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Home-owners...What are your current projects?


wilked

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7 minutes ago, wilked said:

What I did:

So I am 7" from the drywall, and the boards are 5.5".  I cut a set of boards down to 1.5" and then I glued them to a 5.5" (using the T&G connection) to essentially make a 7" wide board.  I just checked, they are solid.  Next is to cut them to the column shape.  I have cardboard already templated that I can transfer.  Will post the result (hopefully tonight, assuming the Celts game doesn't keep me away), Sunday night latest

Sounds like a good first step and it has the added bonus of having the t&g connection. 
 Good Luck 👍

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New roof install with two solar skylights and four roof windows (these are soooo sweet). 

All part of an attic conversion to livable space. Need electrical, drywall, lighting too. Anybody got a good idea on most economical way to have sprayfoam insulation? Need to do it to meet Title 24 code (California).

Edited by ⚡DEADHEAD⚡
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13 hours ago, DEADHEAD said:

New roof install with two solar skylights and four roof windows (these are soooo sweet). 

All part of an attic conversion to livable space. Need electrical, drywall, lighting too. Anybody got a good idea on most economical way to have sprayfoam insulation? Need to do it to meet Title 24 code (California).

I’ve seen versions of those roof windows where they actually become little walkout balconies when you open them up. A platform and railing fold out when you open window up. 

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16 hours ago, DEADHEAD said:

New roof install with two solar skylights and four roof windows (these are soooo sweet). 

All part of an attic conversion to livable space. Need electrical, drywall, lighting too. Anybody got a good idea on most economical way to have sprayfoam insulation? Need to do it to meet Title 24 code (California).

Our attic is MASSIVE.  I've always wanted to try and do something with the space.  I'd love to see some details on how you did this if you have pictures.  Did you just use existing attic stairs to get up there?  Ours is only accessible via a pull-down, which limits the usefulness.

 

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3 hours ago, Fat Nick said:

Our attic is MASSIVE.  I've always wanted to try and do something with the space.  I'd love to see some details on how you did this if you have pictures.  Did you just use existing attic stairs to get up there?  Ours is only accessible via a pull-down, which limits the usefulness.

 

So I'll document the process and include pictures in the months ahead. Here's some detail. A key question for you would be, can you put a stairwell somewhere?

We have attic space - two rooms totaling about 440 square feet - accessible by a stairwell from a second floor. We want to remodel the space and add it to the square footage of our home. At about $1,000/square foot where we live, the math makes sense even though our property value, and therefore our property tax, will increase. I think our project will be $75k, and I think we will add about $250k in value (not all of the 400sf will be countable due to ceiling height).

  • The stairwell does not meet current codes as it's too narrow and the treads are too short. Not good for firefighter access. That said, our house was built in 1906 and the City has agreed to grandfather us in as long as we remodel the attic to code. 
  • As for work done thus far, the small room was lathe and plaster. I tore all that down to the studs. The large room was redwood siding. I tore all that down too. It had charm, but was ragged. So both rooms are down to the studs.
  • I had a 75amp subpanel run to the small room to provide electricity for the floor and likely much of the floor below. i need to swap out the current knob and tube with current electrical. 
  • I am putting on a new roof because the current one is the third layer and it's been there since 1982. It's failing in spots so it's time. 
  • The attic gets hot, so when we're done with the roofing, we will spray-foam insulate. Pricey, but you don't have to worry about condensation and the R value is real good. Will last as long as the roof lasts.
  • We're putting in the roof windows and skylights in part for air circulation (there isn't much up there now), natural light and for ingress/egress, another code requirement. People have to be able to get out, firefighters have to be able to come in. We also have some kickass views of the Bay Area up there. 
  • We plan to drywall both rooms. And we will carpet the stairwell and the large room. This will probably be my room for a few days until the kids discover it, then I probably won't be allowed in (kids are 9 and 7...why am I doing this?). Think rec room. The smaller room will have a hardwood floor and exercise mats, our Peloton, etc. Think exercise, yoga.
  • Working with the City slows everything down immensely, but we're a small community and part of the bargain in living here is signing up for all that stuff. In the end, it works because there's little to no blight here. 

I'll keep posting. You can learn from my mistakes!

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43 minutes ago, DEADHEAD said:

So I'll document the process and include pictures in the months ahead. Here's some detail. A key question for you would be, can you put a stairwell somewhere?

...

I'll keep posting. You can learn from my mistakes!

Shy of a spiral staircase in my son's room, no - not without losing significant bedroom space in one of the bedrooms.  The upstairs is largely 4 large bedrooms and some bathrooms, and a hall way.  I think that's my limiting factor honestly.  

It sounds like your space already had living space and you're just expanding - my idea was a lot more low-key - Basically adding a finished "room" with access either for a) nice storage, or b) on a more creative note, a cool hide-away for the kids to have.

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On 11/1/2019 at 8:44 PM, FBG26 said:

Re-doing the main bathroom. Took everything down to the studs and replaced the subfloor. Took 4 weeks to get the tub back in and now I can start getting the drywall/concrete board up to get ready to tile. Man, this takes forever when you've got kids. I'm lucky to get a couple hours at one time to work, especially when I have to work around naps/bedtime for fear of making too much noise. 

I might actually get this project finished in one year start to finish.  Got 90% everything but one wall (non-shower wall) tiled and then the kid arrived.  Good news is that everything has been fully functional the last year, but I had to trim around the door, build a small cabinet for the built-in closet on that same wall, and tile that wall.  Got the trim and tile done the other recently and just finished building the cabinet so now its stain time.  Just need to finish by end of the month to stay within one year....  Will add some pics when it's all done. 

New siding coming yet this fall. Can't wait for that. Though that's not a DIY job for me. 

 

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On 9/18/2020 at 1:03 PM, DEADHEAD said:

So I'll document the process and include pictures in the months ahead. Here's some detail. A key question for you would be, can you put a stairwell somewhere?

We have attic space - two rooms totaling about 440 square feet - accessible by a stairwell from a second floor. We want to remodel the space and add it to the square footage of our home. At about $1,000/square foot where we live, the math makes sense even though our property value, and therefore our property tax, will increase. I think our project will be $75k, and I think we will add about $250k in value (not all of the 400sf will be countable due to ceiling height).

  • The stairwell does not meet current codes as it's too narrow and the treads are too short. Not good for firefighter access. That said, our house was built in 1906 and the City has agreed to grandfather us in as long as we remodel the attic to code. 
  • As for work done thus far, the small room was lathe and plaster. I tore all that down to the studs. The large room was redwood siding. I tore all that down too. It had charm, but was ragged. So both rooms are down to the studs.
  • I had a 75amp subpanel run to the small room to provide electricity for the floor and likely much of the floor below. i need to swap out the current knob and tube with current electrical. 
  • I am putting on a new roof because the current one is the third layer and it's been there since 1982. It's failing in spots so it's time. 
  • The attic gets hot, so when we're done with the roofing, we will spray-foam insulate. Pricey, but you don't have to worry about condensation and the R value is real good. Will last as long as the roof lasts.
  • We're putting in the roof windows and skylights in part for air circulation (there isn't much up there now), natural light and for ingress/egress, another code requirement. People have to be able to get out, firefighters have to be able to come in. We also have some kickass views of the Bay Area up there. 
  • We plan to drywall both rooms. And we will carpet the stairwell and the large room. This will probably be my room for a few days until the kids discover it, then I probably won't be allowed in (kids are 9 and 7...why am I doing this?). Think rec room. The smaller room will have a hardwood floor and exercise mats, our Peloton, etc. Think exercise, yoga.
  • Working with the City slows everything down immensely, but we're a small community and part of the bargain in living here is signing up for all that stuff. In the end, it works because there's little to no blight here. 

I'll keep posting. You can learn from my mistakes!

I did this a few years back

 

Before:

https://drive.google.com/drive/folders/0B4rklnXTK4MpR2dqQ0ZXaFZTd28?usp=sharing

 

After:

https://drive.google.com/drive/folders/1HJJ2tmJL2Rq_N-KvmJnrhB3hrDomC_AT?usp=sharing

 

I designed and GC'd it, and did some work along the way.  Very happy with the results

Highlights:

-Spray foam rafters, 6" closed cell

-Added Heat Pump and traditional ducted air handler (behind knee wall)

-New windows

-Built in dressers (bought unfinished dressers, finished myself, installed and trimmed around them)

-Built in shelving (Ikea)

-replaced subfloor (Advantech), and installed new cork floor (floating)

-refinished existing pine floors in bedroom and stairs

-Added projector, motorized screen, speakers, and electronics cabinet

-New bathroom, custom glass for shower, plumbing, fan w/ heater

-Skylight in bath (fixed)

Edited by wilked
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1 hour ago, wilked said:

Also, my design on paper

https://imgur.com/QAp1xko

Yes, now I recall seeing these pics. You've done such a great job. Uncanny how similar our project is, layout-wise. Stairwell, room proportions, windows, chimney...all very similar. We don't have a bathroom, however.

Some questions:

  • What heat pump did you put in? Can you link it? We need to put one in.
  • Same question for your hanging lights. I like what you've done.
  • For flooring, is there a reason you didn't put a floor on top of your old floor? Too beat up? Wanted to insulate underneath?
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18 minutes ago, DEADHEAD said:

Yes, now I recall seeing these pics. You've done such a great job. Uncanny how similar our project is, layout-wise. Stairwell, room proportions, windows, chimney...all very similar. We don't have a bathroom, however.

Some questions:

  • What heat pump did you put in? Can you link it? We need to put one in.
  • Same question for your hanging lights. I like what you've done.
  • For flooring, is there a reason you didn't put a floor on top of your old floor? Too beat up? Wanted to insulate underneath?

Heat pump is Bryant 288BNV

Lights - https://m.seagulllightinglights.com/product/seagull-lighting-pratt-street-metal-pendant-65087-962.html

 

replaced the subfloor since:

1. I had to open the floor up anyway to run ducting,

2. The pine planks were somewhat uneven,

3. Advantech supposedly tightens up the joists and strengthens the whole setup.  I didn’t want to finish project and all of a sudden see my plaster ceilings on 2nd floor start cracking as the house adjusts to the new load. My carpenter was originally against it but in the end said it was a good move. Also makes installing the floating floor a cinch 

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I still have my expenses also if it's helpful

 

edit to add - these are Boston prices, so take them with a grain of salt.  Boston trades are notoriously expensive

 

second edit - FIL is an Electrician and has a willing apprentice (me), so that is not included.  We did upgrade the service to 200 amp as part of the project.  

 

EXPENSES	TOTAL
Carpenter	$16,000
Plumber	$5,800
HVAC	$14,000
Insulation	$5,000
Roofer	$410
Plastering	$2,400
Tile	$1,000
Windows	$1,950
Bath Vanity/mirror	$717
Skylight	$300
Bath Fixtures	$250
Toilet	$250
Lighting Fixtures	$600
Shower glass	$2,000
Shower Basin	$900
Cork Floor - 11 cartons	$1,500
Refinish Floor	$1,000
Built in Dressers	$1,200
A/V Rack	$300
Proj Screen	$500
Subwoofer	$300
Speakers	$400
Cables	$250
A/V Receiver	$350
	
Totals	$57,377

 

Edited by wilked
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Getting quotes for two gas fireplace installs, blower units. One large Mendota model in the living room, one medium Jotul model in our master bedroom. With gas lines, install, etc. All in is $9,500. $7k for the units, $2.5k for the install.

I know a fair amount about a fair number of things. I know nothing about this. Anybody have any experience?

Edited by ⚡DEADHEAD⚡
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6 hours ago, wilked said:

2.5k for plumbing plus the carpentry work sounds like a very good price to me. You check the prices of those units?

 

ive seen tradesman install a “$2000“ piece of kit with only $500 additional for labor, when really that kit can be had for $1200 

The Mendota unit is pricey. Top-of-the-line. I'm actually hoping to get Mendota for both units. The more I read and learn, the more $9,500 is sounding pretty reasonable.

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8 hours ago, cubd8 said:

Question - I'm looking for a space heater that I can put on my screen deck, something that isn't a fire hazard and doesn't take much maintenance. Any recommendations on one I could pick up? 

https://cdn.trendir.com/wp-content/uploads/old/archives/assets_c/2015/10/outdoor-gas-heaters-heat-up-your-patio-appeal-firesense-square-mocha-thumb-970xauto-57599.jpg

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On 9/21/2020 at 8:59 PM, FBG26 said:
On 11/1/2019 at 8:44 PM, FBG26 said:

Re-doing the main bathroom. Took everything down to the studs and replaced the subfloor. Took 4 weeks to get the tub back in and now I can start getting the drywall/concrete board up to get ready to tile. Man, this takes forever when you've got kids. I'm lucky to get a couple hours at one time to work, especially when I have to work around naps/bedtime for fear of making too much noise. 

I might actually get this project finished in one year start to finish.  Got 90% everything but one wall (non-shower wall) tiled and then the kid arrived.  Good news is that everything has been fully functional the last year, but I had to trim around the door, build a small cabinet for the built-in closet on that same wall, and tile that wall.  Got the trim and tile done the other recently and just finished building the cabinet so now its stain time.  Just need to finish by end of the month to stay within one year....  Will add some pics when it's all done. 

DONE!!!!

Before

View from entrance

Vanity

Shower front

Shower Back

Linen Closet

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The driveway got repaved this AM - fantastic results.  Looks great.  The additional paved section looks perfect.  The kids have tons of space to play, and now when we host holidays we actually can still "use" our driveway and get in and out easier.  Now I really want to paint a basketball court on it.  Anybody ever do that or have that done?  Tips?

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I'm trying to install a mount for my new big screen TV on my wall. The mount requires drilling 4 quarter-inch holes that are 2.75 inches deep into wood studs. I have DeWalt titanium drill bits. Holy hell I am leaning into this drill full force and it is not moving much at all. The drill bit starts smoking so much I could cook smores if I wanted.

Would a different drill bit help this problem? Do I need a better drill? I know it's not easy drilling into wood studs but I didn't think it would be this difficult. Thanks for any advice. 

eta: the first 1/2 inch of that 2.75 inches is drywall

Edited by leftcoastguy7
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1 hour ago, leftcoastguy7 said:

I'm trying to install a mount for my new big screen TV on my wall. The mount requires drilling 4 quarter-inch holes that are 2.75 inches deep into wood studs. I have DeWalt titanium drill bits. Holy hell I am leaning into this drill full force and it is not moving much at all. The drill bit starts smoking so much I could cook smores if I wanted.

Would a different drill bit help this problem? Do I need a better drill? I know it's not easy drilling into wood studs but I didn't think it would be this difficult. Thanks for any advice. 

eta: the first 1/2 inch of that 2.75 inches is drywall

It’s not hard to drill bit into a wood stud at all, so not sure what your issue is.  A new bit sounds needed from your description. 
 

Are you sure you’re drilling into wood and not concrete behind the wall?

is your drill rotation set correctly...meaning could it be set on reverse while you’re trying to drill forward? 

Edited by offdee
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7 hours ago, offdee said:

It’s not hard to drill bit into a wood stud at all, so not sure what your issue is.  A new bit sounds needed from your description. 
 

Are you sure you’re drilling into wood and not concrete behind the wall?

is your drill rotation set correctly...meaning could it be set on reverse while you’re trying to drill forward? 

Thanks for the reply. I think I just have a old, crappy drill. It is 1200 rpm. 

I picked up a 2500 rpm drill from Ace and going to give that a try. 

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47 minutes ago, leftcoastguy7 said:

Thanks for the reply. I think I just have a old, crappy drill. It is 1200 rpm. 

I picked up a 2500 rpm drill from Ace and going to give that a try. 

Even a 1200 rpm drill should be able to make relatively short work of drilling into a stud with a sharp bit.  

Are you using a wood bit?  A masonry bit won't do much to wood.

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1 hour ago, encaitar said:

Even a 1200 rpm drill should be able to make relatively short work of drilling into a stud with a sharp bit.  

Are you using a wood bit?  A masonry bit won't do much to wood.

I'm using a new titanium bit good for wood or metal.

Offdee mentioned maybe I'm drilling into concrete. That's not possible but aren't there metal bracings that hold wood studs? Maybe that's what I'm hitting to get resistance. 

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Unless you have metal studs or are drilling directly into a drywall screw I can’t imagine why you would be hitting metal. Metal braces for wall studs are uncommon enough to be labeled near zero in probability. Are you sure you are directly on a stud? Crappy electricians use junction boxes to splice wires together on new construction. Good ones use them for minimal rehab projects. Those are metal.

So I would say metal studs, junction box, or maybe directly on a screw. 

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2 hours ago, leftcoastguy7 said:

Thanks for your help everyone. Hated to do it, but I placed the mount higher up the wall and then drilling was a breeze.

I am dead money right in the middle of the stud so I bet the above answer is the correct one. 

You only needed to raise no more than 1/2” to avoid the screw. 

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On 10/3/2020 at 8:35 AM, encaitar said:

Even a 1200 rpm drill should be able to make relatively short work of drilling into a stud with a sharp bit.  

Are you using a wood bit?  A masonry bit won't do much to wood.

Yeah - something's not right.  Agree ANY drill should be able to drill a hole through sheetrock and then a stud with the right drill bit...even a dull one will make it after a while.  Do you have the drill set to reverse?

If you're hitting something hard and it's not masonry block, it might be a protective plate blocking where electric or plumbing pipe passes through the stud.  Try drilling another hole 6" above or below those holes and see if it goes in easier.  If it does, and you think it might be a cable protector plate, don't drill there.  You'll regret it.  

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We have been in a new house for 6 months now and it was almost turnkey (one of the big selling points to me).  One thing that we are wanting to do is to have a covered area under our deck.  We have a 3-story house - main floor has a nice sized deck off the kitchen (~24'x10').  Finished basement with patio off the main family room in the basement which is covered by the deck.  Previous home owners did a DIY under-decking which isn't bad save 2 things:  1. it's ugly - wife hates the way it looks.  I could deal with it but it definitely sticks out some compared to the rest of the house.  2. It leaks in a couple of places - one pretty bad where they ran electrical for a ceiling fan and a little by the house.

So, we are looking at getting new under-decking done.  If I'm being honest, I'm not super handy.  I can do basic stuff but something like this I've not done before and not sure I would trust myself to do it and make it look good.  So, I have a few basic questions:

  • I will post pictures of what is there currently but any thoughts on whether I should just try and patch what they've done?
  • If we go with new under-decking - anybody done this?  Good idea to turn it over to a professional to do?
  • What kind of cost are we looking at?  We are just wanting it covered, looking good and keep water out so we can hang a TV.

 

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1 hour ago, belljr said:

Well normally you install the system as you install the deck. So if you are going to do it right you probably need to remove the deck boards

Or try something like this

https://www.familyhandyman.com/project/under-deck-roof/

Or this

https://www.timbertech.com/product/dryspace/

Not sure I understand the bolded - they obviously installed the current "ceiling" in to joists or something.  I'm probably not explaining what I'm trying to do well.  I'll take some pics tomorrow.

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20 minutes ago, wilked said:

If you’re only leaking in a couple spots I would try fixing it. And if you don’t like the look, out something simple over what’s there. 
 

i only start over if I have no other choice 

Honestly didn't think about this - I could use foam spray or something to "seal it" and then just cover over the old (read: ugly) covering.  Hmmm.

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2 hours ago, AAABatteries said:

Not sure I understand the bolded - they obviously installed the current "ceiling" in to joists or something.  I'm probably not explaining what I'm trying to do well.  I'll take some pics tomorrow.

The bolded means you usually install the waterproof vapor when you install the deck.   You put the gutter like systems between the floor joists or waterproofing as you install the deck. Then put the new deck flooring on.

Then below you can put whatever type of ceiling you want.

The the links I posted are ways to waterproof without doing that. They are similar but not exactly the same, basically you are adding waterproof channels after the fact.

My bolded was just saying the waterproof membrane is usually installed with the deck flooring.    

Video example

Trex version

https://youtu.be/Lw61gb2hL_E

 

The dryspace link I posted is a system to install to a pre-existing deck

Edited by belljr
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  • 1 month later...

Looking for some advice from the experts here.

I have a rooftop deck at my house that I am not using very often. One issue is that its in Austin and its really hot. I was thinking about installing something like this that is retractable but would block the sun. Would y'all recommend that? Any other recommendations for a retractable sun screen type thing?

Also - when I put this up, should I consider adding misters or something up there? How hard would it be to run water up to the rooftop?

Thanks a lot.

Edited by whoknew
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Looks like it would be effective when the sun is between 10 o clock position and 2, but not be helpful the rest. If your time to relax above is after work that night out you outside that window. 
 

anyone else in the hood got a rooftop setup that looks good and you see it getting used? Get up there and look around. If you see something that looks good contact the owner and ask them 

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Hey Everyone - starting a project in a couple weeks to finish my basement - we bought this house 3 years ago and it had an unfinished basement - plan is to convert 1/3 of the room into an office for me and the other 2/3 as a family room with a big TV (65") and an electric fireplace

I uploaded some pictures for y'all to check out: https://drive.google.com/drive/folders/18YOI4Vp5-ffdz5nQF9uxvFtFRNvRIF6_?usp=sharing

The first item to happen is for the water supply being tucked inside of the wall about 8-10 in. The previous homeowner for some reason put up fencing to where the windowsill is in the basement - this is where my office is going to go. The office will be from where the big window is, to where the entrance to the room is.

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Please post here if anyone has a good recommendation for a home-project level miter saw.  I had a Delta sliding saw that gave out after almost 20 years of use.  I would love to get another sliding saw.  The other feature my old one had that I liked is that it had a stand attached to the bottom of the saw, with support shelves that extended out wide on both sides, so I could set it up anywhere and handle longer pieces.  Looking for a good Black Friday deal or just a strong recommendation.  tia

 

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53 minutes ago, CletiusMaximus said:

Please post here if anyone has a good recommendation for a home-project level miter saw.  I had a Delta sliding saw that gave out after almost 20 years of use.  I would love to get another sliding saw.  The other feature my old one had that I liked is that it had a stand attached to the bottom of the saw, with support shelves that extended out wide on both sides, so I could set it up anywhere and handle longer pieces.  Looking for a good Black Friday deal or just a strong recommendation.  tia

 

I just bought a Dewalt dws-779. It is 12 inch, double bevel and sliding and currently on sale for $349. 
I put it together yesterday and am impressed. There is an aftermarket kit to add the laser cut feature that I will probably add.  If I add that it will be the same saw as the DWS-780 and cost me about $200 less 

Edited by berndog
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5 minutes ago, berndog said:
38 minutes ago, CletiusMaximus said:

Please post here if anyone has a good recommendation for a home-project level miter saw.  I had a Delta sliding saw that gave out after almost 20 years of use.  I would love to get another sliding saw.  The other feature my old one had that I liked is that it had a stand attached to the bottom of the saw, with support shelves that extended out wide on both sides, so I could set it up anywhere and handle longer pieces.  Looking for a good Black Friday deal or just a strong recommendation.  tia

 

I just bought a Dewalt dws-779. It is double bevel and sliding and currently on sale for $349. 
I put it together yesterday and am impressed. There is an aftermarket kit to add the laser cut feature that I will probably add.  If I add that it will be the same saw as the DWS-780 and cost me about $200 less 

I have the Ryobi 10inch sliding miter saw (single bevel). Works great. Includes a LED cutting line (like Berndog is mentioning). Currently on sale for $179 at Home Depot

 

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Installed a new toilet fill valve tonite. 15 mins start to finish. 2-3 of those was testing the flush. Job is easy, but I was impressed on the time. It would have taken me over an hour a few years back I think. Getting good at these things... 

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12 hours ago, The Hank said:

Hey Everyone - starting a project in a couple weeks to finish my basement - we bought this house 3 years ago and it had an unfinished basement - plan is to convert 1/3 of the room into an office for me and the other 2/3 as a family room with a big TV (65") and an electric fireplace

I uploaded some pictures for y'all to check out: https://drive.google.com/drive/folders/18YOI4Vp5-ffdz5nQF9uxvFtFRNvRIF6_?usp=sharing

The first item to happen is for the water supply being tucked inside of the wall about 8-10 in. The previous homeowner for some reason put up fencing to where the windowsill is in the basement - this is where my office is going to go. The office will be from where the big window is, to where the entrance to the room is.

Do a projector instead. 80-120 inch screen. Especially in the basement (easy light control), no brainer. 

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On 10/3/2020 at 9:01 AM, leftcoastguy7 said:

Thanks for your help everyone. Hated to do it, but I placed the mount higher up the wall and then drilling was a breeze.

I am dead money right in the middle of the stud so I bet the above answer is the correct one. 

A little late here. As a former drywall taper/hanger, the only time the issue you see happens would be if like you said, your hitting a screw, but its more likely to be a metal strap a electrician placed on the stud to protect wires passing through that area. Hitting a screw behaves differently, hitting a metal strap would cause the dead stop and smoking.

Edited by madshot31
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11-18-20 Update

Took down the builder grade hillbilly setup that was previously in there with the outdoor fencing that was down there previously

Also, my neighbor plumber saved about 4" of length  by re-routing the plumbing, upgrading some of the piping and getting it closer to the wall. 

Also we received our electric fireplace from Amazon - box looks like it got a bit roughed up in transit, hopefully there's no damage!

Progress pictures here:

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What are the expectations for the contractor here...

So we had our old wood deck ripped out, replaced with a poured concrete patio...and then had a sturcture built covering it.  Only thing left for them to come back and do is add the gutters and downspout to the roofing structure.  

So...after the concrete had cured...the guys doing that work just sort of shovled some dirt (mud at the time) up against the edges...pretty clumpy chunks after the excavation and all.  Thought before they were done they would rake it up a bit and at least make it look decent.  I was gone the other day when the guy came and powerwashed the concrete and some of the brick on the house.  Got back and the area around the patio has straw around it.  So I figured, cool, they took care of it.  I move some of the straw and it is just the same big clumps...with some grass seed thrown on it and then straw.   There are also some decent ruts in the yard where the little bobcat thing and mud buggy for the concrete had driven...as well as some from the front of the house to the back where the patio is.

What is my expectation that they should have done there?  Im already having to complain a bit as there is a decent amount of concrete splatter up on my brick.

 

 

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