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Contact Lens and/or Glasses - Need Advice (1 Viewer)

russinfortworth

Footballguy
So, I'm finally biting the bullet and seeing the opthamologist on Friday.

Mid 40's and having trouble seeing things up close and while my arms are still long enough to read and can still utilize the computer with out problem, I notice that I don't enjoy reading or have the same retainment as I used to have. And doing any "fine" work up close is out of the question.

I have no trouble seeing far away stuff, so at least that is a plus

So bottom line I know that I'm going to need to correct my vision. Not a big fan of the "reading" glasses and having to carry them around all the time, and being that i'm outside alot with doing stuff with the kids, I'm not sure that I want an inside pair of glasses, and a pair of subscription sunglasses.

That being said, contacts are an option I would believe, so if I go this route, which are the best and why? Monthly, daily, ????? Which ones???

So what are the pros and cons of glasses, and the pros and cons of the different types of contacts.

Thanks.

 
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johnnycakes

Footballguy
I wore contacts for maybe 10 years in my 20's into my 30's. Back then, the daily disposable ones were just coming out. But I have found I like a nice, light, thin pair of high-index glasses better than any contacts. More comfortable to have on, and far less maintenance. Go with some rimless titanium frames for everyday wear... you hardly notice you have them on.

 

Drifter

Footballguy
I come from the camp that have no issues whatsoever with contacts. I wear weeklies, sleep in them and keep them in for 2 months at a time. Have been doing this for over 20 years with zero issues. I use to have a little bit of oxygen deprivation until they came out with the breathable ones several years back.

I've thought about lasik but contacts are such a non-issue for me that I just can't justify it.

 

johnnycakes

Footballguy
I come from the camp that have no issues whatsoever with contacts. I wear weeklies, sleep in them and keep them in for 2 months at a time. Have been doing this for over 20 years with zero issues. I use to have a little bit of oxygen deprivation until they came out with the breathable ones several years back.

I've thought about lasik but contacts are such a non-issue for me that I just can't justify it.
Arguably, another con for Lasik: In my 20's, 30's and 40's, my distant vision got progressively weaker. I had micro-fine up-close vision until I turned 40; that's when the up-close vision started to suffer. But you know what? After I turned 50, my distant vision has gotten substantially better, while the the up-close vision has declined a little... not a lot, but just a little. The point being... my understanding is that Lasik only corrects for distant vision... but if your distant vision begins to improve after 50, does this then become a waste? Idk... my ophthalmologist says what I am experiencing is totally normal... one of my very few "normal" experiences in life.

 

njherdfan

Footballguy
I definitely prefer contacts over glasses. I wear pairs that are made to last for 2 weeks, and I usually wear them for at least a month, or until they start to bother me. The biggest advantages to contacts over glasses are that you have great peripheral vision, you can play sports/move around in contacts much easier than you can with glasses, and you don't have to worry about your glasses getting dirty or fogging up.

 

Phil Elliott

Footballguy
Muli-focus contacts allow you to have one eye emphasize close vision and the other eye on long distance. Some people have a difficult time adjusting to the multi-focus. It may take a few trips to the opthamologist to fine tune the prescription. Try wearing them for a week at a time. When you get the right prescription mix you probably won't even think about it. Your eyes will adjust to reading close or far away automatically and you shouldn't need "readers". I tried the monthly AirOptix, which you were suppose to be able to sleep in but my eyes got a little dry just wearing them during the day. I switched to Bausch and Lomb and they are great.

 

glumpy

breeze
Initially the same vision issues as OP--distance vision better than normal, reading became weaker beginning in my 20's. I was in to construction and began wearing prescription safety glasses and never tried contacts. Fast forward to now and all vision is weaker so I'm wearing progressives, still safety lenses. Went with photogray for awhile and the glasses began staying darker; last time out went with standard pairs with clip-on sunglasses but don't like carrying around the extra pair. Going in for appointment this week and intending to go back with photograys. Given my work even at play and I'm still better with safety glasses all the time.

eta: given that I'm still good with current prescription will likely keep them in my office for paperwork. Photograys can get tiresome in dimmer light.

 
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Skipdog77

Footballguy
I've been debating this myself, as I hate carrying around both glasses and sunglasses (haven't gotten around to getting prescription sunglasses, so if I want to be able to read a menu or anything in low light, I need my glasses with me). The only thing holding me back from contacts is that I have a hard time putting eyedrops in my eyes, let alone putting my finger in there to put the contacts in or take them out. For all you contacts guys, is that something that you get used to pretty easy?

 

Otis

Footballguy
Been wearing contacts for about 15 years now. Daily disposables. No mess, no fuss, no putting them back in a case with some kind of solution nonsense. You open up two fresh new ones every morning and pop em in. Climb into bed, pull them out and toss them on your night stand. No brainer.

 

Otis

Footballguy
For all you contacts guys, is that something that you get used to pretty easy?
Yes. I couldn't do it at first. Couldn't stick my fingers in my eyes, seemed impossible to get them in and out. Even tried contacts once and gave up and went back to glasses. That phase lasted about a day. Now it's really, really easy and I don't even notice I'm wearing them anymore.

 

honky kong

Footballguy
I definitely prefer contacts over glasses. I wear pairs that are made to last for 2 weeks, and I usually wear them for at least a month, or until they start to bother me. The biggest advantages to contacts over glasses are that you have great peripheral vision, you can play sports/move around in contacts much easier than you can with glasses, and you don't have to worry about your glasses getting dirty or fogging up.
I second this.

 

bro1ncos

IBL Representative
Another vote for contacts. Been wearing them since '86, wouldn't ever want to go back to glasses.

 

Mad Cow

Welshers and Dawdlers Beware!
SO I guess I can weigh in here. So you have never really worn glasses until your 40's, right? You have had fantastic vision your whole life and now the arms are getting short?

I will speak from my experience here as an optometrist, and I will tell you right off the back if you are going to an ophthalmologist for contact lenses at your age, you are in all likelihood going to have a much more negative experience. Far and away, their expertise in those things, particularly multifocal contacts, is inferior to an optometrist. Their bag is surgery and the things that take less chair time. They do not have even close to the training on contact lenses, especially the torics and multifocals. Contact lenses for the 40+ crowd are a different breed, take more time and a lot more know-how in the fitting of them and you won't get it there. Your guy could prove me wrong, but based on my experience, I doubt it.

Generally speaking, for glasses you are looking at either reading glasses or a form of bifocal - progressive or lined. Progressive will be the best bet there, though please do know that there are great differences in type of progressives. There are Yugos and there are Ferraris. I am happy to answer questions about that if you want.

For CLs, you have monovision, where one eye if for far, one for near, or multifocal contact lenses. Monovision is older technology. You lose depth perception which makes driving, especially at night, harder. It does give you defined vision for far and near based on the eye, but I really prefer multifocal contacts. You maintain your bionocularity but there is certainly a learning process to it. It can take a few visits to get right, but generally if you are patient will perform better.

All that said, I will say that your demographic typically adjusts the hardest to contacts for the near. I have more drop-outs with people like you that those that have worn CLs for a long period of time. Either way, you are going to have to give up some vision. It is a compromise, and people that have had great vision their whole life tend to really struggle giving some up.

I am happy to answer any other questions.

 

[icon]

Insoxicated
For all you contacts guys, is that something that you get used to pretty easy?
Yes. I couldn't do it at first. Couldn't stick my fingers in my eyes, seemed impossible to get them in and out. Even tried contacts once and gave up and went back to glasses. That phase lasted about a day. Now it's really, really easy and I don't even notice I'm wearing them anymore.
:goodposting:

been wearing contacts for coming up on 25 years now. The first week or so I struggled with getting them in my eyes. The first time (in docs office) it took me 20 minutes to get them in. Once you get used to it (pretty damn quickly), it's NO biggie. Now I can insert/remove easily without a mirror. My GF will occasionally pull them out for me if I'm hammered and don't feel like ####### with it. I generally soak them nightly but I used to be like others in this thread and go 2+ weeks with the same pair... sleeping in them and all. Now I prefer the clean vision/feeling with a nightly soak.

Glasses suck. Terrible peripheral vision. Much more distortion around the edge of the lens that contributes to a fishbowl effect on your vision. Not to mention you've got to keep up with them. You can't wear normal sunglasses without having custom lenses ground and switching between glasses/shades. They fog up if its' hot/humid...etc etc etc.

Contacts are the way to go.

 

Johnny Bing

Footballguy
I had contacts for about 15 - 20 years also. Recently (past 4 years) went to the "breathable" contacts, which allow me to sleep with them in. Never had a problem.

They say you are supposed to only wear them for 30 days, but I usually stretch a pair for 3 months and never had issue. Suppose it depends on what you do for a living. If you are aroudn a lot of fine dust, then I'd change them more frequently. But office job, I don't get a ton of dust in my eyes.

If Lasik is in the budget I am leaning towards this. While contacts are more convienent than glass, the contacts still are a pain when you get a piece of lint or eye lash in your eye. Likely have the procedure this winter.

 

Dentist

***Official FBG Dentist***
For all you contacts guys, is that something that you get used to pretty easy?
Yes. I couldn't do it at first. Couldn't stick my fingers in my eyes, seemed impossible to get them in and out. Even tried contacts once and gave up and went back to glasses. That phase lasted about a day. Now it's really, really easy and I don't even notice I'm wearing them anymore.
Otis's experience and mine are completely the same.

Daily disposables from the start.

Over 12 years of use.

Had a VERY difficult time the first 2-3 weeks getting used to them.

Now I don't think about it ever.

The only negative experience i have with contacts come when:

1) high dust areas (but this is pretty rare)

2) Watersports/swimming - I have to wear goggles now when i waterski/wakboard/tube or i just can't clear water from my eyes well.

i have a backup pair of glasses for lazy sundays that i got with a prescription YEARS ago and never updated.

 
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Otis

Footballguy
I had contacts for about 15 - 20 years also. Recently (past 4 years) went to the "breathable" contacts, which allow me to sleep with them in. Never had a problem.

They say you are supposed to only wear them for 30 days, but I usually stretch a pair for 3 months and never had issue. Suppose it depends on what you do for a living. If you are aroudn a lot of fine dust, then I'd change them more frequently. But office job, I don't get a ton of dust in my eyes.

If Lasik is in the budget I am leaning towards this. While contacts are more convienent than glass, the contacts still are a pain when you get a piece of lint or eye lash in your eye. Likely have the procedure this winter.
Had no idea there was such a thing as "breathable" contacts. I could get some that I wear for 30 days and then change? Sounds pretty tempting.

 

Mad Cow

Welshers and Dawdlers Beware!
I had contacts for about 15 - 20 years also. Recently (past 4 years) went to the "breathable" contacts, which allow me to sleep with them in. Never had a problem.

They say you are supposed to only wear them for 30 days, but I usually stretch a pair for 3 months and never had issue. Suppose it depends on what you do for a living. If you are aroudn a lot of fine dust, then I'd change them more frequently. But office job, I don't get a ton of dust in my eyes.

If Lasik is in the budget I am leaning towards this. While contacts are more convienent than glass, the contacts still are a pain when you get a piece of lint or eye lash in your eye. Likely have the procedure this winter.
Had no idea there was such a thing as "breathable" contacts. I could get some that I wear for 30 days and then change? Sounds pretty tempting.
By breathable, I assume he means the high-O2 permeable lenses that can be slept in like the Night & Day. Yes, you can wear them for a month at a time.

FWIW, the danger to overwearing those lenses has very little to do with the environment you are in. Saying you are in an office and can wear them 3 months makes no difference. There are many problems with wearing them longer and some real dangers to your eyesight. One of the less serious ones would be GPC, or giant papillary conjunctivitis, which if you get that, you are going to be wearing no CLs at all for 3-4 months.

 

russinfortworth

Footballguy
Thanks for the advice guys. Did not know that they made contacts that you could keep in for upto a month.

Based on one comment with regards to skiing / tubing / etc...............are contacts still ok for swimming?

I think that I'm leaning that way, as I hate the idea of outdoor and indoor glasses............

Maybe I should just check with my dad and see if he still has his old "tinting glasses" that took 15 minutes to go from "sun" to indoor. He looked so crazy wearing those darn things for 15 minutes.

rs

 

Drifter

Footballguy
Contacts for swimming work if you keep your eyes closed underwater or wear goggles. I can open mine for glimpses but you run the risk of them floating out, or at least out of place if you are underwater with eyes open.

 

glock

"Don't grumble, give a whistle!"
Mad Cow- progressive wearer here for the last decade or so for work- reading, computer- with a slight boost for distance. Was told that I am NOT a lasik candidate. I H.A.T.E the whole glasses gig. Are their contacts for people like me?

 

Mad Cow

Welshers and Dawdlers Beware!
Mad Cow- progressive wearer here for the last decade or so for work- reading, computer- with a slight boost for distance. Was told that I am NOT a lasik candidate. I H.A.T.E the whole glasses gig. Are their contacts for people like me?
Not necessarily. What is your Rx? That will give me an idea of options to ask about.

 

Johnny Bing

Footballguy
I had contacts for about 15 - 20 years also. Recently (past 4 years) went to the "breathable" contacts, which allow me to sleep with them in. Never had a problem.

They say you are supposed to only wear them for 30 days, but I usually stretch a pair for 3 months and never had issue. Suppose it depends on what you do for a living. If you are aroudn a lot of fine dust, then I'd change them more frequently. But office job, I don't get a ton of dust in my eyes.

If Lasik is in the budget I am leaning towards this. While contacts are more convienent than glass, the contacts still are a pain when you get a piece of lint or eye lash in your eye. Likely have the procedure this winter.
Had no idea there was such a thing as "breathable" contacts. I could get some that I wear for 30 days and then change? Sounds pretty tempting.
Yes, highly recommend them. I used to wear the contacts that I had to take out every night and put back in next day, but my eye doctor said no one uses those anymore. He ordered me a trial pair of the Night and Day.

I would recommend the same thing if you are thinking about it, ask your doctor for a free sample. Mine gave me one to try and would never go back. I laugh when I hear people still take their contacts out at night because there are better options out there.

 

TheAristocrat

Footballguy
Lasik was the best $2500 I've ever spent. I wore glasses for over 20 years and in 11 minutes my eyesight was restored to perfect. I had the surgery in 2009 and haven't needed a correction yet.

I paid $2500 because my eyes were terrible. On top of other issues, the big 'E' that's on the top of every eye chart was not something that I could see with either eye without squinting pretty seriously without glasses.

 

Phil Elliott

Footballguy
SO I guess I can weigh in here. So you have never really worn glasses until your 40's, right? You have had fantastic vision your whole life and now the arms are getting short?

I will speak from my experience here as an optometrist, and I will tell you right off the back if you are going to an ophthalmologist for contact lenses at your age, you are in all likelihood going to have a much more negative experience. Far and away, their expertise in those things, particularly multifocal contacts, is inferior to an optometrist. Their bag is surgery and the things that take less chair time. They do not have even close to the training on contact lenses, especially the torics and multifocals. Contact lenses for the 40+ crowd are a different breed, take more time and a lot more know-how in the fitting of them and you won't get it there. Your guy could prove me wrong, but based on my experience, I doubt it.

Generally speaking, for glasses you are looking at either reading glasses or a form of bifocal - progressive or lined. Progressive will be the best bet there, though please do know that there are great differences in type of progressives. There are Yugos and there are Ferraris. I am happy to answer questions about that if you want.

For CLs, you have monovision, where one eye if for far, one for near, or multifocal contact lenses. Monovision is older technology. You lose depth perception which makes driving, especially at night, harder. It does give you defined vision for far and near based on the eye, but I really prefer multifocal contacts. You maintain your bionocularity but there is certainly a learning process to it. It can take a few visits to get right, but generally if you are patient will perform better.

All that said, I will say that your demographic typically adjusts the hardest to contacts for the near. I have more drop-outs with people like you that those that have worn CLs for a long period of time. Either way, you are going to have to give up some vision. It is a compromise, and people that have had great vision their whole life tend to really struggle giving some up.

I am happy to answer any other questions.
FWIW - I have gone to both an opthamologist and and an optometrist in the past several years. Not debating the difference here. My optometrist kept telling me I would have to make some compromises in either near or far vision with multi focal contacts. I kept going back fine tuning the prescription. I started "many" years ago on the original B&L soflens. For the past 5 years or so, there seems to be a preference to try and put you in the Night and Days - (marketing funds or just better performance?). I could never wear them over night and optometrist actually recommended not wearing them at night. When I asked to try the B&L multi focals I don't perceive any compromise in my vision and my eyes don't dry out. I don't need "readers" since going to the mutli focus. I love the muti focals. But like you mentioned, it takes a few trips to fine tune the prescription.

 
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apalmer

Footballguy
Mad Cow said:
SO I guess I can weigh in here. So you have never really worn glasses until your 40's, right? You have had fantastic vision your whole life and now the arms are getting short?

I will speak from my experience here as an optometrist, and I will tell you right off the back if you are going to an ophthalmologist for contact lenses at your age, you are in all likelihood going to have a much more negative experience. Far and away, their expertise in those things, particularly multifocal contacts, is inferior to an optometrist. Their bag is surgery and the things that take less chair time. They do not have even close to the training on contact lenses, especially the torics and multifocals. Contact lenses for the 40+ crowd are a different breed, take more time and a lot more know-how in the fitting of them and you won't get it there. Your guy could prove me wrong, but based on my experience, I doubt it.

Generally speaking, for glasses you are looking at either reading glasses or a form of bifocal - progressive or lined. Progressive will be the best bet there, though please do know that there are great differences in type of progressives. There are Yugos and there are Ferraris. I am happy to answer questions about that if you want.

For CLs, you have monovision, where one eye if for far, one for near, or multifocal contact lenses. Monovision is older technology. You lose depth perception which makes driving, especially at night, harder. It does give you defined vision for far and near based on the eye, but I really prefer multifocal contacts. You maintain your bionocularity but there is certainly a learning process to it. It can take a few visits to get right, but generally if you are patient will perform better.

All that said, I will say that your demographic typically adjusts the hardest to contacts for the near. I have more drop-outs with people like you that those that have worn CLs for a long period of time. Either way, you are going to have to give up some vision. It is a compromise, and people that have had great vision their whole life tend to really struggle giving some up.

I am happy to answer any other questions.
I'll agree with the Doc here. I've worn contacts since 1973 and swore I'd never go back to glasses. Then I discovered the effects of aging. My normal contacts required me to add reading glasses. Since reading is an occupational necessity, I tried all the other possibilities. I hated monovision--felt like I couldn't see with either eye. Multifocal were better and I used them for a year, but fine print in printed contracts drove me crazy. I'm now back to glasses with contacts only for occasions when I know I won't have to read and want sunglasses(driving on vacation, on the beach, etc.).

 

Mad Cow

Welshers and Dawdlers Beware!
Phil Elliott said:
Mad Cow said:
SO I guess I can weigh in here. So you have never really worn glasses until your 40's, right? You have had fantastic vision your whole life and now the arms are getting short?

I will speak from my experience here as an optometrist, and I will tell you right off the back if you are going to an ophthalmologist for contact lenses at your age, you are in all likelihood going to have a much more negative experience. Far and away, their expertise in those things, particularly multifocal contacts, is inferior to an optometrist. Their bag is surgery and the things that take less chair time. They do not have even close to the training on contact lenses, especially the torics and multifocals. Contact lenses for the 40+ crowd are a different breed, take more time and a lot more know-how in the fitting of them and you won't get it there. Your guy could prove me wrong, but based on my experience, I doubt it.

Generally speaking, for glasses you are looking at either reading glasses or a form of bifocal - progressive or lined. Progressive will be the best bet there, though please do know that there are great differences in type of progressives. There are Yugos and there are Ferraris. I am happy to answer questions about that if you want.

For CLs, you have monovision, where one eye if for far, one for near, or multifocal contact lenses. Monovision is older technology. You lose depth perception which makes driving, especially at night, harder. It does give you defined vision for far and near based on the eye, but I really prefer multifocal contacts. You maintain your bionocularity but there is certainly a learning process to it. It can take a few visits to get right, but generally if you are patient will perform better.

All that said, I will say that your demographic typically adjusts the hardest to contacts for the near. I have more drop-outs with people like you that those that have worn CLs for a long period of time. Either way, you are going to have to give up some vision. It is a compromise, and people that have had great vision their whole life tend to really struggle giving some up.

I am happy to answer any other questions.
FWIW - I have gone to both an opthamologist and and an optometrist in the past several years. Not debating the difference here. My optometrist kept telling me I would have to make some compromises in either near or far vision with multi focal contacts. I kept going back fine tuning the prescription. I started "many" years ago on the original B&L soflens. For the past 5 years or so, there seems to be a preference to try and put you in the Night and Days - (marketing funds or just better performance?). I could never wear them over night and optometrist actually recommended not wearing them at night. When I asked to try the B&L multi focals I don't perceive any compromise in my vision and my eyes don't dry out. I don't need "readers" since going to the mutli focus. I love the muti focals. But like you mentioned, it takes a few trips to fine tune the prescription.
Contacts are interesting. I could try one lens on one guy and he hates it, but 10 other people love it. One of those confounding things. One of the things I really try to do is find that perfect lens for my patients, where they don't feel it. I see too many people that complain they always feel their lenses and have been told that is just the way contact lenses are.

As for multifocals, they vary in terms of design one company to the next, as well. Some patients love one type, such as the B&L Soflens Multifocal, but do not like the Biofinity or Air Optix, etc. It can just take a little work.

 

glock

"Don't grumble, give a whistle!"
Mad Cow said:
glock said:
Mad Cow- progressive wearer here for the last decade or so for work- reading, computer- with a slight boost for distance. Was told that I am NOT a lasik candidate. I H.A.T.E the whole glasses gig. Are their contacts for people like me?
Not necessarily. What is your Rx? That will give me an idea of options to ask about.
Crap. I don't know... :wall:

 

Rustoleum

Footballguy
Johnny Bing said:
I had contacts for about 15 - 20 years also. Recently (past 4 years) went to the "breathable" contacts, which allow me to sleep with them in. Never had a problem.

They say you are supposed to only wear them for 30 days, but I usually stretch a pair for 3 months and never had issue. Suppose it depends on what you do for a living. If you are aroudn a lot of fine dust, then I'd change them more frequently. But office job, I don't get a ton of dust in my eyes.

If Lasik is in the budget I am leaning towards this. While contacts are more convienent than glass, the contacts still are a pain when you get a piece of lint or eye lash in your eye. Likely have the procedure this winter.
Had no idea there was such a thing as "breathable" contacts. I could get some that I wear for 30 days and then change? Sounds pretty tempting.
Yes, highly recommend them. I used to wear the contacts that I had to take out every night and put back in next day, but my eye doctor said no one uses those anymore. He ordered me a trial pair of the Night and Day.

I would recommend the same thing if you are thinking about it, ask your doctor for a free sample. Mine gave me one to try and would never go back. I laugh when I hear people still take their contacts out at night because there are better options out there.
I take mine out every night, even though I don't technically have to. My eyes get too dry or irritated otherwise, which makes me want to rub them, which ends in an infection. I can wear them 20 hours a day, but sleeping in them starts me down a trail to misery, every time.

 

Popinski

Footballguy
I had contacts for about 15 - 20 years also. Recently (past 4 years) went to the "breathable" contacts, which allow me to sleep with them in. Never had a problem.

They say you are supposed to only wear them for 30 days, but I usually stretch a pair for 3 months and never had issue. Suppose it depends on what you do for a living. If you are aroudn a lot of fine dust, then I'd change them more frequently. But office job, I don't get a ton of dust in my eyes.

If Lasik is in the budget I am leaning towards this. While contacts are more convienent than glass, the contacts still are a pain when you get a piece of lint or eye lash in your eye. Likely have the procedure this winter.
Had no idea there was such a thing as "breathable" contacts. I could get some that I wear for 30 days and then change? Sounds pretty tempting.
By breathable, I assume he means the high-O2 permeable lenses that can be slept in like the Night & Day. Yes, you can wear them for a month at a time.

FWIW, the danger to overwearing those lenses has very little to do with the environment you are in. Saying you are in an office and can wear them 3 months makes no difference. There are many problems with wearing them longer and some real dangers to your eyesight. One of the less serious ones would be GPC, or giant papillary conjunctivitis, which if you get that, you are going to be wearing no CLs at all for 3-4 months.
I used to wear contacts all the time (not overnight), but have been wearing them less often because of dry eyes which is always worse later in the day. By continuing to wear contacts, even if only during the day, am I risking progressing the dry eye issue? And is it reversible if I wear contacts less often? Artificial tears does the trick, but it's only temporary.

 

Mad Cow

Welshers and Dawdlers Beware!
I had contacts for about 15 - 20 years also. Recently (past 4 years) went to the "breathable" contacts, which allow me to sleep with them in. Never had a problem.

They say you are supposed to only wear them for 30 days, but I usually stretch a pair for 3 months and never had issue. Suppose it depends on what you do for a living. If you are aroudn a lot of fine dust, then I'd change them more frequently. But office job, I don't get a ton of dust in my eyes.

If Lasik is in the budget I am leaning towards this. While contacts are more convienent than glass, the contacts still are a pain when you get a piece of lint or eye lash in your eye. Likely have the procedure this winter.
Had no idea there was such a thing as "breathable" contacts. I could get some that I wear for 30 days and then change? Sounds pretty tempting.
By breathable, I assume he means the high-O2 permeable lenses that can be slept in like the Night & Day. Yes, you can wear them for a month at a time.FWIW, the danger to overwearing those lenses has very little to do with the environment you are in. Saying you are in an office and can wear them 3 months makes no difference. There are many problems with wearing them longer and some real dangers to your eyesight. One of the less serious ones would be GPC, or giant papillary conjunctivitis, which if you get that, you are going to be wearing no CLs at all for 3-4 months.
I used to wear contacts all the time (not overnight), but have been wearing them less often because of dry eyes which is always worse later in the day. By continuing to wear contacts, even if only during the day, am I risking progressing the dry eye issue? And is it reversible if I wear contacts less often? Artificial tears does the trick, but it's only temporary.
Ask your doctor about punctal plugs. They can do wonders for dryness if you have the correct type of dry eye. There are simple tests that can be done to determine that. Inserting plugs in my patients has been a game changer for many.
 

Austin Tiger

Footballguy
Mr Mad Cow,

Can you explain a bit more about the punctal plugs? I am 48 and just started wearing contacts this Jan 1, (no vision issues prior to hitting 47) my biggest issue is eye dryness, constantly soaking my eyes with refresh tears. I have tried wearing glasses, but I am too active at work and they get in the way and screw with my peripheral vision.

I currently use airoptic multifocal monthly .5 in my right eye, and a proclear 1 day 1.50m multifocal by cooper vision in my left eye.

I love wearing the contacts, but the eye dryness is driving me crazy

 
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Mad Cow

Welshers and Dawdlers Beware!
Mr Mad Cow,

Can you explain a bit more about the punctal plugs? I am 48 and just started wearing contacts this Jan 1, (no vision issues prior to hitting 47) my biggest issue is eye dryness, constantly soaking my eyes with refresh tears. I have tried wearing glasses, but I am too active at work and they get in the way and screw with my peripheral vision.

I currently use airoptic multifocal monthly .5 in my right eye, and a proclear 1 day 1.50m multifocal by cooper vision in my left eye.

I love wearing the contacts, but the eye dryness is driving me crazy
There are two basic types of dryness - low tear volume and low tear quality. The treatments are very different. Poor tear quality is generally characterized by watery, burning eyes. Low volume by dryness, that using drops helps, but it only lasts for a short time. There are other tests performed to determine exactly which is which. In a nutshell, punctal plugs keep your natural tears in your eyes. It is a very simple, in-office procedure where you put "permanent" (they last generally many years) silicone plugs in the tear ducts, or where the tears drain out. We put some temporary collagen plugs in to let you evaluate them, which last about 3-5 days before they dissolve.

 

Austin Tiger

Footballguy
Mr Mad Cow,

Can you explain a bit more about the punctal plugs? I am 48 and just started wearing contacts this Jan 1, (no vision issues prior to hitting 47) my biggest issue is eye dryness, constantly soaking my eyes with refresh tears. I have tried wearing glasses, but I am too active at work and they get in the way and screw with my peripheral vision.

I currently use airoptic multifocal monthly .5 in my right eye, and a proclear 1 day 1.50m multifocal by cooper vision in my left eye.

I love wearing the contacts, but the eye dryness is driving me crazy
There are two basic types of dryness - low tear volume and low tear quality. The treatments are very different. Poor tear quality is generally characterized by watery, burning eyes. Low volume by dryness, that using drops helps, but it only lasts for a short time. There are other tests performed to determine exactly which is which. In a nutshell, punctal plugs keep your natural tears in your eyes. It is a very simple, in-office procedure where you put "permanent" (they last generally many years) silicone plugs in the tear ducts, or where the tears drain out. We put some temporary collagen plugs in to let you evaluate them, which last about 3-5 days before they dissolve.
Thank you sir, mine is for sure the low tear volume, I will get with my local eye doc for tests and treatment, thanks for your insight.

BTW - have you ever had a patient use 2 different types of lenses in each eye?

Mike

 

Mad Cow

Welshers and Dawdlers Beware!
Mr Mad Cow,

Can you explain a bit more about the punctal plugs? I am 48 and just started wearing contacts this Jan 1, (no vision issues prior to hitting 47) my biggest issue is eye dryness, constantly soaking my eyes with refresh tears. I have tried wearing glasses, but I am too active at work and they get in the way and screw with my peripheral vision.

I currently use airoptic multifocal monthly .5 in my right eye, and a proclear 1 day 1.50m multifocal by cooper vision in my left eye.

I love wearing the contacts, but the eye dryness is driving me crazy
There are two basic types of dryness - low tear volume and low tear quality. The treatments are very different. Poor tear quality is generally characterized by watery, burning eyes. Low volume by dryness, that using drops helps, but it only lasts for a short time. There are other tests performed to determine exactly which is which. In a nutshell, punctal plugs keep your natural tears in your eyes. It is a very simple, in-office procedure where you put "permanent" (they last generally many years) silicone plugs in the tear ducts, or where the tears drain out. We put some temporary collagen plugs in to let you evaluate them, which last about 3-5 days before they dissolve.
Thank you sir, mine is for sure the low tear volume, I will get with my local eye doc for tests and treatment, thanks for your insight.

BTW - have you ever had a patient use 2 different types of lenses in each eye?

Mike
Yes I have, but it is not common. Why did they do that with each eye? What was the reasoning?

 

Austin Tiger

Footballguy
Mr Mad Cow,

Can you explain a bit more about the punctal plugs? I am 48 and just started wearing contacts this Jan 1, (no vision issues prior to hitting 47) my biggest issue is eye dryness, constantly soaking my eyes with refresh tears. I have tried wearing glasses, but I am too active at work and they get in the way and screw with my peripheral vision.

I currently use airoptic multifocal monthly .5 in my right eye, and a proclear 1 day 1.50m multifocal by cooper vision in my left eye.

I love wearing the contacts, but the eye dryness is driving me crazy
There are two basic types of dryness - low tear volume and low tear quality. The treatments are very different. Poor tear quality is generally characterized by watery, burning eyes. Low volume by dryness, that using drops helps, but it only lasts for a short time. There are other tests performed to determine exactly which is which. In a nutshell, punctal plugs keep your natural tears in your eyes. It is a very simple, in-office procedure where you put "permanent" (they last generally many years) silicone plugs in the tear ducts, or where the tears drain out. We put some temporary collagen plugs in to let you evaluate them, which last about 3-5 days before they dissolve.
Thank you sir, mine is for sure the low tear volume, I will get with my local eye doc for tests and treatment, thanks for your insight.

BTW - have you ever had a patient use 2 different types of lenses in each eye?

Mike
Yes I have, but it is not common. Why did they do that with each eye? What was the reasoning?
Mr Mad Cow,

Can you explain a bit more about the punctal plugs? I am 48 and just started wearing contacts this Jan 1, (no vision issues prior to hitting 47) my biggest issue is eye dryness, constantly soaking my eyes with refresh tears. I have tried wearing glasses, but I am too active at work and they get in the way and screw with my peripheral vision.

I currently use airoptic multifocal monthly .5 in my right eye, and a proclear 1 day 1.50m multifocal by cooper vision in my left eye.

I love wearing the contacts, but the eye dryness is driving me crazy
There are two basic types of dryness - low tear volume and low tear quality. The treatments are very different. Poor tear quality is generally characterized by watery, burning eyes. Low volume by dryness, that using drops helps, but it only lasts for a short time. There are other tests performed to determine exactly which is which. In a nutshell, punctal plugs keep your natural tears in your eyes. It is a very simple, in-office procedure where you put "permanent" (they last generally many years) silicone plugs in the tear ducts, or where the tears drain out. We put some temporary collagen plugs in to let you evaluate them, which last about 3-5 days before they dissolve.
Thank you sir, mine is for sure the low tear volume, I will get with my local eye doc for tests and treatment, thanks for your insight.

BTW - have you ever had a patient use 2 different types of lenses in each eye?

Mike
Yes I have, but it is not common. Why did they do that with each eye? What was the reasoning?
I see the clearest with the daily in the left and the monthly in the right, I tried many combinations and types of contacts and this configuration is the clearest and the most comfortable.... if I can get rid of the dryness, I think it would be a game changer...

 

jagbag

Footballguy
MadCow, My daughter is wanting contacts. She just turned 14. Plays Volleyball and softball. I don't know her prescription, is there any special contact you recommend ?

Brand/model. Just don't want to get hosed at the doctor as I know nothing.

TIA

 

Mad Cow

Welshers and Dawdlers Beware!
MadCow, My daughter is wanting contacts. She just turned 14. Plays Volleyball and softball. I don't know her prescription, is there any special contact you recommend ?

Brand/model. Just don't want to get hosed at the doctor as I know nothing.

TIA
There are tons of different ones out there. I hesitate to say one to avoid/look at. I would merely say that if the pair that is tried is not really comfortable, make sure you get to try others.

 

Austin Tiger

Footballguy
Mr Mad Cow,

Can you explain a bit more about the punctal plugs? I am 48 and just started wearing contacts this Jan 1, (no vision issues prior to hitting 47) my biggest issue is eye dryness, constantly soaking my eyes with refresh tears. I have tried wearing glasses, but I am too active at work and they get in the way and screw with my peripheral vision.

I currently use airoptic multifocal monthly .5 in my right eye, and a proclear 1 day 1.50m multifocal by cooper vision in my left eye.

I love wearing the contacts, but the eye dryness is driving me crazy
There are two basic types of dryness - low tear volume and low tear quality. The treatments are very different. Poor tear quality is generally characterized by watery, burning eyes. Low volume by dryness, that using drops helps, but it only lasts for a short time. There are other tests performed to determine exactly which is which. In a nutshell, punctal plugs keep your natural tears in your eyes. It is a very simple, in-office procedure where you put "permanent" (they last generally many years) silicone plugs in the tear ducts, or where the tears drain out. We put some temporary collagen plugs in to let you evaluate them, which last about 3-5 days before they dissolve.
Thank you sir, mine is for sure the low tear volume, I will get with my local eye doc for tests and treatment, thanks for your insight.

BTW - have you ever had a patient use 2 different types of lenses in each eye?

Mike
Yes I have, but it is not common. Why did they do that with each eye? What was the reasoning?
Mr Mad Cow,

Can you explain a bit more about the punctal plugs? I am 48 and just started wearing contacts this Jan 1, (no vision issues prior to hitting 47) my biggest issue is eye dryness, constantly soaking my eyes with refresh tears. I have tried wearing glasses, but I am too active at work and they get in the way and screw with my peripheral vision.

I currently use airoptic multifocal monthly .5 in my right eye, and a proclear 1 day 1.50m multifocal by cooper vision in my left eye.

I love wearing the contacts, but the eye dryness is driving me crazy
There are two basic types of dryness - low tear volume and low tear quality. The treatments are very different. Poor tear quality is generally characterized by watery, burning eyes. Low volume by dryness, that using drops helps, but it only lasts for a short time. There are other tests performed to determine exactly which is which. In a nutshell, punctal plugs keep your natural tears in your eyes. It is a very simple, in-office procedure where you put "permanent" (they last generally many years) silicone plugs in the tear ducts, or where the tears drain out. We put some temporary collagen plugs in to let you evaluate them, which last about 3-5 days before they dissolve.
Thank you sir, mine is for sure the low tear volume, I will get with my local eye doc for tests and treatment, thanks for your insight.

BTW - have you ever had a patient use 2 different types of lenses in each eye?

Mike
Yes I have, but it is not common. Why did they do that with each eye? What was the reasoning?
I see the clearest with the daily in the left and the monthly in the right, I tried many combinations and types of contacts and this configuration is the clearest and the most comfortable.... if I can get rid of the dryness, I think it would be a game changer...
MC,

Spoke with the doc and went in for a visit, he put some dye in my eyes and looked at them, he did say there was some scarring?...and visible dryness. He prescribed Restasis.... do you have any thoughts on that as a prescription? Have you had any success? I understand you can't "diagnose", just looking for opinions and successes and failures for dry eyes

 

Phil Elliott

Footballguy
Mr Mad Cow,

Can you explain a bit more about the punctal plugs? I am 48 and just started wearing contacts this Jan 1, (no vision issues prior to hitting 47) my biggest issue is eye dryness, constantly soaking my eyes with refresh tears. I have tried wearing glasses, but I am too active at work and they get in the way and screw with my peripheral vision.

I currently use airoptic multifocal monthly .5 in my right eye, and a proclear 1 day 1.50m multifocal by cooper vision in my left eye.

I love wearing the contacts, but the eye dryness is driving me crazy
There are two basic types of dryness - low tear volume and low tear quality. The treatments are very different. Poor tear quality is generally characterized by watery, burning eyes. Low volume by dryness, that using drops helps, but it only lasts for a short time. There are other tests performed to determine exactly which is which. In a nutshell, punctal plugs keep your natural tears in your eyes. It is a very simple, in-office procedure where you put "permanent" (they last generally many years) silicone plugs in the tear ducts, or where the tears drain out. We put some temporary collagen plugs in to let you evaluate them, which last about 3-5 days before they dissolve.
Thank you sir, mine is for sure the low tear volume, I will get with my local eye doc for tests and treatment, thanks for your insight.

BTW - have you ever had a patient use 2 different types of lenses in each eye?

Mike
Yes I have, but it is not common. Why did they do that with each eye? What was the reasoning?
Mr Mad Cow,

Can you explain a bit more about the punctal plugs? I am 48 and just started wearing contacts this Jan 1, (no vision issues prior to hitting 47) my biggest issue is eye dryness, constantly soaking my eyes with refresh tears. I have tried wearing glasses, but I am too active at work and they get in the way and screw with my peripheral vision.

I currently use airoptic multifocal monthly .5 in my right eye, and a proclear 1 day 1.50m multifocal by cooper vision in my left eye.

I love wearing the contacts, but the eye dryness is driving me crazy
There are two basic types of dryness - low tear volume and low tear quality. The treatments are very different. Poor tear quality is generally characterized by watery, burning eyes. Low volume by dryness, that using drops helps, but it only lasts for a short time. There are other tests performed to determine exactly which is which. In a nutshell, punctal plugs keep your natural tears in your eyes. It is a very simple, in-office procedure where you put "permanent" (they last generally many years) silicone plugs in the tear ducts, or where the tears drain out. We put some temporary collagen plugs in to let you evaluate them, which last about 3-5 days before they dissolve.
Thank you sir, mine is for sure the low tear volume, I will get with my local eye doc for tests and treatment, thanks for your insight.

BTW - have you ever had a patient use 2 different types of lenses in each eye?

Mike
Yes I have, but it is not common. Why did they do that with each eye? What was the reasoning?
I see the clearest with the daily in the left and the monthly in the right, I tried many combinations and types of contacts and this configuration is the clearest and the most comfortable.... if I can get rid of the dryness, I think it would be a game changer...
MC,

Spoke with the doc and went in for a visit, he put some dye in my eyes and looked at them, he did say there was some scarring?...and visible dryness. He prescribed Restasis.... do you have any thoughts on that as a prescription? Have you had any success? I understand you can't "diagnose", just looking for opinions and successes and failures for dry eyes
FWIW - For a contact solution, I have been using PureMoist by Alcon Opti-Free for about 6 months. It seems to have helped my eye dryness quite a bit. Might help in addition to the Restasis.

 

Mad Cow

Welshers and Dawdlers Beware!
Mr Mad Cow,

Can you explain a bit more about the punctal plugs? I am 48 and just started wearing contacts this Jan 1, (no vision issues prior to hitting 47) my biggest issue is eye dryness, constantly soaking my eyes with refresh tears. I have tried wearing glasses, but I am too active at work and they get in the way and screw with my peripheral vision.

I currently use airoptic multifocal monthly .5 in my right eye, and a proclear 1 day 1.50m multifocal by cooper vision in my left eye.

I love wearing the contacts, but the eye dryness is driving me crazy
There are two basic types of dryness - low tear volume and low tear quality. The treatments are very different. Poor tear quality is generally characterized by watery, burning eyes. Low volume by dryness, that using drops helps, but it only lasts for a short time. There are other tests performed to determine exactly which is which. In a nutshell, punctal plugs keep your natural tears in your eyes. It is a very simple, in-office procedure where you put "permanent" (they last generally many years) silicone plugs in the tear ducts, or where the tears drain out. We put some temporary collagen plugs in to let you evaluate them, which last about 3-5 days before they dissolve.
Thank you sir, mine is for sure the low tear volume, I will get with my local eye doc for tests and treatment, thanks for your insight.

BTW - have you ever had a patient use 2 different types of lenses in each eye?

Mike
Yes I have, but it is not common. Why did they do that with each eye? What was the reasoning?
Mr Mad Cow,

Can you explain a bit more about the punctal plugs? I am 48 and just started wearing contacts this Jan 1, (no vision issues prior to hitting 47) my biggest issue is eye dryness, constantly soaking my eyes with refresh tears. I have tried wearing glasses, but I am too active at work and they get in the way and screw with my peripheral vision.

I currently use airoptic multifocal monthly .5 in my right eye, and a proclear 1 day 1.50m multifocal by cooper vision in my left eye.

I love wearing the contacts, but the eye dryness is driving me crazy
There are two basic types of dryness - low tear volume and low tear quality. The treatments are very different. Poor tear quality is generally characterized by watery, burning eyes. Low volume by dryness, that using drops helps, but it only lasts for a short time. There are other tests performed to determine exactly which is which. In a nutshell, punctal plugs keep your natural tears in your eyes. It is a very simple, in-office procedure where you put "permanent" (they last generally many years) silicone plugs in the tear ducts, or where the tears drain out. We put some temporary collagen plugs in to let you evaluate them, which last about 3-5 days before they dissolve.
Thank you sir, mine is for sure the low tear volume, I will get with my local eye doc for tests and treatment, thanks for your insight.

BTW - have you ever had a patient use 2 different types of lenses in each eye?

Mike
Yes I have, but it is not common. Why did they do that with each eye? What was the reasoning?
I see the clearest with the daily in the left and the monthly in the right, I tried many combinations and types of contacts and this configuration is the clearest and the most comfortable.... if I can get rid of the dryness, I think it would be a game changer...
MC,

Spoke with the doc and went in for a visit, he put some dye in my eyes and looked at them, he did say there was some scarring?...and visible dryness. He prescribed Restasis.... do you have any thoughts on that as a prescription? Have you had any success? I understand you can't "diagnose", just looking for opinions and successes and failures for dry eyes
Scarring is doubtful it came from dryness, but there certainly are other signs. Restasis can do well in increasing tear production, but there are many different things to look at. Did he perform any test where he measured your tear volume? Typically they put a thread or special paper in your eye and measure.

 

Austin Tiger

Footballguy
no tests other than the dye, he may not have said "scarring" but he said he could clearly see the dryness...I just hope this works as wearing the contacts for an extended period of time is almost painful

BTW - could you fill a prescription and using my insurance? just curious

 
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Mad Cow

Welshers and Dawdlers Beware!
no tests other than the dye, he may not have said "scarring" but he said he could clearly see the dryness...I just hope this works as wearing the contacts for an extended period of time is almost painful

BTW - could you fill a prescription and using my insurance? just curious
Depends on the insurance, but there is a good chance. I have used VSP for a few other FBG's in the past.

 

17seconds

root of all aliai
I come from the camp that have no issues whatsoever with contacts. I wear weeklies, sleep in them and keep them in for 2 months at a time. Have been doing this for over 20 years with zero issues. I use to have a little bit of oxygen deprivation until they came out with the breathable ones several years back.

I've thought about lasik but contacts are such a non-issue for me that I just can't justify it.
Same here. Only difference is I wear dailies that I keep a month at a time

Had contacts for 25 years now, just used to it.

 

Austin Tiger

Footballguy
no tests other than the dye, he may not have said "scarring" but he said he could clearly see the dryness...I just hope this works as wearing the contacts for an extended period of time is almost painful

BTW - could you fill a prescription and using my insurance? just curious
Depends on the insurance, but there is a good chance. I have used VSP for a few other FBG's in the past.
do you think getting a personal humidifier would help any by increasing the moisture in the air in my office (it is a closed office)

 

Mad Cow

Welshers and Dawdlers Beware!
no tests other than the dye, he may not have said "scarring" but he said he could clearly see the dryness...I just hope this works as wearing the contacts for an extended period of time is almost painful

BTW - could you fill a prescription and using my insurance? just curious
Depends on the insurance, but there is a good chance. I have used VSP for a few other FBG's in the past.
do you think getting a personal humidifier would help any by increasing the moisture in the air in my office (it is a closed office)
Possibly. Fish oil is a big help, as well.

 

Otis

Footballguy
I had contacts for about 15 - 20 years also. Recently (past 4 years) went to the "breathable" contacts, which allow me to sleep with them in. Never had a problem.

They say you are supposed to only wear them for 30 days, but I usually stretch a pair for 3 months and never had issue. Suppose it depends on what you do for a living. If you are aroudn a lot of fine dust, then I'd change them more frequently. But office job, I don't get a ton of dust in my eyes.

If Lasik is in the budget I am leaning towards this. While contacts are more convienent than glass, the contacts still are a pain when you get a piece of lint or eye lash in your eye. Likely have the procedure this winter.
Had no idea there was such a thing as "breathable" contacts. I could get some that I wear for 30 days and then change? Sounds pretty tempting.
Yes, highly recommend them. I used to wear the contacts that I had to take out every night and put back in next day, but my eye doctor said no one uses those anymore. He ordered me a trial pair of the Night and Day.

I would recommend the same thing if you are thinking about it, ask your doctor for a free sample. Mine gave me one to try and would never go back. I laugh when I hear people still take their contacts out at night because there are better options out there.
Any downside to wearing these all the time? Dryness issues or otherwise? I like the idea of taking a step out of the process of my day if it's easy enough to do and there's no downside...

Thx

 

Van Dyman

Footballguy
Paging @Mad Cow.  Monovision help!

Today my Optometrist suggested I try monovision contacts - right for distance, left for near.  So far (4 hours into it) I hate it.  I only occasionally need to read fine print.  What I DO need to do is use my two huge monitors at work.  I now find myself closing the left (near vision) eye to work.  That's no good.  Any suggestions?

Background:  Astigmatism in the left.  Age 43. Presbyopia hit about 18 months ago.  With no contacts, I can read fine print with my right eye, and I can almost read it with my left.  Can't read it at all with my previous contacts.

 

Mad Cow

Welshers and Dawdlers Beware!
Paging @Mad Cow.  Monovision help!

Today my Optometrist suggested I try monovision contacts - right for distance, left for near.  So far (4 hours into it) I hate it.  I only occasionally need to read fine print.  What I DO need to do is use my two huge monitors at work.  I now find myself closing the left (near vision) eye to work.  That's no good.  Any suggestions?

Background:  Astigmatism in the left.  Age 43. Presbyopia hit about 18 months ago.  With no contacts, I can read fine print with my right eye, and I can almost read it with my left.  Can't read it at all with my previous contacts.
Can you put up your Rx here so I can see?  Glasses Rx please.

 

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