Jump to content
Fantasy Football - Footballguys Forums

***Official Grilling and Smoking Thread***


Recommended Posts

9 hours ago, Ron Swanson said:

A gas torch to light it.

A tip top temperature control or one of the fancy DigiQ type setups for auto temp control.

A diffuser plate.

I only use one of these in my kamado. Sometimes I use the torch if I need to speed things up, but rarely. All I need is the diffuser/plate setter

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • Replies 7.7k
  • Created
  • Last Reply

Top Posters In This Topic

Top Posters In This Topic

Popular Posts

At Memphis in May I Hosted Roberto Mora, owner and head chef of El Mercado and Cuci Suco BBQ pit in Cuenca, Equador. He came in for the festival and commented on our IG page so I reached out and exten

Here we go, fellas...tried something today Ive never done before...pork belly burnt ends aka Meat Candy (Ive never done PB or BE at home), and bacon wrapped jalapeno poppers on the Akorn. They both tu

Weekend cookout draft went well... some pics:  Our private barrel pick of Eagle Rare for 155th Airlift Squadron came in so popped one while prepping the meat.  Bush's Homestyle beans churched

10 hours ago, kaso said:

Decided to make the jump into a kamado... never cooked with charcoal before, so looking forward to the adventure.  My wife thinks I'm nuts since this makes 3 cooking set-ups available to me in the back yard.  Have a Weber Spirit, and Louisiana Grills LG900, and now the Louisiana Grills K24.  

Any tips/tricks or must have accessories for a Kamado newbie?

Honestly the biggest thing to do is learn the vents. They determine the temp. Most of my kamados needed to be open about an inch down low and maybe a half up high to stick between 250-300. My Primo needs almost double the oxygen intake at the bottom. Do a test run. Light the grill up, put it at an inch open at the bottom and close the top vent by half and wait 20 minutes. Go check the temp gauge to see what that temp is. Does it need to be closed more? Does it need to be more open for your desired temps? Once you figure out how to get your desired temp, your kamado should hold that for hours and hours. 

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
18 hours ago, Brony said:

I have a very similar kamado to the LG 24.  I've tried using blow torch to light my charcoal and it still takes a long time to get going.  I've gone back to using the Chimney to get charcoal going and I just prefer the consistency with that method. 

I strongly recommend an ash rake tool with pan to collect the ash.  Once you use the smoker, you'll understand why. 

I haven't use a chimney in years.  I make charcoal lighters from paper towels and bacon grease. 

Every time I make bacon I toss a few paper towels on top of the grease, let them soak for 10-15 minutes, fold them up and then freeze them in a ziplock bag.  Then when I am ready to light the charcoal I just arrange the lump charcoal around a couple squares and light them.   It takes about 10-15 minutes for the charcoal to light.

Link to post
Share on other sites
13 minutes ago, Godsbrother said:

I haven't use a chimney in years.  I make charcoal lighters from paper towels and bacon grease. 

Every time I make bacon I toss a few paper towels on top of the grease, let them soak for 10-15 minutes, fold them up and then freeze them in a ziplock bag.  Then when I am ready to light the charcoal I just arrange the lump charcoal around a couple squares and light them.   It takes about 10-15 minutes for the charcoal to light.

What do you fry your eggs in? Or make refried beans with?

  • Thanks 1
  • Laughing 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
4 minutes ago, Ron Swanson said:

What do you fry your eggs in? Or make refried beans with?

Occasionally I'll fry eggs in bacon grease but only a little and really you can fry eggs in anything, even water.   

I've never made refried beans.

Link to post
Share on other sites
14 hours ago, Ron Swanson said:

Whaaa? By torch I mean basically a flame thrower.  Guaranteed to light it up in less than 30 seconds. Every time.

https://www.harborfreight.com/lawn-garden/gardening-garden-tools/propane-torch-with-push-button-igniter-91037.html

I just put a Bic lighter on mine.  It usually gets the coals going before the fluid runs out.  I add the extra minutes to my cook times so I can advertise low and slow to my friends.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Thank you @Ron Swanson for the Wild Fork link.  I got a prime brisket and some salmon.  

First time cooking brisket here and using a Weber Bullet with charcoal.  I've never fussed too much with temps but mine seems consistent(ish).  One load of charcoal and modified Minion always has plenty of heat for large pork shoulders.  But I imagine that once wrapped, the brisket cook might need more charcoal.  Should I light that on the side in a chimney or just throw it on cold as I think I need it?  

Also wondering if there are any here with experience augmenting the wrap with some beef tallow?  Youtube tells me it may be one of Franklin's secrets.  

Mostly planning on keeping it simple and learning but can't help reach out for the expert opinions here.  

Link to post
Share on other sites
8 hours ago, Godsbrother said:

I haven't use a chimney in years.  I make charcoal lighters from paper towels and bacon grease. 

Every time I make bacon I toss a few paper towels on top of the grease, let them soak for 10-15 minutes, fold them up and then freeze them in a ziplock bag.  Then when I am ready to light the charcoal I just arrange the lump charcoal around a couple squares and light them.   It takes about 10-15 minutes for the charcoal to light.

It's not that I'm naive to other methods.  I can get some charcoal coals to light no problem.  It's just been highly variable on the amount of time needed to get enough lit where I can close the lid and maintain temp.  The chimney solves this for me and costs like 40 cents to use a starter cube.

Link to post
Share on other sites
4 hours ago, Ron Popeil said:

Thank you @Ron Swanson for the Wild Fork link.  I got a prime brisket and some salmon.  

First time cooking brisket here and using a Weber Bullet with charcoal.  I've never fussed too much with temps but mine seems consistent(ish).  One load of charcoal and modified Minion always has plenty of heat for large pork shoulders.  But I imagine that once wrapped, the brisket cook might need more charcoal.  Should I light that on the side in a chimney or just throw it on cold as I think I need it?  

Also wondering if there are any here with experience augmenting the wrap with some beef tallow?  Youtube tells me it may be one of Franklin's secrets.  

Mostly planning on keeping it simple and learning but can't help reach out for the expert opinions here.  

Awesome. Glad to hear it.  I can't really help with the Weber bullet or charcoal used that way.  Never done it.

But, I can promise you the beef tallow thing is totally unnecessary YouTube hype at best. Aaron has experimented with just about every way on earth to cook a brisket and I'm sure he has experimented with tallow at one point. But it is not part of his standard process.  And it is totally unnecessary, especially with Prime beef. Save that tallow for making the best french fries you've had since Mickey D's went veg.

Link to post
Share on other sites
14 hours ago, Brony said:

It's not that I'm naive to other methods.  I can get some charcoal coals to light no problem.  It's just been highly variable on the amount of time needed to get enough lit where I can close the lid and maintain temp.  The chimney solves this for me and costs like 40 cents to use a starter cube.

Faire enough.  I do suggest you give the bacon grease/paper towel a try with the chimney.  Why pay 40 cents for a cube when you can do the same thing for pretty much nothing?

Link to post
Share on other sites
24 minutes ago, heckmanm said:

Or pop your popcorn?

In bacon grease?  No way.  The only oils for popcorn are coconut or peanut.  And flavocol -- you must use flavcol.

Link to post
Share on other sites
24 minutes ago, Godsbrother said:

In bacon grease?  No way.  The only oils for popcorn are coconut or peanut.  And flavocol -- you must use flavcol.

I guess. I mean, if you don't like popcorn that tastes like bacon. :shrug:

Link to post
Share on other sites
1 minute ago, heckmanm said:

I guess. I mean, if you don't like popcorn that tastes like bacon. :shrug:

Sorry, I am a bit of a popcorn snob.  I am sure it tastes good but I like mine to taste like popcorn

Link to post
Share on other sites
21 hours ago, Ron Popeil said:

First time cooking brisket here and using a Weber Bullet with charcoal.  I've never fussed too much with temps but mine seems consistent(ish).  One load of charcoal and modified Minion always has plenty of heat for large pork shoulders.  But I imagine that once wrapped, the brisket cook might need more charcoal.  Should I light that on the side in a chimney or just throw it on cold as I think I need it?  

I tend to already burn down my charcoal before hand and add it when needed. imo if the cold coals are drawing energy to light, then it's drawing energy(heat) away from the meat and you might get dips in temp until they catch up. 

Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, Godsbrother said:

I do suggest you give the bacon grease/paper towel a try with the chimney.  Why pay 40 cents for a cube when you can do the same thing for pretty much nothing?

I think the better question is "why burn perfectly good bacon grease and paper towels when you can pay 40 cents for a cube"?

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, E-Z Glider said:

I think the better question is "why burn perfectly good bacon grease and paper towels when you can pay 40 cents for a cube"?

Fair enough.  I guess I don't put the same value on bacon grease as you.  I typically throw it away so this is a good way for me to put it to productive use.

  • Sad 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

tldr; Moron asks for help

So....we won a Vision HD1 Series Kamado grill this past weekend from a raffle. It's apparently a cheaper cousin to the BGE but boasts some positives over that brand #marketing. You guys might already know about these :shrug: . Whatevs, it was free so I'm gonna (try to) use it. I already have some lump charcoal coming. 

I can do general grilling on my standard charcoal Weber (burgers, brats, a venison tenderloin, steak, chicken, etc) with relative success. But only twice have I tried "smoking" ribs, indirect with some wood chips (modified 3-2-1). Turned out ok. Good but not great. I've never tried anything else that this thing can do....can't wait for pizza but that's going to be like eleventy weeks down the road.

The little reading I've done over the past few days has been overwhelming. I hope I don't spam the thread but I'm going to have a ton of questions. I apologize in advance if these are easy or answered on every page but 153 of them is a little daunting to go through when half the terms I have to look up lol.

I guess my first one is seasoning. I've read the ceramic needs to be seasoned, much like a cast iron skillet. One site suggested just lighting it up and throwing some bacon on and letting it spray and then coating it with oil. I'm guessing they didn't mean Oscar Mayer thin sliced stuff, or did they? Or were they talking about getting a chunk? What kind of oil? Vegetable? Crisco? Grapeseed? What temp?

I realize learning temperature control is the next step. I just don't want to ruin this thing so I'm starting here. Sorry for being the n00b but how far should I go with the "seasoning" of it?. I can't do a ton in the coming weeks because my kids are starting baseball and whatnot so I may have a free few hours here and there to start that part. Just trying to :sehorn: for future reference. 

PS I did see the links on page one. I'll get back to those. I'm literally blind here at this moment as to where I should begin. TIA

Link to post
Share on other sites

Meeting some friends at their place for drinks tomorrow night and want to bring a few smoked appetizers.  I've landed on doing the bacon wrapped pickles, but want to do some form of smoked cheese dip in a small cast iron skillet.  Lots of queso and beer cheese with pretzel dips out there; but I'd like something a little different.  I quick searched the thread and didn't see anything similar. n Anyone have a "different" type smoked cheese dip idea?

Link to post
Share on other sites
15 hours ago, strykerpks said:

tldr; Moron asks for help

So....we won a Vision HD1 Series Kamado grill this past weekend from a raffle. It's apparently a cheaper cousin to the BGE but boasts some positives over that brand #marketing. You guys might already know about these :shrug: . Whatevs, it was free so I'm gonna (try to) use it. I already have some lump charcoal coming. 

I can do general grilling on my standard charcoal Weber (burgers, brats, a venison tenderloin, steak, chicken, etc) with relative success. But only twice have I tried "smoking" ribs, indirect with some wood chips (modified 3-2-1). Turned out ok. Good but not great. I've never tried anything else that this thing can do....can't wait for pizza but that's going to be like eleventy weeks down the road.

The little reading I've done over the past few days has been overwhelming. I hope I don't spam the thread but I'm going to have a ton of questions. I apologize in advance if these are easy or answered on every page but 153 of them is a little daunting to go through when half the terms I have to look up lol.

I guess my first one is seasoning. I've read the ceramic needs to be seasoned, much like a cast iron skillet. One site suggested just lighting it up and throwing some bacon on and letting it spray and then coating it with oil. I'm guessing they didn't mean Oscar Mayer thin sliced stuff, or did they? Or were they talking about getting a chunk? What kind of oil? Vegetable? Crisco? Grapeseed? What temp?

I realize learning temperature control is the next step. I just don't want to ruin this thing so I'm starting here. Sorry for being the n00b but how far should I go with the "seasoning" of it?. I can't do a ton in the coming weeks because my kids are starting baseball and whatnot so I may have a free few hours here and there to start that part. Just trying to :sehorn: for future reference. 

PS I did see the links on page one. I'll get back to those. I'm literally blind here at this moment as to where I should begin. TIA

Not sure about the detail of seasoning since I've never owned a ceramic Kamado.  With all of my other smokers I've just fired them up.and got to cookin'.  I usually do a pork butt as the first cook.  It gives me a good chance to play with the temp control, pork butt puts off lots of grease so probably handles the seasoning aspect, and pork butt is probably the easiest thing to smoke.

One tip with a kamado and slow smoking, start the fire small and keep the vents just cracked to start and see where the temp goes to.  It doesn't take much fuel or fire to get them very hot and they're so well insulated that it takes a long time for the temp to come back down and there's not much you can do about it. So start small.  Smaller than you're even thinking.  You can always raise the temperature.

Second cook should be a hot and fast spatchcocked chicken.  If you've never cooked a chicken this way before you will be very pleased with the results.

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites
20 minutes ago, Ron Swanson said:

Not sure about the detail of seasoning since I've never owned a ceramic Kamado.  With all of my other smokers I've just fired them up.and got to cookin'.  I usually do a pork butt as the first cook.  It gives me a good chance to play with the temp control, pork butt puts off lots of grease so probably handles the seasoning aspect, and pork butt is probably the easiest thing to smoke.

One tip with a kamado and slow smoking, start the fire small and keep the vents just cracked to start and see where the temp goes to.  It doesn't take much fuel or fire to get them very hot and they're so well insulated that it takes a long time for the temp to come back down and there's not much you can do about it. So start small.  Smaller than you're even thinking.  You can always raise the temperature.

Second cook should be a hot and fast spatchcocked chicken.  If you've never cooked a chicken this way before you will be very pleased with the results.

I second this...pretty much all of it.

And I don't think you really need to season it either.  I got a Kamado Joe last year around Father's day.  Love that grill and use it often.

Once you get used to getting the temps right...I also suggest looking into a temp control unit.  Sure, these things do well at holding temps...but my BBQ Guru will do it much easier for me...can basically set it like a pellet grill and let technology do the work.  Especially helpful for long cooks and if I need to cook overnight.

Link to post
Share on other sites

fire it up once without food for burning off any manufacturing/warehouse/packaging schmutz.  Get it hot, see how it works.  It's for peace of mind as much as anything else.  Adding bacon on the grate won't do much for the ceramic.  Spraying oil on the ceramic won't hurt but also won't help.  Treat the grate like you have for other grills, even if that's "I never do anything but cook on it."    

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
7 hours ago, Ron Swanson said:

One tip with a kamado and slow smoking, start the fire small and keep the vents just cracked to start and see where the temp goes to.  It doesn't take much fuel or fire to get them very hot and they're so well insulated that it takes a long time for the temp to come back down and there's not much you can do about it. So start small.  Smaller than you're even thinking.  You can always raise the temperature.

Haven't cooked on a kamado myself but a GB of mine has one and I can attest to the fact that it's WAY easier to raise the temp than to bring it down if you overshoot.

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites
23 hours ago, strykerpks said:

tldr; Moron asks for help

So....we won a Vision HD1 Series Kamado grill this past weekend from a raffle. It's apparently a cheaper cousin to the BGE but boasts some positives over that brand #marketing. You guys might already know about these :shrug: . Whatevs, it was free so I'm gonna (try to) use it. I already have some lump charcoal coming. 

I can do general grilling on my standard charcoal Weber (burgers, brats, a venison tenderloin, steak, chicken, etc) with relative success. But only twice have I tried "smoking" ribs, indirect with some wood chips (modified 3-2-1). Turned out ok. Good but not great. I've never tried anything else that this thing can do....can't wait for pizza but that's going to be like eleventy weeks down the road.

The little reading I've done over the past few days has been overwhelming. I hope I don't spam the thread but I'm going to have a ton of questions. I apologize in advance if these are easy or answered on every page but 153 of them is a little daunting to go through when half the terms I have to look up lol.

I guess my first one is seasoning. I've read the ceramic needs to be seasoned, much like a cast iron skillet. One site suggested just lighting it up and throwing some bacon on and letting it spray and then coating it with oil. I'm guessing they didn't mean Oscar Mayer thin sliced stuff, or did they? Or were they talking about getting a chunk? What kind of oil? Vegetable? Crisco? Grapeseed? What temp?

I realize learning temperature control is the next step. I just don't want to ruin this thing so I'm starting here. Sorry for being the n00b but how far should I go with the "seasoning" of it?. I can't do a ton in the coming weeks because my kids are starting baseball and whatnot so I may have a free few hours here and there to start that part. Just trying to :sehorn: for future reference. 

PS I did see the links on page one. I'll get back to those. I'm literally blind here at this moment as to where I should begin. TIA

That’s the grill I have and is pretty awesome. You should enjoy it. 

heckman is correct in that it’s easier to raise temp. They hold temp very well and it’s a pain to get back down. But once you figure yours out it’s easy to repeat the amounts and get a nice even temp. 

Edited by The Gator
Link to post
Share on other sites
On 4/21/2021 at 8:28 AM, heckmanm said:
On 4/20/2021 at 7:43 AM, Ron Swanson said:

What do you fry your eggs in? Or make refried beans with?

Or pop your popcorn?

or use to hold your hair in place, give it that natural sheen, and draw all the ladies 'round?

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
23 hours ago, strykerpks said:

tldr; Moron asks for help

So....we won a Vision HD1 Series Kamado grill this past weekend from a raffle. It's apparently a cheaper cousin to the BGE but boasts some positives over that brand #marketing. You guys might already know about these :shrug: . Whatevs, it was free so I'm gonna (try to) use it. I already have some lump charcoal coming. 

I can do general grilling on my standard charcoal Weber (burgers, brats, a venison tenderloin, steak, chicken, etc) with relative success. But only twice have I tried "smoking" ribs, indirect with some wood chips (modified 3-2-1). Turned out ok. Good but not great. I've never tried anything else that this thing can do....can't wait for pizza but that's going to be like eleventy weeks down the road.

The little reading I've done over the past few days has been overwhelming. I hope I don't spam the thread but I'm going to have a ton of questions. I apologize in advance if these are easy or answered on every page but 153 of them is a little daunting to go through when half the terms I have to look up lol.

I guess my first one is seasoning. I've read the ceramic needs to be seasoned, much like a cast iron skillet. One site suggested just lighting it up and throwing some bacon on and letting it spray and then coating it with oil. I'm guessing they didn't mean Oscar Mayer thin sliced stuff, or did they? Or were they talking about getting a chunk? What kind of oil? Vegetable? Crisco? Grapeseed? What temp?

I realize learning temperature control is the next step. I just don't want to ruin this thing so I'm starting here. Sorry for being the n00b but how far should I go with the "seasoning" of it?. I can't do a ton in the coming weeks because my kids are starting baseball and whatnot so I may have a free few hours here and there to start that part. Just trying to :sehorn: for future reference. 

PS I did see the links on page one. I'll get back to those. I'm literally blind here at this moment as to where I should begin. TIA

I wouldn't worry about seasoning.  I never heard of that, and didn't do it when I got mine many years ago.  I would say one of the first things to do is to throw the dial thermometer in the trash and get a decent digital thermometer to use while you figure out how to steer that thing.  In our neck of the woods, Discount Liquor on Oklahoma has good prices on the 40 lb bags of Cowboy lump and you can get Royal Oak lump charcoal at Menards.

 

 

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Bacon Day!  Been curing for almost a week. The cook chart is the perfect example of how perfect a pellet smoker with good PID control is for a cook like this.  Keep in mind, this is cured meat.  I wouldn't smoke at this low temp for uncured meat.  5 hours 35 minutes hovering around 200F to bring the bacon to 150F. Plunge cool, vacuum seal, and into the deep freeze.

Start

Finish

Packaged 1/2 Slab

Fireboard Cook Chart

Edited by Ron Swanson
  • Like 9
Link to post
Share on other sites

Quick Kamado update.  Have done 4 quick cooks:  pizza, burgers, pork chops and chicken breast.  Tomorrow is the first long cook, going with a family favorite of pulled pork.

I'm quite surprised with the flavor differences (all improvements) over the pellet grill, even when using a smoke tube.  Just doesn't compare. And light years difference over cooking on propane.  I think I'm slowly becoming a charcoal fan...

 

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
11 minutes ago, kaso said:

Quick Kamado update.  Have done 4 quick cooks:  pizza, burgers, pork chops and chicken breast.  Tomorrow is the first long cook, going with a family favorite of pulled pork.

I'm quite surprised with the flavor differences (all improvements) over the pellet grill, even when using a smoke tube.  Just doesn't compare. And light years difference over cooking on propane.  I think I'm slowly becoming a charcoal fan...

 

I went the other direction from exclusively cooking/smoking on charcoal to getting a pellet grill for the convenience.  I don't think I will ever completely get away from charcoal, but I am currently trying some charcoal blend pellets in my pellet smoker.

Link to post
Share on other sites
12 minutes ago, WDIK2 said:

I went the other direction from exclusively cooking/smoking on charcoal to getting a pellet grill for the convenience.  I don't think I will ever completely get away from charcoal, but I am currently trying some charcoal blend pellets in my pellet smoker.

Please report back with results, thx

Link to post
Share on other sites
17 minutes ago, WDIK2 said:

I went the other direction from exclusively cooking/smoking on charcoal to getting a pellet grill for the convenience.  I don't think I will ever completely get away from charcoal, but I am currently trying some charcoal blend pellets in my pellet smoker.

 

4 minutes ago, heckmanm said:

Please report back with results, thx

Hmmm, I’m interested to hear about these too. Never heard of them 

Link to post
Share on other sites
4 minutes ago, heckmanm said:

Please report back with results, thx

Will do.  I did a chuck roast with a mix of Pit Boss charcoal pellets and Kingsford Hardwood blend.  It was OK, but not "OMG! charcoal flavor."  A local store has Lumberjack Char-Hickory in stock I'm hearing good things about.

Link to post
Share on other sites

 

51 minutes ago, kaso said:

Quick Kamado update.  Have done 4 quick cooks:  pizza, burgers, pork chops and chicken breast.  Tomorrow is the first long cook, going with a family favorite of pulled pork.

I'm quite surprised with the flavor differences (all improvements) over the pellet grill, even when using a smoke tube.  Just doesn't compare. And light years difference over cooking on propane.  I think I'm slowly becoming a charcoal fan...

 

The charcoal flavor vs. wood smoke flavor thing is interesting to me.  There are certainly people who like charcoal flavor and people who don't. 

Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, kaso said:

 

Has anybody used wood chunks on a charcoal grill?  Interested in how this helps or hurts the flavor?

Many times. It works just as well as wood chunks on any other method.  You can make decent BBQ that way.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, kaso said:

 

Has anybody used wood chunks on a charcoal grill?  Interested in how this helps or hurts the flavor?

I usually toss in a 3 or 4 chunks of Hickory or Oak when cooking steaks on my Weber Kettle. Sometimes for burgers as well. For me it just adds a little bit of extra flavor. Wife loves it like that. 

Link to post
Share on other sites
38 minutes ago, Zod said:

Need to buy a grill.  Our house has natural gas but no outlet to hook up an outside grill to.  Any ideas?

What kind of cooking do you plan to mostly do?  Low and Slow (brisket, ribs, pulled pork, bacon,etc.) or Hot and Fast (burgers, steak, chicken, fish, sausage)? What is your budget?

Edited by Ron Swanson
Link to post
Share on other sites
8 minutes ago, Ron Swanson said:

What kind of cooking do you plan to mostly do?  Low and Slow (brisket, ribs, pulled pork, bacon,etc.) or Hot and Fast (burgers, steak, chicken, fish, sausage)? What is your budget?

Probably more tri tip, hamburgers, chicken, steak.  I am prepared to spend up to $1k for a nice grill

Link to post
Share on other sites

So more hot and fast.  I would recommend getting the natural gas line extended outside and get a good natural gas so you don't have to screw with tanks.  Weber would be my top choice, with Napoleon as second just for the infrared sear capability.  

A simple lump charcoal grill (the PK is nice if it's big enough) would be my second choice for that cooking style just because it can truly produce enough heat to sear quickly if you're willing to deal with charcoal.  Some might argue for a pellet grill out of convenience and I wouldn't argue against that too strongly if it's one that can at least get up to the 700 degree range minimum. 

  • Thanks 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
9 hours ago, WDIK2 said:

Will do.  I did a chuck roast with a mix of Pit Boss charcoal pellets and Kingsford Hardwood blend.  It was OK, but not "OMG! charcoal flavor."  A local store has Lumberjack Char-Hickory in stock I'm hearing good things about.

I think this is the 2nd time I’ve read in here of smoking a chuck roast. I’m interested.

Are you guys smoking them to slice or pull?

Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, Cowboysfan8 said:

I think this is the 2nd time I’ve read in here of smoking a chuck roast. I’m interested.

Are you guys smoking them to slice or pull?

I sliced mine and made sandwiches with provolone and fried onions. I may have to do that this weekend. 

Edited by snore
  • Thanks 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, Cowboysfan8 said:

I think this is the 2nd time I’ve read in here of smoking a chuck roast. I’m interested.

Are you guys smoking them to slice or pull?

Pull. Like old school clod. The brisket before brisket.

  • Thanks 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
On 4/22/2021 at 3:20 PM, Cowboysfan8 said:

Any recommendations for a pizza stone for use on a pellet grill ?

Ok, take this with a grain of salt....as I have not used mine for Pizza on the grill just yet (and it will be for Kamado, not Pellet)...but I went with Steel vs. Stone.

Found it online...1/4"-3/8" seasoned steel plate.  After a lot of research (seriously, I typically overthink about everything I buy)...came to the conclusion I would like the steel better.   Gets super hot, can use for multiple applications (Pizza, smash burgers, seafood, eggs, pancakes...)  And it reviewed well vs. stone.

Im pretty sure this is what I have...

They have 1/2" and 1/4" as well...the downside...the weight.

Ordered it as the "Baking Steel" was not out for the round the size I wanted for the Kamado.  There are a bunch out there for a rectangular shape that wouldn't work for me.

https://slice.seriouseats.com/2012/09/the-pizza-lab-the-baking-steel-delivers.html

  • Thanks 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
On 4/22/2021 at 3:56 PM, CletiusMaximus said:

I wouldn't worry about seasoning.  I never heard of that, and didn't do it when I got mine many years ago.  I would say one of the first things to do is to throw the dial thermometer in the trash and get a decent digital thermometer to use while you figure out how to steer that thing.  In our neck of the woods, Discount Liquor on Oklahoma has good prices on the 40 lb bags of Cowboy lump and you can get Royal Oak lump charcoal at Menards.

 

 

Royal Oak has worked well for me...IMO, Cowboy is crap.  Have had it twice and both were the same...some ok chunks but so many small pebbles...

B&B was also very good for me (found it at Academy)

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
On 4/23/2021 at 8:53 AM, kaso said:

Quick Kamado update.  Have done 4 quick cooks:  pizza, burgers, pork chops and chicken breast.  Tomorrow is the first long cook, going with a family favorite of pulled pork.

I'm quite surprised with the flavor differences (all improvements) over the pellet grill, even when using a smoke tube.  Just doesn't compare. And light years difference over cooking on propane.  I think I'm slowly becoming a charcoal fan...

 

I only use my propane if its just me throwing a chicken breast on or a quick small tuna or salmon filet.

Otherwise...its all the Kamado.

Even considering one of the small ones like a KJ Jr. To build into the same table as the regular.  Then I think I would get rid of the propane anyway.  Also would be nice to have for reverse searing steaks.  Cook them slower to just under rare on the KJ...have the JR piping hot for the quick sear (rather than pulling the steaks from the KJ to then open the vents and get it up to searing temp).

 

Link to post
Share on other sites
21 hours ago, kaso said:

 

Has anybody used wood chunks on a charcoal grill?  Interested in how this helps or hurts the flavor?

Regular charcoal grill?  Yeah...used to smoke things all the time in my Weber Kettle.  Worked well...just a pain to constantly check and add coals to keep the temps up.

I always use chunks then and now in the Kamado.   If I used chips...always wrapped them in foil to keep them from just burning up too fast.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Restore formatting

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.


×
×
  • Create New...