, stations, and drills) and departure from Indianapolis

 

menobrown

Footballguy
Was there anything of note today? 
No and I read countless tweets from beat writers I follow today that they boarded their plane to Indy and it was filled with front office people from the team they cover. Got me thinking this was a major travel day for teams and tomorrow is when all 32 teams collide in Indy and at worse rumors should start flying.

 

Gandalf

Footballguy
No and I read countless tweets from beat writers I follow today that they boarded their plane to Indy and it was filled with front office people from the team they cover. Got me thinking this was a major travel day for teams and tomorrow is when all 32 teams collide in Indy and at worse rumors should start flying.
Nice. Can’t wait!

 

Bracie Smathers

Footballguy
Mike McCartney‏Verified account @MikeMcCartney7

NFL Combine is kind of backwards to me. When CFB or NFL teams prepare to play, players are well fed and rested. However, for the Combine, they are exhausted mentally and physically for 3 days before being asked to perform their best. Some can and some won't. Can skew the eval.

11:51 AM - 26 Feb 2019

 

Bronco Billy

Footballguy
Mike McCartney‏Verified account @MikeMcCartney7

NFL Combine is kind of backwards to me. When CFB or NFL teams prepare to play, players are well fed and rested. However, for the Combine, they are exhausted mentally and physically for 3 days before being asked to perform their best. Some can and some won't. Can skew the eval.

11:51 AM - 26 Feb 2019


I’m guessing Mike McCartney has never played pro football.  And yeah, those weigh-ins can really drain a guy for the next 3 days.  And running a couple of 40s?  OMG, how can a potential pro athlete be expected to recover in less than a couple of days.

.

 
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Bracie Smathers

Footballguy
I’m guessing Mike McCartney has never played pro football.  And yeah, those weigh-ins can really drain a guy for the next 3 days.  And running a couple of 40s?  OMG, how can a potential pro athlete be expected to recover in less than a couple of days.
Multi-part series of the most stressful sports events.

NFL Combine came second to Olympics.

The Most Important Job Interview in Sports: Part I

by Noah Gentner, PhD, CC-AASP  [Applied Sport Psychology- Noah Gentner, Ph.D., CC-AASP received his Ph.D. in Sport Psychology- has published his research in several journals and has given presentations on Sport Psychology at worldwide and regional Sport Psychology, Coaching, and Athletic Training Conferences. ] 

...While no other athletic event can match the pressure of the Olympics one may come close:  The NFL Combine.  

...the combine provides an opportunity for each NFL team to medically, physically, and psychologically examine and evaluate potential draft picks.  The players are put through a series of strength, agility, and skills tests in addition to medical exams, psychological tests, and 15 minute interviews with each team.  The results of these tests can often mean the difference between millions of dollars in salary for the players.  In fact, the NFL works on a “slotting system” where rookie salaries are based on their draft position.  So, if a player drops from a top 10 pick to a late first round pick he will most certainly lose millions of dollars.

...Where else do athletes have one chance to secure millions of dollars?  Where else can one mistake cost you more money than I’ll ever see in a lifetime?  I’ve always wondered how athletes deal with that experience.  I believe we can learn a tremendous amount about achieving peak performance by watching how athletes handle situations like the Combine.  By identifying the challenges these athletes face and the strategies they use to overcome them we can gather information about how to help other athletes, or ourselves, deal with difficult situations.  So, to find out more about the Combine I decided to talk to someone who was there. ...
Dr. Gentner published a multi-part series on the stress of the NFL Combine and how the best strategies that prospects use to deal with stress at the Combine can be applied to other situations.

 

Bronco Billy

Footballguy
Multi-part series of the most stressful sports events.

NFL Combine came second to Olympics.

The Most Important Job Interview in Sports: Part I

Dr. Gentner published a multi-part series on the stress of the NFL Combine and how the best strategies that prospects use to deal with stress at the Combine can be applied to other situations.


And yet somehow year after year for decades every player has somehow escaped without permanent PTSD from the event.  Oh my, but so many possible victims!

From the some of the players I’ve heard speaking about the Combine the worst part is the utter boredom from waiting around for their turn to participate.

 

Gandalf

Footballguy
Mike McCartney‏Verified account @MikeMcCartney7

NFL Combine is kind of backwards to me. When CFB or NFL teams prepare to play, players are well fed and rested. However, for the Combine, they are exhausted mentally and physically for 3 days before being asked to perform their best. Some can and some won't. Can skew the eval.

11:51 AM - 26 Feb 2019
I was thinking about this too in terms of the pressure of the whole things on these athletes. Some people are just better playing in games then they are doing drills be it exhaustion or anxiety/pressure. Other it's the reverse, they excel at drills and can't for some reason put it together in games. This is why for me, the combine is just part of the evaluation, does it confirm what I'm seeing on film in college or is it different, good or bad different. If different why?

 

Gandalf

Footballguy
And yet somehow year after year for decades every player has somehow escaped without permanent PTSD from the event.  Oh my, but so many possible victims!

From the some of the players I’ve heard speaking about the Combine the worst part is the utter boredom from waiting around for their turn to participate.
Also it's not like this is the first evaluation day (days) that these athletes have had. By now they should be more used to it, even though the stakes are insanely high for them this week.

 

Bracie Smathers

Footballguy
And yet somehow year after year for decades every player has somehow escaped without permanent PTSD from the event.  Oh my, but so many possible victims!

From the some of the players I’ve heard speaking about the Combine the worst part is the utter boredom from waiting around for their turn to participate.
Yeah, it is about torture and PTSD.  Or the opposite end of the spectrum of complete and utter boredom of waiting where they only run forty yard dashes.  Nothing other than the two choices that you provide.  That is why PhDs in clinical psychology waste their time writing multi-part series that are published in sports journals.  

Their are only extreme polarized views of  :crazy: PTSD or  :sleep: boredom.  No nuance and no one can bring up a valid point if it falls outside of your take.  Gotcha.

 

Bronco Billy

Footballguy
Also it's not like this is the first evaluation day (days) that these athletes have had. By now they should be more used to it, even though the stakes are insanely high for them this week.


The stakes are high, but so are the rewards.  This is what these guys have spent almost their entire lives preparing for.  And one bad result among all the other data teams have is not going to cost anyone millions and millions of dollars - unless they confess to beating women or something similar in interviews.

 

Bronco Billy

Footballguy
Yeah, it is about torture and PTSD.  Or the opposite end of the spectrum of complete and utter boredom of waiting where they only run forty yard dashes.  Nothing other than the two choices that you provide.  That is why PhDs in clinical psychology waste their time writing multi-part series that are published in sports journals.  

Their are only extreme polarized views of  :crazy: PTSD or  :sleep: boredom.  No nuance and no one can bring up a valid point if it falls outside of your take.  Gotcha.


Oh please stop.  Such a drama queen.

 

Gandalf

Footballguy
The stakes are high, but so are the rewards.  This is what these guys have spent almost their entire lives preparing for.  And one bad result among all the other data teams have is not going to cost anyone millions and millions of dollars - unless they confess to beating women or something similar in interviews.
Yes and no. Would you say the difference between running a 4.4 and a 4.7 is a big deal? It's 0.3 seconds, yet if you are N'Keal Harry it will mean millions of dollars because if he runs a 4.4 then he should go early-to-mid round 1 and if he runs a 4.7 he will be a 3rd or 4th rounder.

 

Bronco Billy

Footballguy
Yes and no. Would you say the difference between running a 4.4 and a 4.7 is a big deal? It's 0.3 seconds, yet if you are N'Keal Harry it will mean millions of dollars because if he runs a 4.4 then he should go early-to-mid round 1 and if he runs a 4.7 he will be a 3rd or 4th rounder.


If the best a guy can manage is a 4.7, don’t you think that shows up in the miles of game tapes on the guy?  If Harry runs a 4.7, do you think that negates all the YAC and return highlights he has posted over his career?  

 

Gandalf

Footballguy
If the best a guy can manage is a 4.7, don’t you think that shows up in the miles of game tapes on the guy?  If Harry runs a 4.7, do you think that negates all the YAC and return highlights he has posted over his career?  
Not in my eyes, but in the eyes of some NFL people yes. Right or wrong, players get over and undervalued because of their 40 times. I would take the good football player over the fast 40 time but it happens every year that teams fall in love with the workout warriors (hence making them millions) and out of love with the 4.6-4.7 type WRs because they "can't separate" despite being able to make plays in college. This is where I think the pressure is real for these guys.

 

Bronco Billy

Footballguy
Not in my eyes, but in the eyes of some NFL people yes. Right or wrong, players get over and undervalued because of their 40 times. I would take the good football player over the fast 40 time but it happens every year that teams fall in love with the workout warriors (hence making them millions) and out of love with the 4.6-4.7 type WRs because they "can't separate" despite being able to make plays in college. This is where I think the pressure is real for these guys.


I get that and agree to a point, but on the flip side all it takes is 1 team of the 32 to recognize that a guy is dropping when he shouldn’t be.

 

Mr. Irrelevant

IBL Representative
Not in my eyes, but in the eyes of some NFL people yes. Right or wrong, players get over and undervalued because of their 40 times. I would take the good football player over the fast 40 time but it happens every year that teams fall in love with the workout warriors (hence making them millions) and out of love with the 4.6-4.7 type WRs because they "can't separate" despite being able to make plays in college. This is where I think the pressure is real for these guys.
Of course it is, and don't think the NFL isn't aware of it and encouraging it. This is why you'll hear former scouting directors and player personnel directors talking about trying to outdo each other with offbeat, crazy interview questions , or having QB prospects whiteboarding against defensive schemes that have never been employed before on an actual NFL field - they'll openly admit they want to get these guys out of their comfort zone and keep them off-balance. They'd go full SEAL training and march them through hostile wilderness in bare feet with no food or sleep for 2 days beforehand if they thought the NFL would let them get away with it.

 

voiceofunreason

Footballguy
Mike McCartney‏Verified account @MikeMcCartney7

NFL Combine is kind of backwards to me. When CFB or NFL teams prepare to play, players are well fed and rested. However, for the Combine, they are exhausted mentally and physically for 3 days before being asked to perform their best. Some can and some won't. Can skew the eval.

11:51 AM - 26 Feb 2019
So you don’t think they will be under scrutiny and stress in the nfl?

I think people have it backwards, teams don’t care much about timed drills. They want to look players in the eye and see how they react to pressure. If 40 times were important you may be right but they aren’t.

 

Gandalf

Footballguy
So you don’t think they will be under scrutiny and stress in the nfl?

I think people have it backwards, teams don’t care much about timed drills. They want to look players in the eye and see how they react to pressure. If 40 times were important you may be right but they aren’t.
I think there’s different kinds of pressure. There’s pressure of winning the big game and then there’s pressure of passing a job interview. It’s not the same thing but I agree with you that’s what the nfl teams are doing.

 
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Mr. Irrelevant

IBL Representative
So you don’t think they will be under scrutiny and stress in the nfl?

I think people have it backwards, teams don’t care much about timed drills. They want to look players in the eye and see how they react to pressure. If 40 times were important you may be right but they aren’t.
The problem is they think the sort of crap they put them through at the combine is indicative of how they'll respond to stress on an NFL field when the bullets are flying. It's apples and oranges.

Donovan McNabb went 2nd overall, and with his back to the wall in the 4th quarter of the Super Bowl he was quite literally puking on his shoes.

Joe Montana went 82nd overall, and with his back to the wall in the 4th quarter of the Super Bowl he was cracking jokes and pointing out celebrities in the huddle while engineering a breathtaking comeback.

Show me the scout or personnel director who can predict which guy will do what based on the next 4 days, and I'll show you a liar.

 

BoltBacker

Footballguy
I think people have it backwards, teams don’t care much about timed drills. They want to look players in the eye and see how they react to pressure. If 40 times were important you may be right but they aren’t.
I think that it really depends on the position.

If you play against the SEC all year and have tape that you run away/with people... then it also matters less. If you are an OT nobody really cares how long it takes to run 40 yards(or even 20) so you are right... but don't tell that to Orlando Brown. Who would have guessed that guy could run block even if he did run one of the slowest 40's in the past two decades? If you are a small school WR/CB/LB/S it absolutely matters how fast you run your 40.

I'm not saying it throws out all his college tape based on a slow 40..... but do you honestly think guys like John Ross and Phillip Dorsett would have been drafted at the same spot if they hadn't run a 40 at the combine? At this time of year EVERYTHING matters it's just a sliding scale what matters to which teams at which positions etc. 

 

voiceofunreason

Footballguy
BoltBacker said:
I think that it really depends on the position.

If you play against the SEC all year and have tape that you run away/with people... then it also matters less. If you are an OT nobody really cares how long it takes to run 40 yards(or even 20) so you are right... but don't tell that to Orlando Brown. Who would have guessed that guy could run block even if he did run one of the slowest 40's in the past two decades? If you are a small school WR/CB/LB/S it absolutely matters how fast you run your 40.

I'm not saying it throws out all his college tape based on a slow 40..... but do you honestly think guys like John Ross and Phillip Dorsett would have been drafted at the same spot if they hadn't run a 40 at the combine? At this time of year EVERYTHING matters it's just a sliding scale what matters to which teams at which positions etc. 
So you actually believe that teams didn’t know Dorset and Ross were fast before the combine? I know people say this all the time but it’s ridiculous.

 

travdogg

Footballguy
So you actually believe that teams didn’t know Dorset and Ross were fast before the combine? I know people say this all the time but it’s ridiculous.
Its not about knowing if they were fast, but how fast. Ross is not a top-10 pick without his 4.22. Not a chance in my mind, he's still a 1st rounder, but not top-10. Dorsett goes on day 2 without his combine. It makes a difference. 

 
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voiceofunreason

Footballguy
Mr. Irrelevant said:
The problem is they think the sort of crap they put them through at the combine is indicative of how they'll respond to stress on an NFL field when the bullets are flying. It's apples and oranges.

Donovan McNabb went 2nd overall, and with his back to the wall in the 4th quarter of the Super Bowl he was quite literally puking on his shoes.

Joe Montana went 82nd overall, and with his back to the wall in the 4th quarter of the Super Bowl he was cracking jokes and pointing out celebrities in the huddle while engineering a breathtaking comeback.

Show me the scout or personnel director who can predict which guy will do what based on the next 4 days, and I'll show you a liar.
It’s not 100% accurate so it means nothing.

And how they played in college may have something to do with draft position. By your logic teams have never seen a player play but draft solely on what they thought about them. You deem talent by the tape and you try and weed out people like Josh Gordon and Fournette at the combine.

 

Bronco Billy

Footballguy
So you actually believe that teams didn’t know Dorset and Ross were fast before the combine? I know people say this all the time but it’s ridiculous.


On top of that some guys run very differently in shorts and tees vs a clock than they do in pads vs opponents.  It’s interesting watching a 4.6 RB busting off long TD runs and not getting chased down by DBs supposedly a whole lot faster than them.

 

-OZ-

Footballguy
BoltBacker said:
I think that it really depends on the position.

If you play against the SEC all year and have tape that you run away/with people... then it also matters less. If you are an OT nobody really cares how long it takes to run 40 yards(or even 20) so you are right... but don't tell that to Orlando Brown. Who would have guessed that guy could run block even if he did run one of the slowest 40's in the past two decades? If you are a small school WR/CB/LB/S it absolutely matters how fast you run your 40.

I'm not saying it throws out all his college tape based on a slow 40..... but do you honestly think guys like John Ross and Phillip Dorsett would have been drafted at the same spot if they hadn't run a 40 at the combine? At this time of year EVERYTHING matters it's just a sliding scale what matters to which teams at which positions etc. 
In other words it's a job interview. For most of us, the job interview is stressful. It can make the difference between landing that great job and continuing to seek unemployment. Meanwhile for most of these guys it's the difference of a fraction of their salary. 

Sure there's stress, but that's pretty much part of life. 

 

FreeBaGeL

Footballguy
Mr. Irrelevant said:
The problem is they think the sort of crap they put them through at the combine is indicative of how they'll respond to stress on an NFL field when the bullets are flying. It's apples and oranges.

Donovan McNabb went 2nd overall, and with his back to the wall in the 4th quarter of the Super Bowl he was quite literally puking on his shoes.

Joe Montana went 82nd overall, and with his back to the wall in the 4th quarter of the Super Bowl he was cracking jokes and pointing out celebrities in the huddle while engineering a breathtaking comeback.

Show me the scout or personnel director who can predict which guy will do what based on the next 4 days, and I'll show you a liar.
But McNabb had a relatively poor combine, so aren't you kind of proving his point here more than contradicting it? 

 
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Sir Psycho

Footballguy
Ian Rapoport‏Verified account @RapSheet 40s40 seconds ago

More

#Oklahoma QB Kyler Murray told scouts & personnel people of several NFL teams that he doesn't plan to throw at the Combine, sources say. They cautioned Murray is a competitor who could throw after seeing everyone else do it, but as of last night, Murray’s plan is not to do much.

 

matuski

Footballguy
Ian Rapoport‏Verified account @RapSheet 40s40 seconds ago

More

#Oklahoma QB Kyler Murray told scouts & personnel people of several NFL teams that he doesn't plan to throw at the Combine, sources say. They cautioned Murray is a competitor who could throw after seeing everyone else do it, but as of last night, Murray’s plan is not to do much.
So he won't, but he might, but he won't.

Thanks for this update.

 

Gandalf

Footballguy
I was looking more for measurements, get an "accurate" height. We know he throws fairly well.
I mean if he shows up to the combine and doesn’t get measured that’s just ridiculous. I am avoiding him at this point

 
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menobrown

Footballguy
Murray of course will get sized up, heard he expects to come in at 206. When I heard that I figured he'd not want to run.

 

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