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The process of getting a government job(Healthcare. Start date May 10th!)


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28 minutes ago, flapgreen said:

Going out to the base next week for physical and fingerprints and to look at housing. Looking like starting end of April or beginning of May. Can't come quick enough. Current job is miserable. 

Good luck.  Hope the doctor has skinny fingers

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Got a tentative offer at Ft Leonard Wood! 

Got the official final offer letter today. 

They agreed to my pay request. GS 12-7! 

From the sound of it, I won't know my start date until 14 days or less from the time I start. Going to inform my current job of the situation when I return to work on the 15th. Still looking like end of April and I want at least a week off before going. 

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40 minutes ago, flapgreen said:

From the sound of it, I won't know my start date until 14 days or less from the time I start. Going to inform my current job of the situation when I return to work on the 15th. Still looking like end of April and I want at least a week off before going. 

that seems weird

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38 minutes ago, belljr said:

that seems weird

My buddy who works base in Florida said he got a notification of a start date in 10 days when he was hired but got them to extend it a couple weeks because he was about to board a ship on a cruise. I just can't seem to get a clear picture on how it's going to work once I get the final offer. 

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From the HR person today:

 

Hello Mr. ____,

Once you clear all your conditions of employment then I will contact you for a starting date. Once I get your starting date, I will code your action and then I will send you  Official Job Offer thru Onboarding. A week before you start I will send you an email with instructions for in-processing the day you start.  Your physical will clear on the same day you take it. Once you have your fingerprints taken I will submit your PSIP request which you will get 3 emails from them on what to do. Once you complete the SF85 form online and submit it then we will wait for it to clear. Your childcare investigation will probably take up to 4 week to clear (sooner I hope)..

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1 hour ago, flapgreen said:

From the sound of it, I won't know my start date until 14 days or less from the time I start. Going to inform my current job of the situation when I return to work on the 15th. Still looking like end of April and I want at least a week off before going. 

That basically just means once everything is ready, they'll offer you a start date of the next pay period (most jobs start on day 1 of a new pay period). I'm sure it won't be a problem if you want to give them a later a date (likely 14 days later) so that you can take care of some stuff and take a little time off.

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34 minutes ago, flapgreen said:

Really going to miss middle Tennessee. Lve it here and didn't plan on ever leaving. 

Hey after you get in the door for a year or two I'm not sure how it works in the DoD but they always have opportunities to move jobs or take assignments

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16 minutes ago, belljr said:

Hey after you get in the door for a year or two I'm not sure how it works in the DoD but they always have opportunities to move jobs or take assignments

Yeah, I could eventually transfer to any base opening. 

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Posted (edited)

Any recommendations on my options at insurance when I get to that point? Buddy said he has the cheaper option GEHA insurance, but I'm leaning more toward the BCBS nationwide option.

Edited by flapgreen
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  • flapgreen changed the title to The process of getting a government job(Healthcare. Visiting base. Fingerprints and physical this week)
1 hour ago, flapgreen said:

Any recommendations on my options at insurance when I get to that point? Buddy said he has the cheaper option GEHA insurance, but I'm leaning more toward the BCBS nationwide option.

Sorry I'm on my wife's company cause it's dirt cheap in comparison. Everyone I work with does have bcbs that I know of

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2 minutes ago, belljr said:

Sorry I'm on my wife's company cause it's dirt cheap in comparison. Everyone I work with does have bcbs that I know of

Damn. Your wife's insurance is cheaper than federal? I thought it was the best there was. 

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24 minutes ago, flapgreen said:

Damn. Your wife's insurance is cheaper than federal? I thought it was the best there was. 

Nope.  That's the big misnomer.  Sure you get to keep it after retirement but as far as cost it's not cheap.  It might be cheap equivalent to other companies but no one has sniffed my wife's cost.  We pay ~ 200 a month with a 4k deductible.  A similar plan was about 350. I won't bore with all the details but it's cheaper 

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11 minutes ago, belljr said:

Nope.  That's the big misnomer.  Sure you get to keep it after retirement but as far as cost it's not cheap.  It might be cheap equivalent to other companies but no one has sniffed my wife's cost.  We pay ~ 200 a month with a 4k deductible.  A similar plan was about 350. I won't bore with all the details but it's cheaper 

Very interesting. Figured it would be dirt cheap. My wife works for the school system and our insurance is good. Hoping it's comparable. 

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Never saw this thread. I spent 9 months trying to get a job at the local Naval Hospital. Ridiculous process. Got and accepted the job offer. Was just waiting on a start date when after several months I got a phone call out of the blue that said the offer was withdrawn because I didn't pass a screening. Very little explanation, no further questions...for the same RN job I've been doing for multiple years.

Would love the benefits, but the process is beyond painful

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We signed up for the high deductible GEHA plan so that we can take advantage of the retirement health savings plan that is allowed if you are in a high deductible health plan.  Look into it as it's a really good advantage for putting away savings for health insurance when you are retired.  

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Posted (edited)
On 3/7/2021 at 4:34 PM, renesauz said:

Never saw this thread. I spent 9 months trying to get a job at the local Naval Hospital. Ridiculous process. Got and accepted the job offer. Was just waiting on a start date when after several months I got a phone call out of the blue that said the offer was withdrawn because I didn't pass a screening. Very little explanation, no further questions...for the same RN job I've been doing for multiple years.

Would love the benefits, but the process is beyond painful

They better not try that with me. Only a couple things left to do now and I'm done.  Offered job 2 months ago. Should be close to starting in 2 more

Edited by flapgreen
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Done with the physical and fingerprints. Met my future boss and coworkers. I'm older and have been doing it longer than any of them. Lol

 

Looking at local housing today. Can't believe I'm moving to the middle of nowhere Missouri. At least it's cheap. 

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  • flapgreen changed the title to The process of getting a government job(Healthcare. Fingerprints and physical complete)
On 3/11/2021 at 11:02 AM, flapgreen said:

Done with the physical and fingerprints. Met my future boss and coworkers. I'm older and have been doing it longer than any of them. Lol

 

Looking at local housing today. Can't believe I'm moving to the middle of nowhere Missouri. At least it's cheap. 

Yeah, you are literally in the middle of nowhere.

Welcome to Chiefs kingdom.  :banned:

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Wife got an email from the base today about ideas on helping to transition for the move, whatever that means. But I still haven't gotten anything. 

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Finally an email today on a PSIP security clearance processing or something. Not sure what that means.  Hoping it's a good sign. Current job is about to make me drive my car off a cliff. 

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Saw the first 14 level job posted for my field yesterday. Some huge money. Didn't realize they went up that high in my area. 

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  • flapgreen changed the title to The process of getting a government job(Healthcare. Start date May 10th!)
Posted (edited)

Finally got a start date. So it took 9 months from the first position I applied for until I got an offer for a job and started. 

Edited by flapgreen
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1 hour ago, flapgreen said:

Finally got a start date. So it took 9 months from the first position I applied for until I got an offer for a job and started. 

sounds about right

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Received the oath of office letter today to sign and it brought a tear to my eye reading it. So cool

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11 minutes ago, flapgreen said:

Received the oath of office letter today to sign and it brought a tear to my eye reading it. So cool

I don't know if they do it where your going or covid or what. But you may or may not get sworn in at the end of orientation.  We got a nice picture with the director as we were sworn in

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I'm about to start hammering retirement for the next 20 years. 3% or whatever they take out for pension. 6% on the 401k match. Then another 6% to ROTH for the next 20 years. Still leaves us 85% of my income to live on. Selling our house and just keeping that money in the bank until we settle down and buy a home somewhere. No debt

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14 hours ago, flapgreen said:

I'm about to start hammering retirement for the next 20 years. 3% or whatever they take out for pension. 6% on the 401k match. Then another 6% to ROTH for the next 20 years. Still leaves us 85% of my income to live on. Selling our house and just keeping that money in the bank until we settle down and buy a home somewhere. No debt

I would probably max out on the TSP before doing a ROTH.  You can do up to $19,500, and once you turn 50 an additional $6500.  The TSP has some solid investing options and super low fees.  And contributions and earnings are all tax deferred, so no taxes at all until you withdraw.  

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5 minutes ago, jon_mx said:

I would probably max out on the TSP before doing a ROTH.  You can do up to $19,500, and once you turn 50 an additional $6500.  The TSP has some solid investing options and super low fees.  And contributions and earnings are all tax deferred, so no taxes at all until you withdraw.  

Tsp has Roth option 

Also you get the match on if it's the typical 401k contribution or a Roth contribution.  So for example let's say you did all Roth tsp contributions you'll still get the 3 to 5%, match  whatever it is in the traditional contribution

 

Edited by belljr
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Just now, belljr said:

Tsp has Roth option

But why pay taxes now when you are making more money and probably a higher tax bracket than when you are retired.  Plus you have all that extra non-taxed money to grow.  

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6 minutes ago, jon_mx said:

But why pay taxes now when you are making more money and probably a higher tax bracket than when you are retired.  Plus you have all that extra non-taxed money to grow.  

I can't speak for his financial situation but when I switched over I had a ton of traditional money so I switched to Roth so that way you have different buckets when you retired based off the tax rate 

I just advised to have different money so you can withdraw based off  tax rates during retirement 

:shrug:

I have both

 

Edited by belljr
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17 minutes ago, jon_mx said:

I would probably max out on the TSP before doing a ROTH.  You can do up to $19,500, and once you turn 50 an additional $6500.  The TSP has some solid investing options and super low fees.  And contributions and earnings are all tax deferred, so no taxes at all until you withdraw.  

Alright. I'll look into this further. Guessing I'm going to need some type of advisor to help me through this. 

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Posted (edited)
19 minutes ago, belljr said:

I can't speak for his financial situation but when I switched over I had a ton of traditional money so I switched to Roth so that way you have different buckets when you retired based off the tax rate 

I just advised to have different money so you can withdraw based off  tax rates during retirement 

:shrug:

I have both

 

I'm not really private about my money. We have no debt, except for our house, and about 130 equity in our home. Retirement has been minimal up until this point due to paying off school loans and raising the family. Probably only 30 or so in retirement at 43 years old. Not a great start but we're pouring a ton in over the next 20 years.  I'll start out making 93 as a government employee. Max out at current level around 100. Figure I'll move up to a 13 at some point and max around 125 or 130. There are a few GS 14 level positions with my job but I have no desire to move to that level. 

Edited by flapgreen
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Just to give you an idea of the difference in investing tax free money vs. Taxed.  If your wife has any earnings at all, you will be solidly in the 22% tax bracket in the current year.  Let's assume about an 8 percent return investing somewhat aggressively in the stock market, which at your age you should be.  

So $20,00 tax free can all be invested now and in 21 years will have about a 500% return, so you will have $120,000 which will be taxed when you withdraw it.  Assume you will be in the next lower tax bracket at 12% and you will pocket $105,600 during your retirement years.  

If you invest after tax dollars like the ROTH, you will only have $15,600 to invest as you sent $4,400 to uncle Sam.   That money will grow tax free and again about a 500% return.  You will have about $93,600 in your account of which $15,600 you can withdraw tax free.  The remaining $78,000 will be taxed at 12% leaving about $68,640.   So in total you will have $84,240 that goes into your pocket during the retirement years.  

So in the end, there is more than a $21,000 benefit for your retirement years to investing pretaxed dollars vs. after taxed dollars. 

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1 minute ago, jon_mx said:

Just to give you an idea of the difference in investing tax free money vs. Taxed.  If your wife has any earnings at all, you will be solidly in the 22% tax bracket in the current year.  Let's assume about an 8 percent return investing somewhat aggressively in the stock market, which at your age you should be.  

So $20,00 tax free can all be invested now and in 21 years will have about a 500% return, so you will have $120,000 which will be taxed when you withdraw it.  Assume you will be in the next lower tax bracket at 12% and you will pocket $105,600 during your retirement years.  

If you invest after tax dollars like the ROTH, you will only have $15,600 to invest as you sent $4,400 to uncle Sam.   That money will grow tax free and again about a 500% return.  You will have about $93,600 in your account of which $15,600 you can withdraw tax free.  The remaining $78,000 will be taxed at 12% leaving about $68,640.   So in total you will have $84,240 that goes into your pocket during the retirement years.  

So in the end, there is more than a $21,000 benefit for your retirement years to investing pretaxed dollars vs. after taxed dollars. 

Great stuff. Very helpful, bro. 

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That's very doable. If I contribute to max to my TSP each year and retire at 65, which is 22 years, we should be in good shape, along with the pension. 

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1 hour ago, jon_mx said:

Just to give you an idea of the difference in investing tax free money vs. Taxed.  If your wife has any earnings at all, you will be solidly in the 22% tax bracket in the current year.  Let's assume about an 8 percent return investing somewhat aggressively in the stock market, which at your age you should be.  

So $20,00 tax free can all be invested now and in 21 years will have about a 500% return, so you will have $120,000 which will be taxed when you withdraw it.  Assume you will be in the next lower tax bracket at 12% and you will pocket $105,600 during your retirement years.  

If you invest after tax dollars like the ROTH, you will only have $15,600 to invest as you sent $4,400 to uncle Sam.   That money will grow tax free and again about a 500% return.  You will have about $93,600 in your account of which $15,600 you can withdraw tax free.  The remaining $78,000 will be taxed at 12% leaving about $68,640.   So in total you will have $84,240 that goes into your pocket during the retirement years.  

So in the end, there is more than a $21,000 benefit for your retirement years to investing pretaxed dollars vs. after taxed dollars. 

He wouldn't owe taxes on the gains in the Roth, that's kind of the whole point. Plus these calculations assume you're putting less into the Roth (or extra into a taxable account after the traditional), which in theory makes some sense but in practice very often isn't the case.

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1 hour ago, jon_mx said:

Just to give you an idea of the difference in investing tax free money vs. Taxed.  If your wife has any earnings at all, you will be solidly in the 22% tax bracket in the current year.  Let's assume about an 8 percent return investing somewhat aggressively in the stock market, which at your age you should be.  

So $20,00 tax free can all be invested now and in 21 years will have about a 500% return, so you will have $120,000 which will be taxed when you withdraw it.  Assume you will be in the next lower tax bracket at 12% and you will pocket $105,600 during your retirement years.  

If you invest after tax dollars like the ROTH, you will only have $15,600 to invest as you sent $4,400 to uncle Sam.   That money will grow tax free and again about a 500% return.  You will have about $93,600 in your account of which $15,600 you can withdraw tax free.  The remaining $78,000 will be taxed at 12% leaving about $68,640.   So in total you will have $84,240 that goes into your pocket during the retirement years.  

So in the end, there is more than a $21,000 benefit for your retirement years to investing pretaxed dollars vs. after taxed dollars. 

Roth earnings won't be taxed 

 

Eta oops already covered

 

 

Edited by belljr
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