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The Top 155 Songs by American Artists According to 5 Middle-Aged Idiots (2 Viewers)

Dr. Octopus

Footballguy
6


Dr. Octopus:


Simple Man – Lynyrd Skynyrd

The song is one of Lynyrd Skynyrd's most popular songs. Since the song became available for digital download, it has become Lynyrd Skynyrd's third best-selling digital song after "Sweet Home Alabama" and "Free Bird." It has sold 1,333,000 copies in the U.S. as of November 2013.


Jeb

Journey to the Center of the Mind – The Amboy Dukes

"Journey to the Center of the Mind" featured a psychedelic rock, garage rock, hard rock and acid rock sound.] The song features lyrics written by the Dukes' second guitarist Steve Farmer, and melody written by Ted Nugent. The song was recorded with a higher budget than their past recordings. During the recording of the song there was a lot of tension amongst the band members, and a few of the members quit after the album was released. Released in the summer of 1968, the single helped define the psychedelic era as it peaked at # 16 on the Billboard charts.


Scooter:


Roadhouse Blues – The Doors

Hailed by sound engineer Bruce Botnick as "the all-time American bar band song," "Roadhouse Blues"–despite its relatively unsuccessful chart peak–received strong airplay on rock radio stations.



Doug:


Me and Julio Down by the Schoolyard – Paul Simon
The song is about two boys ("Me and Julio") who have broken a law, although the exact law that has been broken is not stated in the song. When "the mama pajama" finds out what they have done, she goes to the police station to report the crime. The individuals are later arrested, but released when a "radical priest" intervenes.


Chap:


Raindrops Keep Falling on My Head – B.J. Thomas

"Raindrops Keep Fallin' on My Head" is a song written by Burt Bacharach and Hal David for the 1969 film Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid. The uplifting lyrics describe somebody who overcomes his troubles and worries by realizing that "it won't be long till happiness steps up to greet me.
 

DocHolliday

Footballguy
Round 7

My ranking is probably different than most. I like but don’t love all of the songs.
  1. Up around the bend. It’s my favorite CCR tune.
  2. Detroit Rock City. It’s simple, straight ahead rock and it does rock.
  3. Jimi. The greatest guitar player but not a big fan of the song.
  4. Schools Out. Great song by an artist that comes to life on stage.
  5. Elvis.
 

Just Win Baby

Footballguy
I haven't been ranking each group, but Simple Man takes this one for me, and it's not close. :thumbup:

Here are my retroactive top choices:

31. Black - Pearl Jam – criminally low at #31 IMO
30. Mr. Tambourine Man – The Byrds
28. She’s Gone – Hall & Oates
27. Dream On - Aerosmith
25. What’s Going On – Marvin Gaye
24. The Load Out – Jackson Browne
23. (Sittin’ On) The Dock of the Bay – Otis Redding
22. Purple Haze – Jimi Hendrix
21. Come Sail Away - Styx
20. Bulls On Parade – Rage Against the Machine
19. American Girl – Tom Petty and the Heartbreakers
18. Seven Nation Army – The White Stripes
16. Perfect Day – Lou Reed
15. (Don’t Go Back To) Rockville – R.E.M.
14. Ramblin’ Man – Allman Brothers Band – close call over Sweet Home Alabama
13. Son of a Son of a Sailor - Jimmy Buffet
12. L.A. Woman – The Doors
11. Thunder Road – Bruce Springsteen
9. Smells Like Teen Spirit - Nirvana
8. La Grange – ZZ Top
7. All Along The Watchtower – Jimi Hendrix – song is available to choose despite questionable American status
6. Simple Man – Lynyrd Skynyrd

I left out groups 10, 17, 26, and 29, because none of the songs in those groups appealed to me.
 

Pip's Invitation

Footballguy
This is an underwhelming bunch for a ranking as high as 6.

The best sonic achievement is Journey to the Center of the Mind, but Ted Nugent grosses me out.

The Simon, Skynyrd and Doors songs are all very good but not what I'd consider as their very best achievements.

The Raindrops jawn is not terrible, but not my thing.

Holding my nose and voting for Journey to the Center of the Mind, with the Doors second, Skynyrd third and Simon fourth, not separated by much.

BJ Thomas avoids the "worst of Chap" tier, also not by much.
 

Uruk-Hai

Footballguy
6


Dr. Octopus:


Simple Man – Lynyrd Skynyrd

The song is one of Lynyrd Skynyrd's most popular songs. Since the song became available for digital download, it has become Lynyrd Skynyrd's third best-selling digital song after "Sweet Home Alabama" and "Free Bird." It has sold 1,333,000 copies in the U.S. as of November 2013.


Jeb

Journey to the Center of the Mind – The Amboy Dukes

"Journey to the Center of the Mind" featured a psychedelic rock, garage rock, hard rock and acid rock sound.] The song features lyrics written by the Dukes' second guitarist Steve Farmer, and melody written by Ted Nugent. The song was recorded with a higher budget than their past recordings. During the recording of the song there was a lot of tension amongst the band members, and a few of the members quit after the album was released. Released in the summer of 1968, the single helped define the psychedelic era as it peaked at # 16 on the Billboard charts.


Scooter:


Roadhouse Blues – The Doors

Hailed by sound engineer Bruce Botnick as "the all-time American bar band song," "Roadhouse Blues"–despite its relatively unsuccessful chart peak–received strong airplay on rock radio stations.



Doug:


Me and Julio Down by the Schoolyard – Paul Simon
The song is about two boys ("Me and Julio") who have broken a law, although the exact law that has been broken is not stated in the song. When "the mama pajama" finds out what they have done, she goes to the police station to report the crime. The individuals are later arrested, but released when a "radical priest" intervenes.


Chap:


Raindrops Keep Falling on My Head – B.J. Thomas

"Raindrops Keep Fallin' on My Head" is a song written by Burt Bacharach and Hal David for the 1969 film Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid. The uplifting lyrics describe somebody who overcomes his troubles and worries by realizing that "it won't be long till happiness steps up to greet me.
#1 is a runaway and Paul Simon doesn't come in last!

#1. "Simple Man". In general, it seems to me that the Southern rock singers of the 70s were better at singing both ballads and rockers than their contemporaries hailing from other frequencies. It was certainly true for the two top-tier Southern bands. Gregg Allman and Ronnie Van Zandt were two of the best singers of any genre. This one has Ronnie at the top of his game and the band is right there with him. One of their Mount Rushmore recordings.

2. "Journey.....". More proof that an average band can have one or two great songs in it. None of this thing should work, but it does. And it captures the acid rock scene better than anything the Beatles or Hendrix didn't do.

3. "Me & Julio". The music on most of Simon's hits in the 70s was always at least fun. It sure is here, along with a cute vocal melody. One of his better efforts, IMO.

4. "Roadhouse Blues". Jim's vocal here irritates me. I'm sure it was because he was just tanked and slurring everything, but it kinda seemed to me he was doing the vocal equivalent of blackface. The backing music is good and the song moves, but it sounds a little generic to me.

5. "Raindrops". Bacharach and David are considered legends - rightfully so. I never thought much of this record, though. It's not bad or anything, and I won't turn the channel the couple of times a year I run across it. BJ Thomas was a pleasant enough singer most of the time, but he wasn't at his best here (I think I recall reading that he had been ill or something when he recorded it). This was a monster hit.
 

Uruk-Hai

Footballguy
In my ranking of these rankings, Chap has 5 in my bottom 10. This should not surprise anyone.
:lol: I probably have Jeb with more #5s than Chap. It's kind of crazy given Chap's album list, though. I mean, I like some of the records he chose, but that stupid Dawn song leaned too far towards shtick. I'm terrified of what his Top 5 is going to look like.
 

Pip's Invitation

Footballguy
In my ranking of these rankings, Chap has 5 in my bottom 10. This should not surprise anyone.
:lol: I probably have Jeb with more #5s than Chap. It's kind of crazy given Chap's album list, though. I mean, I like some of the records he chose, but that stupid Dawn song leaned too far towards shtick. I'm terrified of what his Top 5 is going to look like.
He can't pick anything worse than the Dawn thing or Billy Don't Be a Hero, can he?
 

Uruk-Hai

Footballguy
He can't pick anything worse than the Dawn thing or Billy Don't Be a Hero, can he?
Those two are awful, but..........

My Unholy Three are still on the board. Based on what (& when) he's chosen so far, I'm almost sure one won't get picked and I'm fairly hopeful on another. But the 3rd is right in his wheelhouse and I'm dreading the reveals each day.

(It's actually an Unholy Four, but one isn't eligible).
 

Pip's Invitation

Footballguy
He can't pick anything worse than the Dawn thing or Billy Don't Be a Hero, can he?
Those two are awful, but..........

My Unholy Three are still on the board. Based on what (& when) he's chosen so far, I'm almost sure one won't get picked and I'm fairly hopeful on another. But the 3rd is right in his wheelhouse and I'm dreading the reveals each day.

(It's actually an Unholy Four, but one isn't eligible).
Do these involve Billy Joel or Jackson Browne, or something different altogether?
 

Dr. Octopus

Footballguy
5


Dr. Octopus:


You Are The Sunshine Of My Life – Stevie Wonder

The first two lines of the song are sung, not by Wonder, but by Jim Gilstrap; Lani Groves sings the next two.[5] Gilstrap and Groves, together with Gloria Barley, also provide backing vocals. The single version of the song differs from the album version with the addition of horns to the mix; this version is also included in the greatest hits compilation album Stevie Wonder's Original Musiquarium I (1982).


Jeb

Blitzkrieg Bop - Ramones
Blitzkrieg Bop" is a song by the American punk rock band Ramones. It was released as the band's debut single in February 1976 in the United States. It appeared as the opening track on the band's debut album, Ramones, that was released April 23, 1976.


Scooter:


Bat Out of Hell - Meatloaf

"Bat Out of Hell" is the result of Steinman's desire to write the "most extreme crash song of all time".


Doug:

Signed, Sealed, Delivered (I’m Yours) – Stevie Wonder

"Signed, Sealed, Delivered (I'm Yours)" is a soul song, by American musician Stevie Wonder, released in June 1970 as a single on Motown's Tamla label. It spent six weeks at number one on the U.S. R&B chart and peaked at number three on the U.S. Pop chart. In the same year, the song was also released on the album Signed, Sealed & Delivered.


Chap:


Paradise By The Dashboard Light – Meatloaf

Ellen Foley performs the lead female vocal on "Paradise By The Dashboard Light".
 

Don Quixote

Footballguy
And, as I mentioned in other thread, I’m not sure Blitzkrieg Bop eligible under your rules because Tommy Ramone born in Hungary.
 
Last edited:

Dr. Octopus

Footballguy
And, as I mentioned in other thread, I’m not sure Blitzkrieg Bop eligible under your rules because Tommy Ramone born in Hungary.

Yeah - we had some "idiots" chose songs chose by Rush, Joe Cocker (x2)*, Dusty Springfield, and a few others which I corrected right away and got re-picks. Personally I just missed KISS, Van Halen and now Ramones when they were all picked (all by Jeb incidentally). I probably did know about Gene Simmons but wouldn't have even considered checking on VH or Ramones.

For my purposes here, I'm ok as this is not some scientific experiment and generally speaking KISS, VH, Blondie and Ramones are all considered "American Bands". If I didn't know David Byrnes was born in Scotland and announce it beforehand, I would have said the same as to Talking Heads. So for what amounts to some dumb playlist I will not correct these errors, but understand why krista would be more draconian in her new project. There it makes more sense. I'm doing my due dilligence.

*Doug chose "with a little help from my friends" by Cocker 2 days after I made a big deal of the fact Cocker's most famous album was called "Mad Dogs and Englishmen" when I yelled at Scooter for choosing "Feeling Alright".
 

Pip's Invitation

Footballguy
Today's winner is Stevie.

But which Stevie?

Slight edge to Signed Sealed. But I could feel differently tomorrow.

The two selections by Mr. Loaf are probably his two best songs.

Ramones song is pretty good too. Was surprised we hadn't seen them yet (not knowing until yesterday that Tommy Ramone was not US-born).
 

FairWarning

Footballguy
Very interesting thread, wish I had the time to participate. A lot of classics that I haven’t heard in a while.

props for the Bo Donaldson song. It really was a big song in the mid 70’s
 

Uruk-Hai

Footballguy
5


Dr. Octopus:


You Are The Sunshine Of My Life – Stevie Wonder

The first two lines of the song are sung, not by Wonder, but by Jim Gilstrap; Lani Groves sings the next two.[5] Gilstrap and Groves, together with Gloria Barley, also provide backing vocals. The single version of the song differs from the album version with the addition of horns to the mix; this version is also included in the greatest hits compilation album Stevie Wonder's Original Musiquarium I (1982).


Jeb

Blitzkrieg Bop - Ramones
Blitzkrieg Bop" is a song by the American punk rock band Ramones. It was released as the band's debut single in February 1976 in the United States. It appeared as the opening track on the band's debut album, Ramones, that was released April 23, 1976.


Scooter:


Bat Out of Hell - Meatloaf

"Bat Out of Hell" is the result of Steinman's desire to write the "most extreme crash song of all time".


Doug:

Signed, Sealed, Delivered (I’m Yours) – Stevie Wonder

"Signed, Sealed, Delivered (I'm Yours)" is a soul song, by American musician Stevie Wonder, released in June 1970 as a single on Motown's Tamla label. It spent six weeks at number one on the U.S. R&B chart and peaked at number three on the U.S. Pop chart. In the same year, the song was also released on the album Signed, Sealed & Delivered.


Chap:


Paradise By The Dashboard Light – Meatloaf

Ellen Foley performs the lead female vocal on "Paradise By The Dashboard Light".
Weird group. I like all of these.

1. "....Sunshine Of My Life". As wikkid used to say, "this is what a smile sounds like".

2. "Signed Sealed Delivered". You can already hear Stevie breaking away from the Motown shackles on this one, though it's would be another year before he got real control of his art. This record rocks as hard as anything released in 1970.

3. "Paradise...". I'm a sucker for big, dumb, dramatic, hook-laden songs. This one all four in spades. I used to be close friends with a brother and sister who could karaoke the hell out of this (which we thought was kind of strange given the subject matter, but whatever...).

4. "Blitzkrieg Bop". In hindsight, the Ramones wore their influences on their sleeves. We were just too dumb to realize it at the time. This record has 50s/60s Philly pop/rock/doo-*** written all over it.

5. 'Bat...". I like this intro better than the Cougar song, Pip. Don't ask me why. Anyway, good 70s bombast here.
 

Dr. Octopus

Footballguy
4


Dr. Octopus:


Blue Sky – Allman Brothers Band

"Blue Sky" is a song by the American rock band the Allman Brothers Band from their third studio album, Eat a Peach (1972), released on Capricorn Records. The song was written and sung by guitarist Dickey Betts, who penned it about his girlfriend (and later wife), Sandy "Bluesky" Wabegijig. The track is also notable as one of guitarist Duane Allman's final recorded performances with the group. The band's two guitarists, Duane Allman and Dickey Betts, alternate playing the song's lead: Allman's solo beginning 1:07 in, Betts joining in a shared melody line at 2:28, followed by Betts's solo at 2:37. The song is notably more country-inspired than many songs in the band's catalogue.

Jeb

Rock’n Me – Steve Miller Band

Billboard Magazine described "Rock'n Me" as a "catchy and highly humorous midtempo rocker," saying that the melody sounds like the Beach Boys and the Eagles in places. Cash Box said that it "draws from the best of rock ’n' roll over the last ten years" and has "hook-filled guitar lines."

Scooter:

Incident on 57th Street – Bruce Springsteen

"Incident on 57th Street" is a song written by Bruce Springsteen that was first released on his 1973 album The Wild, the Innocent & the E Street Shuffle. It has been described by critics as a key development in Springsteen's songwriting career and regarded by fans as one of his greatest songs.


Doug:

Franklin’s Tower – Grateful Dead

The nearly structureless title suite that closes the album was performed three times in 1975 and then retired, while several other songs written for the album were performed regularly for the rest of the Dead's career; specifically "Crazy Fingers", "The Music Never Stopped" and the "Help on the Way->Slipknot!->Franklin's Tower" sequence (the last section of which was often played separately).


Chap:


Mercy Mercy Me (The Ecology) – Marvin Gaye

As the single became his second million-seller from What's Going On, the album started on the soul album charts in the top five and began charging up the pop rankings. "Mercy Mercy Me (The Ecology)" soon became one of Gaye's most famous songs in his extensive catalogue. In 2002 it was his third single recording to win a "Grammy Hall of Fame" Award. As on "Inner City Blues", Bob Babbitt, not James Jamerson, plays the bass line.
 

Uruk-Hai

Footballguy
4


Dr. Octopus:


Blue Sky – Allman Brothers Band

"Blue Sky" is a song by the American rock band the Allman Brothers Band from their third studio album, Eat a Peach (1972), released on Capricorn Records. The song was written and sung by guitarist Dickey Betts, who penned it about his girlfriend (and later wife), Sandy "Bluesky" Wabegijig. The track is also notable as one of guitarist Duane Allman's final recorded performances with the group. The band's two guitarists, Duane Allman and Dickey Betts, alternate playing the song's lead: Allman's solo beginning 1:07 in, Betts joining in a shared melody line at 2:28, followed by Betts's solo at 2:37. The song is notably more country-inspired than many songs in the band's catalogue.

Jeb

Rock’n Me – Steve Miller Band

Billboard Magazine described "Rock'n Me" as a "catchy and highly humorous midtempo rocker," saying that the melody sounds like the Beach Boys and the Eagles in places. Cash Box said that it "draws from the best of rock ’n' roll over the last ten years" and has "hook-filled guitar lines."

Scooter:

Incident on 57th Street – Bruce Springsteen

"Incident on 57th Street" is a song written by Bruce Springsteen that was first released on his 1973 album The Wild, the Innocent & the E Street Shuffle. It has been described by critics as a key development in Springsteen's songwriting career and regarded by fans as one of his greatest songs.


Doug:

Franklin’s Tower – Grateful Dead

The nearly structureless title suite that closes the album was performed three times in 1975 and then retired, while several other songs written for the album were performed regularly for the rest of the Dead's career; specifically "Crazy Fingers", "The Music Never Stopped" and the "Help on the Way->Slipknot!->Franklin's Tower" sequence (the last section of which was often played separately).


Chap:


Mercy Mercy Me (The Ecology) – Marvin Gaye

As the single became his second million-seller from What's Going On, the album started on the soul album charts in the top five and began charging up the pop rankings. "Mercy Mercy Me (The Ecology)" soon became one of Gaye's most famous songs in his extensive catalogue. In 2002 it was his third single recording to win a "Grammy Hall of Fame" Award. As on "Inner City Blues", Bob Babbitt, not James Jamerson, plays the bass line.
For God's sakes, Jeb. I would have expected that pick out of Chap,

1. "Mercy Mercy Me". Ladies and gentlemen, this is how you do a concept album. What a gorgeous, timeless piece of music this song is.

2. "Blue Sky". This song can make me both cry and smile, often at the same time. These guys were so freaking good.

3. "Incident...". This is one of the more listenable Early Bruce songs for me because he slows the hell down (relatively speaking). Always enjoyed this one.

4. "Franklin's Tower". As with almost every Dead song, it's ok to me. They are like soccer: I enjoy them more listening to them/watching a match with people who love them/it. By myself? It's white noise.

5. "Rock'n Me". It's my fault. I bought the original albums. I bought that damned Greatest Hits - it sold like 20 million copies. THEN I BOUGHT IT AGAIN WHEN CDs BECAME A THING. Through each iteration, I listened less. I don't think I EVER listened to the CD version of Greatest Hits that I spent like $20 on. God have mercy on my soul.
 

Pip's Invitation

Footballguy
Blue Sky, one of my favorite songs from one of my favorite bands, wins this round, but Mercy Mercy Me is close. Both are highly emotional and extremely well-crafted.

Rock N Me is one of the better Miller hits -- great riffage and momentum.

As I said, I'm not a huge fan of the Dead, but I've always liked Franklin's Tower, mainly for the rollicking rhythm (which is absent from most of their other songs.) I have this much higher than their other selections from this exercise so far.

I'm also not a fan of Bruce but I think Incident is one of his best. It helps that it wasn't overplayed to death on the radio. As Uruk said, the song actually breathes, which was not often the case for him.
 

Dr. Octopus

Footballguy
3


Dr. Octopus:


America – Simon & Garfunkel

The song was written and composed by Paul Simon, and concerns young lovers hitchhiking their way across the United States, in search of "America", in both a literal and figurative sense. It was inspired by a 1964 road trip that Simon took with his then-girlfriend Kathy Chitty. The song has been regarded as one of Simon's strongest songwriting efforts and one of the duo's best songs. A 2014 Rolling Stone reader's poll ranked it the group's fourth-best song.


Jeb


Where It’s At – Beck

"Where It's At" is a song by American alternative rock musician Beck. It was released as the first single from his 1996 album Odelay. Beck wrote the song in 1995. He premiered it at Lollapalooza 1995, in a version very similar to its incarnation on Odelay. He has played the song very often since 1995, although he regularly experiments with the music and lyrics.



Scooter:


Piano Man – Billy Joel

The title track, a fictionalized retelling of Joel's experiences with people he met as a lounge singer in Los Angeles, peaked at No. 25 on the US Billboard Hot 100 and No. 4 on the Adult Contemporary singles chart.


Doug:

Me and Bobby McGee – Janis Joplin


The song is the story of two drifters, the narrator and Bobby McGee. The pair hitch a ride from a truck driver and sing as they drive through the American South before making their way westward to California. They visit California and then part ways, with the song's narrator expressing sadness afterwards. Due to the singer's name never being mentioned and the name "Bobby" being gender-neutral (especially in America), the song has been recorded by both male and female singers with only minor differences in the lyrical content.


Chap:

Tangled Up In Blue – Bob Dylan
Billboard regarded "Tangled Up in Blue" as Dylan's most powerful and most commercial single in a long time, saying that Dylan's voice and the "strong acoustic background" instrumentals were reminiscent of Dylan's early songs. Cash Box said that it is a "great tune...with lyrics pouring forth in profusion and with Bob's voice in excellent shape."
 

heckmanm

Footballguy
4


Dr. Octopus:


Blue Sky – Allman Brothers Band

"Blue Sky" is a song by the American rock band the Allman Brothers Band from their third studio album, Eat a Peach (1972), released on Capricorn Records. The song was written and sung by guitarist Dickey Betts, who penned it about his girlfriend (and later wife), Sandy "Bluesky" Wabegijig. The track is also notable as one of guitarist Duane Allman's final recorded performances with the group. The band's two guitarists, Duane Allman and Dickey Betts, alternate playing the song's lead: Allman's solo beginning 1:07 in, Betts joining in a shared melody line at 2:28, followed by Betts's solo at 2:37. The song is notably more country-inspired than many songs in the band's catalogue.

Jeb

Rock’n Me – Steve Miller Band

Billboard Magazine described "Rock'n Me" as a "catchy and highly humorous midtempo rocker," saying that the melody sounds like the Beach Boys and the Eagles in places. Cash Box said that it "draws from the best of rock ’n' roll over the last ten years" and has "hook-filled guitar lines."

Scooter:

Incident on 57th Street – Bruce Springsteen

"Incident on 57th Street" is a song written by Bruce Springsteen that was first released on his 1973 album The Wild, the Innocent & the E Street Shuffle. It has been described by critics as a key development in Springsteen's songwriting career and regarded by fans as one of his greatest songs.


Doug:

Franklin’s Tower – Grateful Dead

The nearly structureless title suite that closes the album was performed three times in 1975 and then retired, while several other songs written for the album were performed regularly for the rest of the Dead's career; specifically "Crazy Fingers", "The Music Never Stopped" and the "Help on the Way->Slipknot!->Franklin's Tower" sequence (the last section of which was often played separately).


Chap:


Mercy Mercy Me (The Ecology) – Marvin Gaye

As the single became his second million-seller from What's Going On, the album started on the soul album charts in the top five and began charging up the pop rankings. "Mercy Mercy Me (The Ecology)" soon became one of Gaye's most famous songs in his extensive catalogue. In 2002 it was his third single recording to win a "Grammy Hall of Fame" Award. As on "Inner City Blues", Bob Babbitt, not James Jamerson, plays the bass line.
Absolute heavyweights here. And special guest star: Steve Miller

I'm partial to Bruce and the Dead personally, but really, throw a hat over all 4 of them.
 

Uruk-Hai

Footballguy
3


Dr. Octopus:


America – Simon & Garfunkel

The song was written and composed by Paul Simon, and concerns young lovers hitchhiking their way across the United States, in search of "America", in both a literal and figurative sense. It was inspired by a 1964 road trip that Simon took with his then-girlfriend Kathy Chitty. The song has been regarded as one of Simon's strongest songwriting efforts and one of the duo's best songs. A 2014 Rolling Stone reader's poll ranked it the group's fourth-best song.


Jeb


Where It’s At – Beck

"Where It's At" is a song by American alternative rock musician Beck. It was released as the first single from his 1996 album Odelay. Beck wrote the song in 1995. He premiered it at Lollapalooza 1995, in a version very similar to its incarnation on Odelay. He has played the song very often since 1995, although he regularly experiments with the music and lyrics.



Scooter:


Piano Man – Billy Joel

The title track, a fictionalized retelling of Joel's experiences with people he met as a lounge singer in Los Angeles, peaked at No. 25 on the US Billboard Hot 100 and No. 4 on the Adult Contemporary singles chart.


Doug:

Me and Bobby McGee – Janis Joplin


The song is the story of two drifters, the narrator and Bobby McGee. The pair hitch a ride from a truck driver and sing as they drive through the American South before making their way westward to California. They visit California and then part ways, with the song's narrator expressing sadness afterwards. Due to the singer's name never being mentioned and the name "Bobby" being gender-neutral (especially in America), the song has been recorded by both male and female singers with only minor differences in the lyrical content.


Chap:

Tangled Up In Blue – Bob Dylan
Billboard regarded "Tangled Up in Blue" as Dylan's most powerful and most commercial single in a long time, saying that Dylan's voice and the "strong acoustic background" instrumentals were reminiscent of Dylan's early songs. Cash Box said that it is a "great tune...with lyrics pouring forth in profusion and with Bob's voice in excellent shape."
Oh my :lol:

1. "Where It's At". I did not like Beck when he first came out. That's mainly because I wasn't crazy about some of the people I was around who were into him and that whole scene. That's on me, as I just didn't get it. I still don't with many of those artists, but I've come around big-time on him. This song is funky and funny. Once I got past my bias, I've liked pretty much everything he's done.

2. "Me & Bobby McGee". I'm not this planet's biggest Janis fan. Too many of her songs lack finesse. That's not all her fault - I think most of her studio companions didn't know what to do with her and thought "screaming banshee" was the way to start all of her records. Here, though, she has a first-rate composition to work with and nails it. This is basically her "Dock Of The Bay" and shows how she had a really interesting path to a different kind of stardom in the 70s.

3. "America". S&G's records were always pretty. They had great dynamics and the singing was always superb. This is one of Simon's least "allegorical/poetic" lyrics, which is a plus in my book. It's a minor gem.

4. "Tangled Up In Blue". A frenzy of........something. I like the energy and don't give a crap about the lyrics (Dylan doesn't either). I don't know enough about Bob's day-to-day to know what he was up to personally during this period, but this sounds like a cocaine record to me (or maybe meth, given the title). Anyway, one of his better 70s efforts.

5. "Piano Man". I have several thousand words rattling about in my brain about this thing. I'm not wasting the energy. This record is THE avatar for everything I don't like in music.
 

Pip's Invitation

Footballguy
The heavyweights are out for the #3 picks.

Where It's At and Tangled Up in Blue are among the best and most revered songs of their respective decades, and move into the top 10 of my ranking of your rankings. I do have a Dylan song yet to be revealed ranked above Tangled, and that one is likely to be my Dylan representative (if I have one) on my own list. But Tangled is a top 2 or 3 Dylan song for me, which says a lot. As with Uruk, Where It's At completely turned me around on Beck -- it's an immensely listenable and well-crafted record that you can chuckle, think AND dance to -- and is my #1 song from him.

Me and Bobby McGee is a fantastic song with a fantastic vocal. It was one of my dad's favorites, though he tended to play (and sing along to) the Gordon Lightfoot version.

America was another one of my dad's favorites, and is a sweeping, compelling work.

I don't hate Piano Man, and I get why others love it, but it's in the Take It Easy/Truckin' category of songs that aren't bad but I never need to hear again.
 

krista4

Footballguy
Have you guys had any duplicates among you yet? It doesn’t seem like you have, but I might have missed it.
 

Dr. Octopus

Footballguy
Have you guys had any duplicates among you yet? It doesn’t seem like you have, but I might have missed it.
I actually mentioned earlier in the thread that (for the purpose of my playlist) a few people announced they went with a different song instead (usually by the same artist) if it would have been a duplicate. There would have been about 4-5 songs that would have been on at least 2 lists.
 

Uruk-Hai

Footballguy
Have you guys had any duplicates among you yet? It doesn’t seem like you have, but I might have missed it.
I actually mentioned earlier in the thread that (for the purpose of my playlist) a few people announced they went with a different song instead (usually by the same artist) if it would have been a duplicate. There would have been about 4-5 songs that would have been on at least 2 lists.
If krista actually read your posts, she'd have known that.

(I don't actually remember you posting that, either)
 

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